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A Handful of Hard Men: The SAS and the Battle for Rhodesia

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During the West s great transition into the post-Colonial age, the country of Rhodesia refused to succumb quietly, and throughout the 1970s fought back almost alone against Communist-supported elements that it did not believe would deliver proper governance.During this long war many heroes emerged, but none more skillful and courageous than Captain Darrell Watt of the Rhod During the West s great transition into the post-Colonial age, the country of Rhodesia refused to succumb quietly, and throughout the 1970s fought back almost alone against Communist-supported elements that it did not believe would deliver proper governance.During this long war many heroes emerged, but none more skillful and courageous than Captain Darrell Watt of the Rhodesian SAS, who placed himself at the tip of the spear in the deadly battle to resist the forces of Robert Mugabe and Joshua Nkomo.It is difficult to find another soldier s story to equal Watt s in terms of time spent on the field of battle and challenges faced. Even by the lofty standards of the SAS and Special Forces, one has to look far to find anyone who can match his record of resilience and valor in the face of such daunting odds and with resources so paltry. In the fight he showed himself to be a military maestro. A bush-lore genius, blessed with uncanny instincts and an unbridled determination to close with the enemy, he had no peers as a combat-tracker (and there was plenty of competition). But the Rhodesian theater was a fluid and volatile one in which he performed in almost every imaginable fighting role; as an airborne shock-trooper leading camp attacks, long range reconnaissance operator, covert urban operator, sniper, saboteur, seek-and-strike expert, and in the final stages as a key figure in mobilizing an allied army in neighboring Mozambique. After 12 years in the cauldron of war his cause slipped from beneath him, however, and Rhodesia gave way to Zimbabwe. When the guns went quiet Watt had won all his battles but lost the war. In this fascinating work we learn that in his twilight years he is now concerned with saving wildlife on a continent where they are in continued danger, devoting himself to both the fauna and African people he has cared so deeply about. "


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During the West s great transition into the post-Colonial age, the country of Rhodesia refused to succumb quietly, and throughout the 1970s fought back almost alone against Communist-supported elements that it did not believe would deliver proper governance.During this long war many heroes emerged, but none more skillful and courageous than Captain Darrell Watt of the Rhod During the West s great transition into the post-Colonial age, the country of Rhodesia refused to succumb quietly, and throughout the 1970s fought back almost alone against Communist-supported elements that it did not believe would deliver proper governance.During this long war many heroes emerged, but none more skillful and courageous than Captain Darrell Watt of the Rhodesian SAS, who placed himself at the tip of the spear in the deadly battle to resist the forces of Robert Mugabe and Joshua Nkomo.It is difficult to find another soldier s story to equal Watt s in terms of time spent on the field of battle and challenges faced. Even by the lofty standards of the SAS and Special Forces, one has to look far to find anyone who can match his record of resilience and valor in the face of such daunting odds and with resources so paltry. In the fight he showed himself to be a military maestro. A bush-lore genius, blessed with uncanny instincts and an unbridled determination to close with the enemy, he had no peers as a combat-tracker (and there was plenty of competition). But the Rhodesian theater was a fluid and volatile one in which he performed in almost every imaginable fighting role; as an airborne shock-trooper leading camp attacks, long range reconnaissance operator, covert urban operator, sniper, saboteur, seek-and-strike expert, and in the final stages as a key figure in mobilizing an allied army in neighboring Mozambique. After 12 years in the cauldron of war his cause slipped from beneath him, however, and Rhodesia gave way to Zimbabwe. When the guns went quiet Watt had won all his battles but lost the war. In this fascinating work we learn that in his twilight years he is now concerned with saving wildlife on a continent where they are in continued danger, devoting himself to both the fauna and African people he has cared so deeply about. "

30 review for A Handful of Hard Men: The SAS and the Battle for Rhodesia

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ryan K.

