hits counter Roast Beef Medium: The Business Adventures of Emma McChesney - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Roast Beef Medium: The Business Adventures of Emma McChesney

Availability: Ready to download

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.


Compare

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

30 review for Roast Beef Medium: The Business Adventures of Emma McChesney

  1. 4 out of 5

    Majenta

    A four-and-a-HALF-star road trip with 30-something divorced mother-of-one "Emma McChesney, Mrs. (I place it in the background because she generally did)" (Loc. 179), proud 10-year-road-vet representative of T.A. Buck's Featherloom Petticoats, "and her favorite pastime was studying men and women. The two things went well together" (Loc. 352): "'Call 'em weasels. That covers their style, occupation, and character'" (Emma describing a certain desirable element hanging around a department store at Lo A four-and-a-HALF-star road trip with 30-something divorced mother-of-one "Emma McChesney, Mrs. (I place it in the background because she generally did)" (Loc. 179), proud 10-year-road-vet representative of T.A. Buck's Featherloom Petticoats, "and her favorite pastime was studying men and women. The two things went well together" (Loc. 352): "'Call 'em weasels. That covers their style, occupation, and character'" (Emma describing a certain desirable element hanging around a department store at Loc. 420). "'Full?' repeated Emma McChesney (and if it weren't for the compositer there'd be an exclamation point after that question mark)" (Loc.487). "Emma McChesney stood on the bottom step, looking up and down Main Street and breathing in great draughts of that unadjectivable air" (Loc. 555). "'When you begin to talk like that...I always feel as though I could take hold in a way to make those famous jobs that Hercules tackled look like little Willie's chores after school'" (Emma's new boss at Loc. 1463). If you enjoyed this sample, hop on the next train through Edna Ferber's early-20th-century Midwest with her plucky warrior, Emma McChesney. Thanks for reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jaylia3

    Savvy, straight-talking, and self-reliant, Emma McChesney, is as witty and entertaining as the “fast-talking dames” found in old movies, but it’s closer to 1910 than 1930 or 40. Emma’s an early career woman, working as the Midwest sales representative for T.A. Buck’s Featherloom skirts and petticoats, and most of her life is spent on the road--traveling by train, sleeping in hotels, meeting the most interesting people, and outsmarting the male sales reps who are her competition. She’s still styl Savvy, straight-talking, and self-reliant, Emma McChesney, is as witty and entertaining as the “fast-talking dames” found in old movies, but it’s closer to 1910 than 1930 or 40. Emma’s an early career woman, working as the Midwest sales representative for T.A. Buck’s Featherloom skirts and petticoats, and most of her life is spent on the road--traveling by train, sleeping in hotels, meeting the most interesting people, and outsmarting the male sales reps who are her competition. She’s still stylish and attractive enough to make a man hope, but as a hardworking divorced mother dependant on her income she’s a stickler about her reputation. Roast Beef Medium is the first of three books about the adventures of Emma McChesney. Edna Ferber, also the author of Giant and Show Boat, wrote the McChesney books long enough ago that they’re all in the public domain and ebook copies of them can be downloaded from sites like Project Gutenberg. I listened to a wonderfully narrated Libravox recording, also free, which kept me grinning even when stuck in traffic.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Zapata

    I love Edna Ferber. Maybe old-fashioned sometimes, but funny, witty and fast-moving always. These stories follow Emma McChesney through a period in her life as a divorced mother making a career for herself as a traveling sales rep of a petticoat company, back in the day when traveling was a career for men only. I've read other stories about Emma McChesney, so I was familiar with her and the other characters, and I know how their lives will eventually unfold. But that did not take away the fun of I love Edna Ferber. Maybe old-fashioned sometimes, but funny, witty and fast-moving always. These stories follow Emma McChesney through a period in her life as a divorced mother making a career for herself as a traveling sales rep of a petticoat company, back in the day when traveling was a career for men only. I've read other stories about Emma McChesney, so I was familiar with her and the other characters, and I know how their lives will eventually unfold. But that did not take away the fun of reading these stories, learning more about our friend Emma McChesney and her approach to life. One thing I noticed more in this collection than I have in other Ferber collections. Any time she mentions Emma McChesney, it is by stating her full name. Even Emma McChesney's dearest friend calls her Emma McChesney. I do wonder why that seemed necessary....maybe Ferber just liked the sound of the name, who knows? It doesn't distract, but I did notice it....and will watch for it in other works. Does Ferber do the same for other heroines or is it only Emma McChesney who gets the Emma McChesney treatment? I have four more Ferber works available to me so someday we shall see!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Janelle

