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A Peculiar Glory: How the Christian Scriptures Reveal Their Complete Truthfulness

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God has provided a way for all people, not just scholars, to know that the Bible is the Word of God. John Piper has devoted his life to showing us that the glory of God is the object of the soul's happiness. Now, his burden in this book is to demonstrate that this same glory is the ground of the mind's certainty. God's peculiar glory shines through his Word. The Spirit of G God has provided a way for all people, not just scholars, to know that the Bible is the Word of God. John Piper has devoted his life to showing us that the glory of God is the object of the soul's happiness. Now, his burden in this book is to demonstrate that this same glory is the ground of the mind's certainty. God's peculiar glory shines through his Word. The Spirit of God enlightens the eyes of our hearts. And in one self-authenticating sight, our minds are sure and our hearts are satisfied. Justified certainty and solid joy meet in the peculiar glory of God.


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God has provided a way for all people, not just scholars, to know that the Bible is the Word of God. John Piper has devoted his life to showing us that the glory of God is the object of the soul's happiness. Now, his burden in this book is to demonstrate that this same glory is the ground of the mind's certainty. God's peculiar glory shines through his Word. The Spirit of G God has provided a way for all people, not just scholars, to know that the Bible is the Word of God. John Piper has devoted his life to showing us that the glory of God is the object of the soul's happiness. Now, his burden in this book is to demonstrate that this same glory is the ground of the mind's certainty. God's peculiar glory shines through his Word. The Spirit of God enlightens the eyes of our hearts. And in one self-authenticating sight, our minds are sure and our hearts are satisfied. Justified certainty and solid joy meet in the peculiar glory of God.

30 review for A Peculiar Glory: How the Christian Scriptures Reveal Their Complete Truthfulness

  1. 4 out of 5

    Peter Jones

    Piper does a good job answering the questions, "Can someone know the Bible is God's Word without scholarly study and if so how?" He does a good job answering that question while also diving into various topics related to the reliability of Scripture and giving some pastoral guidance and glorifying Christ along the way. Piper does a good job answering the questions, "Can someone know the Bible is God's Word without scholarly study and if so how?" He does a good job answering that question while also diving into various topics related to the reliability of Scripture and giving some pastoral guidance and glorifying Christ along the way.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Josh Wilson

    Much of the book might be review for a lot of people, but Piper still has some important an original contributions. His big ideas are that Scripture is its own apologetic (my words) and testifies itself to those whose hearts are awakened by the Spirit, and that the pecuiliar glory of Christ is the infinite God manifested as the lowliest of servants. Piper writes as one trained in historical criticism, but his book contains talking points geared against that perspective. But it is much broader th Much of the book might be review for a lot of people, but Piper still has some important an original contributions. His big ideas are that Scripture is its own apologetic (my words) and testifies itself to those whose hearts are awakened by the Spirit, and that the pecuiliar glory of Christ is the infinite God manifested as the lowliest of servants. Piper writes as one trained in historical criticism, but his book contains talking points geared against that perspective. But it is much broader than that. For me it was different. I don't find Piper to be a particularly eloquent writer, and I am not as committed to upholding key points of reformed theology. It's just a difference in emphasis, not theology. But I think he's right in pointing to glory as that key component of Scripture that speaks of its truthfulness and efficacy.

  3. 4 out of 5

    E

    This is Piper's attempt to prove the inerrancy and infallibility of the Scriptures using a roundabout method. Anyone familiar with Piper's method and passion will recognize it as vintage Piper; others may wonder what the big deal is. What is the "peculiar glory" mentioned in the title that proves the Bible is what it claims to be? How it points toward the glory of its author, the scope of the gospel, the beauty of its truth, the effects on its readers, and so on. Piper's main point is that you w This is Piper's attempt to prove the inerrancy and infallibility of the Scriptures using a roundabout method. Anyone familiar with Piper's method and passion will recognize it as vintage Piper; others may wonder what the big deal is. What is the "peculiar glory" mentioned in the title that proves the Bible is what it claims to be? How it points toward the glory of its author, the scope of the gospel, the beauty of its truth, the effects on its readers, and so on. Piper's main point is that you will not be convinced of the authority of the Scriptures unless the light of 2 Corinthians 4:6 is streaming into your heart and mind. I like Piper and his method, especially in the first half of this book. He first establishes what the Scriptures claim for themselves before discussing how we can evaluate these claims (only by faith through the Spirit; Pascal's wager is not enough). Then we confirms these claims by looking at the meekness/majesty paradigm of Jesus Christ (arguing that you can't make up something like that), the fulfillment of prophecies, the miracles of Jesus, the word-created people (apostles and church), and finally (intentionally finally) historical reasoning. At the end of the day, Piper loves the Bible, and wants you to too. Through this book he has succeeded in deepening such love in me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Manchester

    I'm not going to lie, I wish I could give this book 3.5 stars, but a part of me wants to give it 5. In interviews Piper admits he stumbled onto this book as he was trying to write what will be part 2 of this series and a book I am now super excited to read (see here: Reading the Bible Supernaturally: Seeing and Savoring the Glory of God in Scripture https://www.amazon.com/dp/143355349X/...). This stumbling and at times rambling shows here and there, particularly in the second third of the book. I'm not going to lie, I wish I could give this book 3.5 stars, but a part of me wants to give it 5. In interviews Piper admits he stumbled onto this book as he was trying to write what will be part 2 of this series and a book I am now super excited to read (see here: Reading the Bible Supernaturally: Seeing and Savoring the Glory of God in Scripture https://www.amazon.com/dp/143355349X/...). This stumbling and at times rambling shows here and there, particularly in the second third of the book. John Piper once wrote, “Books don’t change people; paragraphs do. Sometimes even sentences. When I read a book, I am realizing that many of the words I read I may have already read or heard before, but I read for the few sentences that will change my life. That's the best thing I can say about this book. Don't get me wrong. The book is solid. Piper nails down the Reformed view of the canon (which I believe is the first *accessible* book it's been done in to this degree). His beat-down of Pascal's Wager was one of my favorite parts. However, it is the last 20% of this book that will change your life. He has to lay that much foundation to wreck you at the end. Piper at the end finally gives the reason why this book was needed. He says "(Saving) faith comes from hearing, and (spiritual) sight comes from reading." His metaphors that the Bible is not a candle in a box waiting to be opened but rather the light inside a fire were perfect and stirring. After reading this book, I come away with an appreciation of how the Bible authenticates itself, how it is the question and the answer, how it cannot be controlled. Outside of what I said in the beginning, the only other problem I had dealt with the audiobook edition I read. I wish Piper would read his own audiobooks because he writes so purposely that it needs to be communicated verbally the same. And it wasn't. The narrator sounded just like the US American voice of Siri. Yuck. ChristianAudio: please make a point of fixing things like this. Piper deserves better, someone with more inflection and emotion in their voice. Please try to get Piper himself for his next book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Becky Pliego

