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30 review for Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Yes, there is a sudden mini-flood of Ada Lovelace biographies. Think of it as simply correcting a terrible oversight. And this is so far my favorite of the bunch.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Pett

    A fantastic biography of an amazing, but little-known, hero of STEM. The art is whimsical and her story is told in an orderly fashion. Included in the back are a glossary, notes from the author and a timeline of important dates in computer science. This book is a great way to introduce kids to the concept of computer programming.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Egbert

    This is an informative biography for children to get a sense of what Ada Lovelace contributed. It is also a quality jumping off place for adults to begin learning about Lady Lovelace. I was stunned to learn that Ada Lovelace was the daughter of the rascally, if talented Lord Byron. Now, while I am going to go to work learning more about Lady Lovelace, my real hunger is to learn more about her mother.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Danna Smith

    Review from my blog www.picturebookplaylist.wordpress.com: Where will booksellers keep all the amazing nonfiction books that are popping up? I recently read an article in Publishers Weekly which stated that “even before 2009 and the beginning of Common Core, some booksellers were seeing narrative non-fiction and information picture books take off.” It’s no wonder that with beautifully illustrated and well-written nonfiction books like Ada Lovelace Poet of Science that publishers and readers can’t Review from my blog www.picturebookplaylist.wordpress.com: Where will booksellers keep all the amazing nonfiction books that are popping up? I recently read an article in Publishers Weekly which stated that “even before 2009 and the beginning of Common Core, some booksellers were seeing narrative non-fiction and information picture books take off.” It’s no wonder that with beautifully illustrated and well-written nonfiction books like Ada Lovelace Poet of Science that publishers and readers can’t get enough! Summary Two hundred years ago, a daughter was born to the famous poet, Lord Byron, and his mathematical wife, Annabella. Like her father, Ada had a vivid imagination and a creative gift for connecting ideas in original ways. Like her mother, she had a passion for science, math, and machines. It was a very good combination. Ada hoped that one day she could do something important with her creative and nimble mind. A hundred years before the dawn of the digital age, Ada Lovelace envisioned the computer-driven world we know today. And in demonstrating how the machine would be coded, she wrote the first computer program. She would go down in history as Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer. What I love about this book From the perspective of an author, it is a challenge to tell the life story of any significant figure in history or historical event with minimal text that will not only inform but entertain the reader. From the perspective of a reader, Diane Stanley (Bard of Avon: The Story of William Shakespeare) and illustrator Jessie Hartland (Lexie the Word Wrangler) have taken this task to heart and created a story to be devoured. Ada Lovelace’s story is told in the third person and with minimal text (just 1354 words to be exact) beginning from when she was a little girl “Long, long ago, on a cold winter day, a lonely little girl walked from room to room in a big, old, dark country house. Her name was Ada Byron and she was looking for something to do,” to a still determined, grown women with children of her own, “but she hadn’t lost sight of her dream, just postponed it. Now at last her moment had come.” I was pleased to see that Stanley managed to insert a bit of humor within the pages when tells the reader that Ada’s mother was worried about her active imagination, “She hoped the study of math and science would suppress her daughter’s imagination. So Ada was given a world-class scientific education.” She goes on to explain that “her imagination was not harmed in the least.” There is oodles of back matter to peruse including an Author’s Note, Important Dates, and a Glossary. Artwork by Jessie Hartland, rendered in colorful gouache breathes a refreshing bit of whimsy and detail throughout this 40-page picture book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christina Getrost

    Nice picture book biography of Lord Byron's daughter Ada Lovelace, who in the 19th century wrote a translation of an article on Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine, the first computer--and in so doing she created the first computer program: step by step instructions for it to function. Sadly she died of cancer at age 36 and never wrote more. Illustrations are kind of goofy, cartoony, look a little like primitive paintings. Selected bibliography, brief author's note on how Ada's work was lost for Nice picture book biography of Lord Byron's daughter Ada Lovelace, who in the 19th century wrote a translation of an article on Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine, the first computer--and in so doing she created the first computer program: step by step instructions for it to function. Sadly she died of cancer at age 36 and never wrote more. Illustrations are kind of goofy, cartoony, look a little like primitive paintings. Selected bibliography, brief author's note on how Ada's work was lost for a long time, but resurfaced and noted computer genius Alan Turing read it as part of his work.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Niki Marion