    I am saddened that I could only give this book 5 stars - it deserves more. I have always been interested in the South African bush wars and the insurgency and sadly, downfall of Rhodesia. Recently I have had the opportunity to focus my reading on this conflict and I can say undoubtedly, that this is one of the best books on the subject I could have hoped to read. Not only that, but as an avid military history buff, this book stands out by far as one of the best military history books of any mode I am saddened that I could only give this book 5 stars - it deserves more. I have always been interested in the South African bush wars and the insurgency and sadly, downfall of Rhodesia. Recently I have had the opportunity to focus my reading on this conflict and I can say undoubtedly, that this is one of the best books on the subject I could have hoped to read. Not only that, but as an avid military history buff, this book stands out by far as one of the best military history books of any modern day conflict I have ever read. Aside from the perhaps unfortunate name, the book does a brilliant job of blending the first hand accounts of action throughout the conflict and tempers it with the very relevant background political motivations and wranglings that were happening. I found that part of the story really laid the groundwork for understanding why certain actions or operations took place or, how certain actions shaped the negotiations. It was really a fascinating and sad, sad story of betrayal and a beautiful country lost.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam Carey

    This book does a wonderful job of telling the story of Rhodesia through the eyes of a soldier. The strength and resolve of the SAS is told through accounts of various engagements that took place across the over decade-long struggle. The book, several times, shifts to update the changing political landscape surrounding the war which is nice for context. It’s a shame to know that no matter how well the men of the SAS fought, they were still at the mercy of politics. The book mainly follows the sto This book does a wonderful job of telling the story of Rhodesia through the eyes of a soldier. The strength and resolve of the SAS is told through accounts of various engagements that took place across the over decade-long struggle. The book, several times, shifts to update the changing political landscape surrounding the war which is nice for context. It’s a shame to know that no matter how well the men of the SAS fought, they were still at the mercy of politics. The book mainly follows the story of Darrell Watt, an extremely skilled tracker and hunter, who used his bush skills to great effectiveness in battle. It also tells the stories of several other soldiers in the SAS which can sometimes be confusing as Wessels jumps from account to account. Nevertheless, “A Handful of Hard Men” is an extremely engaging read for someone who enjoys military history. A bit like rewatching a tragic movie, reading this book invokes thoughts of “maybe they will overcome” or “perhaps they will win this time” even though you know that it will end in tragedy. Wessels does an excellent job of giving credit to the brave men who fought so hard for the home that they loved. A shame that so many of them were unrecognized in their struggle. A telling story of patriotism, brotherhood, duty, and resolve, “A Handful of Hard Men” encapsulates a fighting spirit and speaks true to the statement “Rhodesians Never Die”.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lukas Novotny

    Violent end of Rhodesia raises strong emotions till this day. There's a lot of misinformation, deliberately idealising Rhodesia as a paradise inside of barbaric Africa. This book continues in building that myth and the author, Hannes Wessels, is not even trying to cover his bitterness about the past. NEVERTHELESS, Wessels offers a unique viewpoint from the turbulent times and can't be dismissed. Aside from the memories of the hair raising military operations, author describes the isolation of Rho Violent end of Rhodesia raises strong emotions till this day. There's a lot of misinformation, deliberately idealising Rhodesia as a paradise inside of barbaric Africa. This book continues in building that myth and the author, Hannes Wessels, is not even trying to cover his bitterness about the past. NEVERTHELESS, Wessels offers a unique viewpoint from the turbulent times and can't be dismissed. Aside from the memories of the hair raising military operations, author describes the isolation of Rhodesia, which was abandoned by the British and Americans, while it's enemies were generously supported by the Soviets. Worth a read!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I suspect that the standard story of this conflict is heavily slanted, but unfortunately this book feels really slanted in the other direction. The biggest thing that strikes me as implausible here is that over and over he brings up various situations where the soldiers felt that "if we were just allowed to press our advantage, we would have won." Maybe this is true, and it definitely seems like there was a lot of politics going on, but I can't think of a lot of historical examples of countries I suspect that the standard story of this conflict is heavily slanted, but unfortunately this book feels really slanted in the other direction. The biggest thing that strikes me as implausible here is that over and over he brings up various situations where the soldiers felt that "if we were just allowed to press our advantage, we would have won." Maybe this is true, and it definitely seems like there was a lot of politics going on, but I can't think of a lot of historical examples of countries decisively winning a guerilla war of this nature with tiny forces and huge international pressure against them. It seems like a pretty bold counterfactual to state so many times. What's good about this book is getting a ground-level look at an unusual subculture in an easily-forgotten aspect of history. There are a lot of war stories that were relatively repetitive but entertaining in their own way, though of course there's a lot of pretty horrific things described here. Interestingly, the terrorists are described as basically inhuman monsters (and it sounds like they really were), but I didn't leave thinking the SAS were exactly angels. Considering they casually talked about wiping out dozens of people, including shooting people in the back while they were running away. From the perspective of, "every one of these people I let go could end up killing a dozen innocents" it makes sense, but they don't even really seem to bother to make that case, it's just natural that they would slaughter the enemy wholesale. 2.5 of 5 stars

