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Cuba!: Recipes and Stories from the Cuban Kitchen [A Cookbook]

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Cuba! explores the magic of this vibrant country through more than 75 recipes that will set taste buds on fire and stories that will delight even the most well-seasoned traveler. Brazen, bold, and colorful, Cuba is a country that pulses with life. Fascinated by its people and their endlessly delicious home-cooked cuisine, friends Dan Goldberg and Andrea Kuhn have been visi Cuba! explores the magic of this vibrant country through more than 75 recipes that will set taste buds on fire and stories that will delight even the most well-seasoned traveler. Brazen, bold, and colorful, Cuba is a country that pulses with life. Fascinated by its people and their endlessly delicious home-cooked cuisine, friends Dan Goldberg and Andrea Kuhn have been visiting this magnetic country, capturing its passion and vibrancy, for the past five years. Dan, an award-winning photographer and Andrea, an acclaimed prop stylist and art director, along with renowned food writer Jody Eddy, bring the best of Cuban food to home kitchens with more than 75 meticulously tested recipes. From Cuban-Style Fried Chicken and Tostones Stuffed with Lobster and Conch, to Squid-ink Empanadas and Mojito Cake with Rum-Infused Whipped Cream, this book offers a unique opportunity to bring a little slice of Cuba into your home and onto your plate.


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Cuba! explores the magic of this vibrant country through more than 75 recipes that will set taste buds on fire and stories that will delight even the most well-seasoned traveler. Brazen, bold, and colorful, Cuba is a country that pulses with life. Fascinated by its people and their endlessly delicious home-cooked cuisine, friends Dan Goldberg and Andrea Kuhn have been visi Cuba! explores the magic of this vibrant country through more than 75 recipes that will set taste buds on fire and stories that will delight even the most well-seasoned traveler. Brazen, bold, and colorful, Cuba is a country that pulses with life. Fascinated by its people and their endlessly delicious home-cooked cuisine, friends Dan Goldberg and Andrea Kuhn have been visiting this magnetic country, capturing its passion and vibrancy, for the past five years. Dan, an award-winning photographer and Andrea, an acclaimed prop stylist and art director, along with renowned food writer Jody Eddy, bring the best of Cuban food to home kitchens with more than 75 meticulously tested recipes. From Cuban-Style Fried Chicken and Tostones Stuffed with Lobster and Conch, to Squid-ink Empanadas and Mojito Cake with Rum-Infused Whipped Cream, this book offers a unique opportunity to bring a little slice of Cuba into your home and onto your plate.

