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The Collected Fantasies, Vol. 3: The Airtight Garage

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Jerry Cornélius a disparu à la fin des années 70, dans le magazine métal hurlant. Il faut le retrouver avant le major, en avançant d'un minimum de deux pages par mois. Mais le garage hermétique est un vrai labyrinthe. Jerry Cornélius a disparu à la fin des années 70, dans le magazine métal hurlant. Il faut le retrouver avant le major, en avançant d'un minimum de deux pages par mois. Mais le garage hermétique est un vrai labyrinthe.


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Jerry Cornélius a disparu à la fin des années 70, dans le magazine métal hurlant. Il faut le retrouver avant le major, en avançant d'un minimum de deux pages par mois. Mais le garage hermétique est un vrai labyrinthe. Jerry Cornélius a disparu à la fin des années 70, dans le magazine métal hurlant. Il faut le retrouver avant le major, en avançant d'un minimum de deux pages par mois. Mais le garage hermétique est un vrai labyrinthe.

30 review for The Collected Fantasies, Vol. 3: The Airtight Garage

  1. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    "Grubert is a quasi-legendary being! He's the Creator of this world... he has allied himself with the twenty-three generating divinities who are the sacred pillars of the Tar'hai Mythology... with the help of thirteen expansion generators using The Grubert Effect (the patents of which he had just filed the previous day), he could transform any insignificant asteroid from somewhere within the belt, into a vast and complex world, with several levels if need be..." Jean Giraud, aka Moebius, "Grubert is a quasi-legendary being! He's the Creator of this world... he has allied himself with the twenty-three generating divinities who are the sacred pillars of the Tar'hai Mythology... with the help of thirteen expansion generators using The Grubert Effect (the patents of which he had just filed the previous day), he could transform any insignificant asteroid from somewhere within the belt, into a vast and complex world, with several levels if need be..." Jean Giraud, aka Moebius, aka Gir (for the Blueberry series), is also a quasi-legendary being: born in France in 1938, died just last year, co-founder of the magazine Metal Hurlant (known to english-speaking audiences as Heavy Metal), one of the most influential of comic artists, drug lover, New Age philosopher, deadpan humorist, devious postmodernist, genius. it is probably pretty pointless to give a synopsis to this collection of tales but i'll give it a try. so Major Grubert crosses time and space and travels throughout various dimensions. he and his lover Malvina have unimaginable powers although we get to witness very few of them. he has a rival who appears to be Michael Moorcock's character Jerry Cornelius. he has created a world - his own "Garage Hermetic". that world wants to grow on its own and no longer be Grubert's private fantasyland. revolution! but a very odd, minor note one. various personages (Engineer Barnier! The Archer! Samuel Mohad and his giant robot 'The Star Billiard'!) assemble and travel throughout this world's three levels, and to other places as well (poor Lark! stuck in the Old West!). they have various agendas and have various adventures. Major Grubert and Malvina also get involved, with varying degrees of effectiveness. and then... Not the End! adventures in the Garage Hermetic rarely end. characters die but hey they may be robotic avatars so no big deal. the whole world is a moebius strip so the last page is never the last page. here's poor, smitten Lark after finding that a kiss from Malvina will send you... elsewhere: this is one of my 5-star books that i find hard to recommend to most people. the narrative manages to be quaintly charming, nearly impenetrable, and to feel rather similar to that of a classic children's fantasy novel like one of the Oz books. it can be interpreted as a parody of colonial attitudes. it can be viewed as a wink in the direction of Moorcock's Multiverse. you can enjoy it as a series of rather adult Boy's Adventures. any specific "meaning" to be found is probably ephemeral at best and that meaning will most likely change by the next page. transformation, irony, pastiche, stylishness, psychedelia, non-linear, and whimsy are all words that can be seen as hallmarks of the various Airtight Garage tales. there are countless references, most of which i can barely understand. the art is by turns delicate, eerie, hallucinatory, and just plain lovely. very Yellow Submarine. very Fifth Element. very Art Deco. very original. very Moebius! his very name evokes the image of a particular kind of style, a particular sort of sensibility. in one of the interesting pieces included in this collection, Moebius explains his modus operandi: "Every month, I would try very hard to recreate a coherent story from the existing elements. Then, I would break them apart again in order to create again a feeling of insecurity, so that, the next month, I would again have to pick up the pieces and do it again, and so on until the end of the story." when i think of Moebius, i think of something that is both surreal and playful. the fizzy champagne version of postmodernism. Moebius juggles styles and ideas and homage and makes it all look so easy and fun. don't expect to find resolution or to even have an Aha, now I finally get it! type moment. but do expect to find things that you won't expect.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    If “The Airtight Garage” seems incoherent at times, that's at least partly by design. Moebius did the first two pages as a parody of a serial, setting things up so that it couldn't possibly go anywhere, or so he thought. The editor of Metal Hurlant found the pages in the artist’s studio, and asked him to draw an ending to the story so that he could publish it. One month later, Moebius was reminded of the promised ending, and he did two more pages to buy himself some time. And what began as a par If “The Airtight Garage” seems incoherent at times, that's at least partly by design. Moebius did the first two pages as a parody of a serial, setting things up so that it couldn't possibly go anywhere, or so he thought. The editor of Metal Hurlant found the pages in the artist’s studio, and asked him to draw an ending to the story so that he could publish it. One month later, Moebius was reminded of the promised ending, and he did two more pages to buy himself some time. And what began as a parody of a serial became an actual serial. Moebius intentionally set up a situation where his challenge every month was to solve the continuity problems that he had introduced in previous months. Needless to say, I won't attempt to summarize the plot. It defies easy summary. For an artist with a lesser imagination than Moebius, such an approach would result in an incoherent mess. That “The Airtight Garage” barely avoids this is a tribute to the artist’s genius. As originally published, the name of the character, Lewis Carnelian, was “Jerry Cornelius.” Cornelius was a character from the New Wave school of science fiction. The idea was that he would appear in works by multiple authors, partly as an inside joke, and partly as a sort of “open source” creation. The most famous appearances of the character were probably the novels by Michael Moorcock, and it may have been the fame of Moorcock’s books that led Moebius to rename the character for reprintings of the story.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    A hard to find and utterly weird, dreamlike comic. The more I think about it the less it approaches sense(not really its intent), but still the images are wonderful. Reminds me of the animated film The Fantastic Planet.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sebastien