    Dnf. Too boring

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cherie

    What a treat! I will be searching for more Edna Ferber's stories of Mrs. McChesney. What an amazing woman. "When Emma McChesney aimed to get things out of the way she did not use a shovel; she used a road-drag."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Pascale

    So sad that I should be the first one to review this reprint of what was, in its day (1911), a very successful book, and justly so. Emma McChesney, a wise and feisty Yankee if there ever was one, is an immensely endearing heroine. Forced to earn a living after a bitter divorce, Emma has become a traveling saleswoman. The book starts when she is 36, with a son about to graduate high school. Emma makes a good living, but at what price! Not only does she have to put up with the discomforts of exhau So sad that I should be the first one to review this reprint of what was, in its day (1911), a very successful book, and justly so. Emma McChesney, a wise and feisty Yankee if there ever was one, is an immensely endearing heroine. Forced to earn a living after a bitter divorce, Emma has become a traveling saleswoman. The book starts when she is 36, with a son about to graduate high school. Emma makes a good living, but at what price! Not only does she have to put up with the discomforts of exhausting rail journeys and poor hotel food, but she must constantly fight back unwanted advances and ribald jokes from men who consider that "this isn't woman's work." Although traveling saleswomen were always a rarity, and have completely disappeared nowadays, this book is timeless in its description of how hard it is for a woman in just about any society to juggle a career, a personal life, and raising a child. Ferber is never preachy, but makes her points with as much clarity as her character plows ahead, regardless of setbacks and disappointments. Almost every page draws a smile, and I found myself tearing up when Emma falls ill, and can't even contact her son, who is on a fishing trip in Canada. Dame Edna begs to be rediscovered, folks!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I wish I could have given this one 3.5 stars, but it was a fun read overall, so I'll err on the side of generosity. Interesting to read these early "strong woman" stories that frequently walk a fine line between emerging feminist thought and adherence to (or perhaps nostalgia for) traditional male/female roles.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gwen

    Decent fiction work. Traveling petticoat saleswoman, single mother. Fascinating look at what it means to be a single woman traveling throughout America on business, dealing with bosses and society. Kind of a sell-out at the end, but a great look at a strong woman.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    Emma McChesney, traveling saleswoman for a company that manufactures petticoats, is a remarkably modern character. Introduced by Ferber in a story sold to a magazine in 1911, McChesney became an instant hit, with the public clamoring for more about her. Imagine: writing before World War I, the popularity of a female character who was divorced and glad of it, seemingly left her son to be raised at boarding schools, and traveled endlessly with heavy sample bags, making a good living in a man's fie Emma McChesney, traveling saleswoman for a company that manufactures petticoats, is a remarkably modern character. Introduced by Ferber in a story sold to a magazine in 1911, McChesney became an instant hit, with the public clamoring for more about her. Imagine: writing before World War I, the popularity of a female character who was divorced and glad of it, seemingly left her son to be raised at boarding schools, and traveled endlessly with heavy sample bags, making a good living in a man's field, and outselling, outsmarting and certainly out-charming them at the same time. Having read this delightful, clever and often funny series of stories amidst a news cycle filled with disturbing cases of sexual exploitation and harassment of women in the workplace or women attempting to join it, Emma displays blunt self-assurance and moxie when she is, frequently, hit upon by men. After one man suddenly kisses her, she "wrench(es) herself free with a violent jerk" and then, after upbraiding him mercilessly, accuses him of having planted a "married kiss," before continuing her scorching lecture. In a later story, when the boss's son propositions her, she says, "So, if I let you make love to me, I keep my job, is that it?" and then details her worst-scenario job, which she claims she would gladly take over giving in to him. Of course, Emma McChesney is a fictional character, one that Ferber imbued with a surplus of confidence and fearlessness. Her biggest vulnerability is with her son, Jock, who appears in several stories as a nearly-grown up 17-year-old and in whom Emma sees too much of the selfishness of his father. While Emma is not drawn in a rich and deep way, she is still a full-bodied, colorful sympathetic and very human character trying to balance motherhood with making a living. Historically, these stories were written at a time when women were already well established working in stores but much newer to life on the road. As such, Emma's adventures include other aspects of standing up for herself as a woman alone, such as refusing a hotel room she knows will be close to the loud boiler room; dealing with women buyers who still prefer placing orders with men, and fighting rumors that she is "morally compromised." Ferber's language is wonderful, and while it is old-fashioned, that is a big part of its charm. There are two other Emma McChesney books and I will certainly be checking them out. I can't get enough of a character whose feminism isn't strident or angry, but is part of her confidence and dignity. After she has cleared her name with her new boss from ugly rumors spread by a competitor, she is offered better territory as a way of making amends. Emma cries briefly, while telling her boss, "For Heaven's sake, stop patting me on the head!"

