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Things are finally looking up for defense attorney Mickey Haller. After two years of wrong turns, Haller is back in the courtroom. When Hollywood lawyer Jerry Vincent is murdered, Haller inherits his biggest case yet: the defense of Walter Elliott, a prominent studio executive accused of murdering his wife and her lover. But as Haller prepares for the case that could launc Things are finally looking up for defense attorney Mickey Haller. After two years of wrong turns, Haller is back in the courtroom. When Hollywood lawyer Jerry Vincent is murdered, Haller inherits his biggest case yet: the defense of Walter Elliott, a prominent studio executive accused of murdering his wife and her lover. But as Haller prepares for the case that could launch him into the big time, he learns that Vincent's killer may be coming for him next. Enter Harry Bosch. Determined to find Vincent's killer, he is not opposed to using Haller as bait. But as danger mounts and the stakes rise, these two loners realize their only choice is to work together. Bringing together Michael Connelly's two most popular characters, The Brass Verdict is sure to be his biggest book yet.


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Things are finally looking up for defense attorney Mickey Haller. After two years of wrong turns, Haller is back in the courtroom. When Hollywood lawyer Jerry Vincent is murdered, Haller inherits his biggest case yet: the defense of Walter Elliott, a prominent studio executive accused of murdering his wife and her lover. But as Haller prepares for the case that could launc Things are finally looking up for defense attorney Mickey Haller. After two years of wrong turns, Haller is back in the courtroom. When Hollywood lawyer Jerry Vincent is murdered, Haller inherits his biggest case yet: the defense of Walter Elliott, a prominent studio executive accused of murdering his wife and her lover. But as Haller prepares for the case that could launch him into the big time, he learns that Vincent's killer may be coming for him next. Enter Harry Bosch. Determined to find Vincent's killer, he is not opposed to using Haller as bait. But as danger mounts and the stakes rise, these two loners realize their only choice is to work together. Bringing together Michael Connelly's two most popular characters, The Brass Verdict is sure to be his biggest book yet.