30 review for Cuba!: Recipes and Stories from the Cuban Kitchen [A Cookbook]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ I thought eating goat would guaranty the Cubs a victory in Game 1 of the World Series . . . . In case you are unaware of some pretty important sportsball history, in 1945 a dumb motherfucker Billy Sianis thought it would be totes cool to bring his pet goat in to Wrigley Field in order to watch Game 4 of the Series. After being booted on his ass (as should have happened) Sianis cursed the Cubs' organization with a promise that they w Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ I thought eating goat would guaranty the Cubs a victory in Game 1 of the World Series . . . . In case you are unaware of some pretty important sportsball history, in 1945 a dumb motherfucker Billy Sianis thought it would be totes cool to bring his pet goat in to Wrigley Field in order to watch Game 4 of the Series. After being booted on his ass (as should have happened) Sianis cursed the Cubs' organization with a promise that they would never win a world series again. And they haven't. In order to do my part in hopes of reversing the curse, I decided to pull out all the stops and cook the other other white meat . . . . It’s what’s for dinner. Alright, so I loooooooooove cookbooks. Like I love them so much I’m getting ready to pull one over on my husband Jeffrey . . . . wait, that’s The Barefoot Contessa’s husband’s name, not mine. Anyway, I want to sneak a bookshelf into the kitchen and Jeffrey or whatever his name is will just have to deal with it. I also understand why cookbooks cost so much money (assuming the book in question is – you know – a good one). Full color photography and sets and whatnot cost dollar dollar bills yo. That doesn’t change the fact that I am as broke as a mothereffin’ joke. At $22.50 retail Cuba!: Recipes and Stories from the Cuban Kitchen actually is quite the steal . . . . but I still prefer to get things for free. The cover of this one alone was enough to make me want a copy. The sucker is just puuuuurrrrrty. And filling the pages with not only recipes but stories about Cuban culture and history was a winner with the bibliophile in me. When I sat down this weekend to peruse the selections to see what I could possibly cook a few recipes got post-it noted as possibilities, but (as stated above) the winner was glaringly obvious as soon as I saw it. The first issue we had to deal with was obtaining goat meat. Butcher shop #1 gave us the option of “whole” or “half” and we ain’t talking pounds, kids. As much as I would have liked to channel my inner Big Fat Greek Wedding, I didn’t have time to build a pit in the backyard so that wasn’t going to work. Hubs called butcher shop #2 who had frozen goat meat available so that was the winner. I left work early . . . . because priorities . . . . ran to the grocery store to pick up the other ingredients and came home to hopefully not kill my family with tainted meat start cookin’ . . . . (Why yes, that does say “goat cubes” – I hope they didn’t pay the marketing person a whole lot to come up with that winner of a name.) As you can see, there’s nothing complex about this recipe. (Sidenote: For any new cooks, I highly recommend you get recipes/cookbooks from any country other than ‘Murica (unless you have the chance to get a Martha Stewart cookbook because she is a goddess).) Good food doesn’t have to be complicated and I’ve found non-U.S. recipes do a good job at using the ol’ K.I.S.S. plan. This one did the same – meat, carrots, peppers, onion, tomatoes, cumin and oregano is about all there was to it. Served over a bed of rice it made for quite the pretty picture once complete . . . . Too bad the Cubs couldn’t pull out a victory. Maybe I should have killed a goat????? Mitchell says next time. Let’s hope our boys in blue can get it done tonight - and that they partner Arrieta up with Grandpa Ross because they are magic together . . . . If you won’t do it for my goat eating family, Cubs, do it for Harry and Bill . . . . ARC provided by Crowne Publishing in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    In the interest of full disclosure, I received this book from NetGalley and Ten Speed Press in exchange for an honest review. But, more importantly, I need to disclose that both of my parents were Cuban. I was born in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of New York City when it had evolved from the White Harlem of comedian George Carlin’s youth into a Puerto Rican enclave and moved to the Cuban mecca of Miami at age 7. I grew up regularly eating black beans and rice, pollo en fricasé, congrí, t In the interest of full disclosure, I received this book from NetGalley and Ten Speed Press in exchange for an honest review. But, more importantly, I need to disclose that both of my parents were Cuban. I was born in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of New York City when it had evolved from the White Harlem of comedian George Carlin’s youth into a Puerto Rican enclave and moved to the Cuban mecca of Miami at age 7. I grew up regularly eating black beans and rice, pollo en fricasé, congrí, tostones, moros y cristianos, picadillo, arroz con pollo, bacalao, bistec empanizado, flan, and more, both at home and at friends’ homes and restaurants. So I believe I’m in a pretty good place to evaluate the authenticity of the recipes in ¡Cuba!: Recipes and Stories from the Cuban Kitchen. Which is not so much. That’s not to say that the fusion cooking that authors Dan Goldberg, Andrea Kuhn and Jody Eddy have devised doesn’t have some very interesting recipes; however, as they say they made three trips to Cuba and traveled around the island, it seems that so much of that research was discarded in favor of gilding the lily. Cream of Malanga Soup with Pistachio Pistou, Black-Bean Burgers with Pineapple Avocado Salsa, Puréed Plantain Soup with Crispy Shallots, Ribs with Guava Barbecue Sauce, and Chile and Garlic Langostinos are dishes you’ll find at a trendy restaurant in New York or L.A. — not in a rundown apartment in Havana, Santa Clara or Vinñales. And the less said about the New England-style lobster roll recipe, the better. And you will never, never, never — did I say “never”? — find jalapeños or sour cream in Cuban cooking. Ever. As the authors themselves admit, Cubans do not like heat in their food, and I can testify that sour cream is unknown in Cuba. What’s sad is that, to make room for trendy fusion fare, Goldberg, et al., left out tasty Cuban staples that would have made the book authentic: pollo en fricasé, arroz con pollo, rice with squid, picadillo, caldo gallego, vaca frita, papa rellena, stuffed peppers, fufú de plátanos, ajiaco, boliche, Elena Ruz sandwich, frita cubana, asopao criollo, bacalao, steak and onions, bistec empanizado, guava turnovers, pudín diplomatico or ropa vieja. So four stars for the interesting stories of the authors’ interactions with the natives and two stars for the recipes; that gives a median of three stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katie N

    The food sounds amazing and the photography is beautiful. It is nice to be given a glimpse into a country that I know little about. There is nothing more inviting than sharing food and a cookbook is a great way to do that. Really beautiful, bright and fresh looking food.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This makes me not only want to eat absolutely everything, but it also makes me want to visit Cuba. Rice and beans...plantains...mango salsa...yum. Just yum. The recipes are charming and accessible. The photos make you feel that you have been transported to Cuba, and they are so varied...the people, the country, the food are all beautifully represented. The written descriptions make the Cuban culture and experience vivid and accessible. This is so much more than a cookbook, it is a tour of Cuba, fr This makes me not only want to eat absolutely everything, but it also makes me want to visit Cuba. Rice and beans...plantains...mango salsa...yum. Just yum. The recipes are charming and accessible. The photos make you feel that you have been transported to Cuba, and they are so varied...the people, the country, the food are all beautifully represented. The written descriptions make the Cuban culture and experience vivid and accessible. This is so much more than a cookbook, it is a tour of Cuba, from kitchen to kitchen. I highly recommend this book...and the food. ***ARC Provided by the Publisher and NetGalley***