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elle

    I was drawn to this book by the quirky title and after reading a few reviews I expected to fall in love with it instantly. I was sadly disappointed. On the upside - the storyline was very different to anything else I've read, the author paints some really wonderful word pictures and the issues tackled were obviously leagues ahead of their time. But it just felt like the author was trying too hard. I was being TOLD a story rather than having the pleasure of discovering it myself. The writing styl I was drawn to this book by the quirky title and after reading a few reviews I expected to fall in love with it instantly. I was sadly disappointed. On the upside - the storyline was very different to anything else I've read, the author paints some really wonderful word pictures and the issues tackled were obviously leagues ahead of their time. But it just felt like the author was trying too hard. I was being TOLD a story rather than having the pleasure of discovering it myself. The writing style - although natty and sharp - felt contrived. And I'm tired to death of reading about female characters who are so flawless in every way that men simply fall at their feet at the first greeting! If Emma McChesney had only been a little more humanly imperfect I might have enjoyed this book more.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mary Grace McGeehan

    I was eager to read this book because I loved Ferber's short story collection "Buttered Side Down." And I did enjoy this episodic novel (clearly serialized in magazines) about Emma McChesney, a divorced mother in her thirties whose passion is her work as a traveling petticoat saleswoman. Like Ferber's short stories, it paints an evocative picture of early twentieth-century middle-class and working-class America and tells us, with both anger and humor, of the indignities faced by a single woman w I was eager to read this book because I loved Ferber's short story collection "Buttered Side Down." And I did enjoy this episodic novel (clearly serialized in magazines) about Emma McChesney, a divorced mother in her thirties whose passion is her work as a traveling petticoat saleswoman. Like Ferber's short stories, it paints an evocative picture of early twentieth-century middle-class and working-class America and tells us, with both anger and humor, of the indignities faced by a single woman working back then. Emma's adventures continue in two more books, and I'm looking forward to reading them. Still, if I had to recommend one of Ferber's books, I'd recommend "Buttered Side Down," because of the broader sweep of characters and locales. I read this book as part of my My Year in 1918 project (myyearin1918.com).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Though written more than 100 years ago, the Emma McChesney stories hold up remarkably well. There is a reason they were among the most popular fiction of their time. Fashions have changed, the traveling salesperson is a thing of the past, and social expectations for women have evolved, but the problems Emma faces, from sexual harassment to being underestimated by male colleagues to struggling to balance work and family, remain very relevant. Through it all she is strong-willed and optimistic, ou Though written more than 100 years ago, the Emma McChesney stories hold up remarkably well. There is a reason they were among the most popular fiction of their time. Fashions have changed, the traveling salesperson is a thing of the past, and social expectations for women have evolved, but the problems Emma faces, from sexual harassment to being underestimated by male colleagues to struggling to balance work and family, remain very relevant. Through it all she is strong-willed and optimistic, outspoken and uncompromising. A character to root for.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    3 stars (liked it) A witty 1913 novel, and the first in a trilogy, chronicling the trials and tribulations of the traveling saleswoman, Emma McChesney, as she navigates her way in a world dominated by men while staying connected with her son as a single mother. I found her no-nonsense attitude as the main appeal of the story and wished that, once the novelty of introducing her personality had waned, there had been a bit more interest to the plot.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christine Schaffer

    What a fun delightful read. According to Emma McChesney, Roast Beef Medium is always the safe choice for the seasoned traveling salesman. She, however didn’t make the safe choice of careers as a traveling saleswoman for the T. A. Buck Featherloom Petticoat Company. Emma shares with the readers the pitfalls of being on the road and in a man’s world in the 1930’s. A woman way ahead of her time, you will love Emma. Edna Ferber, you never disappoint me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    What a delightful story! 3.5 stars

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Nealen

    Delightful story of professional traveling saleswoman and later executive, Emma McChesney. It would be a little unusual today, but really unusual in this time period because it is the 1910s!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    I love Ferber, and this is quite funny and charming. It's covering a fairly serious topic of discrimination, in a lighthearted way, which doesn't quite resonate in today's world, but still worth a read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    End Ferber's "Roast Beef, Medium" is a series of short stories that provide a somewhat humorous view into the life of a female traveling salesperson in the US in the early 1900's. The stories provide some insight into society at the time. The book is a pleasure.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Bertsch