30 review for The Brass Verdict

  1. 5 out of 5

    James Thane

    The Brass Verdict is, I think, one of Michael Connelly's best books, and it reinforces the notion that in this genre, virtually nobody does it better. It's Connelly's eighteenth book and is significant because it is the first to feature both his long-time L.A. homicide detective, Harry Bosch, and the defense lawyer, Mickey Haller. It's principally Haller's book, but Bosch plays a prominent role. As the book opens, Haller is just returning to work after a prolonged absence. At the close of the las The Brass Verdict is, I think, one of Michael Connelly's best books, and it reinforces the notion that in this genre, virtually nobody does it better. It's Connelly's eighteenth book and is significant because it is the first to feature both his long-time L.A. homicide detective, Harry Bosch, and the defense lawyer, Mickey Haller. It's principally Haller's book, but Bosch plays a prominent role. As the book opens, Haller is just returning to work after a prolonged absence. At the close of the last book in which he appeared, The Lincoln Lawyer, Haller was wounded. He then wound up addicted to drugs following his surgery and has been through rehab, and is now making a comeback. He intends to do so slowly, but then another attorney, Jerry Vincent, is murdered in the parking garage of his office building. Vincent and Haller were friends of a sort and occasionally pinch-hit for each other. Vincent had named Haller as his legal successor, and on the morning of Vincent's murder, a judge calls Haller to inform him that he now has in excess of thirty new cases, including a couple that demand immediate appearances in court. Among the cases that Haller inherits is an especially high profile murder case. A major Hollywood executive has been accused of killing his wife and her lover. The evidence against him seems fairly strong, and the trial is due to start the following week. Most of Vincent's case notes have disappeared, along with his computer, and Mickey has no idea how Vincent planned to structure the executive's defense. Logically, Haller wants to file a motion to delay the trial so that he can get up to speed and plan a defense. But his client seems totally unconcerned about all of this and insists that there be no delay. He is innocent, he says, and wants his good name restored ASAP. If Haller can't be ready to go, he will get someone who can. Given no choice in the matter, Haller plunges in, determined to do the best he can. Meanwhile, Harry Bosch is investigating the murder of Jerry Vincent, which brings Bosch and Mickey Haller into contact and conflict. Bosch suspects that there might be information in Vincent's files suggesting who might have a motive to kill him, but Haller insists on protecting the confidentiality of the clients he has just inherited. Bosch suggest that by doing so, Haller might make himself a target, and thus the dance is on. Watching these two work their respective parts of the criminal system is great fun. The case is an intriguing one and gives Connelly an opportunity to further develop the Haller character. The legal maneuverings are interesting and it's always entertaining to watch Harry Bosch investigate a murder. I found the combination irresistible and when I first read it, it immediately became one of my favorites of all of Connelly's books. It's hard to imagine that there's any fan of crime fiction that would not enjoy it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    Michael Connelly has in his 2008 novel The Brass Verdict the opportunity to bring two of his most compelling characters together into one plot – and he rises to the occasion, delivering a solid and very entertaining crime mystery. Connelly’s benchmark detective Harry Bosch is joined by his motion picture legal thriller protagonist Mickey Haller in a suspenseful thriller sure to please fans. Everybody lies. This is the universal truth that Haller sets out as the book begins and this theme of decepti Michael Connelly has in his 2008 novel The Brass Verdict the opportunity to bring two of his most compelling characters together into one plot – and he rises to the occasion, delivering a solid and very entertaining crime mystery. Connelly’s benchmark detective Harry Bosch is joined by his motion picture legal thriller protagonist Mickey Haller in a suspenseful thriller sure to please fans. Everybody lies. This is the universal truth that Haller sets out as the book begins and this theme of deception and human frailty is returned to again and again. Mickey Haller has been away from law for a year. But this was not just time off, he struggled through addiction and made decisions that have negatively impacted his closest relationships. Though the drugs were off stage and in the past, Connelly vividly depicts the results in Haller’s actions and priorities. When another LA lawyer is killed, Haller takes over his cases, including a high profile and deep pockets “franchise” case set for trial. The dead attorney’s murder is investigated by none other than Connelly headliner Harry Bosch, and the two will need to work together to solve one murder while Haller tries the other. As good as The Lincoln Lawyer and as impressive as the Harry Bosch series, this is a must read for Connelly fans and a damn fine book for any reader.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    I am reading my way steadily through the Harry Bosch series and decided I would include this book which crosses over with the Mickey Haller series. I am not usually a fan of court cases but this one was pretty good and, of course, it helped that Harry Bosch was around to provide extra interest! Mickey Haller is an okay character but not quite up to Harry's standard. Having said that however Haller does very well in the court room. He is cunning and very smart and knows all the psychological aspec I am reading my way steadily through the Harry Bosch series and decided I would include this book which crosses over with the Mickey Haller series. I am not usually a fan of court cases but this one was pretty good and, of course, it helped that Harry Bosch was around to provide extra interest! Mickey Haller is an okay character but not quite up to Harry's standard. Having said that however Haller does very well in the court room. He is cunning and very smart and knows all the psychological aspects of playing a jury along. He is not necessarily a good person but he is certainly an interesting one. The ending presented an intriguing twist which I did not see coming, although a certain character was so unlikable I was happy he/she (no spoilers!) came to a sticky end. Now on to the next Harry Bosch:)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    In this second book in the 'Mickey Haller' series, the attorney defends a Hollywood mogul. The book can be read as a standalone. ***** Criminal defense attorney Mickey Haller is 'The Lincoln Lawyer' who - instead of keeping an office - works out of the back of one of his three specially equipped Lincoln sedans. As Mickey's chauffeur drives him around to meet with clients, interview witnesses, go to the courthouse, examine crime scenes, etc. the attorney studies his case files, make phone calls, sen In this second book in the 'Mickey Haller' series, the attorney defends a Hollywood mogul. The book can be read as a standalone. ***** Criminal defense attorney Mickey Haller is 'The Lincoln Lawyer' who - instead of keeping an office - works out of the back of one of his three specially equipped Lincoln sedans. As Mickey's chauffeur drives him around to meet with clients, interview witnesses, go to the courthouse, examine crime scenes, etc. the attorney studies his case files, make phone calls, sends and receives faxes, plans his defense strategy, and so on. Haller's second ex-wife, the meticulously organized Lorna Taylor, works as his 'office manager' from her home and Mickey's private investigator Cisco is a phone call away - so it all works quite well. As the story opens Mickey has been on sabbatical for a year, recovering from a gunshot would and the painkiller addiction that resulted. Mickey is ready to re-open his law practice, but wants to start with a low-key case or two to get back in the game. Fate has other plans for Mickey, however, which he discovers in the office of the chief judge of the Los Angeles Superior Court. The justice tells Mickey that his colleague, Jerry Vincent, was just murdered and Mickey is the designated 'heir' to Vincent's law practice. Thus Mickey instantaneously gets Vincent's thirty-something cases - assuming he and the clients agree on his representation. Mickey hustles over to Vincent's office, to make sure detectives investigating his murder don't grab any case files - which would violate attorney-client privilege. And wouldn't you know it, Mickey finds Detective Harry Bosch and his partner riffling through Vincent's papers. There's a brief stand-off and the cops leave, but Bosch insists the identity of the murderer is somewhere in Vincent's file cabinet. Bosch isn't about to let it go, and initiates some cat and mouse games to try to get the information he wants. Meanwhile, Mickey learns that Vincent was working on a variety of run-of-the-mill cases and one REALLY BIG ONE. The dead lawyer was defending Hollywood movie producer/studio head Walter Elliott, a multimillionaire charged with killing his trophy wife Mitzi Elliott and her lover Johan Rilz. Mickey is anxious to keep the lucrative, high profile case and quickly makes an appointment to speak to Elliott, who's out on bail and working at his movie studio. Elliott agrees to keep Mickey on as his lawyer under one condition - the trial, slated to start next week, CANNOT be postponed. Elliott insists he's innocent and will be acquitted, and he wants the whole business over with. Mickey reluctantly agrees, though he's puzzled by Elliott's confidence and certainty. Mickey and his private eye immediately start re-investigating the Mitzi Elliott/Johan Rilz murder - so Mickey can prepare a defense - and Bosch continues to look for Jerry Vincent's killer. All of this leads to some surprising discoveries. The novel contains gripping courtroom scenes, and the descriptions of jury selection, as well as the maneuvers of the prosecution and defense, are compelling. It's fun to see Mickey lay traps for the prosecution, though it's not always easy to root for his client.....who seems like a sly fellow. In his personal life, Mickey is trying to maintain cordial relations with his first ex-wife Maggie, a fierce prosecutor and the mother of their daughter Hayley. Pre-adolescent Hayley acts a bit like Mickey's conscience, asking why he gets criminals off rather than putting them away like mom. This book is a turning point in the 'Bosch Universe' since Mickey and Bosch meet for the first time and form a kind of uneasy cop/attorney truce. I've read books further along in the series and it's always a treat to see them work together. Connelly is an excellent mystery writer and this is a very good story. Highly recommended to fans of suspense novels. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bill Kerwin