    "I do not merely hold a view of Scripture. I am held." Thanks be to God this is true in my life as well. That we may love the Word of God more and believe it fully! "I do not merely hold a view of Scripture. I am held." Thanks be to God this is true in my life as well. That we may love the Word of God more and believe it fully!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Neil Kruger

    In large sections of 'A Peculiar Glory' Piper is at his best showing us passionately that what matters is the glory of God. Piper's aim is to show that belief in the gospel, the Bible and the God of the Bible is sufficiently grounded. All people everywhere can have certainty with regards to their faith in Christ and trust in the Scriptures. This certainty is not derived from cleverly formulated historical evidences and rational arguments, though these have their place. But, it is rooted in the il In large sections of 'A Peculiar Glory' Piper is at his best showing us passionately that what matters is the glory of God. Piper's aim is to show that belief in the gospel, the Bible and the God of the Bible is sufficiently grounded. All people everywhere can have certainty with regards to their faith in Christ and trust in the Scriptures. This certainty is not derived from cleverly formulated historical evidences and rational arguments, though these have their place. But, it is rooted in the illumination of the Spirit when the beauty and glory of Christ and by extension the Scriptures are revealed to us. As someone fully convinced by Piper's thesis as it concerns conversion and salvation, I was challenged and helped greatly to think of its implications for the truth of Scripture. Piper is a gift to the church, but his books are not always as readable as one might expect, given how practical the topic at hand is. He is always finds a way of connecting the subject to the glory of God. This is welcomed, but sometimes he labours when conciseness would be preferred - extended sections with hyphenated adjectives can wear the reader down. Though I would admit that this is likely because I am already familiar with his style. At times you are also left with what may amount to leaps of logic. He is clearly convinced that his explanations support his assertions, but the flow of thought is not always explicitly clear. These are minor criticisms though, this book is well worth the read and it reminds us that God is glorious and beautiful and worthy of our affections, and that the Scriptures inspired by the Spirit point to a glorious Saviour and they radiate the glory of God as He reveals Himself.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Simply amazing!!! Can I give this six stars? I honestly did not give this book a chance at first, since the argument sounded like fideism or the "burning in the bosom" argument used by some less than Biblical cults, but boy was I wrong. Not sure I totally get it or understand it fully, but Dr. Piper's argument is Biblically sound and deeply convicting!! Highly recommended Simply amazing!!! Can I give this six stars? I honestly did not give this book a chance at first, since the argument sounded like fideism or the "burning in the bosom" argument used by some less than Biblical cults, but boy was I wrong. Not sure I totally get it or understand it fully, but Dr. Piper's argument is Biblically sound and deeply convicting!! Highly recommended

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Jones

    Really enjoyed walking through this paragraph by paragraph. So much wisdom. I pray with Piper, “It felt like my view of the Bible was holding on to me...God was holding onto me by clarifying and brightening and deepening my view of Him in the Bible.”

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Hughes

    A very quick review: Yes, Piper repeats himself throughout the book. Every chapter reviews at least the previous chapter if not other previous ones. However, this is to help solidify what was said and lay a foundation for what is ahead. Like most of Piper’s books, he hits the topic from every possible angle. If you don’t like repetition and slow case building, you won’t enjoy the book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Robertson

    This excellent book by John Piper shows how the truth of the scripture is based on the glory of God. After a brief introduction about what to expect in the book, Piper launches into his life story and the impact the Bible and the glory of God has had in it. Piper then very thoroughly explains the scriptural composition of the Bible, including all sixty six books, what they represent, and how they relate to each other. The Bible is the sure foundation for historic Christian belief. Piper goes to This excellent book by John Piper shows how the truth of the scripture is based on the glory of God. After a brief introduction about what to expect in the book, Piper launches into his life story and the impact the Bible and the glory of God has had in it. Piper then very thoroughly explains the scriptural composition of the Bible, including all sixty six books, what they represent, and how they relate to each other. The Bible is the sure foundation for historic Christian belief. Piper goes to great lengths to explain the historical accuracy and authority of the Bible. He does a great job explaining how the scriptures are fulfilled, and how we can trust that the scripture is infallible, inerrant, and God breathed. This book places a great emphasis on Paul and the authority granted to him along with the other apostles. Piper also draws heavily from the teachings of Jonathan Edwards and John Calvin. The premise and summary of the whole book is that God's glory is revealed in the scriptures. Piper acknowledges that there is too much on this topic to fit into one book, and he is already working on volume two. I look forward to reading that one when it comes out. I would recommend this book to all Christians who would like a deeper and more personal explanation of the Bible and its teachings. I received this as a free ARC from Crossway on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I have read many of Piper's books, and this one has been the most challenging to complete. He is very careful, as though he were wielding a scalpel, as he dissects the ability of Scripture to reveal, not just glory in general, but specific, or peculiar, glory. The first half of the book and the last 3 chapters were very accessible. My favorite part is when he shared about his faith journey in the first chapter. I have to admit I struggled in the middle, but my efforts were rewarded. My biggest t I have read many of Piper's books, and this one has been the most challenging to complete. He is very careful, as though he were wielding a scalpel, as he dissects the ability of Scripture to reveal, not just glory in general, but specific, or peculiar, glory. The first half of the book and the last 3 chapters were very accessible. My favorite part is when he shared about his faith journey in the first chapter. I have to admit I struggled in the middle, but my efforts were rewarded. My biggest takeaways: the Word of God is sufficient to hold us. We don't hold a view of Scripture--it holds us. We need not fear as it is powerful enough. Secondly, we are not called to blind faith. Unwarranted trust is no honor to the One trusted. God has made sure through His word that we can know He is trustworthy. . There were other great ideas, but it isn't always easy to follow. Look forward to following up with Kevin DeYoung's new title on the same subject to see how they synthesize!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie

    I recently went on a theological dig to try to understand how I felt about traditional Christian Doctrines about the Bible. This book isn't a totally rigorous theology by any means, and I'm still not completely clear on what I believe about certain doctrines, but I did walk away from it with a newfound excitement for the Bible and a desire to understand it more. My main takeaway from this book is that God made himself known through the Bible and people who believe in Him can know Him through it. I recently went on a theological dig to try to understand how I felt about traditional Christian Doctrines about the Bible. This book isn't a totally rigorous theology by any means, and I'm still not completely clear on what I believe about certain doctrines, but I did walk away from it with a newfound excitement for the Bible and a desire to understand it more. My main takeaway from this book is that God made himself known through the Bible and people who believe in Him can know Him through it. If that is true, it is crazy and should affect how I view the Bible. If it isn't true, then the Bible (and by extension, Christianity(?)) is just another avenue to find truth and it is no more beneficial for me to read than any other book. Essentially, the Bible matters, and if I believe what this book says about it, I (and others) ought to pay more attention to it and try to understand what is being communicated in it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Luke Miller

    Piper writes as a scholar but not just to scholars. As always, I was greatly edified by the logic and passion of Piper's arguments for the self-authenticating glory of the Scriptures. He says: "I thought I was holding a view of Scripture. Then, I realized I was being held." This too has been my experience, not just in this area but in the whole of my Christian experience. I thank God for this book. It has stirred me to love God's Word in new ways. Piper writes as a scholar but not just to scholars. As always, I was greatly edified by the logic and passion of Piper's arguments for the self-authenticating glory of the Scriptures. He says: "I thought I was holding a view of Scripture. Then, I realized I was being held." This too has been my experience, not just in this area but in the whole of my Christian experience. I thank God for this book. It has stirred me to love God's Word in new ways.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Adam Thomas

    This is a book that I imagine Piper will still be known for in decades to come. A beautiful, Piper-y demonstration of the self-attesting authority of the Scriptures. I can't claim to have agreed with all of the detail, but I can claim to have rejoiced in many helpful insights he offers. Piper is driven by the conviction that people don't need to be expert historians to have a well-grounded confidence in the authority of the Bible as the word of God. In fact, people don't even need to understand This is a book that I imagine Piper will still be known for in decades to come. A beautiful, Piper-y demonstration of the self-attesting authority of the Scriptures. I can't claim to have agreed with all of the detail, but I can claim to have rejoiced in many helpful insights he offers. Piper is driven by the conviction that people don't need to be expert historians to have a well-grounded confidence in the authority of the Bible as the word of God. In fact, people don't even need to understand why they have a well-grounded confidence to have a well-grounded confidence. Rather, they can just find themselves captivated by a sight of the glory of God shining through the Scriptures. In Piper's words, "We know the Scriptures to be true, not because our light shows them to be so, but because their divine light shines with its own unique, all-enlightening, all-explaining glory" (160). As he says in another place, "Sight is its own argument" (250). The peculiar glory of God revealed in the Scriptures is the glory of "majesty in meekness." Piper gets particularly passionate at this point, as he describes how the Scriptures are self-authenticating because they manifest a God who "wins the praise of his majesty not by amassing slave labor to serve him but by becoming a servant to free the slaves of sin" (217) – that is, who does not exalt himself by demanding to be served, but exalts himself by serving others. One of the most helpful chapters is on the inward testimony of the Holy Spirit. Piper helpfully explains how this inward testimony is not about the Spirit giving additional revelation, in the form of information about the Bible, but rather "he awakens us, as from the dead, to see and taste the divine reality of God in Scripture, which authenticates it as God's own word" (186). Historical and apologetic arguments do have a place, but as "secondary aids to our feebleness" (in Calvin's words) to encourage us when our sight of God's glory is clouded. The final section of the book offers an enlightening slant on some traditional approaches to defending the authority of the Bible, by highlighting three ways that the Scriptures put the peculiar glory of God on display. First, the fulfilment of prophecy – not just the fact of fulfilment, but also its manner, as the Promised One shows "majesty in suffering" (235). Second, the miracles of Jesus, which are done "in the service of humble God-exaltation, not crowd-pleasing self-exaltation" (248). Third, the creation of new people, transformed from selfishness to be "God-centered, Christ-exalting servants who live for the temporal and eternal good of others" (254). Take, read, and be encouraged.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Wittman

    What made this book a special and intriguing read for me did not end up being any of the historical inquiries about how the scriptures are self-authenticating (though, that is certainly useful and here in helpful amounts). What ended up sticking with me is how Piper was able to make a case for how this ought to apply to our spiritual lives in giving God all the honor and glory He deserves. That God crafted His word in such a way that through its self-authenticating nature, we can fall more deepl What made this book a special and intriguing read for me did not end up being any of the historical inquiries about how the scriptures are self-authenticating (though, that is certainly useful and here in helpful amounts). What ended up sticking with me is how Piper was able to make a case for how this ought to apply to our spiritual lives in giving God all the honor and glory He deserves. That God crafted His word in such a way that through its self-authenticating nature, we can fall more deeply in love with Him and know His word to be true in more than one way. This was a refreshing read, as it has the evidential and historical usefulness of an apologetics book, but the readability, practical application, and conviction that most of Piper's other work brings to the table. I will say, this is not a book that you read expecting every paragraph to be a treasure. You read it for those key phrases that stick out and make you want to highlight and find every application for it in scripture and in life. The rest of the text, while appearing to be "fluff" is actually there to give context and support for those truth bombs. From what I understand, Piper did not intend to write this book, but in while writing "Reading the Bible Supernaturally", he had to stop and write this because it lays so much foundation for that next book. Anyway, enough blabbering from me. Here is a fitting excerpt from this book that I think gives an idea of what this is all about. "I have argued that the way the Scriptures convince us is by the revelation of a peculiar glory. In other words, the power of Scripture to warrant well-grounded trust is not by generic glory. Not, as it were, by mere dazzling. Not by simply boggling the mind with supernatural otherness. Rather, what we see as inescapably divine is a peculiar glory. And at the center of this peculiar glory is the utterly unique glory of Jesus Christ." (Piper, pg.284)