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anton Van Reenen

    The Best book ever ! This is probably one of the best books I have ever read . The author provides an accurate account of the war, the politics behind the war and the key players, however, above all, the author keeps you interested and in suspense all the time. The horror of this war is portrayed better than anything Ive ever read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Gibbison

    Insightful Wow, this amazing story brings back long forgotten memories of home. The tenacity and commitment of Rhodesian soldiers comes through and the achievements were incredible given the political odds. Stories like this need to be written, "lest we forget". Insightful Wow, this amazing story brings back long forgotten memories of home. The tenacity and commitment of Rhodesian soldiers comes through and the achievements were incredible given the political odds. Stories like this need to be written, "lest we forget".

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tom Martin

    What could have been The deceit of the Great Britain political elite will live in infamy. What could have been a model country has become a basket case.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cav

    This was a great ground-level account of some of the major events of the Rhodesian Bush War. The book focuses on Rhodesian SAS Captain Darrell Watt, (who sounded like one hell of an exemplary soldier), but mentions others as well. "A Handful of Hard Men" talks about some of their major raids, as well as working in slices of the everyday lives of Rhodesian SAS soldiers. There's a great story about a rag-tag band of rescued animals that lived in the troop barracks; a baboon named Enoch, a Zebra name This was a great ground-level account of some of the major events of the Rhodesian Bush War. The book focuses on Rhodesian SAS Captain Darrell Watt, (who sounded like one hell of an exemplary soldier), but mentions others as well. "A Handful of Hard Men" talks about some of their major raids, as well as working in slices of the everyday lives of Rhodesian SAS soldiers. There's a great story about a rag-tag band of rescued animals that lived in the troop barracks; a baboon named Enoch, a Zebra named Stripes, two warthogs, and two goats that provided a humorous interlude from all the horror of war the book describes. The author lays out detailed and horrendous accounts of the downing of two civilian Rhodesian Air Viscount aircraft shot down by Zimbabwe People's Revolutionary Army (ZIPRA) terrorists, and the subsequent massacre of the 10 survivors of one of the crashes (Flight 825), as well as the revenge raid by the SAS that followed. SPOILER: They killed all the terrorists involved. He also touches on the betrayal of Rhodesia and her interests by Great Britain, although not very deeply. I enjoyed this book. Especially since books on Rhodesia are few and far between. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the Bush War, or Rhodesia in general.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John

    One of the benefits of growing up (basically unsupervised) during the cold war was the total acceptance of hating communists. In fact, while other kids I hung out with wanted to be super heroes or firemen, I fantasized about being a mercenary killing commies in some remote African country. Rhodesia was always fascinating because it became synonymous with the proxy wars of post-colonialism in Africa. This book, told by warriors who were there, is about the 15+ year struggle to save a nation. I ne One of the benefits of growing up (basically unsupervised) during the cold war was the total acceptance of hating communists. In fact, while other kids I hung out with wanted to be super heroes or firemen, I fantasized about being a mercenary killing commies in some remote African country. Rhodesia was always fascinating because it became synonymous with the proxy wars of post-colonialism in Africa. This book, told by warriors who were there, is about the 15+ year struggle to save a nation. I never really understood the challenges facing the small nation of Rhodesia, and I certainly never knew what crazy odds the very small army had in front of them. I laughed several times when reading about how a handful of 40+ SAS warriors took on 10,000 troops and kicked their asses. This is a story about a heroism and courage and how dirty politics is nothing new. A great read for the warriors out there or anyone interested in a non-PC point of view.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    Incredible account of some of the hardest blokes to hold a rifle. I’d recommend the actual book in print and not the audiobook. The audiobook completely ruined the story, with an American narrator who struggled to pronounce most of the proper nouns, as well as abruptly stop-starting throughout his entire narration.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Walter Stevens