    With our society inextricably dependent on technology, kids should know the name Ada Lovelace

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I'd never heard of Ada Lovelace before hearing of this book. It's kind of hard to fathom that she lived 200 years ago and is considered the first computer programmer. It was fascinating to read about her life and her work with Charles Babbage. This left me intrigued and wanting to know more. I'll probably read more about her. Stanley includes an author's note, a timeline of important events (about her life but also about computer programming and inventions related to programming), a bibliography I'd never heard of Ada Lovelace before hearing of this book. It's kind of hard to fathom that she lived 200 years ago and is considered the first computer programmer. It was fascinating to read about her life and her work with Charles Babbage. This left me intrigued and wanting to know more. I'll probably read more about her. Stanley includes an author's note, a timeline of important events (about her life but also about computer programming and inventions related to programming), a bibliography and a glossary. The illustrations are fun and whimsical, highlighting her creativity and imagination.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    I DID NOT KNOW punch cards weren't invented by someone in the 1950's to lure kids coming out of high school into this brand new profession, 'key punch operator!' I had a friend who got sucked into this idea and had to be re-educated for another job that would last. Ada Lovelace (the daughter of THE Lord Byron!) a new factory for weaving cloth into intricate patterns, and saw the punched cards that seem to be 'giving' the looms the correct directions...and her imagination started to work overtime. I DID NOT KNOW punch cards weren't invented by someone in the 1950's to lure kids coming out of high school into this brand new profession, 'key punch operator!' I had a friend who got sucked into this idea and had to be re-educated for another job that would last. Ada Lovelace (the daughter of THE Lord Byron!) a new factory for weaving cloth into intricate patterns, and saw the punched cards that seem to be 'giving' the looms the correct directions...and her imagination started to work overtime. She inherited Byron's imagination, she just took her creativity in a new direction. She worked with Charles Babbage on a new invention called the Analytical Engine that could do mathematical functions. Ada partnered with Babbage, translated a promotional article into French, added footnotes, and actually expanded the possibilities of the Engine. She actually programmed the symbols and rules of operation into digital forms. But she was afraid to put her name on her work, fearing people would not take the work seriously if a woman was the author. Just another Mighty Girl who is finally getting her due with the general public. Bout time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brianna Crall

    Loved this book. I had no idea who Ada Lovelace was prior to this read. Fascinating story about a young girl who goes against the mold. Very inspiring for young girls. This will find a permanent place on my shelf.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Angelina

    A great way to get acquainted with Ada and her work.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cami

    My daughter brought this home to read to me. A great little book giving much overdue credit to the first computer programmer. I loved learning about her life and her contributions to STEM fields!

  12. 4 out of 5

    LaTonya Roberts (IG:RemindMeToRead)

    I loved the illustrations. As a children's book I think it's fun with all the bright colors. I really like how you can see every stroke like the book was hand painted. It's a good intro to Ada Lovelace and inspirational to any child who gets to read it or have it read to them. I loved the illustrations. As a children's book I think it's fun with all the bright colors. I really like how you can see every stroke like the book was hand painted. It's a good intro to Ada Lovelace and inspirational to any child who gets to read it or have it read to them.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    My little one was bored but interested to learn about Ada Lovelace.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kris Dersch

    Great book! It's a little long for a picture book biography but the details are great and the illustrations are fabulous. A very important topic to introduce early elementary kids to and a great way to do it. Did not hold the 4-year-old's attention, I would say probably primary level for this one. Great book! It's a little long for a picture book biography but the details are great and the illustrations are fabulous. A very important topic to introduce early elementary kids to and a great way to do it. Did not hold the 4-year-old's attention, I would say probably primary level for this one.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mallory