  16. 5 out of 5

    John Brackbill

    I listened to this, but plan on getting a hard copy for future reference. It starts off like a personal systematic theology on bibliology. In fact, several times throughout the book the elder's affirmation and doctrinal statement at Bethlehem is referenced. The first half is helpful, but mostly you can get the same data and reasoning in a good systematic theology. However, it is the 2nd half of the book that is gold. His dealing with the Bible's self-authenticating nature, true faith, illuminati I listened to this, but plan on getting a hard copy for future reference. It starts off like a personal systematic theology on bibliology. In fact, several times throughout the book the elder's affirmation and doctrinal statement at Bethlehem is referenced. The first half is helpful, but mostly you can get the same data and reasoning in a good systematic theology. However, it is the 2nd half of the book that is gold. His dealing with the Bible's self-authenticating nature, true faith, illumination, and how the self-authenticating nature of the bible relates to interpretation was over the top helpful. I found it especially helpful that a driving question he had in writing was how an average person without access to historical evidence and advanced training could come to a settled and valid faith that the Bible is God's Word. Unsurprisingly Piper nailed his life theme here by saying that the center of the Bible's self-authenticating nature is the revelation of the glory of God. He makes the point that it is not a particular word or letter of the Bible that in and of itself is self-authenticating, but the unfolding of the meaning coupled with illumination by the Spirit reveals God's glory and self-authenticates the Word to the reader. This seems to be the central argument for why preaching within the church ought to be expositional-simply unfolding the meaning and praying for the Spirit's illumination so that the glory of God might be displayed and the Word might be known to truly be God's Word. In the words of Spurgeon-you don't defend a lion, you let it loose.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andy Dollahite

    Piper’s writing can be an acquired taste, but his passion to see God made great in our lives is contagious. This work truly helps the reader see the “peculiar glory” of Scripture in a manner friendly to laymen, and yet without ignoring issues of historical criticism or the nuances of the doctrine of inerrancy. At its core is the idea that scripture is sui generis. It is not merely the greatest book, it is a truly unique and marvelous book. It is a window through which we see the majestic meeknes Piper’s writing can be an acquired taste, but his passion to see God made great in our lives is contagious. This work truly helps the reader see the “peculiar glory” of Scripture in a manner friendly to laymen, and yet without ignoring issues of historical criticism or the nuances of the doctrine of inerrancy. At its core is the idea that scripture is sui generis. It is not merely the greatest book, it is a truly unique and marvelous book. It is a window through which we see the majestic meekness of God. Piper draws heavily on one of his classic influences, Jonathan Edwards. But his thesis is reflected recently in Sonderegger who describes God’s Holy Hiddenness & Dane Ortland who highlights Christ as Gentle and Lowly. It also reminds me of how Nietzsche hated Christianity precisely for how it unveiled God as reaching down from the highest Heaven to demonstrate perfect humility in the gospel. This book exults and magnifies the glory of God’s perfect word to us in Scripture, and I commend it with highest praise.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Thaddeus

    I really enjoyed this book a lot. Piper's writings are amazing for stirring the affections and helping us to see the glory of God in the scriptures - and this book is a tremendous reflection of that! By taking his readers straight to the scriptures themselves, Piper uses his excellent exegetical skills to lay bare so many treasures in the scriptures that reflect the glory of God. I was actually quite surprised by the scope of the book! Piper starts off by sharing a bit of his own story and how he I really enjoyed this book a lot. Piper's writings are amazing for stirring the affections and helping us to see the glory of God in the scriptures - and this book is a tremendous reflection of that! By taking his readers straight to the scriptures themselves, Piper uses his excellent exegetical skills to lay bare so many treasures in the scriptures that reflect the glory of God. I was actually quite surprised by the scope of the book! Piper starts off by sharing a bit of his own story and how he's been 'held by the Bible' even in the midst of German Higher Criticism and Liberalism during his studies. He then moves to the question of Canon and the reliability of the text of scripture. Here Piper shows his scholarly knowledge in tandem with his pastoral heart in that - what could have been a really dry section of the book to read, was written beautifully to inspire the soul to exult in the remarkable way in which God has preserved his Word! Next, Piper looks at what the Bible claims of itself and then, based on this, how we can know the scriptures are true. This part was surprising to me in his exposition of Pascal's Wager - which was quite enlightening! His description of what it is like to see the glory of God was also likewise, good food for reflection. Lastly, Piper focuses on how the scriptures display what he calls "their peculiar glory" by their consistent giving of glory to God throughout their scope, their display of the majestic meekness of Christ, the fulfillment of prophecy, the miracles of Jesus, and their power to create a distinct 'people of God'. He closes off by reflecting a bit on the place of historical reasoning in light of the self-authenticating model of scripture's truthfulness. I read this book in tandem with Michael Kruger's "Canon Revisited" and found it to be a really great pairing! Definitely recommend checking out both those books!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christian Barrett

    The first of these three is more apologetic than pastoral or theological. However, that does not mean that it is not full of pastoral and theological work. Piper goes to great lengths to defend the authenticity of the Bible, and even further lengths to demonstrate how the truth of the Bible changes the hearts of men and women. In doing so he illustrates that the Bible is full of revelations of the glory of God. He concludes this book by arguing that the glory of God as displayed in the Bible is The first of these three is more apologetic than pastoral or theological. However, that does not mean that it is not full of pastoral and theological work. Piper goes to great lengths to defend the authenticity of the Bible, and even further lengths to demonstrate how the truth of the Bible changes the hearts of men and women. In doing so he illustrates that the Bible is full of revelations of the glory of God. He concludes this book by arguing that the glory of God as displayed in the Bible is something every human must deal with, and as Christian it must lead us to deep satisfaction. This is one of the main premises in the second book, thus this book does well in leading into the next one. The second book does contain some overlap that appears here, but it is necessary. This is a must read for all, especially those who want to understand what Christians believe about the Bible and why Christians should read the Bible.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rafael Salazar