    An entertaining read. The breezy, cynical voice of Michael Connelly's lawyer Mickey Haller produces something much different--and much lighter in tone--than the Harry Bosch books, but it is something just as exciting and engrossing. There's a bonus here as well: Bosh appears as a minor, but important character.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Connelly does it again. I love it when he brings his characters together & this one has a bunch of them. Primarily, this is a Mickey Haller story (#14 - The Lincoln Lawyer) & is told by him, but Harry Bosch is a major character. Jack McEvoy (#05 - The Poet) makes several appearances. There is a reference to Cassie Black (#09 - Void Moon) & Mickey Haller's father that was fantastic. The interplay between Haller & Bosch was great since they're a bit at odds & it had my sympathies volleying between Connelly does it again. I love it when he brings his characters together & this one has a bunch of them. Primarily, this is a Mickey Haller story (#14 - The Lincoln Lawyer) & is told by him, but Harry Bosch is a major character. Jack McEvoy (#05 - The Poet) makes several appearances. There is a reference to Cassie Black (#09 - Void Moon) & Mickey Haller's father that was fantastic. The interplay between Haller & Bosch was great since they're a bit at odds & it had my sympathies volleying between them like an Olympic ping pong ball. As usual, it's a twisty tale of murder. There are a lot of loose plot threads floating around, but they'll be woven in eventually. It's a police procedural told from the defense bench as Mickey tries to keep his client out of jail. The magic bullet of the defense was obvious early on, but it still unfolded well & the court scenes were far more interesting here than they would have been in real life. The end: When you get to about the 90% mark, make sure you don't have anything else on the schedule. Once I hit that point, I couldn't stop. Didn't dare. Fantastic! Obviously, I'll be reading more in the series soon. You can find the full reading order in my review of the first bookThe Black Echo here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... 17 - The Overlook (Harry Bosch #13), 2007 17.4 - Father’s Day (2007) in Angle of Investigation (2011) (HB's first investigation?) 17.6 - One Dollar Jackpot(2007) in Suicide Run, 2011 18 - The Brass Verdict (Harry Bosch #14, also Mickey Haller #2), 2008 19 - Nine Dragons (Harry Bosch #15), 2009 20 - The Scarecrow (Jack McEvoy #2), 2009 21 - The Reversal (Mickey Haller #3), 2010 (Harry Bosch #16, 21.5 - The Perfect Triangle, 2010 Mickey Haller short story 21.6 - Blue on Black - Harry Bosch Short Story 2010 22 - The Fifth Witness (Mickey Haller #4)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jonetta

    It's been two years since Mickey was injured and a lot has happened. After taking time off to get his life in order, he's suddenly handed a full practice load following the murder of another defense attorney whose clients he inherits. Included is a high profile murder case involving a Hollywood studio head who is accused of murdering his wife and her lover, and it comes with some pretty impressive fees. And for the first time, Mickey and Harry Bosch cross paths as he's the lead detective assigne It's been two years since Mickey was injured and a lot has happened. After taking time off to get his life in order, he's suddenly handed a full practice load following the murder of another defense attorney whose clients he inherits. Included is a high profile murder case involving a Hollywood studio head who is accused of murdering his wife and her lover, and it comes with some pretty impressive fees. And for the first time, Mickey and Harry Bosch cross paths as he's the lead detective assigned to investigate the attorney's death. I really enjoyed this story as it had so many elements to sink your teeth into. There's Mickey and his personal issues, the process associated with assuming another attorney's clients, the studio head's trial and, finally, Bosch and Mickey. I got hooked from the beginning and enjoyed every minute of this story. While my initial suspicions of who was probably involved were borne out, I still didn't know the "whys and what fors" and was caught flatfooted in the end. The narration was excellent, done by Peter Giles who has a couple of past stories under his belt. I've looked forward to Mickey and Harry finally interacting and it didn't disappoint. This one was a psychological battle and I'm not sure who won.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    "Everybody lies." The Brass Verdict is the second book in the Mickey "The Lincoln Lawyer" Haller series. Published in 2008 it seemed in part timely. At the end of The Lincoln Lawyer Haller was seriously wounded. He became addicted to the drugs he was prescribed following surgery and has been through rehab. Now he is ready to return to work. The plan is to ease back into the job but things don't work out that way. Another attorney, Jerry Vincent, is murdered in the parking garage next to his office "Everybody lies." The Brass Verdict is the second book in the Mickey "The Lincoln Lawyer" Haller series. Published in 2008 it seemed in part timely. At the end of The Lincoln Lawyer Haller was seriously wounded. He became addicted to the drugs he was prescribed following surgery and has been through rehab. Now he is ready to return to work. The plan is to ease back into the job but things don't work out that way. Another attorney, Jerry Vincent, is murdered in the parking garage next to his office building. Mickey was named co-counsel on Vincent's cases and successor in his practice. On the morning of Vincent's murder Mickey is summoned by the head judge and informed he suddenly has thirty plus new cases. Including the latest trial of the century. A Hollywood executive, Walter Elliott, has been accused of killing his wife and her lover. The trial is scheduled to start the following week. First Mickey must visit all of Vincent's clients and explain the situation. They have the option of staying with Mickey or changing lawyers. Among those who decide to stay with Mickey is Walter Elliott. Naturally Mickey wants to delay the start of the trial so that he can prepare a defense. Among the complications of inheriting Vincent's caseload is the fact that his laptop and notes have disappeared. Walter Elliott however insists that there be no delay. He claims he is innocent and wants to clear his name. If Mickey can't be ready to start he will get another lawyer. The lead investigator in Jerry Vincent's murder is Harry Bosch. Haller and Bosch first meet when Mickey goes to Vincent's office and finds Harry going through Vincent's files. He believes there might be a clue to his murderer in the files. Mickey objects citing attorney-client confidentiality. This sets up a conflict between the two. Bosch suggests that by inheriting Vincent's clients he could find that he could be in danger. It was fun to read how these two went about their jobs. Different sides of the criminal system coin. At one point Harry is on the deck at Mickey's house and comments that he has the same view but from the other side of the mountain. I was curious about the title and it is explained at the end of the story. Michael Connelly is a terrific story teller and does not disappoint. Mickey Haller is the main protagonist but Harry Bosch has an important role. When I finished this story I had to add The Reversal to my TBR shelf.