    A really whacked out trippy sci-fi narrative meandering thru multiple dimensions/created worlds. So for me the story and narrative were so-so, but the art is just phenomenal. Def worth reading just to experience the art of Moebius. Kind of reminds me of Winsor McCay's Little Nemo, both the dreamlike quality and the art style. Speaking of which, I'd be curious if Moebius ever cited McCay's work as an influence, will have to look into that. A really whacked out trippy sci-fi narrative meandering thru multiple dimensions/created worlds. So for me the story and narrative were so-so, but the art is just phenomenal. Def worth reading just to experience the art of Moebius. Kind of reminds me of Winsor McCay's Little Nemo, both the dreamlike quality and the art style. Speaking of which, I'd be curious if Moebius ever cited McCay's work as an influence, will have to look into that.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I read the 4 issue reprint edition by DC. Each issue had a page prose recap of the plot... I have no idea what just happened in this comic. The story is serialized, so every few pages the page reprints the title. This causes the story to lose its smoothness of narration. Which isn't a particular problem here because the story seems nonsensical. (I think the author was making this up as he went along). The art is typical beautiful Moebius. Unfortunately that is the only redeeming feature of this c I read the 4 issue reprint edition by DC. Each issue had a page prose recap of the plot... I have no idea what just happened in this comic. The story is serialized, so every few pages the page reprints the title. This causes the story to lose its smoothness of narration. Which isn't a particular problem here because the story seems nonsensical. (I think the author was making this up as he went along). The art is typical beautiful Moebius. Unfortunately that is the only redeeming feature of this comic. I wish Moebius worked with writers more often because I find his solo work to lack a certain narrative cohesiveness.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Peterk