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    Cuba!: Recipes and Stories from Cuban Kitchen by Dan Goldberg et. al. is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early, early September. Looooooooooved it. Even though my heart is in Mexican-sourced recipes, this book, its many recipes (that range from snacks to drinks to restaurant-quality homestyle main dishes), candid colorful photographs, and its beautifully textured pages (with the look of parchment, painted wood, and plaster stucco) had me imagining the flavors of lime, the grit of masa, sing Cuba!: Recipes and Stories from Cuban Kitchen by Dan Goldberg et. al. is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early, early September. Looooooooooved it. Even though my heart is in Mexican-sourced recipes, this book, its many recipes (that range from snacks to drinks to restaurant-quality homestyle main dishes), candid colorful photographs, and its beautifully textured pages (with the look of parchment, painted wood, and plaster stucco) had me imagining the flavors of lime, the grit of masa, singe of cumin, and the clean slick of whitefish on my tongue. Elegantly simple, welcoming, and plenty for sharing with a family or party of 4+.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mary C

    Another fabulous cookbook that tells of where and how that fabulous sandwich, The Cubano was invented and why!! I've already tried a couple recipes from this book, a chicken, and the mojo sauce, fabulous, and totally enjoyed reading about this country and it's genuine people. Another fabulous cookbook that tells of where and how that fabulous sandwich, The Cubano was invented and why!! I've already tried a couple recipes from this book, a chicken, and the mojo sauce, fabulous, and totally enjoyed reading about this country and it's genuine people.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lo

    The thing about food/cookbooks is that they're discussed as a single genre, or regarded as just books of recipes, and that's simply not true. There's all kinds of resources out there, and even more ways to use them. Whether you'll enjoy this depends on what you want and how you'll use it. If you're looking for a book that encapsulates a certain mood, has beautiful pictures, sprinklings of anecdotes and a set menu of dishes, this is a good one. Recipes are complete and will make sense to anyone w The thing about food/cookbooks is that they're discussed as a single genre, or regarded as just books of recipes, and that's simply not true. There's all kinds of resources out there, and even more ways to use them. Whether you'll enjoy this depends on what you want and how you'll use it. If you're looking for a book that encapsulates a certain mood, has beautiful pictures, sprinklings of anecdotes and a set menu of dishes, this is a good one. Recipes are complete and will make sense to anyone with basic kitchen skills, but are not exhaustive for complete beginners or experts. I picked this up on a whim at the library because it was pretty. It was a solid, maybe slightly above average example of books that I enjoy reading like a story book on a rainy day, and get inspired to actually cook something at home (for myself!) for the first time in 6 months. We whiled away a day together, this book and I, sipping wine and looking at the pictures while making black bean soup very, very slowly. It primarily includes ingredients that Americans will probably recognize and be able to find easily. Whether that's a feature or bug depends on whether you love finding strange things to feel exotic and want to be authentic, or perhaps live in the middle of nowhere and just want recipes you can actually use. I'm a pastry chef/cook and almost never follow recipes, so I don't really care (thus my lack of rating). I'm not an expert on Cuban food but lived for years with a Cuban family that ran a restaurant, and agree with other reviewers that this is mostly not what people eat in Cuba, or even most American Cuban restaurants. If you're looking for something very authentic, comprehensive, an overview of the cuisine, any history, or thoughts from actual Cuban people, this is not the one you're looking for. It's not overtly politically biased, but if you have opinions about Cuban politics, it'll probably bug you. The flaws I noticed most were the lack of Cuban input and a hipstery flavor that grated a bit at times... it seemed at times that the authors think they discovered Cuba, or that there's tasty food there. It's also worth noting that if you have any familiarity with Cuban food or people, this may seem strange, pretty basic or even verging on pedestrian. But many folks would never notice, and it's pretty! Final thought: If you have a hipster friend who calls themselves "foodie" maybe has a ton of kitchen gadgets but hardly ever cooks, this would be an amazing gift. Your friend will tell you something like, “it was okay, but doesn't compare to [other, more obscure thing your brilliant friend discovered]." He/she will enjoy the experience immensely.

  8. 5 out of 5

    DelAnne Frazee

    Title: Cuba!: Recipes and Stories from the Cuban Kitchen Author: Dan Goldberg, Andrea Kuhn, Jody Eddy Publisher: Ten Speed Press Published: 9-20-2016 Pages: 256 Genre: Cooking, Food & Wine Sub-Genre: Cookbooks; Ethnic; Cuban; International ISBN: 9781607749868 ASIN: B01A4B2JJE Reviewed For NetGalley and Ten Speed Press Reviewer: DelAnne Rating: 4.5 Starts As someone who grew up in the Miami-Key west area I am familiar with Cuban cuisine. I had many friends that were either directly from Cuba or first genera Title: Cuba!: Recipes and Stories from the Cuban Kitchen Author: Dan Goldberg, Andrea Kuhn, Jody Eddy Publisher: Ten Speed Press Published: 9-20-2016 Pages: 256 Genre: Cooking, Food & Wine Sub-Genre: Cookbooks; Ethnic; Cuban; International ISBN: 9781607749868 ASIN: B01A4B2JJE Reviewed For NetGalley and Ten Speed Press Reviewer: DelAnne Rating: 4.5 Starts As someone who grew up in the Miami-Key west area I am familiar with Cuban cuisine. I had many friends that were either directly from Cuba or first generation Cuban American. I used to love to hear their stories of growing up in Cuba and how they came to America. I was lucky in that I learned many of their native dishes. I must admit I never cared for plantains and apparently I still don't. The stories are a joy to read. The recipes given are tasty and easy to follow. Be sure to try the Steamed Cuban Beef Buns or Guava Hand Pies or the Paella. So much to try and savor. My rating of "Cuba!" is 4.5 out of 5 stars. Amazon Link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01A4B2JJE/... B&N Link: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/cuba... GoodReads Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... The Reading Room Link: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.ph... Twitter Link: https://twitter.com/DelAnne531/status...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lili