  9. 5 out of 5

    kartik narayanan

    The Brass Verdict is an excellent follow up to 'The Lincoln Lawyer'. The story is good - with excellent courtroom drama. Mickey Haller is turning out to be another favorite character of mine. On top of it, Harry Bosch is present in this story too. W00t!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Weinstein

    This is the 4th mystery/thriller I have started in the last several days. It is the only one I will finish. The others, all by authors well known who I will not name, were a mishmash of confusing scenes, unnecessary filler (the price of having to produce a book every year?), and reader-unfriendly prose. Connelly, who crafts just as complicated a plot, does so without confusion and without extra "stuff." He is a pleasure to read. The rest was as good as the beginning. It is interesting to see how This is the 4th mystery/thriller I have started in the last several days. It is the only one I will finish. The others, all by authors well known who I will not name, were a mishmash of confusing scenes, unnecessary filler (the price of having to produce a book every year?), and reader-unfriendly prose. Connelly, who crafts just as complicated a plot, does so without confusion and without extra "stuff." He is a pleasure to read. The rest was as good as the beginning. It is interesting to see how Connelly brings his two series characters together in this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Well, this was an interesting book, a good read and held my interest from the first. I must say I wasn't as taken with it as with the first, but it's still good and I've got the next waiting though I might try another Connelly character first as I have a Harry Bosch novel waiting to. Here some time has passed since the last book and Connelly used what I'd call a "plot device" to reset Michael's character to a "bad place". He was injured as the last book ended. Here we find that he went back to wo Well, this was an interesting book, a good read and held my interest from the first. I must say I wasn't as taken with it as with the first, but it's still good and I've got the next waiting though I might try another Connelly character first as I have a Harry Bosch novel waiting to. Here some time has passed since the last book and Connelly used what I'd call a "plot device" to reset Michael's character to a "bad place". He was injured as the last book ended. Here we find that he went back to work too soon, had another injury and ended up addicted to painkillers. This destroyed his relationship with ex-wife one...caused him to lose co-custody of his daughter and have only visitation. He closed his practice and went to rehab. That's where we start here. Michael is still a good lawyer and he has another high profile case, and he's still somehow looking at his soul, his conscious and his "morals"...something really inconvenient for a lawyer to have. Recommended...good book...enjoy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan K

    Legal suspense at its best! There's little doubt that this author is a master of storytelling, especially when it comes to crime. Having been introduced to Mick Haller in The Lincoln Lawyer, I felt it important to read the second installment which was on par with the first. While I enjoy well crafted stories, I have to admit that this genre is lower on my list than others. Regardless, for those that enjoy well paced crime stories with plot twists a many, you'll love this book!

  13. 5 out of 5

    RM(Alwaysdaddygirl) Griffin (alwaysdaddyprincess)

    4 stars. 🇺🇸 Read again. 5 stars. The reason why is I have change ( do not wish to discuss). I see things differently again. Mahalo, RM 🐼💀🦋🇺🇸