    Good for this type of book, but... I won't repeat the story of what this book is about, but just emphasize that it describes the exploits of soldiers at an operational level through the years of the Rhodesian War. It also provides a version of the chronology of political events, in a similar style that of the rest of the book, so that it appears to have been the version held by most of the characters mentioned in the book. So far so good. And in its telling of the exploits of the SAS, the author d Good for this type of book, but... I won't repeat the story of what this book is about, but just emphasize that it describes the exploits of soldiers at an operational level through the years of the Rhodesian War. It also provides a version of the chronology of political events, in a similar style that of the rest of the book, so that it appears to have been the version held by most of the characters mentioned in the book. So far so good. And in its telling of the exploits of the SAS, the author does a good job. Perhaps because because I've read a few of this type of book, it left me dissatisfied. I would have hoped that people in that position would by now be able to give their views on a lot of more difficult questions. As an example I've listed some below: -Smith's leading of the country into UDI is expressed as being his only option. But was it? Flowers' book suggests otherwise. In general, the coverage of political events is fairly rudimentary. -How does one reconcile the competing narratives that (1) the terrs were largely untrained and bereft of leadership, and (2) that the Rhodesian forces were amazing efficient? Is it the kill ratios? I cant figure out if most contacts were like shooting fish in a barrel, or not? -Training: why did the Rhodesians persist with so much square bashing and conventional training when manpower was so critical and the men were being deployed straight into a COIN conflict? A year-long officer's training course? Making badged SAS soldiers joining or rejoining the unit undergo selection again? -The level of expertise at staff level. Much frustration is expressed in this and other books about the quality of leadership, as well as senior leaders' propensity to get involved in operational matters. The operations of COMOPS doesn't seem as marvelous as the rest of the narrative. I get the impression of a layer of competent officers waiting impatiently to step into the shoes of some dead wood. -I understand that the Selous Scouts evolved to a point where Ron Reid-Daly was asked to lead the unit, and create a very different identity for it than the SAS. But the amount of overlapping skills and the degree of professional jealousy begs the question of why weren't the Selous Scounts and the SAS more tightly integrated? Did it make sense for such a small army to have 2 units like that? What was the cost of leaving it unresolved? -Recruitment and integration of black troops. Given the numbers facing Rhodesia, the only way to win the war would be to make it largely a black versus black conflict. Keeping the black troops separate under the RAR and only introducing black officers in 1976 seems to have been shortsighted. Was it the case? -Counter espionage: the story of the Rhodesian war is riddled with rumours of ops that were stopped or leaked, with the ultimate culprits often seen as South Africa, Britain, Lonrho or others. Leaks have been attributed to the CIO and more specifically to Ken Flower. This whole question deserves thorough study, rather than merely being an aside. -Thorough coverage of the politics at senior level within the military. Walls in particular seems to have been an interesting but divisive character. Reid-Daly's electronic eavesdropping.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Martinez

    🥺. Courage, bravery, honor, virtue. Unfortunately these are not enough to defeat evil ideologies who devoutly pronounce themselves as righteous. The paternalist approach by Western Liberals to destroy the country of Rhodesia is disgusting, and is ever more troubling now with the racial supremacy and ignorance an issue around the world. Deceived and cheated out of victory by the politicians who sought their economic gains over any sort of ethical responsibility, it’s a shame people like this domi 🥺. Courage, bravery, honor, virtue. Unfortunately these are not enough to defeat evil ideologies who devoutly pronounce themselves as righteous. The paternalist approach by Western Liberals to destroy the country of Rhodesia is disgusting, and is ever more troubling now with the racial supremacy and ignorance an issue around the world. Deceived and cheated out of victory by the politicians who sought their economic gains over any sort of ethical responsibility, it’s a shame people like this dominate the political power positions of the world. But enough of that, Darrell Watt is a DANGEROUS MAN, incredible tracker, warrior, bushman who led dozens of successful missions against formidable odds. Easily one of the greatest fighters the world has seen, he was a different breed. But he wasn’t just a soldier, he was a good man, who never lost touch with his humanity. The same can be said for most of the Rhodesian SAS, who fought so valiantly. Even if the country is no more, their deeds will not be forgotten, and they were in the true moral right as they fought not for “race supremacy” like the conceited liberals judged, but for their homeland, for honor, they never lost it. Rest In Peace to all the brave men, and salutations to those willing to fight not a material reward, but willing to fight for metaphysical means, as long as this type of man lives, there is hope for this world.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anna Erishkigal