    My first exposure to the remarkable Ada Lovelace. I will definitely be exploring more books about her.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Annie O'Hare

    The art of the narrative is very lively and imaginative. It shows the protagonist of the story, Ada Lovelace, growing up through her early years as a young child, to her growth as a mom and inventor. The illustrations depict Ada as a curious and inventive young girl, who asks questions about everything. The words chosen for the narrative very well match the illustrations of the book. (EDUC 412, assign. #1).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anna Chappell

    Fun introduction to Ada Lovelace and her part in history. I do wish it had incorporated more of the endnotes into the text, but I can see why they weren't. Fun introduction to Ada Lovelace and her part in history. I do wish it had incorporated more of the endnotes into the text, but I can see why they weren't.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily Metheny

    Can you think of some characteristics you took from both your parents? Well Ada Lovelace can, she took her dads creativeness and ability to imagine things while from her mother she took her love for science and math. Ada puts these great characteristics to use throughout this story as she wrote the first computer program. She had the gift to imagine the technological driven world that we live in today and knew the importance that could come with this computer program. This is a great book to cra Can you think of some characteristics you took from both your parents? Well Ada Lovelace can, she took her dads creativeness and ability to imagine things while from her mother she took her love for science and math. Ada puts these great characteristics to use throughout this story as she wrote the first computer program. She had the gift to imagine the technological driven world that we live in today and knew the importance that could come with this computer program. This is a great book to crack into the creative side of your students!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    2017 Amelia Bloomer Project Top Ten

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Walz

    This is my personal opinion and I have nothing negative to say about the author and illustrator. I did not care for this book at all. I felt that some of the words led the reader to assume misinformation and the illustration style is not my favorite. I am disappointed, I was eagerly awaiting the book to read, I really like a lot of Diane Stanley's work. I didn't care for this at all. This is my personal opinion and I have nothing negative to say about the author and illustrator. I did not care for this book at all. I felt that some of the words led the reader to assume misinformation and the illustration style is not my favorite. I am disappointed, I was eagerly awaiting the book to read, I really like a lot of Diane Stanley's work. I didn't care for this at all.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    Another picture book biography of Ada Lovelace, appealing and informative.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Smith

    For my final twin text I choose to pair my nonfiction book Ada Lovelace: The Poet of Science by Diane Stanley copyright 2016 with the fiction book Charlotte the Scientist Is Squished by Camille Andros copyright 2017. I would start by reading my fiction book, Charlotte the Scientist Is Squished. This book is about a rabbit named Charlotte. She feels like she is being squished by all of her siblings. Using the scientific method, she devises a plan to stop feeling so squished. In her first two atte For my final twin text I choose to pair my nonfiction book Ada Lovelace: The Poet of Science by Diane Stanley copyright 2016 with the fiction book Charlotte the Scientist Is Squished by Camille Andros copyright 2017. I would start by reading my fiction book, Charlotte the Scientist Is Squished. This book is about a rabbit named Charlotte. She feels like she is being squished by all of her siblings. Using the scientific method, she devises a plan to stop feeling so squished. In her first two attempts she tries to make her family disappear and then make herself disappear. That does not work. Next, she flies her rocket ship to space to get some alone time. While she is up there she, is lonely. So she comes back to earth and realizes it is not too bad to be around all the people you love. Next, I would read my nonfiction book, Ada Lovelace: The Poet of Science. Ada Lovelace is about a very unique girl, Ada. Her father was an imaginative poet named Lord Byron. Her mother was a logical reasoned thinker, who excelled in math and science. The marriage between the two only lasted a year but, they created a very smart girl, Ada. She was highly educated in math and science pairing that with the imagination she inherited from her father, she became the first computer programmer. This book was written about two hundred years ago, so it is a huge feat that Ada accomplished. I would relate these two books with both science and history. In the science lesson we would talk about the scientific method, which is outlined in my fiction book. There are also experiments in the back of the fiction book. We could all do the experiments together and be like Ada trumping new grounds. In the history lesson, I would show the class that Ada received traits from both her mother and her father. Charlotte thought that she wanted to get away from her family but she just wanted to have a break. Both of these books show the importance of family. The class could make family trees. If the students had siblings, parents, or grandparents they could find out what kind of activities others in their family like and compare and contrast those traits to their own life. Bibliography Andros, Camille, and Brianne Farley. Charlotte the Scientist Is Squished. Boston: Clarion , Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017. Print. Diane Stanley (Author), Jessie Hartland. "Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer Hardcover – October 4, 2016." Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer: Diane Stanley, Jessie Hartland: 9781481452496: Amazon.com: Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 June 2017.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tecora Jenkins