  14. 4 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Wow what a great follow-up to "The Lincoln Lawyer". This book does not have sequel disease thank goodness, it was gripping from beginning to end. It's been a couple years since the events in "The Lincoln Lawyer" and Mickey Haller has been retired from law for a year. After being shot in the last book his recovery caused him to become addicted to pain pills which led to him almost losing everything. When he's called into a judge's chambers and told that he has inherited a dead lawyer's practice, j Wow what a great follow-up to "The Lincoln Lawyer". This book does not have sequel disease thank goodness, it was gripping from beginning to end. It's been a couple years since the events in "The Lincoln Lawyer" and Mickey Haller has been retired from law for a year. After being shot in the last book his recovery caused him to become addicted to pain pills which led to him almost losing everything. When he's called into a judge's chambers and told that he has inherited a dead lawyer's practice, just like that Haller is back in the saddle again. So "The Brass Verdict" focuses on Mickey doing what he can for his new clients and finding out that he might have a huge franchise case involving a Hollywood movie producer whose standing accused of murdering his wife and her lover. Just like in "The Lincoln Lawyer" not all is as it appears and it takes a lot of twists and turns to find out who's truly innocent in this one. We also get an appearance by another one of Michael Connelly's characters Harry Bosch. Now as many of you know this year I've had a kind of grudging respect, than love, than just general annoyance with Harry Bosch. I really do think that he's an intriguing character and Connolly has allowed him to grow. But the last couple of Bosch books have not exactly thrilled me. When Haller appeared in the Bosch books I already knew about the twosomes connection so getting to read it backwards like this was actually pretty cool. I always thought that in the Bosch books Mickey wasn't that interesting and was kind of a jerk, but when you read it from his point of view, he's actually a pretty straightforward person. So Haller and Bosch are going head-to-head because the latter is trying to investigate the murder of the lawyer who left Haller the practice. We do get welcome appearances by other characters that we've rad about from the prior books, Lorna, Mickey's second wife, and we get to see him interact more with his young daughter, and his former wife Maggie McPherson. We also get an introduction to another investigator, Cisco, that I really liked as well. The writing was typical Connolly, you definitely know the man knows his way around a courtroom, knows how prosecutors and defense attorneys are supposed to prepare. And it was really cool to read about how juries are picked and to get to see people at trial. I thought the flow was quite good in this one and there was nothing that I could actually quibble about when it came to the writing or flow. I thought the setting of a different Los Angeles one that's kind of seedy and just not typical for people who aren't living as A list celebrities is always a nice and realistic read. The ending definitely leaves some secrets revealed and I definitely didn't see a couple coming at all.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Lawyer Mickey Haller is back and this time he gets to share the spotlight with Connolly's L.A. Detective Harry Bosch. It's been over a year since the events of "The Lincoln Lawyer" and Haller is looking to get back into the world of lawyering. He gets to do so in a big way, when a fellow lawyer is killed and leaves his practice to Haller. At stake are 30 or so cases, including a big one where a Hollywood movie mogul is accused of killing his wife and her lover. Circumstantial evidence and a kille Lawyer Mickey Haller is back and this time he gets to share the spotlight with Connolly's L.A. Detective Harry Bosch. It's been over a year since the events of "The Lincoln Lawyer" and Haller is looking to get back into the world of lawyering. He gets to do so in a big way, when a fellow lawyer is killed and leaves his practice to Haller. At stake are 30 or so cases, including a big one where a Hollywood movie mogul is accused of killing his wife and her lover. Circumstantial evidence and a killer (no pun intended) pre-nuptual agreement put the husband firmly as the prime suspect, but Haller figures his old friend had a "magic bullet" that was the key to the case. The only problem is his old friend was killed by an unknown attacker and had his laptop stolen. As Haller begins to work on the case, he makes one alarming discovery after another. He crosses paths with Bosch, looking into the murder of the lawyer and Bosch drops hints that the FBI may be interested in both the murder and the big case. For a while, Haller can't figure out why but slowly begins to connect the pieces and find out the bigger picture. Connelly is no stranger to creating good mysteries with an element of suspense to keep the pages turning. In "The Brass Verdict," he raises his game to the next level, creating a lot of plot threads that come together in a satisfying way. As the various plots and conspiracies unfolded, I found myself more and more intrigued by what was happening and curious as to where Conelly would take me next. And when he delivers the final twists and turns of the novels last 100 pages, they are easily some of the most satisfying of any mystery novel I've read in a long while. (Probably second only to this year's "Careless in Red" by Elizabeth George). A lot of this can be credited to Connelly's decision to bring back Haller. Haller is an extremely flawed protagonist. He's not a perfect man and Connelly wisely doesn't portray him as such. He's haunted by demons from his past and driven by the desire to be a better man and laywer now. This comes into conflict each time he meets with his client, who is obviously hiding a lot of things from Haller, including just how far he'll go to retain his freedom. Haller's slow whittling away to the truth is compelling and fascinating. The only part I didn't like is that, at the end of the story, we get a force family connection between Haller and Bosch and the story strongly suggests this is the end of Haller's career. I know we sort of had that at the end of "The Lincoln Lawyer" and we saw Haller come back here. Hopefully Connelly will find another story worthy of Haller's return in the future.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette (Again)

    Another winner from Michael Connelly. I always have to ration myself when I get one of his new books so I don't go through it too fast and then have to wait forever for the next one. I think I managed to make this one last a whole five days. This one is fun because it brings Harry Bosch (our old fave) and Mickey Haller (from The Lincoln Lawyer) together in the same book. Mickey is the main character and narrator in the story, but Bosch appears at all the right moments with his cleverness and wel Another winner from Michael Connelly. I always have to ration myself when I get one of his new books so I don't go through it too fast and then have to wait forever for the next one. I think I managed to make this one last a whole five days. This one is fun because it brings Harry Bosch (our old fave) and Mickey Haller (from The Lincoln Lawyer) together in the same book. Mickey is the main character and narrator in the story, but Bosch appears at all the right moments with his cleverness and well-earned cynicism. This is mostly a lawyer story, not so much a police procedural. I think the basic storyline is covered well enough by other reviews, but I will mention that if you read this book, be sure to pay attention to little details and seemingly unimportant characters as you're reading. As things fall into place in the story's conclusion, some of these little things become important and it might be hard to follow if you've forgotten the details. As always, Connelly provides a satisfying conclusion full of unexpected curveballs and solutions. Michael Connelly is one of those authors who throws in little treats for his long-time readers. I call them "Easter eggs" because you never know where you'll find them. They're just little things related to previous novels that aren't essential to the story but give you the satisfied little smirk of an insider. There's an especially good Easter egg in this book. I figured it out at the beginning, but it was fun to have it confirmed at the end.