    Piper's approach to this crucial subject is both traditional and innovative. It is traditional in the sense that Piper himself describes the work as an update and expansion of Jonathan Edwards' approach to the inspiration of Scripture, as well as an explanation and commentary of the Westminster Larger Catechism (q.4). It is also innovative because this is done, however, with the original trademark of Piper's principle of attaching God's glory to the satisfaction of men's souls. These two reasons Piper's approach to this crucial subject is both traditional and innovative. It is traditional in the sense that Piper himself describes the work as an update and expansion of Jonathan Edwards' approach to the inspiration of Scripture, as well as an explanation and commentary of the Westminster Larger Catechism (q.4). It is also innovative because this is done, however, with the original trademark of Piper's principle of attaching God's glory to the satisfaction of men's souls. These two reasons alone are enough to commend this work as a great introduction to the historical, satisfactory and true principle of the self-attestation of the Holy Scriptures. By all means, is is worth to read it!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris Curry

    How can someone (with little to no education in the history, theology, and language of the Bible) come to know the God of the Bible and believe that it is truly His inspired Word? That is the question John Piper tackles in this book "A Peculiar Glory." Piper doesn't take sections of his book for use of critiquing other apologetic views, but (in how I saw it) combines them all into a view that's presented in a brilliant fashion. His work, though deep, isn't something as technical as you would find How can someone (with little to no education in the history, theology, and language of the Bible) come to know the God of the Bible and believe that it is truly His inspired Word? That is the question John Piper tackles in this book "A Peculiar Glory." Piper doesn't take sections of his book for use of critiquing other apologetic views, but (in how I saw it) combines them all into a view that's presented in a brilliant fashion. His work, though deep, isn't something as technical as you would find in seminary class, but something you would see a pastor presenting before his congregation to strengthen them for the mission field of evangelism. That's what I love most about Piper's work — and maybe that's why John Frame (who endorsed the book) said possibly only Piper could have written this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mark A Powell

    A wonderfully simple premise: can the Bible be understood by anyone? Piper unpacks it with customary depth and candor, arguing that the Scriptures reveal the glory of God most clearly in Jesus Christ. A solid resource and the first volume of a planned trilogy that will undoubtedly be worthy of careful contemplation.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Conrado Adverci

    This book was really transformative in my life. Showing me not only how God reveals his glory in the scriptures but also in all things.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Piper says multiple times that the weight of his argument is in chapters 8-15. If you already have a foundation in bibliology, you would not be missing much, apart from Piper's great prose, by skipping to the meat of the book in the back half. Very helpful for me. Piper says multiple times that the weight of his argument is in chapters 8-15. If you already have a foundation in bibliology, you would not be missing much, apart from Piper's great prose, by skipping to the meat of the book in the back half. Very helpful for me.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Quite good. Piper defending the autopistos of Scripture. I haven't read something from Piper in a while, pretty good stuff. Quite good. Piper defending the autopistos of Scripture. I haven't read something from Piper in a while, pretty good stuff.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shorel