    Ada Lovelace is a biography presented in the form of a juvenile picture book written by Golden Kite Award- winning author, Diane Stanley. This book is a great work about the power of imagination and perseverance. I was unsure about the quality of the book and whether it would be a watered-down biography of sorts-due to the text complexity being primarily for the elementary-age student. However, it was a very smooth read and captivated my interest at just page 3. This book highlights the lifespan Ada Lovelace is a biography presented in the form of a juvenile picture book written by Golden Kite Award- winning author, Diane Stanley. This book is a great work about the power of imagination and perseverance. I was unsure about the quality of the book and whether it would be a watered-down biography of sorts-due to the text complexity being primarily for the elementary-age student. However, it was a very smooth read and captivated my interest at just page 3. This book highlights the lifespan of Ada Lovelace, the first woman computer programmer. It is interesting in that it gives a unique view into her life that is both relatable to adults, but light enough for children to express, perhaps even sigh, "Me too." This book has such a span of great teaching points because there are so many important lessons and topics a teacher could cover using this one book. On a most basic, yet profound level, a teacher could share this book during a morning meeting or social studies unit that mentions women inventors. It would provide wonderful insight to students who may not know much about inventors, especially women inventors. The power of imagination is strongly prevalent as well. The book stresses how Ada had a dream and a vision from a young age, yet outside factors tried to come in and influence that dream. Additionally this would be a wonderful book to use to help students to develop goals for themselves. This profound woman had goals from childhood all the way up to adulthood. Due to the themes presented in this book, it would be ideal for fourth or fifth grade students. In my own classroom, I could see the book being useful in helping students to understand the process of an idea and how often it is an intricate journey that requires hard work; not necessarily just a destination to arrive at. It can help communicate the value of hard work. This is certainly a book that offers up many possibilities for teachers in the classroom while leaving students with important life concepts.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sunah Chung

    Recently, I am thrilled to acknowledge what I have learned as history has different perspectives and behind it. Much like historical fiction, biographies can sometimes tell me what I have missed in my educational experiences. The biography, Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer, teaches me about sound friendship and insight of a woman who contributes computer programing way before the first electronic computer is invented in 1946. Ana is a daughter of George Gordon Byron Recently, I am thrilled to acknowledge what I have learned as history has different perspectives and behind it. Much like historical fiction, biographies can sometimes tell me what I have missed in my educational experiences. The biography, Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer, teaches me about sound friendship and insight of a woman who contributes computer programing way before the first electronic computer is invented in 1946. Ana is a daughter of George Gordon Byron known as Lord Byron, a famous British poet. Unlike Lord Byron, her mother, Lady Byron, loves math and science. Since her father left her family when she was a baby, the major educational influence is coming from her mother. However, she still has a lot imagination, and the creativity and mathematical thinking produce scientific imagination in her whole life. Luckily, she has a good friend, Charles Babbage, who is an inventor of a calculating machine called "a thinking machine." They work together by sharing ideas and developing the machine. In the process, she translates the works of the machine in English which can be published in Britain. She also contributes to develop the algorithm which makes her to be considered as the first computer programmer by the current scholars. In spite of ascendance of woman’s rights and social status in the current society, there are still prejudices that STEM fields are for man’s study and work. To encourage female students’ interests in STEM as well as to facilitate their imagination, the biography of Ada Lovelace is great educational choice.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Ada Lovelace: The Poet of Science is a children's picture book written by Diane Stanley and illustrated by Jessie Hartland. This book surveys the brief life of Byron's daughter, whose scientific education and inquiring mind shaped her foundational contributions to computer science. Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, was an English mathematician and writer, chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage's proposed mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. She was the first to Ada Lovelace: The Poet of Science is a children's picture book written by Diane Stanley and illustrated by Jessie Hartland. This book surveys the brief life of Byron's daughter, whose scientific education and inquiring mind shaped her foundational contributions to computer science. Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, was an English mathematician and writer, chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage's proposed mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. She was the first to recognize that the machine had applications beyond pure calculation, and published the first algorithm intended to be carried out by such a machine. Stanley's text is rather simplistic, straightforward, and informative. Stanley delivers a breezy but insightful overview of the curiosity and determination that drove Ada Lovelace to pursue her intellectual passions. An author's note and timeline could be found in the backmatter. Hartland keeps the mood light in loopy gouache cartoons that humorously portray Lovelace as the creative and intelligent product of parents in facing family portraits. The premise of the book is rather straightforward. The picture book traces Ada Lovelace's childhood dreams of flight, her friendship and working relationship with Charles Babbage, and her pioneering programming work in service of promoting Babbage's Analytical Machine. All in all, Ada Lovelace: The Poet of Science is a splendid and admiring introduction to the first computer programmer – Ada Lovelace.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jackson