    For me this is the best comic novel ever, although not everybody's cup of tea due to its chaotic story structure and high level of complexity. I've read it over 20 times and with each read I still discover things I hadn't thought of before. Graphically Moebius has performed better than this (although the result he delivers here is still very impressive), but story wise it is so amazingly creative and refreshing it leaves all other comic books behind by far. As always with Moebius, you have to ac For me this is the best comic novel ever, although not everybody's cup of tea due to its chaotic story structure and high level of complexity. I've read it over 20 times and with each read I still discover things I hadn't thought of before. Graphically Moebius has performed better than this (although the result he delivers here is still very impressive), but story wise it is so amazingly creative and refreshing it leaves all other comic books behind by far. As always with Moebius, you have to accept that you'll probably be more puzzled when reaching the end of the book than you were when starting it, given his love for stopping a comic seemingly in the middle of the storyline, but the effort of going through is very rewarding and you keep falling form one wonder into another. A classic in every way!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Jackson

    3.5 stars. Psychedelic sci-fi adventure story dealing with multiple levels of reality. The storyline unfurls in short chapters that are designed to be alternately improvised and heavily-plotted. The overall vibe falls somewhere between, say, the films "The Holy Mountain" and "Fantastic Planet" without being as coherent or successful as either, though Moebius's imagery is often breathtaking. 3.5 stars. Psychedelic sci-fi adventure story dealing with multiple levels of reality. The storyline unfurls in short chapters that are designed to be alternately improvised and heavily-plotted. The overall vibe falls somewhere between, say, the films "The Holy Mountain" and "Fantastic Planet" without being as coherent or successful as either, though Moebius's imagery is often breathtaking.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    "The Hermetic Garage" is the 2nd volume in the "Major Grubert" series, which is among Moebius' most famous output but also in my book one of the most inaccessible and the most difficult to follow. One reason is that the "Major Grubert" trilogy in every volume throws the reader headfirst into a weird and complicated universe with minimal exposition, with this volume having a complex plot moving at a fast pace with new twists constantly popping up every chapter. Then we have the fact that Moebius "The Hermetic Garage" is the 2nd volume in the "Major Grubert" series, which is among Moebius' most famous output but also in my book one of the most inaccessible and the most difficult to follow. One reason is that the "Major Grubert" trilogy in every volume throws the reader headfirst into a weird and complicated universe with minimal exposition, with this volume having a complex plot moving at a fast pace with new twists constantly popping up every chapter. Then we have the fact that Moebius expects the audience to be familiar with quite a bit of literature that most readers under a certain age and outside certain countries are unlikely to even have heard of in the first place. One example: Until when I re-read "The Airtight Garage" in 2018, I did not know that this story is technically part of the British science-fiction/fantasy author Michael Moorcock's Eternal Champion cycle. This mythology follows the many different incarnations of a cosmic champion fighting for chaos and freedom against the forces of order and tyranny, through a multitude of parallel universe. One of the Eternal Champion's many incarnations appears as a main character here, Jerry Cornelius who can best be described as a No Celebrities Were Harmed version of David Bowie that moonlights as a time-travelling secret agent. The forces of order are represented by Major Grubert, a mysterious figure who appears as a stereotypical 19th century colonialist complete with pith helmet introduced in the previous volume "Horny Goof". What really made "The Airtight Garage" click for me was realising how Moebius has basically written a Gnostic Christian allegory here: Grubert is depicted as a Demiurge figure, that is a malevolent creator of the physical world masquerading as the true god, whom Jesus Christ is sent to expose. Notice the initials of Grubert's adversary Jerry Cornelius, whom Moebius depicts as a spiritually enlightened mystic who liberates the residents of an artificial planet. The religious themes in "The Airtight Garage" contains more examples of the its acute 1970s-ness: Moebius uses the plot to illustrate the ideas of Carlos Castañeda, a popular New Age author of the era who claimed to have been initiated into the shamanic traditions of the Yaqui Indians but was later revealed to be a total fraud. Anyway, the mysterious supernatural powers that Jerry Cornelius displays here, and the liberatory forces he channels, are exactly those (eg the Nagual) whom Castañeda claimed to have learned from the probably-fictional Yaqui sorcerer Don Juan Matus. The blending of New Agey mysticism with nuts-and-bolts space opera, as well as the Gnostic themes involving artificially constructed universes, nonetheless allows Moebius to pull out all stops when depicting strange and inventive settings that seamlessly blend elements from epic fantasy, "used future" science fiction, even superhero comics and spy thrillers. The landscapes and cities clearly draw upon his experience from mainstream Western comics, but are much more creative because he no longer has to stick to real-life societies and cultures. If you want to dig deeper, there's also some Cold War-era anti-imperialist left-wing political subtext: Parts of the artificial planet Grubert rules over resembling a futuristic North Africa, Grubert himself dressing like an old fashioned British colonialist etc. This aspect becomes clearer if you notice all the playing around with the genre conventions of espionage thriller novels that appear in the story, sometimes giving the feel of Joseph Conrad's "The Secret Agent" on mescaline. The trippy art might be the main attraction for readers of "The Airtight Garage", but if you are more familiar with all the literary and religious sources that Moebius draws on you might get even more out of the story. In particular if you try to patch together in your head how the fictional universe works. (which Moebius is purposefully vague about here) The result is one of those few creative works where I do genuinely discover something new about them every time I read them.