    I received this book as an advance reader copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The authors – a photographer, an art director, and a writer – collaborated across five years and three trips to Cuba to produce this cookbook as “a love letter to a place and its people.” This overarching intent shines through in structure and the content of the cookbook. During their trips to Cuba, the authors explored not only the restaurants of Havana, but also the Cuban countryside and the coastlin I received this book as an advance reader copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The authors – a photographer, an art director, and a writer – collaborated across five years and three trips to Cuba to produce this cookbook as “a love letter to a place and its people.” This overarching intent shines through in structure and the content of the cookbook. During their trips to Cuba, the authors explored not only the restaurants of Havana, but also the Cuban countryside and the coastline, and cooked in the homes of those who would welcome them. They then reworked these cooking and dining experiences into recipes that are accessible to American home cooks. The cookbook is structured around ten chapters of recipes, with each chapter focusing on a different aspect of Cuban cuisine. Each chapter begins with an informative two-page introduction that discusses that aspect of the cuisine, and often highlights the differences between the capitol and the countryside. The authors’ personal experiences during their trips to Cuba figure prominently in the chapter introductions. Each recipe has a headnote, which often give a personal anecdote from the authors’ trips to Cuba in addition to additional information about how to prepare the recipe. The yield is clearly specified underneath the recipe title. The ingredients are listed in the order of use, and are measured in American measurements. In most cases, the ingredients are common supermarket items; however, some specialized vegetables, seafood and meats are required by a few recipes. The recipe steps are written in paragraph format, although the paragraphs are separated by line spaces to make them easier to read. There was occasionally parenthetical information included in the recipe steps that provided tips to the home cook. The selection of recipes was extremely broad. The “Basic Training” chapter opened with the recipe for congri (rice and black beans) and continued with additional rice recipes and classic Cuban fare. There was also a variety of appetizers in the “Snack & Chat” chapter. The “Pressed & Starched” chapter started off with the Cubano sandwich, which was actually invented in Key West, and continued with other sandwiches with a Cuban flair, such as a black bean burger and a lobster roll. The chapter about seafood contained seviche, grilled shrimp with sugarcane, whole fish with mojo, and paella, among other recipes. The paella recipe was pretty close to the one that I have been using for years. The “Three Amigos” chapter focused on chicken, beef and pork recipes that did not fit in other chapters. The “Pots & Pans” chapter contained recipes for one pot stews and soups, while the recipes in the “Dim Sum & a Little Rum” chapter represented “a fun mashup” of Cuban and Chinese cultures that were learned while cooking with a native Chinese chef in Havana. (Little known fact that, prior to the Revolution, the largest Chinatown in Latin America was in Havana.) The “All Aboard” chapter was a curious mix of recipes ranging from Fried Whole Snapper with Salsa Verde to Savory Goat Stew and Crispy Twice-Cooked Lamb. The “Azucar (Sugar)” chapter featured desserts and other sweet creations, including churros, flan, tres leches cake and ice cream. Finally, the recipes in the “With a Twist” chapter cover beverages of all types: alcoholic, caffeinated, and otherwise. I have no experience with cooking Cuban food or enjoying it in restaurants, so I cannot comment on how authentic the recipes are. Sprinkled throughout the recipe chapters are half-page to two-page cultural interludes that describe the authors’ experiences on their trips to Cuba, and otherwise provide background information about modern Cuba using anecdotes from their trips. For example, the “Rations” interlude provided a brief history of the Cuban economic system in conjunction with a rationing story from one of their Cuban friends. “The Santeria Religion” interlude discussed the influence of the religion on the foodways of Cuba. The “Tobacco” interlude was one of the longer interludes, and described tobacco farming and the processing of tobacco leaves for cigars. The “Cuban Pantry” section was simply a one-page glossary of twelve Cuban ingredients and dishes. This seemed to be a missed opportunity to educate American home cooks on how to stock their kitchens to make Cuban cuisine a part of their culinary routine. The photography is predominantly photojournalism of the people and places of Cuba. Very seldom are there photographs of finished recipes or recipe steps in progress. While the photojournalistic photography is very striking and reinforces the authors’ overarching intent to write “a love letter” to the Cuban people, it is not very helpful to the home cook struggling with preparing a foreign cuisine. Overall, this cookbook is a gorgeous and informative study of modern Cuba that seems to be better suited to the coffee table or the library than the kitchen. For example, the recipes are placed around the photographs, allowing the photographs to take center stage in the book. When a recipe is overlaid on a darker photograph, that recipe is printed in white, which can be more difficult to read. As soon as I happened upon the Rice and Beans (Congri) recipe in the “Basic Training” chapter, I added the ingredients to my grocery shopping list and made plans to prepare it. The recipe was a little challenging to follow as it wasn’t clear whether the beans could be prepared in tandem with the rice, or whether they needed to be prepared before the rice and let soak in the hot water while the rice was cooking. I took the later approach and was glad that I did. There was also some inconsistency with timing – sometimes the recipe steps suggested how long to cook something, and sometimes they didn’t. For example, the recipe steps direct you to cook the beans until just tender, then to add salt and to cook for 15 minutes. Overall, I figured it out, and it was a good enough recipe that I would try it again. I have several other recipes marked to try before my advance reader copy expires. When I do, I will update my review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ilana