    Genre – Nonfiction - biography Awards received – The Amelia Bloomer Book List (2017) Audience – 4-8 years old What is the topic of the book? – This book is a child friendly biography about Ada Lovelace, explaining her history with creativity and invention as well as her endeavors as an inventive woman during her time period. How is the topic presented in a child friendly way? – While the suppression of women is mentioned in the story it is not done in the horrific detail as reality, but it is gener Genre – Nonfiction - biography Awards received – The Amelia Bloomer Book List (2017) Audience – 4-8 years old What is the topic of the book? – This book is a child friendly biography about Ada Lovelace, explaining her history with creativity and invention as well as her endeavors as an inventive woman during her time period. How is the topic presented in a child friendly way? – While the suppression of women is mentioned in the story it is not done in the horrific detail as reality, but it is generalized in order to properly carry out the proper details in the book. It also simplifies the complexity of the math done as students at this age would not be able to understand that level of calculous. What type of text features are available in this book? – Right off the bat the art style is very child friendly, with a cartoony style of watercolor. The colors are vibrant, and the images are relevant and not too busy to the eye. The font style of the text throughout is fitting for the visuals of the book. The content is written in an easy to understand way that is easy to follow all the while being historically accurate. How and When could this book be used with children? – This book can be used beyond its age range as a historic lesson in the history of programming for a technology course. It can also be used to talk about woman’s suffrage in history classes and introduce young children to begin to explore invention, inspiring them to be creative and seek out their goals.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Ada Byron had a vivid imagination as a child. She was more interested in inventing than in learning the social graces. Unfortunately, that wasn't really acceptable in the early 1800's. In spite of the social expectations, Ada learned from some of the innovators of the Industrial Revolution. She took what they taught her and applied it to other topics and situations. What she learned of the workings of the mechanical loom and the analytical engine, which could work out math problems, helped her e Ada Byron had a vivid imagination as a child. She was more interested in inventing than in learning the social graces. Unfortunately, that wasn't really acceptable in the early 1800's. In spite of the social expectations, Ada learned from some of the innovators of the Industrial Revolution. She took what they taught her and applied it to other topics and situations. What she learned of the workings of the mechanical loom and the analytical engine, which could work out math problems, helped her envision a machine that could work with any kind of symbol. Diane Stanley has written an interesting but short picture book biography of Ada Lovelace. Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science will introduce elementary-age children to this incredible woman. They will learn about her life, her interests, and how she learned to program machines before computers were ever invented. Jessie Harland used gouache for her illustrations which add to the text. The publisher recommends this book for grades K-2. I would extend that to include grades 3-5. I think the older age-group will enjoy this book more than the younger ones. Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science is on this years Land of Enchantment list. I can't wait to share it with my students. Even if you aren't in New Mexico or don't participate in the Land of Enchantment Award, I recommend this book for your biography section. It would be a great addition.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    **All reviews can be found at drhodgesreads.blogspot.com** Ada Lovelace is getting a lot of love these days, and for good reason. She is credited with being one of the first computer programmers in history, and the first woman. YAY! I also did not know that she was the daughter of Lord Byron, who had quite the reputation with the ladies (which I did know). In this book, we learn about Ada Lovelace's life. This book begins by telling a little information about Ada's father and mother. Her father w **All reviews can be found at drhodgesreads.blogspot.com** Ada Lovelace is getting a lot of love these days, and for good reason. She is credited with being one of the first computer programmers in history, and the first woman. YAY! I also did not know that she was the daughter of Lord Byron, who had quite the reputation with the ladies (which I did know). In this book, we learn about Ada Lovelace's life. This book begins by telling a little information about Ada's father and mother. Her father was Lord Byron, a famous, well-respected poet. He was a big deal in his time. Her mother was a mathematician and very logical and organized. She put her daughter in a heavy, rich educational program to steer her away from creativity so she would not be like her father. It didn't work, and she capitalized on being both logical and creative. I loved this book! It was fun to read, interesting, and engaging. I really enjoyed seeing Ada's life unfold and learning about how she became a computer programmer (in the context of history). There is a lot of history and science in this book, and it is beautifully illustrated.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Weidman