  9. 5 out of 5

    zxvasdf

    I order things I can't find through the local interlibrary loan system, and quite often I don't have much expectations towards actually acquiring a copy of an object of desire. Especially one as elusive as The Airtight Garage. Well, I was surprised. The only reason I wanted to read this is the Jerry Cornelius fiasco. Moorcock coined the character with the intent of allowing other authors to toy with him as they wished, and this was collected in The Nature of the Catastrophe. Well, apparently Moeb I order things I can't find through the local interlibrary loan system, and quite often I don't have much expectations towards actually acquiring a copy of an object of desire. Especially one as elusive as The Airtight Garage. Well, I was surprised. The only reason I wanted to read this is the Jerry Cornelius fiasco. Moorcock coined the character with the intent of allowing other authors to toy with him as they wished, and this was collected in The Nature of the Catastrophe. Well, apparently Moebius went ahead and made his own version of Jerry Cornelius. This caused a tiff between the two creators. Moorcock wasn't happy Moebius did this and Moebius wasn't happy that Moorcock wasn't happy. All in all, this resulted in Moebius's Cornelius being renamed Lewis Carnelian. Now the two creators are claiming that their disagreement was overblown in context, and that there wasn't really any animosity in the first place. I call bullshit on that—they're probably doing this because with the advent of technology and ease of shared content, their fanbases have grown larger and mingled. Now at risk of offending respective parties, they've pretended to make peace. Soem might say Moebius' Carnelian isn't a Cornelius knockoff in anything but name; this is definitely not true. Moebius' weird world borrows elements from Moorcock's Eternal Champion Multiverse, including, especially, the Second Ether. If you were ignorant of the controversy behind, and hadn't read Moorcock, you'd still enjoy this book, because Moebius is a genius in his field. His pages are gorgeous and despite the episodic nature of the narrative, you enjoy indulging in the title blocks and abosrbing the weirdness of the storytelling.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

    Not everything is as it seems. I wasn't too impressed with the art work or the trying too hard dialog. Then I read more. And read even further. My dreams were changed and interrupted with the stories of Jerry Cornelius (or Lewis Carnelian). Intense. Hopefully we will see an open-ended video game based on this world. Read it if you can find a copy. Not everything is as it seems. I wasn't too impressed with the art work or the trying too hard dialog. Then I read more. And read even further. My dreams were changed and interrupted with the stories of Jerry Cornelius (or Lewis Carnelian). Intense. Hopefully we will see an open-ended video game based on this world. Read it if you can find a copy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    I just... what? What did I just read? Who knows. Moebius' art was crazy fun, but I have no idea about anything else. This book is probably a lot more enjoyable if you happen to be in an altered state of consciousness. Other than that it's just really fucking bizarre. I just... what? What did I just read? Who knows. Moebius' art was crazy fun, but I have no idea about anything else. This book is probably a lot more enjoyable if you happen to be in an altered state of consciousness. Other than that it's just really fucking bizarre.

  12. 4 out of 5

    briz

    What in the Lord. IDEA: Wouldn't it have been awesome if Moebius had drawn a graphic novel based on Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles? Yeah. What in the Lord. IDEA: Wouldn't it have been awesome if Moebius had drawn a graphic novel based on Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles? Yeah.