  17. 5 out of 5

    HBalikov

    Do you remember the Lincoln Lawyer? Not Matthew McConaughey, but the original Mickey Haller created by Michael Connelly. He's back after some time off for bad behavior. Harry Bosch is around as well, but in this novel he is definitely second fiddle and it would severely challenge Titus Welliver to play him with nuance. Where is this all going? Haller is handed some cases when his friend is murdered. Has Mickey climbed back on the wagon sufficiently to represent a rich client in L.A.'s murder of t Do you remember the Lincoln Lawyer? Not Matthew McConaughey, but the original Mickey Haller created by Michael Connelly. He's back after some time off for bad behavior. Harry Bosch is around as well, but in this novel he is definitely second fiddle and it would severely challenge Titus Welliver to play him with nuance. Where is this all going? Haller is handed some cases when his friend is murdered. Has Mickey climbed back on the wagon sufficiently to represent a rich client in L.A.'s murder of the decade? Bosch hangs around and both scares and annoys Haller as the case marches ahead. This may really be a 3 star effort from Connelly but I loved both the audiobook narration and the meticulous description of courtroom tactics and backroom strategy for the criminal defense. If you stick around through some wooden dialogue, I think you will be surprised by the conclusion and some plot revelations.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kellie

    Connelly has some of the best quotes in his books. "There is nothing you can do about the past except keep it there." A quote from Mickey Haller when discussing his prior addiction to OxyContin. This was a fantastic read! Mickey Haller is taking a break from the law. After being injured, and becoming addicted to pain pills, he is planning on getting back into his practice gradually. When one of his colleagues, Jerry Vincent, is murdered, Haller has suddenly found himself back in the game. With 31 Connelly has some of the best quotes in his books. "There is nothing you can do about the past except keep it there." A quote from Mickey Haller when discussing his prior addiction to OxyContin. This was a fantastic read! Mickey Haller is taking a break from the law. After being injured, and becoming addicted to pain pills, he is planning on getting back into his practice gradually. When one of his colleagues, Jerry Vincent, is murdered, Haller has suddenly found himself back in the game. With 31 clients. Jerry Vincent had Mickey appointed to take over his practice if anything was to happen to him. Now Haller has inherited one of the most high profile cases of the day. Walter Elliot is a prominent producer in Hollywood and is accused of killing his wife and her lover. Enter Harry Bosch. Harry is in charge of the Vincent murder and he thinks Haller knows more than he does. I thought Connelly was great at writing from the prospective of a LA homicide detective. He does an equally great job writing as a defence attorney. I can't wait to see what Connelly does next!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    mp3 workaday. 'The truth is short, a lie long.' Probably just me but after 2 hours I still have no interest at all - goes like that sometimes doesn't it! ETA - having trawled back through, it seems that I mark courtroom dramas rather low, so it's probably a genre I should steer clear of.

  20. 5 out of 5

    William

    Not keen at all on Haller. He has so little integrity. Bosch, however, is a man on a mission of truth and justice, a super-man.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Attorney Mickey Haller is just getting back to work when a judge calls him for a meeting. She informs him that his friend, Defense Attorney Jerry Vincent, was found murdered. Mickey has just inherited all of Vincent's active cases, including the high profile defense of Hollywood Producer Walter Elliot, who is accused of murdering his wife and her lover. Mickey sees this murder case as a case that could make him a household name. Detective Harry Bosch contacts Mickey to talk about Vincent's cases Attorney Mickey Haller is just getting back to work when a judge calls him for a meeting. She informs him that his friend, Defense Attorney Jerry Vincent, was found murdered. Mickey has just inherited all of Vincent's active cases, including the high profile defense of Hollywood Producer Walter Elliot, who is accused of murdering his wife and her lover. Mickey sees this murder case as a case that could make him a household name. Detective Harry Bosch contacts Mickey to talk about Vincent's cases. He believes there is something in one of those cases that could explain Vincent's murder. He is also worried that Mickey may be the next target. This book is a nice combination of two murder mysteries. Mickey is trying to get his client off of a murder wrap, even though the client keeps lying about exactly what happened the night of the murder. We also have Harry Bosch investigating the death of Jerry Vincent. Why was he killed? Did it have something to do with the Walter Elliot case? I thought this was a very entertaining story. I was very surprised by the end of the story. I really like having both of Connelly's popular characters in the same book. My rating: 4.5 Stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sully (thysaltymar)