    I would pair this with Rosie Revere, Engineer (Andrea Beaty 2013). The reason I would compare these two stories is because they are both about women who are fascinated with science. Rosie Revere is a fiction story about a child and Ada Lovelace is an autobiography about an actual scientist and first computer programmer. Both stories are about overcoming obstacles and failures and achieving your dreams. I would start by reading Rosie Revere, Engineer. I would have the students reflect for a minut I would pair this with Rosie Revere, Engineer (Andrea Beaty 2013). The reason I would compare these two stories is because they are both about women who are fascinated with science. Rosie Revere is a fiction story about a child and Ada Lovelace is an autobiography about an actual scientist and first computer programmer. Both stories are about overcoming obstacles and failures and achieving your dreams. I would start by reading Rosie Revere, Engineer. I would have the students reflect for a minute and think about times they've been scared to fail or wanted to give up but didn't. In the book, Rosie is afraid of being laughed at so she is scared to try but does it anyways. Then, I would read Ada Lovelace. I would the have the students complete a Venn Diagram comparing the fictional character Rosie to Ada Lovelace. This would be a crossover with science but also with history and social studies. There is also some crossover with social studies in Rosie Revere with references to Rosie the Riveter (her great grandma in the book is Rosie and Riveter).

  30. 5 out of 5

    Yuridia

    Ada Lovelace poet of Science is a great biography about Ada Lovelace the first woman computer programmer. Ada grew up during times where women were only allowed to do “ women” things. But Ada had a great imagination and loved to invent new things like wings she could use to fly. Her mother grew concerned that she would become like her father and use too much imagination. Her mother encouraged her to Mary and she was wed and had 3 kids. Years later Ada realized she still wanted to follow her pass Ada Lovelace poet of Science is a great biography about Ada Lovelace the first woman computer programmer. Ada grew up during times where women were only allowed to do “ women” things. But Ada had a great imagination and loved to invent new things like wings she could use to fly. Her mother grew concerned that she would become like her father and use too much imagination. Her mother encouraged her to Mary and she was wed and had 3 kids. Years later Ada realized she still wanted to follow her passions of inventing and remembered she encountered a work of art which inspired her to become a computer programmer. This book is a great read for grades 3-5 due to its longer story and vocabulary . This book can be used to encourage girls to keep your dreams even bought others may say you should do other wise. This book is great for our future female computer programmers and make programmers to know that everyone can do be a program , with passion and courage to be “strange” In the eyes of some.

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