  13. 5 out of 5

    BobFish

    I talked about this one here : https://youtu.be/i0cU6QLYV8o I talked about this one here : https://youtu.be/i0cU6QLYV8o

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jemppu

    Out of all the 'Collected Fantasies', "The Airtight Garage" is probably the one I've ever cared least about, for it's rather too whimsical narrative (decidedly so, as Giraud recounts in their commentary). But even still, it's free, unscripted imagination is to be appreciated for the visual execution; just as rich and artistically uncompromising as ever. Fine and calculated line-art of which I personally find much more appealing than the 'smudgy' strokes in "Arzach" . ("Ilmatiivis Autotalli" wa Out of all the 'Collected Fantasies', "The Airtight Garage" is probably the one I've ever cared least about, for it's rather too whimsical narrative (decidedly so, as Giraud recounts in their commentary). But even still, it's free, unscripted imagination is to be appreciated for the visual execution; just as rich and artistically uncompromising as ever. Fine and calculated line-art of which I personally find much more appealing than the 'smudgy' strokes in "Arzach" . ("Ilmatiivis Autotalli" was collected in their own separate albums in Finnish.)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Evan

    I respect Moebius quite a lot, and I feel SUPER guilty for not loving all of his stuff—like I'm wrong or broken—but Airtight Garage is one of the absolute least enjoyable things I've read in recent memory. Props to Moebius for having explored new narrative forms (i.e. the absence of a narrative), but holy shit if you're not going to tell a story, why waste the reader's time with so much gibberish nonsense dialogue and narration? Hate it, hate it. At least with Bulletproof Coffin, The Wrenchies, I respect Moebius quite a lot, and I feel SUPER guilty for not loving all of his stuff—like I'm wrong or broken—but Airtight Garage is one of the absolute least enjoyable things I've read in recent memory. Props to Moebius for having explored new narrative forms (i.e. the absence of a narrative), but holy shit if you're not going to tell a story, why waste the reader's time with so much gibberish nonsense dialogue and narration? Hate it, hate it. At least with Bulletproof Coffin, The Wrenchies, Prophet, and Multiple Warheads, it seemed as if SOME thought and consideration went into their overwrought deliberate nonsense.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Abe Something

    So much fun, but it requires you to let go of your expectations of how a story comes together. Moebius is clearly writing this story as he goes along, and possibly not going back to read previous pages but merely recalling pieces of them. It is largely coherent, despite a few sequences with questionable motives/intent. The story wraps with a touch too much convenience, which would have been a let down were it not for the final two pages. Those last two pages made the whole book complete and sati So much fun, but it requires you to let go of your expectations of how a story comes together. Moebius is clearly writing this story as he goes along, and possibly not going back to read previous pages but merely recalling pieces of them. It is largely coherent, despite a few sequences with questionable motives/intent. The story wraps with a touch too much convenience, which would have been a let down were it not for the final two pages. Those last two pages made the whole book complete and satisfying. And, of course, the art is marvelous.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    There's nothing quite like Moebius, in terms of artwork and writing style. The artwork is utterly dreamlike. Dense, heavy with moving parts, gentle, abstract--he's got it all. The narrative structure is at times chaotic and difficult to follow, but it ultimately rewards with quirky characters and plot points. These are not easy to find, so if you're able to get a hold of one, do it. There's nothing quite like Moebius, in terms of artwork and writing style. The artwork is utterly dreamlike. Dense, heavy with moving parts, gentle, abstract--he's got it all. The narrative structure is at times chaotic and difficult to follow, but it ultimately rewards with quirky characters and plot points. These are not easy to find, so if you're able to get a hold of one, do it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    It's really a shame that an English translation of this book as well as the rest of Moebius's work isn't kept in print on a more less permanent basis. The Airtight Garage is arguably the best thing that Girard did under the Möebius pen name. It's filled with the most incredible, mind bending art, as well as a cast of quirky characters who came alive on the page. It's really a shame that an English translation of this book as well as the rest of Moebius's work isn't kept in print on a more less permanent basis. The Airtight Garage is arguably the best thing that Girard did under the Möebius pen name. It's filled with the most incredible, mind bending art, as well as a cast of quirky characters who came alive on the page.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zena V.