    I was strolling around a book store looking for new books to read and I came across a table full of half-priced best-sellers. And guess what? From the original price of Php649.00, The Brass Verdict was only sold for Php100.00 only! I, of course, didn't let go of the chance. That moment was one of the precious moments of my life (and yes, I'm over-reacting. haha!) The Brass Verdict is the 19th novel by American author Michael Connelly. This is the first time I tried out a different Detective/ Crim I was strolling around a book store looking for new books to read and I came across a table full of half-priced best-sellers. And guess what? From the original price of Php649.00, The Brass Verdict was only sold for Php100.00 only! I, of course, didn't let go of the chance. That moment was one of the precious moments of my life (and yes, I'm over-reacting. haha!) The Brass Verdict is the 19th novel by American author Michael Connelly. This is the first time I tried out a different Detective/ Crime fiction author actually. My routine was always, John Grisham to Sidney Sheldon and Sidney Sheldon to John Grisham (always). Michael Connelly is a good writer, he uses uncomplicated words and describes a crime scene & court room dramas effectively. I recently learned that his recent works have been translated into 36 languages and have garnered him a lot of awards too (including this novel which won the 2009 "Best Novel" award). Ooh, and interestingly, Connelly was once the President of the Mystery Writers of America back from 2003 to 2004 (Got this information from his official website). Okaaay, enough about Michael Connelly and his achievements. hoho. The story of The Brass Verdict spans around the detective works of an attorney named Mickey Haller and a LAPD detective, Harry Bosch. In the first few chapters, those two were immature enough to work together but they found out that they didn't have any choice if they want to save their asses immediately. Their team work was perfect in solving one of the intriguing cases of the century. :> I loved the characters supremely. I would love to try some of his books a lot more. :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    I found this story kept me guessing. It was taking different twists and turns, then just when you think you have it all figured out, it goes a different way. There is an interesting reveal near the end of the story and I really enjoyed that the title, "The Brass Verdict", has meaning in the legal community! 7 out of 10.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Quinn Barrett

    "The Brass Verdict" was released in 2008, but I only recently got around to reading The Lincoln Lawyer Series. This is the second book in the series and while I think it's a good read, the story didn't captivate me as much as the first book's action-packed plot. We come to find Mickey Haller acclimating back into his role as lawyer after a protracted struggle with alcohol and drug addiction, followed by a lengthy stay in rehab. As he tries to decide if he even wants to practice law anymore, a col "The Brass Verdict" was released in 2008, but I only recently got around to reading The Lincoln Lawyer Series. This is the second book in the series and while I think it's a good read, the story didn't captivate me as much as the first book's action-packed plot. We come to find Mickey Haller acclimating back into his role as lawyer after a protracted struggle with alcohol and drug addiction, followed by a lengthy stay in rehab. As he tries to decide if he even wants to practice law anymore, a colleague is murdered, but has left instructions which appoints Mickey to take over his practice and the money that goes along with it. Mickey's back in business and getting the band back together to boot (his ex-wife and girl Friday, Lorna) because one of his newly inherited clients just happens to be the head of a major Hollywood studio. What a lucky break! Mickey has one chance to win over the tinsel town big wig and, what do you know, he pulls it off -- but not without two key restrictions. First, must be on the only attorney so he can't hire anyone else to assist him. Very suspicious. More important, Mickey must guarantee no trial delays, giving him only a couple weeks to get up to speed for a murder one case. Okay, that's just crazy. Good news, though; Mickey's no dummy and these incredible requests are major red flags to our protagonist who now has the dual task to defend his client while investigating the death of his friend and colleague, knowing he is probably in the line of fire. Mickey wonders if the two cases are linked so he proceeds with caution, not just for fear of his life, but also another addictive relapse. Michael Connelly is a great storyteller if legal/crime dramas are your cup of tea. I love picturing Matthew McConaughey, who was perfectly cast in the role of Mickey Haller, for the screen adaptation of The Lincoln Lawyer. The novel starts a little slower than I would have liked, but Connelly is giving us the backstory to what happened after the first novel. The Brass Verdict reads more like a psychological thriller, but is back ended with a lot of turmoil for you action junkies. Michael Connelly might not be my favorite author, but he's pretty damn good.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    4.5 stars*** I decided to read the second installment of the Lincoln lawyer series after enjoying the first more than I expected. I enjoyed this book for many reasons. First the author’s writing style is smooth and easy to read. This makes it a quicker read. I enjoyed how the author added new dimensions to the main character (Mickey Haller) from the first book. This are it feel like you grew with the character from the first book to the second. The plot had a few twists that I didn’t see coming. 4.5 stars*** I decided to read the second installment of the Lincoln lawyer series after enjoying the first more than I expected. I enjoyed this book for many reasons. First the author’s writing style is smooth and easy to read. This makes it a quicker read. I enjoyed how the author added new dimensions to the main character (Mickey Haller) from the first book. This are it feel like you grew with the character from the first book to the second. The plot had a few twists that I didn’t see coming. This is always a nice surprise because there are many books that you know what is going to happen way before it happens, and that predictably ruins most of the fun. In this book we meet defective Bosch for the first time. His involvement and character in this story was well done and interesting. After meeting him in this book I have decided that I will give the Harry Bosch series a try. This author reminds me of many grisham books that I have read. Those types of books got me back into reading, so I’m always happy to add something similar to the mix. I will definitely continue on with this series and pick up the Harry Bosch series soon.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Fred

    The Brass verdict “Everybody lies. Cops lie. Lawyers lie. Witnesses lie. The victims lie. A trial is a contest of lies.” Harry Bosch & Mickey Haller fight together New York Times Best Seller #1 - 11/2/2008 Goodreads - #6 Legal Thriller - 10/2019 Goodreads - #29 in Best Police Procedurals - 10/2019 Micheal Connelly - Speaks of this book’s theme YouTube - 2 SFPD cases, 2 kinds of truths The Brass verdict “Everybody lies. Cops lie. Lawyers lie. Witnesses lie. The victims lie. A trial is a contest of lies.” Harry Bosch & Mickey Haller fight together New York Times Best Seller #1 - 11/2/2008 Goodreads - #6 Legal Thriller - 10/2019 Goodreads - #29 in Best Police Procedurals - 10/2019 Micheal Connelly - Speaks of this book’s theme YouTube - 2 SFPD cases, 2 kinds of truths