    This book, written in 1913, was way ahead of its time. It’s a loosely connected series of chapters about Emma McChesney, not a sweet young thing, but rather an attractive 35-year-old divorcee with a grown so,n who makes a good living as a travelling saleswoman, outperforming the men in her field. Tough, competent and fast-talking, with an earthy sense of humour, Emma was an icon of feminism, at the time. Be prepared to make allowance for a heavy dose of early twentieth century slang, because Emm This book, written in 1913, was way ahead of its time. It’s a loosely connected series of chapters about Emma McChesney, not a sweet young thing, but rather an attractive 35-year-old divorcee with a grown so,n who makes a good living as a travelling saleswoman, outperforming the men in her field. Tough, competent and fast-talking, with an earthy sense of humour, Emma was an icon of feminism, at the time. Be prepared to make allowance for a heavy dose of early twentieth century slang, because Emma is a very modern woman, and is tuned in to every fad of expression that was popular at the time. In case you didn’t know, we didn’t invent slang. No, not by a long shot. While Emma is still an impressive character almost a hundred years later, Ferber couldn’t quite rise above all of the biases of her own time, as the women in the book go all weak in the knees with pleasure at the very thought of plunging their arms into a basin of dirty dishwater. Because we all know that’s what every woman really longs to be doing. Nevertheless, it’s an entertaining read, and Emma’s down-to-earth wisdom, while it gets a bit preachy at times, it's well worth your time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Harron68

    Ferber had the smarts to both please her readers, mostly female, but also to push for fairer treatment for women in life. This book, first in the trilogy, really draws readers in. Some of the style may seem stilted, but the joy of reading a 100 year old book that still speaks to today's lives and values IS important. Emma's bravery in getting a job as sales rep and traveling a large area back then makes her a real model of self confidence and her ability to also pay for good schooling for her s Ferber had the smarts to both please her readers, mostly female, but also to push for fairer treatment for women in life. This book, first in the trilogy, really draws readers in. Some of the style may seem stilted, but the joy of reading a 100 year old book that still speaks to today's lives and values IS important. Emma's bravery in getting a job as sales rep and traveling a large area back then makes her a real model of self confidence and her ability to also pay for good schooling for her son while she's "on the road" testifies to her values. Though she has the weakness of needing only the most recent fashions, her practicality otherwise shows a clear head. Each of the books may be read as a single unit, but the fun is to read them in order. Most praiseworthy is the modern writing style, making the books all of a piece. If you've read some of the books from a century ago, you understand how convoluted and nearly archaic they can be. Emma deserves much wider readership than the modest few who have explored Ferber's early works. I can recommend her short story collections nearly as highly.

  21. 4 out of 5

    MsVette

    This book puts starch in your spine! Absolutely a wonderful read, I found myself turning page after page no matter the hour of day or night. And when I was done, I found the sequel book, which I have only about 3 pages left. My first Edna Ferber book I read was called Dawn O'Hara, and I haven't even finished it. But I finished this one! I like how Emma McChesney doesn't let anyone, child included, get the best of her and how she does it with such style and grace that people are left scratching t This book puts starch in your spine! Absolutely a wonderful read, I found myself turning page after page no matter the hour of day or night. And when I was done, I found the sequel book, which I have only about 3 pages left. My first Edna Ferber book I read was called Dawn O'Hara, and I haven't even finished it. But I finished this one! I like how Emma McChesney doesn't let anyone, child included, get the best of her and how she does it with such style and grace that people are left scratching their heads afterwards.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laura McDonald

    Emma McChesney has a clear head on her shoulders. She has a straightforwardness that I find lacking in popular fiction/movies these days. Speaking of movies, while reading this I couldn't help being reminded of a movie I saw recently, Up In the Air with George Clooney. His experiences of living airports and hotel rooms--loving the life but at the same time longing for the kind of normalcy that stationary people live-reminded me a lot Emma's experiences 100 years ago.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    My parents got me a Kindle for my birtday, and so far, I've just been using it to explore the free-range public domain pickings out there. This one caught my eye because of its unique perspective of a traveling saleswoman at the turn of the last century. Pretty glib stuff, but full of snappy patter and moxie.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mady

    A book written in the early 1900 about a woman who works as a travelling salesman. I can imagine that the issues she mentions were quite relevant at the time: she's a working mother, who left her son at home to pursue a career as the only woman among men and manages to earn a "man's salary"!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lynette

    I like the Sister Carrie type setting

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    The dialogue was a little too snappy but a great story of a traveling saleswoman at the turn of the century.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    I always wish Edna's characters well, but I still love reading her stuff

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Anthing written by Edna Ferber is time well spent. I would suggest reading some of her later novels first, but "Roast Beef" is still worth your time.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    way ahead of its time, description of an autonomous woman without any theatrics to make a point

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

    There is nothing NOT to love in this book! And the ending--Perfection!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.