    The hardest part of reading this book was the introduction, with the various appreciations regarding the situation in the country at the time of documenting the book. I have serious reasons to doubt about the truth of a quote like this: 'There is plenty of stress and deprivation in Cuba, but it does not dictate the lives of most of its people'. However, once you skip this part and land in the world of food and recipes - I doubt that many of the Cubans can afford to cook them, but you can skip pa The hardest part of reading this book was the introduction, with the various appreciations regarding the situation in the country at the time of documenting the book. I have serious reasons to doubt about the truth of a quote like this: 'There is plenty of stress and deprivation in Cuba, but it does not dictate the lives of most of its people'. However, once you skip this part and land in the world of food and recipes - I doubt that many of the Cubans can afford to cook them, but you can skip part of my review as well - everything make sense and tastes much better. The local recipes are adapted for the American tastes, but the original ideas - sofrito or yuca or the various chicken recipes - are maintained. An interesting world worth a try, either as a travel destination or as a thematic food evening. Disclaimer: Book offered by the published in exchange for an honest review

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amy Harber

    And here is my latest love in my series of destination cookbooks. I am particularly fond of this one. Many years ago (and I mean 35 or so), our family was camping in Miami. In August. One evening, a Spanish speaking woman knocked on the door of our camper. She came over to give is a mango, something we had never seen before. Back then, in rural metro Atlanta, we just didn’t see “exotic” fruit all that often or even ever. The communication barrier was broken down enough for us to figure out that And here is my latest love in my series of destination cookbooks. I am particularly fond of this one. Many years ago (and I mean 35 or so), our family was camping in Miami. In August. One evening, a Spanish speaking woman knocked on the door of our camper. She came over to give is a mango, something we had never seen before. Back then, in rural metro Atlanta, we just didn’t see “exotic” fruit all that often or even ever. The communication barrier was broken down enough for us to figure out that this woman was Cuban. All these years later, her generosity and hospitality are still a fond memory for me. From what I have eaten in my life of Cuban food, it seems to be a mixture of Spanish and Caribbean food. Probably other types of food that I haven’t even tried yet. It is simple, straightforward, and good food though. This book is beautiful. I am looking forward to trying my hand at some of these recipes. The pictures make me yearn to visit this mysterious island even more than I did before. This was sent to me by Blogging for Books in exchange for this review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dave Laskowski

    what an extraordinary journey with great recipes yet. Beautiful photography and wonderfully written. I feel I know, and will cherish, the Cuban people because of this book. Cannot wait to try some of the recipes. Thank you Dan, Jody, and Andrea.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    This book gives you a nice look at the long hidden culture of Cuba and how the people have overcome their harsh and restrictive environment to preserve and build upon their delicious food history. I can't wait to try to recipes! This book gives you a nice look at the long hidden culture of Cuba and how the people have overcome their harsh and restrictive environment to preserve and build upon their delicious food history. I can't wait to try to recipes!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Juno

    It’s a beautiful cookbook, it really is. Yet, I was so frustrated wondering if they just took all of these recipes without requesting permission from the cooks. Was any compensation given to those whose places they stayed in and food they tried and recreated on their own?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tekla

    Pretty pictures. Nice-ish recipes but not "authentic" by any means. The authors just visited Cuba a few times and then made up some recipes inspired by their visits. Pretty pictures. Nice-ish recipes but not "authentic" by any means. The authors just visited Cuba a few times and then made up some recipes inspired by their visits.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Draper

    Always wanted to take a trip to Cuba. This cookbook give you an inside look at the people, the food, the culture without even leaving your home.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Richards

    Required reading when going to Cuba I enjoyed the introduction to each chapter.Will try new foods when I visit again.Cuban people are dear to my heart.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Burdette