    I will completely side-step the issue of whether or not Rhodesian government was "racist" as seems to be in-vogue today and review this book solely as a military biography. The Rhodesian SAS was one of the most ingenious and lethal fighting forces the world has ever seen. The men you will meet in this book loved their country, feared what would happen if the communists took over, and ultimately, it turned out their fears were not unfounded. The narrative is easy to read and you will feel like yo I will completely side-step the issue of whether or not Rhodesian government was "racist" as seems to be in-vogue today and review this book solely as a military biography. The Rhodesian SAS was one of the most ingenious and lethal fighting forces the world has ever seen. The men you will meet in this book loved their country, feared what would happen if the communists took over, and ultimately, it turned out their fears were not unfounded. The narrative is easy to read and you will feel like you are on patrol with these soldiers as they creep through the African bush, lay in wait, and then ambush their quarry with devastating accuracy, bravery and cunning. No study of asymmetrical warfare would be complete without studying the Rhodesian SAS. I see what has happened in that poor, sad country today, as well as what is happening in South Africa, and it's too bad they weren't given more time to transition gradually into a fully color-blind, democratic society.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robert Miller

    I enjoy reading books about the US Special Forces which in turn got me interested in the Rhodesian SAS and Selous Scouts. I was not very familiar with the politics involved in the Rhodesian Bush War so it made this book a little more difficult to read but the operations themselves within the book were amazing and very enjoyable. To all who are interested in reading this, this book is definitely Pro-Rhodesia because Hans Wessel was a fighting member of the Rhodesian Military so understand where h I enjoy reading books about the US Special Forces which in turn got me interested in the Rhodesian SAS and Selous Scouts. I was not very familiar with the politics involved in the Rhodesian Bush War so it made this book a little more difficult to read but the operations themselves within the book were amazing and very enjoyable. To all who are interested in reading this, this book is definitely Pro-Rhodesia because Hans Wessel was a fighting member of the Rhodesian Military so understand where he comes from when he wrote this. This isn't a "history of the Rhodesian War" book this is a book about Darrell Watt being the amazing man that he was and the gunfights he was in. Overall was it worth the purchase, yes. I got what I intended out of the booked and learned a little on the way. The only reason I gave it 4 stars was because at times it was difficult to read and keep up with everything but nonetheless a great military read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jerimy Stoll

    This was not what I was expecting. The book covers a Small special forces unit from Rhodesia in the 70s. The backdrop theme is the political agendas of several African countries, Britain, and the United States. Much of the conflict was happening during the Vietnam "conflict." I was amazed to hear about Marxism as a rule and was relieved to see how a small unit of men could make a difference when it came to trying to free people from such idiotic political irresponsibilities. It would seem that e This was not what I was expecting. The book covers a Small special forces unit from Rhodesia in the 70s. The backdrop theme is the political agendas of several African countries, Britain, and the United States. Much of the conflict was happening during the Vietnam "conflict." I was amazed to hear about Marxism as a rule and was relieved to see how a small unit of men could make a difference when it came to trying to free people from such idiotic political irresponsibilities. It would seem that even America is to be headed towards Marxist idealism. One has only to crack any history book dealing with Marxist countries to know that it never works. Man is always corruptible.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Austin

    Hannes Wessel's fascinating glimpse into the brutal Rhodesian bush war. The firsthand accounts of the men who were there provides insights into the tactics and techniques of one of the most successful counter insurgencies. It also tells the story of a geo-political drama involving colonialism, Marxism and racism. Awareness of the tragedies that unfolded over the next 40 years adds another interesting dimension to this story. Great read if you are interested in combat action, counter insurgencies Hannes Wessel's fascinating glimpse into the brutal Rhodesian bush war. The firsthand accounts of the men who were there provides insights into the tactics and techniques of one of the most successful counter insurgencies. It also tells the story of a geo-political drama involving colonialism, Marxism and racism. Awareness of the tragedies that unfolded over the next 40 years adds another interesting dimension to this story. Great read if you are interested in combat action, counter insurgencies and geo-politics.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Scott Andrews