    Recently, a friend commented to me that it is a pity we don't have prophets anymore. People who can relay God's voice to us. I replied that what we have now is of greater value than any prophet. We have the self-authenticating word of God in written form that addresses every concerns that we have in life. As I get older, I see more and more that the Bible really does address EVERY question and concern. The fact that I only need go to God's word for everything is incredible! God's word is suffici Recently, a friend commented to me that it is a pity we don't have prophets anymore. People who can relay God's voice to us. I replied that what we have now is of greater value than any prophet. We have the self-authenticating word of God in written form that addresses every concerns that we have in life. As I get older, I see more and more that the Bible really does address EVERY question and concern. The fact that I only need go to God's word for everything is incredible! God's word is sufficient. Nothing else is needed to prove it or supplement it. In trial, a self-authenticating document is any document that can be submitted without requiring outside proof that supports the document. Throughout history, skeptics and theologians alike have asked the question, "How do we KNOW the Bible is truly God's word?" Or in the words of the Westminster Larger Catechism, question 4: “How doth it appear that the scriptures are the word of God?” It is a critical question, because the the claims of Christianity are founded upon the affirmative answer: "Yes, the Bible is the word of God and everything it says is true." And its claims are universe-shaking. Very simply, in this book Pastor John shows that the Bible is the self-authenticating (no outside proof needed) word of God. He starts by explaining what the Bible is, what the Bible claims, how we can know the Bible is true and finally how the Bible magnifies (makes clearer/displays the awe of...) God in multiple ways. I won't go into more detail, but after reading this book, I come away in amazement of what it means that God's word is "living and active." If you are still with me in this post...and you believe that God's word is true...what are you going to do about it? Do you want to know God more? Read what He is saying to you. Dive into His word. Come to thirst after God's word more than anything. ---- Excerpts----- Notes in Workspace: Excerpt:In fact, one could understand this book as an extended meditation on three sentences. One of those sentences is from the Westminster Larger Catechism. Question 4 asks, “How doth it appear that the scriptures are the word of God?” One of the answers is: “The scriptures manifest themselves to be the word of God, by . . . the scope of the whole, which is to give all glory to God.” This book is an effort to press into that answer as deeply as I can (peculiar-glory-en, p.14) Excerpt:Can we say, “The mind ascends to the truth of the [Scriptures] but by one step, and that is its divine glory”? (peculiar-glory-en, p.15) Excerpt:The third sentence at the root of this book is Paul’s word from Ro- mans 4: Abraham “grew strong in his faith as he gave glory to God, fully convinced that God was able to do what he had promised” (Rom. 4:20–21). Trusting God’s word glorifies God. Why is that true? It is true because trusting a person calls attention to the person’s trustworthiness. But that is true only if the trust is warranted. Groundless trust does not honor the person trusted. If you trust me with your money when you don’t know me or have any good reason, based on my character, to believe I won’t steal it, you are not showing me to be trustworthy; you are showing yourself to be a fool. Only warranted trust glorifies the one trusted. (peculiar-glory-en, p.15) Excerpt:Which means that the task I have set myself in this book is to answer the question: What warrant—what good foundation—in the Christian Scriptures provides a well-grounded trust? What basis of belief in the Scriptures as the word of God will, in fact, honor God? (peculiar-glory-en, p.16) Excerpt:My argument is that the glory of God in and through the Scriptures is a real, objective, self-authenticating reality. Christian faith is not a leap in the dark. It is not a guess or a wager. God is not honored if he is chosen by the flip of a coin. A leap into the unknown is no honor to one who has made himself known. (peculiar-glory-en, p.16) Excerpt:In the End We Know by Sight, Not Inference The argument of this book is that the final step of certainty concern- ing the Scriptures is the step of sight, not inference. The pathway that leads to sight may involve much empirical observation, and historical awareness, and rational thought (see chapter 17). But the end we are seeking is not a probable inference from historical reasoning but a full assurance that we have seen the glory of God. Thus, at the end of all human means, the simplest preliterate person and the most educated scholar come to a saving knowledge of the truth of Scripture in the same way: by a sight of its glory. (peculiar-glory-en, p.16) Object Group Excerpt:Liberating and Devastating Of course, this is both liberating and devastating. It is liberating because it means the sweetness of well-grounded, God-honoring confidence in (peculiar-glory-en, p.16) Excerpt:Scripture is not reserved for scholars but is available for all who have eyes to see. And it is devastating because no human being can see this glory with- out God’s help. This is not because we are helpless victims of blindness but because we are lovers of blindness. “This is the judgment: the light has come into the world, and people loved the darkness rather than the light because their works were evil” (John 3:19). We are not chained in a dark cell, longing to see the sunshine of God’s glory. We love the cell, because sin and Satan have deceived us into seeing the drawings on the wall as the true glory and the source of greatest pleasure. Our prison cell of darkness is not the bondage of external constraint but of internal preference. We have exchanged the glory of God for images (Rom. 1:23). We love them. That is our blindness. What must happen is described by the apostle Paul in 2 Corinthians 4:6. The God who created light in the beginning must shine into our dark cell to reveal himself. “For God, who said, ‘Let light shine out of darkness,’ has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.” The answer to our dark- ness is the shining of divine glory into our hearts by means of the light of knowledge—the knowledge mediated by God’s inspired Scripture. (peculiar-glory-en, p.17) Excerpt:This does not mean that there is nothing we can do in our quest to see the self-authenticating glory of God in Scripture. Jesus gave the apostle Paul an impossible mission. He sent Paul “to open their eyes, so that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God” (Acts 26:18). If it is hopeful for the apostle to move toward the blind, then it is hopeful for the blind to move toward the apostle. (peculiar-glory-en, p.17) Excerpt:I will argue that there is in every human being a “knowledge” of this God—this glory. There is a built-in template that is shaped for this peculiar communication of God’s glory. When God opens our eyes (2 Cor. 4:6) and grants us the knowledge of the truth (2 Tim. 2:25), through the Scriptures (1 Sam. 3:21), we know that we have met ul- timate reality (peculiar-glory-en, p.18) Excerpt:As I said at the beginning, the Bible has not been for me like a masterpiece hanging on the wall of an Alpine chalet but rather like a window in the wall of the chalet, with the Alps on the other side. In other words, I have been a Christian all these years not because I had the courage to hold on to an embattled view of Scripture, but because I have been held happily captive by the beauty of God and his ways that I see through the Scriptures. (peculiar-glory-en, p.19) Excerpt:Cover to cover, the Bible describes the world as personal. A personal God created the world. He created human beings in his own image to manage the world as his stewards. God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them. And God blessed them. And God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it, and have dominion.” (Gen. 1:27–28) The least this means is that we are personal the way God is. We are personal in a way that the animals are not. In our personhood, the Bible says, we are meant to image forth the kind of person God is. That is what images are for. Only these images are living persons, not statues. Fill the earth with God-imaging persons—according to the Bible, that is human destiny. “Blessed be his glorious name forever; may the whole earth be filled with his glory! Amen and Amen!” (Ps. 72:19). (peculiar-glory-en, p.24) Excerpt:There was no claim to perfection, either in knowledge of God or responses to that knowledge. They knew what the Bible itself taught about our knowledge: “Now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I have been (peculiar-glory-en, p.25) Excerpt:fully known” (1 Cor. 13:12). We can know truly, but we cannot know comprehensively or flawlessly while we remain sinners. The day will come when Jesus will return to earth, and the followers of Jesus will be changed. We will sin no more. And even though we will not become omniscient, we will cease to believe wrong things (1 Cor. 13:12). (peculiar-glory-en, p.26) Excerpt:1. Scripture, the Word of God Written 1.1 We believe that the Bible, consisting of the sixty-six books of the Old and New Testaments, is the infallible Word of God, verbally inspired by God, and without error in the original manuscripts. 1.2 We believe that God’s intentions, revealed in the Bible, are the su- preme and final authority in testing all claims about what is true and (peculiar-glory-en, p.35) Excerpt:what is right. In matters not addressed by the Bible, what is true and right is assessed by criteria consistent with the teachings of Scripture. 