    Love this book--yummy recipes and great photos

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

    This book is peak white people congratulating themselves on discovering ethnic food. The design is also a train wreck.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Here is a book that could be worth getting just for the photography, but also a book about food and culture that happens to have recipes. The recipes in Cuba! come from the three authors’ trips to the island, what they learned there, and how they can be made here. Unless you’re a real foodie with a decent budget, most people would realistically find one or a few recipes here to actually make; although, because of the simplicity of the ingredients, there is a higher percentage of “doable” recipes Here is a book that could be worth getting just for the photography, but also a book about food and culture that happens to have recipes. The recipes in Cuba! come from the three authors’ trips to the island, what they learned there, and how they can be made here. Unless you’re a real foodie with a decent budget, most people would realistically find one or a few recipes here to actually make; although, because of the simplicity of the ingredients, there is a higher percentage of “doable” recipes than in other niche cookbooks. Whether you make one, none, or many of these recipes, having this kind of book lets us learn more about cuisine and culture that we might not otherwise know much about, and is colorful joy to look through. Every page is completely dressed in a single photo – no “blank” spaces. The ten chapters have two pages of introductory blurbs, then a two-page overhead shot of a table that I would love to be at: bright and sunny, and lined out with Cuban food. Of the single-page photos, my favorite has to be the empanadas with a unique coloring – a purple, almost black – from squid ink. To the left of that, too, is a man wearing purple, a beret and an impressive mustache. Honorable mention also goes to a scene of a chicken flying through a home kitchen, where much of their field research was done. They quote from Cubans they befriended, their personal stories, and the shared cultural history in that country. I didn’t realize how devastating the rations were in the 1990s – one of countless ways history has also shaped the “foodways” of Cuba. You can read about some of the legends, like how the Cubano sandwich really originated, and note the differences between Havana and the rest of the country. The black market is everywhere, so this publication hopefully won’t endanger anyone, though it is notable that several people wanted to be fully or partly anonymous. (For humorous stories of contraband in Cuba, see Paquito D’Rivera’s “Letters to Yeyito.”) Provable heritage to regions of Spain, and even China, help some restaurants get by, but the Afro-Cuban majority does not have as many ties. The country is changeless and always changing at the same time. Turning now to the main feature: the food. Cumin is one very common seasoning, sometimes called for as seeds. Oregano and garlic are there a lot too – easy enough. The food is not the spiciest, but when it is, habanero or jalapeno peppers can be used – or even just vinegar, to liven things up. That’s probably what I like best about this book, other than the design and imagery: the recipes are reasonable, with ingredients that shouldn’t be too hard to find, and instructions that cover all the bases. I also appreciate the practical tips on what to expect in preparation, and the substitutions or adjustments that can be made. They even plug the right occasions for certain plates, and refer to other recipes (with page numbers) for suggested pairings. A few minor detractions here. Not every recipe is pictured, unless they’re somewhere in the table spread, and there are a few ambiguous ingredients, at least for a non-cook like me (what exactly is Mexican crema? which are the five spices in five-spice powder?) I’m sure anyone planning to make any of these recipes would be able to figure something out though. Just an observation, on some spelling: I don’t know why they spell ceviche “seviche” with an “s” – but that’s a dish I avoid anyway. There are Cuban versions of dishes found elsewhere, like tortilla and paella, and a good section on drinks. I enjoyed paging through “Cuba!” and look forward to trying something new soon! Note: I received a free copy of this title through BloggingForBooks in exchange for an honest review. For more reviews, follow my blog at http://matt-stats.blogspot.com/

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I checked this cookbook out from the library, but now I must have one for my very own! The recipes are excellent, the photography is stunning, the writing is comfy... It's just a gorgeous, useful book! I checked this cookbook out from the library, but now I must have one for my very own! The recipes are excellent, the photography is stunning, the writing is comfy... It's just a gorgeous, useful book!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Audiothing

    Cuba continues to captivate visitors with its vibrant culture, colorful cities, and incredible cuisine.Cuba! explores the magic of this country through recipes and stories that will set taste buds on fire and delight even the most well-seasoned traveler. Review What a fabulous read! Cuba! takes cookbooks to a higher level, giving as it does so much more than recipes. I enjoyed learning a little of the history of Cuba and the effects of the strict rationing which gave rise to The Paladares, private Cuba continues to captivate visitors with its vibrant culture, colorful cities, and incredible cuisine.Cuba! explores the magic of this country through recipes and stories that will set taste buds on fire and delight even the most well-seasoned traveler. Review What a fabulous read! Cuba! takes cookbooks to a higher level, giving as it does so much more than recipes. I enjoyed learning a little of the history of Cuba and the effects of the strict rationing which gave rise to The Paladares, private restaurants. Once illegal because, by taking advantage of black market products, they provided relief from the rationing for those who could afford it. I was surprised to read of the proliferation of organoponicos (organic urban gardens) which have been so successful in providing food for city dwellers, and are now copied worldwide. An interesting concept and well worth looking up. Oh and the recipes, I appreciate how both the original recipes and the "gussied up" recipes are both given, there can't be a more staple meal than rice and beans, but with a few tasty additions who wouldn't appreciate a plateful of congri? There's a whole raft of wonderful recipes in this book to try, and I can't wait to get going on some of them. The authors also include a few anecdotes about the Cuban people themselves, allowing us a brief insight to their daily lives. The illustrations are gorgeous, my favourite being the Cuban Pantry. I would like to express my appreciation to the authors for producing this outstanding book, so entertaining, so informative and so beautiful. ARC provided by NetGalley and Ten Speed Press for an unbiased review About the Authors (via Amazon) Dan Goldberg is an award-winning commercial photographer specializing in food photography. His work has been recognized by the London International Advertising Awards and he’s been listed as Archive’s Best 200 Advertising Photographers. When not taking photographs, you can find him seeking out the best food and drink in town, fly-fishing, and traveling the world with his wife, Casey and daughter, Dylan. Prop stylist and art director, Andrea Kuhn’s work has appeared in national magazines and ad campaigns, as well as numerous cookbooks, including The Girl in the Kitchen, the James Beard-nominated Spiaggia, Cookie Love and Fat Rice. When not on set, you can find Andrea perusing flea markets (near and far) looking for that perfect prop, enjoying a good cup of coffee, and hanging at the dog park with her doodle, Finley. She lives in Chicago, Illinois. Jody Eddy is a food writer and the author of Come In, We're Closed and the IACP Award-winning North: The New Nordic Cuisine of Iceland. She is also the former editor of Art Culinaire. A graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education in Manhattan, Jody has cooked at Jean Georges, Tabla, and The Fat Duck. She lives in Chicago where she enjoys running, gardening, and planning tomorrow’s next culinary adventure.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