    I found this to be a challenging read and very slow at times, but its important to keep in mind its a chronicle, with the focus being on the facts, not entertaining the reader with a literary masterpiece. That being said, I found this account to be very compelling. The tales of unconventional warfare, the Rhodesian SAS & Darrell Watt where captivating to say the least. I knew very little about this chapter in history and left me feeling ashamed of the British governments actions during this peri I found this to be a challenging read and very slow at times, but its important to keep in mind its a chronicle, with the focus being on the facts, not entertaining the reader with a literary masterpiece. That being said, I found this account to be very compelling. The tales of unconventional warfare, the Rhodesian SAS & Darrell Watt where captivating to say the least. I knew very little about this chapter in history and left me feeling ashamed of the British governments actions during this period. This book has certainly inspired me to find more books on the war in Rhodesia.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Fisher_FA

    This was my first foray into the Rhodesian Bush War and I was impressed by the extraordinary operations the Rhodesian SAS conducted. This book chronicles the war through many dozen anecdotes as told by the SAS operators that fought there. For the price (under three dollars) it was an excellent way to familiarize fans of special operations with this conflict without much in the way of politics. The book is a quick, easy read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jim Shivers

    Apart from the unfortunate title ( I'm sure no pun intended), this shows the Rhodesian War from the ground, and at times the exploits of the Rhodesian SAS are unbelievably dangerous and exciting as they took the fight to the enemy. The accounts of external operations into neighbouring countries, the firefights, the day to day existence in a hostile environment constantly hunted by a numerically superior force is nail biting stuff. Great read and highly recommended. Apart from the unfortunate title ( I'm sure no pun intended), this shows the Rhodesian War from the ground, and at times the exploits of the Rhodesian SAS are unbelievably dangerous and exciting as they took the fight to the enemy. The accounts of external operations into neighbouring countries, the firefights, the day to day existence in a hostile environment constantly hunted by a numerically superior force is nail biting stuff. Great read and highly recommended.

  20. 5 out of 5

    James Bell

    Very good first hand experienced war Excellent history of the end of Rhodesia. First hand story told by the men who fought it. Long with a dissatisfied ending, but reading true history is that way.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Austin Robert

    Excellent read. Terrific look at a group of hardened warriors. Their restlessness in tracking the enemy is unmatched. Recommend to military history buffs, young enlisted and officers from the army and Marine Corps.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gary J

    Sorry Rhodesia!!! If only the ignorant U.S. could have looked past the Black & White issue and see it was Black & White working together trying to save a Great nation before its demise.

  23. 4 out of 5

    mick macdonald

    Excellent account of the Rhodesian SAS. Descriptive and entertaining and explains the incredible part that this unit played in the fight to save Rhodesia from becoming the s hockingZimbabwe it is today. Well worth a read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Interesting book. Could make a great television series were it more PC. Did several fact checks and all were A OK. This novel should be on every national security policy wonks reading list - after all is said and done, war is about people, and some can make a big difference

  25. 4 out of 5

    Fred

    I really liked this book. it gave me an idea of what went on during a turbulent time. It was amazing what a small group of committed individuals can do!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Baty

    Very good - especially on the duplicity of politicians.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paul moved to LibraryThing

    Exceptional collection of war stories as told by the soldiers themselves. The political backdrop is provided in a hugely biased manner. I don't think anyone can claim a moral highground there. Exceptional collection of war stories as told by the soldiers themselves. The political backdrop is provided in a hugely biased manner. I don't think anyone can claim a moral highground there.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jaap Nieuwenhuis

    Great read about the Bush War. Lot of detail on certain missions and also an overview on the political situation in the country.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shayne Lee Charlesworth

    Great book!!! Amazing g trials and "victory" over obstacle. Great book!!! Amazing g trials and "victory" over obstacle.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Excellent

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