1.3 We believe God’s intentions are revealed through the intentions of inspired human authors, even when the authors’ intention was to express divine meaning of which they were not fully aware, as, for example, in the case of some Old Testament prophecies. Thus the meaning of Biblical texts is a fixed historical reality, rooted in the historical, unchangeable intentions of its divine and human au- thors. However, while meaning does not change, the application of that meaning may change in various situations. Nevertheless it is not legitimate to infer a meaning from a Biblical text that is not demonstrably carried by the words which God inspired. 1.4 Therefore, the process of discovering the intention of God in the Bible (which is its fullest meaning) is a humble and careful effort to find in the language of Scripture what the human authors intended to communicate. Limited abilities, traditional biases, personal sin, and cultural assumptions often obscure Biblical texts. Therefore the work of the Holy Spirit is essential for right understanding of the Bible, and prayer for His assistance belongs to a proper effort to understand and apply God’s word. (peculiar-glory-en, p.36) Excerpt:After almost seven decades of seeing and savoring the glory of God in Scripture, the doxology of Jude 24–25 is very personal: Now to him who is able to keep you from stumbling and to pres- ent you blameless before the presence of his glory with great joy, to the only God, our Savior, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory, majesty, dominion, and authority, before all time and now and forever. Amen. (peculiar-glory-en, p.36) Excerpt:One of Jesus’s followers said to him, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life” (John 6:68). In other words, any attempt to find eternal life apart from the words of Jesus will fail. This is what the emissaries of Jesus taught when he had been raised from the dead: “There is salvation in no one else, for there is no other (peculiar-glory-en, p.40) Excerpt:name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved” (Acts 4:12). (peculiar-glory-en, p.41) Excerpt:Our purpose so far has not been to answer the question of why Jesus believed the Old Testament was the word of God or why we should. Our purpose has simply been to identify what Jesus’s Bible was. What books were included in it? And is this the same as the Old Testament that we have in our modern-language Bibles today? Our conclusion is that when we say, “We believe that the Bible con- sists of the sixty-six books of the Old and New Testaments,” we mean that thirty-nine of those sixty-six are the books of the Old Testament that Jesus and the apostles counted as authoritative, and these thirty- nine are the same as the twenty-four books of the Hebrew Bible that Jesus knew as authoritative Scripture. Now we turn with a similar ques- tion to the second part of our Bible. Which books make up the canon of the New Testament? (peculiar-glory-en, p.50) Excerpt:How many Greek manuscripts of the New Testament writings do we possess today? About 5,800. The following statistics are taken from the Institut für Neutestamentliche Textforschung, Münster, Germany, as of 2011. To my knowledge, no discoveries of any manuscripts have happened since then. 322 Uncial texts (all capital letters) 2,907 minuscule texts (all small letters) 2,445 lectionary portions (text portions containedin church readings) 127 papyri (manuscripts written on papyrus) 5,801 Total It is a wonder of our day that many of these manuscripts are visible online at the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts. 8 (peculiar-glory-en, p.82) Excerpt:God may lead us to see things and know things, but all our revela- tory experiences with God are subordinate to Scripture. Therefore, we are not infallible. God is. And the word he inspired is. We may experi- ence the powerful, personal dimension of God’s word as the Holy Spirit makes it real and personal to us (Rom. 5:5). But God has bound his infallible word to the writings—the Scriptures. (peculiar-glory-en, p.101) Excerpt:The first thing we can say is this: miracles by themselves do not con- vince sinners of the true spiritual beauty of Jesus Christ. Miracles may convince sinners that Jesus can do miracles and that he would, there- fore, make a very useful king (John 6:15, 26). Miracles even convinced his own brothers that he was a miracle worker. They urged him to go to Jerusalem to show off his power, “for no one works in secret if he seeks to be known openly. If you do these things, show yourself to the world” (John 7:4). But on this, John commented, “For not even his brothers believed in him” (John 7:4–5; see 2:22–25). They were persuaded by the miracles, and they were not yet truly believers. 2 So when Abraham said, “If they do not hear Moses and the Proph- ets, neither will they be convinced if someone should rise from the dead,” he probably meant this: wherever there is a spiritual deafness to the voice of God in the Old Testament, mere external miracles will not cure that spiritual deafness. (peculiar-glory-en, p.109) Excerpt:The Bible does not teach or assume that we come to faith by leaping into the dark. It assumes that we embrace Christ and his Scripture by seeing real and compelling grounds for faith. I found help at this point from a surprising source. At least it sur- prised me at the time. While I was wrestling with these things in Ger- many, I was reading Jonathan Edwards for my own personal spiritual enrichment amid all the critical studies. Little did I expect to find him addressing this problem with such amazing insight and relevance. I was so helped by Edwards that I wrote two articles about it. 8 Edwards’s starting point is not, What kind of certainty is possible for historical reasoning? but rather, What is possible for the ordinary members of the church? In his Treatise Concerning Religious Affec- tions, Edwards says ordinary people cannot come to well-grounded faith the way a trained historian might: It is impossible that men, who have not something of a general view of the historical world, or the series of history from age to age, should come at the force of arguments for the truth of Christianity, drawn from history to that degree, as effectually to induce them to venture their all upon it. 9 The voice of the missionary 10 can be heard when he adds, Miserable is the condition of the Houssatunnuck Indians and others, who have lately manifested a desire to be instructed in Christianity, (peculiar-glory-en, p.134) Excerpt:if they can come at no evidence of the truth of Christianity, sufficient to induce them to sell all for Christ, in any other way but this [path of historical reasoning]. 11 You might think that Edwards is leading us to say that faith in the mes- sage of the Bible is a leap in the dark rather than a valid sight of real, objective foundations that provide a basis for firm and justified knowl- edge. But, no, that is not where he is leading us. To be sure, he insists that historical argumentation cannot provide the deepest and surest ground of faith for the nonhistorian (or for the historian either, as we shall see). Nevertheless, he still maintains that ordinary people can have a “certainty of divine things” founded on “real evidence” and “good reason.” (peculiar-glory-en, p.135) Excerpt:Unwarranted Trust Is No Honor to the Trusted One Edwards is deeply persuaded, as I think we all should be, that the fruit of Christian faith is no better than nonsupernatural virtue unless this faith is rooted in “a reasonable persuasion or conviction.” 13 Before I let him explain, think of it this way: suppose you meet a man on the street whom you do not recognize, and he gives you a bag with $50,000 in cash and asks you to deposit it in the bank for him. He says that his account number is in the bag. You are surprised because you do not know him at all. You ask, “Why do you trust me with this?” Suppose he says, “No reason; I’m just taking a risk.” What is the effect of that faith in you? Does it honor you? No, it does not. It shows the man is a fool. But suppose he said, “I know that you don’t know me, but I work in the same building you do, and I have watched you for the last year. I have seen your integrity in a dozen ways. I have spoken to people who know you. The reason I am trusting you with this money is that I have good reason to believe you are honest and reliable.” Now, what is the effect of that faith? It truly honors you. Why? Because it is based on real evidence that you are honorable. The fruit of such faith is not folly. The fruit of such faith is wisdom, and that faith and wisdom honor the person who is trusted. (peculiar-glory-en, p.135) Excerpt:The passage of Scripture that made the lights go on for me was 2 Corinthians 4:4–6. When Edwards used this passage to support what he was saying, it was as though God himself put the stamp of approval on it. For in the end, it is not Edwards or Piper or any other man who compels true faith, but God himself. “My speech and my message were not in plausible words of wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power, so that your faith might not rest in the wisdom of men but in the power of God” (1 Cor. 2:4–5). Here is the key passage. Even if our gospel is veiled, it is veiled to those who are perishing. In their case the god of this world has blinded the minds of the unbelievers, to keep them from seeing the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God. For what we proclaim is not ourselves, but Jesus Christ as Lord, with ourselves as your servants for Jesus’ sake. For God, who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. (2 Cor. 4:3–6)