    what did i just read?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    I can't begin to explain how amazing Moebius's lines are. The details made this longer to read than it should have - analyzing each panel, the cross hatching and color combinations... Sigh. I can't begin to explain how amazing Moebius's lines are. The details made this longer to read than it should have - analyzing each panel, the cross hatching and color combinations... Sigh.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Of all the works by Jean Giraud that I have read, The Airtight Garage represents the pinnacle, with the artist presenting some of his most amazing artwork alongside a characteristically freewheeling narrative that draws inspiration from a whole host of wonderful sources. Major Grubert (he of the stylish pith helmet) is at the heart of this wild story, and his almost comical appearance belies his outsize role as an immortal possessing god-like powers of creation. But with any number of antagonists Of all the works by Jean Giraud that I have read, The Airtight Garage represents the pinnacle, with the artist presenting some of his most amazing artwork alongside a characteristically freewheeling narrative that draws inspiration from a whole host of wonderful sources. Major Grubert (he of the stylish pith helmet) is at the heart of this wild story, and his almost comical appearance belies his outsize role as an immortal possessing god-like powers of creation. But with any number of antagonists, as well as his plotting lady-love Malvina, nothing the Major attempts is easy, and the journey that Giraud constructs for his protagonist is a thrilling ride for the reader. The Airtight Garage has stuck with me ever since I first read it as a young college student, and its powerful imagery has found echoes in odd places throughout my adult life. The book is just that good; it not only impresses on the first read, but stays with you ever after as you navigate your way through the world, a world you begin to suspect may in fact be yet another of Major Grubert's incredible creations.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Frank McGirk

    Okay...not this book, but the complete mini-series of The Elsewhere Prince. Fun, weird, overly complex, and then stunningly (and amusingly stupidly) simple. I really enjoyed this series, especially the odd shorts at the ends of the issues. I tried reading a collection of the more adored Moebius stuff, but couldn't get into it. This world, and the "let's not take my seriousness seriously" approach worked for me though. CREEPY art in issue six. Okay...not this book, but the complete mini-series of The Elsewhere Prince. Fun, weird, overly complex, and then stunningly (and amusingly stupidly) simple. I really enjoyed this series, especially the odd shorts at the ends of the issues. I tried reading a collection of the more adored Moebius stuff, but couldn't get into it. This world, and the "let's not take my seriousness seriously" approach worked for me though. CREEPY art in issue six.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    The airtight garage and the rest of the stories combined in the third volume of Moebius' collected fantasies are a crazy creative experience to read. Giraud introduces Major Grubert in this volume whose postmodern stories take him to journeys to beautifully illustrated lands. The story is as weird and campy as it can be but the soul and creativity make anything Moebius writes fun. The airtight garage and the rest of the stories combined in the third volume of Moebius' collected fantasies are a crazy creative experience to read. Giraud introduces Major Grubert in this volume whose postmodern stories take him to journeys to beautifully illustrated lands. The story is as weird and campy as it can be but the soul and creativity make anything Moebius writes fun.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gurra

    I don't really understand the story, but the world and images are so satisfying to look at, so I just have to read it again. I don't really understand the story, but the world and images are so satisfying to look at, so I just have to read it again.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Максим Гах

    Crazy stuff)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ted

    Wonderfully strange and strangely wonderful.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Morpheus Lunae

    I loved how loose and associative these stories were. There is also a ton of drawing techniques and styles to be studied here.

  28. 4 out of 5

    NONATION

    perfect perfect is amazing

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    I'd been recommended this as the best Moebius book. How nice when something chimes with your own strange dreams, just yesterday I was walking down a dark street writing a sci fi story about a milk-like immortal alien creature... today I read this book, where such a creation would be entirely at home. I'd been recommended this as the best Moebius book. How nice when something chimes with your own strange dreams, just yesterday I was walking down a dark street writing a sci fi story about a milk-like immortal alien creature... today I read this book, where such a creation would be entirely at home.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Admittedly, the story is a little (very) difficult to follow...and Moebius himself admits this...but the artwork in here is so sensational (not surprisingly). No one I can think of can create such intricate illustrations with such solid forms...his characters exist in a rich, real world (of course, that real world is about as magical and surreal as you could imagine).

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