    Dan Goldberg, Andrea Kuhn and Jody Eddy made three trips to Cuba to do the research, cooking and photos for their cookbook ¡Cuba! Recipes and Stories from the Cuban Kitchen. They planned to focus on the paladores, underground kitchens using bootleg ingredients. However, they were overrun by tourists, so they instead turned to family cooking in the kitchens of everyday Cubans. This decision adds an authenticity and informality to the food. The photos are stunning, particularly the photos of the pe Dan Goldberg, Andrea Kuhn and Jody Eddy made three trips to Cuba to do the research, cooking and photos for their cookbook ¡Cuba! Recipes and Stories from the Cuban Kitchen. They planned to focus on the paladores, underground kitchens using bootleg ingredients. However, they were overrun by tourists, so they instead turned to family cooking in the kitchens of everyday Cubans. This decision adds an authenticity and informality to the food. The photos are stunning, particularly the photos of the people, their homes and their kitchens. I also loved the photos of the sea. The photos of the food had this authenticity and simplicity that set them apart from most cookbooks. The only false notes came from the shots of several dishes on a table at once. They looked so much the same and so much on trend. You know what I mean, lots of food, spilled herbs, nuts, and deliberate messiness. It’s done over and over and over in book after book and generally works. However, that spilling the food all over the table messiness is an expression of wealth and privilege and strikes a false note when representing the humble foods of people who make an art form of making do. This cookbook is as much coffee table book as recipe collection. Every page is a picture. The text is printed on photos, many of them pictures of painted walls with peeling paint. In others, the text wraps around elements of the photo. It makes an extraordinarily beautiful book. Visually, this book is a feast. The recipes are good, focusing on simple ingredients that speak for themselves. There are few recipes that have long lists of ingredients. There is not the abundance to indulge in that sort of cooking, instead a bit of salt, oil and roasting bring out the natural simple flavors of good ingredients. I found myself feeling irritated, however, with Eddy’s frequent mentions of the oppressive Castro regime without even once mentioning the embargo. This is fundamentally dishonest and discredits the excellent work that went into researching the recipes and taking the photos. She repeatedly talks about the limited access to ingredients, to meat, the poverty and privation, the need to repair, not replace and on and on and on. With all that discussion of deprivation without even once using the word embargo is a massive failure of honesty. Telling the truth about the effects of the embargo would not excuse or diminish the regime’s restrictions on liberty, political speech and on the arts. It damages the writer’s credibility and does a disservice to the people of Cuba and the readers. I was provided a review copy of ¡Cuba! Recipes and Stories from the Cuban Kitchen by Blogging For Books. ¡Cuba! Recipes and Stories from the Cuban Kitchen at Ten Speed Press Dan Goldberg at Goldberg Photography Andrea Kuhn at Andrea Kuhn Style Jody Eddy web site ★★★ http://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpres...

  24. 4 out of 5

    roxi Net

    Now I'm just freaked out. I've been wanting to make Congri forever and am planning to serve it up at work event and haven't even looked for a recipe. And then Cuba! came along and completely made my day (along with a few other cookbooks to review so I'm in heaven). The first recipe is for Congri, so of course, I cracked up and didn't stop reading. Not only are the photos of Cuba amazing and fairly familiar to my Caribbean culture upbringing, the recipes I've been trying to nail down are included. Now I'm just freaked out. I've been wanting to make Congri forever and am planning to serve it up at work event and haven't even looked for a recipe. And then Cuba! came along and completely made my day (along with a few other cookbooks to review so I'm in heaven). The first recipe is for Congri, so of course, I cracked up and didn't stop reading. Not only are the photos of Cuba amazing and fairly familiar to my Caribbean culture upbringing, the recipes I've been trying to nail down are included. Fate, no?! I'm excited to cook Congri, Papas Rellanas, their version of mango salsa and basically all other staples that I'm familiar and unfamiliar with. So yeah, the whole book. It's a beautifully laid out book, vibrant colors, simple to follow recipes (using pretty basic ingredients) and of course, makes me want to go to Cuba. Right now.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I decided to try out some Cuban recipes. I knew the flavor would be amazing from what some friends had told me. So when I was offered this book to review, I jumped on the opportunity. Glad that I did. My daughter isn't one to be adventurous with her food, so I had to wait for her to go visit her dad before I could try any of these recipes. So far the only one that we tried in the book was the Lobster Roll. The taste was just simply amazing! And it was very easy to make. I wasn't able to get the f I decided to try out some Cuban recipes. I knew the flavor would be amazing from what some friends had told me. So when I was offered this book to review, I jumped on the opportunity. Glad that I did. My daughter isn't one to be adventurous with her food, so I had to wait for her to go visit her dad before I could try any of these recipes. So far the only one that we tried in the book was the Lobster Roll. The taste was just simply amazing! And it was very easy to make. I wasn't able to get the fresh lobster for this recipe however, so I had bought from my grocers frozen section, but the flavor was still there. There are so many more recipes in here that I can't wait to try. This cookbook offers many beautiful pictures and wonder stories that I feel as if that I learned some more of this culture. I highly recommend this for anyone feeling a bit adventurous.