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Steele

    John Piper. A Peculiar Glory. Wheaton: Crossway Books, 2016. 302 pp. $20.98 How is the Bible confirmed by the peculiar glory of God? This critical question is addressed in John Piper’s latest book, A Peculiar Glory. The book is written to nourish and edify followers of Christ and help bring clarity on the matter of biblical authority. Yet, initial reviews are troubling. One critic accuses Piper of “circular reasoning and arrogance.” In a Christianity Today review, Jason Byassee laments a “lack of John Piper. A Peculiar Glory. Wheaton: Crossway Books, 2016. 302 pp. $20.98 How is the Bible confirmed by the peculiar glory of God? This critical question is addressed in John Piper’s latest book, A Peculiar Glory. The book is written to nourish and edify followers of Christ and help bring clarity on the matter of biblical authority. Yet, initial reviews are troubling. One critic accuses Piper of “circular reasoning and arrogance.” In a Christianity Today review, Jason Byassee laments a “lack of charity” in Piper’s new book. And while he affirms that liberals and mainline denominations need “Christ-centered, biblically attentive doctrines of Scripture,” he doubles down in his critical review of Piper. “This book doesn’t quite fit that need” argues Byassee. I will argue, much to the contrary that not only does Piper succeed, he does it with grace, unmatched skill. Indeed, this work will leave a significant mark that will be difficult to surpass. Peculiar Glory gives readers an inside look into the words of the Westminster Larger Catechism (Question 4): “The Scriptures manifest themselves to be the word of God, by … the scope of the whole, which is to give all glory to God.” Readers will discover the glory that occupies Piper’s attention (and should occupy ours as well) is the glory of Jesus Christ. Piper argues there is “an essence or a center or a dominant peculiarity in the way God glorifies himself in Scripture.” He observes that God glorifies himself in “working for those who wait for him, through fulfilled prophecy, the miracles of Jesus, and through Scripture-shaped lives of radical love. That dominant peculiarity is the revelation of God’s majesty through meekness.” And in the final analysis, we learn that the most intense aspect of God’s glory shines brightest in the person and work of the Lord Jesus Christ, who has died for sinners and was raised and seated at the right hand of God the Father. Piper’s conclusion is simple: “The Bible has final authority over every area of our lives and that we should, therefore, try to bring all our thinking and feeling and acting into line with what the Bible teaches.” He admits this is a massive claim of epic proportions: The Bible is not the private charter of a faith community among other faith communities. It is a total claim on the whole world. God, the creator owner, and governor of the world, has spoken. His words are valid and binding on all people everywhere. That is what it means to be God. And to our astonishment, his way of speaking with unique, infallible authority in the twenty-first century is through a book. One book. Not many. That is the breathtaking declaration of the Christian Scriptures. Piper’s concluding argument is laced with precision and resolve: Only the divine ‘light of the gospel of the glory of Christ’ transforms the soul. Only divine light yields certainty that secures the soul for a life of love through the worst sufferings. Only the sight of God’s glory in his inspired word gives certainty to the simplest and the most educated person. I commend A Peculiar Glory to followers of Christ who want to gain a deeper understanding of God’s word. This book will no doubt ground many believers in the deep soil of God’s grace and help nourish many souls so that God’s peculiar glory will manifest itself in their lives.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    The Gospel is a holy book revealed by God to Jesus christ to show the disputes in the previous holy book Torah. Again, the current Gospels are having lots of contradiction with the nature, life, science, logics etc. As an example, it says that the sun is a disc rotating around the earth. Whereas it's proven that the sun is a sphere and earth rotating around sun. That's why most scientists have denied that book. That is why God revealed another book which COMPLIMENTS the former books and CLARIFIE The Gospel is a holy book revealed by God to Jesus christ to show the disputes in the previous holy book Torah. Again, the current Gospels are having lots of contradiction with the nature, life, science, logics etc. As an example, it says that the sun is a disc rotating around the earth. Whereas it's proven that the sun is a sphere and earth rotating around sun. That's why most scientists have denied that book. That is why God revealed another book which COMPLIMENTS the former books and CLARIFIES the former disputes which is the Quran which has zero contradiction. We know not all Muslims follow the Quran as it is a global book. It has a challenge that it is the final book and God promised to preserve it till the day of hereafter, and that no one can produce a single verse similar to its powerful wording and miracles in compatibility with humans life, nature, science, logics, etc. That's why the media is trying to say slanders against Quran and Muslims who follow it. In fact, if whosover follow it, there is no place for non-followers in this worldly life. For more info, write me with subject BIBLE at: [email protected]

  29. 5 out of 5

    Law Wei Xiang

    Have you ever questioned how you come to believe in the bible? What is your evidence? John Piper presented a perspective on how Christian especially those lacking historical evidence to has conviction that the bible is the truth. By studying the bible and its gospel, a christian experiences the glory of god, which is His majesty and supreme excellency that is adequate to convict its truthfulness. While some I might not agree, there are indeed lots of helpful arguments (some phrases are complex, Have you ever questioned how you come to believe in the bible? What is your evidence? John Piper presented a perspective on how Christian especially those lacking historical evidence to has conviction that the bible is the truth. By studying the bible and its gospel, a christian experiences the glory of god, which is His majesty and supreme excellency that is adequate to convict its truthfulness. While some I might not agree, there are indeed lots of helpful arguments (some phrases are complex, hope can simplify) that helps in building sound foundation on the bible.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Josh J

    Piper's style is best described as exhaustive. He goes to great lengths to meticulously prove each point he makes, which is greatly appreciated. His argument style is exhaustive, but that commitment to precision also makes his work exhausting. I feel like I need to take a nap after reading Piper. All that being said, this book was illuminating for my heart. I appreciate God's word more after reading it! Piper's style is best described as exhaustive. He goes to great lengths to meticulously prove each point he makes, which is greatly appreciated. His argument style is exhaustive, but that commitment to precision also makes his work exhausting. I feel like I need to take a nap after reading Piper. All that being said, this book was illuminating for my heart. I appreciate God's word more after reading it!

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