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kurt

    I have read all four Mickey Haller books, and while I think this is my least favorite, Michael Connelly is still my guilty pleasure author of choice, and even a disappointing Mickey Haller book is still one that I want to read. On its own, there's nothing all that special about this book. There's a mystery when someone murders one of Haller's former professional acquaintances ("friends" is a little too strong a word - these are lawyers, after all), and Haller inherits the dead man's caseload, inc I have read all four Mickey Haller books, and while I think this is my least favorite, Michael Connelly is still my guilty pleasure author of choice, and even a disappointing Mickey Haller book is still one that I want to read. On its own, there's nothing all that special about this book. There's a mystery when someone murders one of Haller's former professional acquaintances ("friends" is a little too strong a word - these are lawyers, after all), and Haller inherits the dead man's caseload, including a high-pressure murder trial with a difficult client. The overarching mystery is not much of a whodunit, as the culprit is pretty obvious from the person's first few appearances, but there's a gritty satisfaction as the reader waits for Haller himself to catch up. The courtroom scenes are engaging and relatively plausible (and, really, the main reason I love the Mickey Haller books), with crazy jury antics and surprise strategic moves that I didn't see coming. The great characters from the first book return for this one, and we get the welcome new addition of Dr. Shami Arslanian, the kind of expert witness every defense attorney dreams of finding. This book, standing alone, is a perfectly good legal thriller, of the kind you can find in any airport bookstore. What intrigues me, though, is the way that Connelly works with this book in connection with his other novels. This was only my second Connelly novel (between reading it and writing this review, I've followed with five more, though), and I was utterly impressed by his ability to let his characters grow and mature (satisfying returning readers) without spoiling any of the best surprises of their earlier adventures (satisfying new readers). For example, Haller brings up injuries that he sustained in The Lincoln Lawyer because they have an effect (physically and psychologically) on how he pursues the mysteries in this book, but Connelly doesn't slip up and reveal who gave him the injuries, so a reader who tries this book and likes the characters can go back and enjoy the earlier story. Also, Connelly uses this book to connect his two most popular characters (Mickey Haller and Harry Bosch), and I didn't feel like I had missed out by my lack of familiarity with Bosch. I did feel like the last-minute revelation of a deep connection between the two men felt arbitrary and silly, but in context it was actually wonderful. See, I've now read all of the Mickey Haller novels, and I'm working my way chronologically through the Harry Bosch books, and it turns out that this surprise connection was actually established in The Harry Bosch Novels: The Black Echo / The Black Ice / The Concrete Blonde, roughly twenty years before this book was published. Now, instead of being irritated by a new twist, I'm responding with admiration for the way Connelly held back his information for nearly two Mickey Haller books before bringing new readers up to speed. This is a level of confidence and planning that I don't expect in a series of legal/crime thrillers, and it elevates the book for me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Michael Connelly has done it again The Brass Verdict is a very good read by putting Harry Bosch with Mickey Haller creates a good mix was a real page turner & very exciting from start to finish as usual never picked the ending Michael Connelly has done it again The Brass Verdict is a very good read by putting Harry Bosch with Mickey Haller creates a good mix was a real page turner & very exciting from start to finish as usual never picked the ending

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bernadette

    I loved being in the backseat of the Lincoln again riding with Lincoln Lawyer Mickey Haller for one of Michael Connelly's best legal thrillers yet. The chemistry between two of his great characters -- defense lawyer Haller and LAPD homicide detective Harry Bosch -- is terrific as they spar, spin, speculate, bait and barter for information to solve a case involving a wealthy Hollywood movie mogul, charged with murdering his wife and her lover. This is Haller's story, as he is coming back to pract I loved being in the backseat of the Lincoln again riding with Lincoln Lawyer Mickey Haller for one of Michael Connelly's best legal thrillers yet. The chemistry between two of his great characters -- defense lawyer Haller and LAPD homicide detective Harry Bosch -- is terrific as they spar, spin, speculate, bait and barter for information to solve a case involving a wealthy Hollywood movie mogul, charged with murdering his wife and her lover. This is Haller's story, as he is coming back to practice law after a two-year break including rehab and he has to work to get his mojo back to defend the movie icon on very short notice. Bosch seems top of his game and lends the counterpoint to whether or how justice will be achieved. I enjoyed all the rich information about jury selection and the courtroom maneuvers which built suspense and involved critical plot details. Well told entertainment.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lori Anderson

    I love Harry Bosch, and I hated how he was portrayed in this book. He was a side character in this one, so I didn't expect to like it as well, but I kept getting bored. Kind of meh, but I love Connelly, so I'll give it a pass. Lori Anderson Lori Anderson:The Store Lori Anderson:The Blog Twitter I love Harry Bosch, and I hated how he was portrayed in this book. He was a side character in this one, so I didn't expect to like it as well, but I kept getting bored. Kind of meh, but I love Connelly, so I'll give it a pass. Lori Anderson Lori Anderson:The Store Lori Anderson:The Blog Twitter

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