  26. 4 out of 5

    lifelike

    I received a free electronic copy of this book in exchange for a review for Netgalley. Based on the title, I was hoping this would be a collection of Cuban recipes and stories from a Cuban person's kitchen. I also imagined it might be full of stories from a Cuban-American person's kitchen. Nope. Instead, this book could more accurately be called Cuba! Recipes and Stories from Americans Who Visited Cuba Three Times. The book's strength is its design - you can tell, even from the cover, that the boo I received a free electronic copy of this book in exchange for a review for Netgalley. Based on the title, I was hoping this would be a collection of Cuban recipes and stories from a Cuban person's kitchen. I also imagined it might be full of stories from a Cuban-American person's kitchen. Nope. Instead, this book could more accurately be called Cuba! Recipes and Stories from Americans Who Visited Cuba Three Times. The book's strength is its design - you can tell, even from the cover, that the book has a very visual layout. If you like the design of the cover, you will like the design throughout. This feels more like an art book by American foodies for American foodies, interspersed with recipes and travel stories, than a resource about traditional Cuban food.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Leyla Johnson

    This book is so topical now with the relaxing of some of the strained relationships between Cuba and America. The book fills two purposed, one it is a cookbook of very high standard and easy to follow recipes, but it also gives a comprehensive story of life in Cuba. The book take you into the home of these resilient people who not only offer up their food but also their life stories and their memories. I is a wonderful book that I recommend very highly and that would not only give a new twist to This book is so topical now with the relaxing of some of the strained relationships between Cuba and America. The book fills two purposed, one it is a cookbook of very high standard and easy to follow recipes, but it also gives a comprehensive story of life in Cuba. The book take you into the home of these resilient people who not only offer up their food but also their life stories and their memories. I is a wonderful book that I recommend very highly and that would not only give a new twist to food to cook, but make a wonderful coffee table book that you and your guest would not be able to put down. This book was provided to me in return for an honest and unbiased review

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I got a copy of this cookbook from Net Galley (many thanks!) and couldn't stop reading, I gobbled it up in one sitting and now have plans for a month of Cuban dishes at home! This charming look at Cuban cooking with nibbles of history and culture, glimpses in the lives of the people, give the reader the experience of traveling to authentic Cuban kitchens without ever leaving home. Full of recipes that are sure to please, reading this took me back to memories of my last trip to Cuba and made me hu I got a copy of this cookbook from Net Galley (many thanks!) and couldn't stop reading, I gobbled it up in one sitting and now have plans for a month of Cuban dishes at home! This charming look at Cuban cooking with nibbles of history and culture, glimpses in the lives of the people, give the reader the experience of traveling to authentic Cuban kitchens without ever leaving home. Full of recipes that are sure to please, reading this took me back to memories of my last trip to Cuba and made me hungry for more.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gooshe Net

    The book is filled with 75 traditional Cuban recipes. There are recipes for Tostones, Ropa Vieja, Squid Empanadas, Ribs, Plantain chips, Cuban Style Fried Chicken, Mojito Cake, and Cuban Sandwich which also comes highly recommended. From the book; "Without ingredients like rice and beans and fried plantains, Cuban cuisine would lose its identity. Snacking, chatting, and helping each other out is what it's all about in Cuba." The book is filled with 75 traditional Cuban recipes. There are recipes for Tostones, Ropa Vieja, Squid Empanadas, Ribs, Plantain chips, Cuban Style Fried Chicken, Mojito Cake, and Cuban Sandwich which also comes highly recommended. From the book; "Without ingredients like rice and beans and fried plantains, Cuban cuisine would lose its identity. Snacking, chatting, and helping each other out is what it's all about in Cuba."

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarita

    This is not mami's copy of Cocina Criolla. More of a travelogue/history/cookbook fusion that puts some new (and some questionable) twists on the classics of Cuban cuisine. The photographs are gorgeous, and the recipes seem well thought out, but it would probably be much more authentic if some actual Cubans were involved. I would say this is a fancy, Cuba-inspired book for those looking to add to their travel/cookbook collections. This is not mami's copy of Cocina Criolla. More of a travelogue/history/cookbook fusion that puts some new (and some questionable) twists on the classics of Cuban cuisine. The photographs are gorgeous, and the recipes seem well thought out, but it would probably be much more authentic if some actual Cubans were involved. I would say this is a fancy, Cuba-inspired book for those looking to add to their travel/cookbook collections.

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