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Contiene Marvel Graphic Novel. Doctor Strange: Into Shamballa USA. El guionista de "La última cacería de Kraven" y el mítico dibujante del Doctor Extraño Dan Green desarrollan una historia del Señor de las Artes Místicas diferente a cualquier otra que se haya narrado jamás, publicada originalmente en 1986, dentro de la primera serie de Novelas Gráficas Marvel e inédita hast Contiene Marvel Graphic Novel. Doctor Strange: Into Shamballa USA. El guionista de "La última cacería de Kraven" y el mítico dibujante del Doctor Extraño Dan Green desarrollan una historia del Señor de las Artes Místicas diferente a cualquier otra que se haya narrado jamás, publicada originalmente en 1986, dentro de la primera serie de Novelas Gráficas Marvel e inédita hasta ahora en España. El Doctor Extraño regresa a su antiguo hogar en el Himalaya, donde fuera introducido por El Anciano en las artes arcanas. Stephen Extraño está allí para rendir un último homenaje a su maestro... Pero es entonces cuando descubre que El Anciano le ha dejado un último y misterioso regalo. Guión: J. M. DeMatteis Dibujo: Dan Green


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Contiene Marvel Graphic Novel. Doctor Strange: Into Shamballa USA. El guionista de "La última cacería de Kraven" y el mítico dibujante del Doctor Extraño Dan Green desarrollan una historia del Señor de las Artes Místicas diferente a cualquier otra que se haya narrado jamás, publicada originalmente en 1986, dentro de la primera serie de Novelas Gráficas Marvel e inédita hast Contiene Marvel Graphic Novel. Doctor Strange: Into Shamballa USA. El guionista de "La última cacería de Kraven" y el mítico dibujante del Doctor Extraño Dan Green desarrollan una historia del Señor de las Artes Místicas diferente a cualquier otra que se haya narrado jamás, publicada originalmente en 1986, dentro de la primera serie de Novelas Gráficas Marvel e inédita hasta ahora en España. El Doctor Extraño regresa a su antiguo hogar en el Himalaya, donde fuera introducido por El Anciano en las artes arcanas. Stephen Extraño está allí para rendir un último homenaje a su maestro... Pero es entonces cuando descubre que El Anciano le ha dejado un último y misterioso regalo. Guión: J. M. DeMatteis Dibujo: Dan Green

30 review for Doctor Extraño: Dentro de Shamballa

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    Doctor Strange Into Shamballa is way different from a typical superhero story. It has a certain level of mysticism and abstraction that truly stands out due to an amazing art and engaging narration. The nearest I can think of about it is that it reads like Sandman with some Promethea elements coupled with nirvana-ish stuff. Here, our Sorcerer Supreme doesn't battle any villain. This Marvel graphic novel is more of an inner discovery of oneself. Crudely explained, it is a deep journey on how Docto Doctor Strange Into Shamballa is way different from a typical superhero story. It has a certain level of mysticism and abstraction that truly stands out due to an amazing art and engaging narration. The nearest I can think of about it is that it reads like Sandman with some Promethea elements coupled with nirvana-ish stuff. Here, our Sorcerer Supreme doesn't battle any villain. This Marvel graphic novel is more of an inner discovery of oneself. Crudely explained, it is a deep journey on how Doctor Strange acquired his magic. Into Shamballa is a visual treat. The illustrations are top-notch and perfectly complement the narration. It is like an art Alex Ross drew in his dreams (or when baked!). The details and expressions are hauntingly accurate.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    Although Stan Lee and Steve Ditko created everyone's favourite web-slinger that will forever be as popular as Batman and Superman, there was another Marvel creation under their collaboration that ware more mature and leans more toward the supernatural and the sci-fi origins of most of Marvel's back catalogue. Although Doctor Strange has his own movie that was hugely successful, his adventures were always more psychedelic than the typical superhero spectacle, including this graphic novel that is Although Stan Lee and Steve Ditko created everyone's favourite web-slinger that will forever be as popular as Batman and Superman, there was another Marvel creation under their collaboration that ware more mature and leans more toward the supernatural and the sci-fi origins of most of Marvel's back catalogue. Although Doctor Strange has his own movie that was hugely successful, his adventures were always more psychedelic than the typical superhero spectacle, including this graphic novel that is a favourite towards the Strange enthusiasts. As part of the Marvel Graphic Novel line published from 1982 to 1993, Doctor Strange returns to the Ancient One's Himalayan home to pay respect to his departed master, and discovers that his mentor has left one final gift, in the shape of a mysterious box. Instead of facing a villain like Baron Mordo or Dormammu, Into Shamballa is really a journey of self-discovery for the eponymous doctor who, despite his title of "Master of the Mystic Arts", he is still wrestling with his inner demons, as established when his first instinct after wasting many hours trying to dissect the Ancient One's box is to simply destroy it, which immediately plunges him to some place otherworldly. Marvel is all about flawed heroes and Stephen Strange is no exception as he was an egotistical surgeon before a car accident permanently damaged his hands. What we get from this story that has a great narration by J. M. DeMatteis, Strange may not have rid himself of his ego and feels a sense of unfinished business with his departed master. Under the writing style of a prose novel, DeMatteis goes in depth to how the Doctor ticks and no matter how outlandish the story goes, Strange as a protagonist grounds it all. With a lengthy career as an inker, co-writer Dan Green provided the watercolour illustrations, showcasing his stunning depictions of the numerous locations from our world to the other dimensions. For a book that is word-heavy, there are plenty of pages in which it’s just the art, that is very close to Alex Ross illustrating a Doctor Strange story. Honestly, given that it was published in 1986 as well as the history of that character, you can see how Stan Lee and Steve Ditko's creation was a big influence towards the likes of Neil Gaiman's The Sandman. Granted, this is no longer in publication (and there are diehard fans that are screaming for a rerelease), if you can track down Doctor Strange: Into Shamballa by J. M. DeMatteis and Dan Green, it is worth your time as this is a truly magical labyrinthine story that brings out the best of the Sorcerer Supreme.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    Dr. Strange has always been one of my favorite characters. So while I was haunting the aisles of my local bookstore, I stumbled across this gem. Into Shamballa was written back in 1986, but due to the exceptional writing of Mr. DeMatteis and the surreal art, which reminds me of a painting, this book feels timeless. The story begins with Dr. Strange making a trip to pay his respects to the Ancient One's temple. The Ancient One has passed away, some time ago, but Dr. Strange finds that he has left Dr. Strange has always been one of my favorite characters. So while I was haunting the aisles of my local bookstore, I stumbled across this gem. Into Shamballa was written back in 1986, but due to the exceptional writing of Mr. DeMatteis and the surreal art, which reminds me of a painting, this book feels timeless. The story begins with Dr. Strange making a trip to pay his respects to the Ancient One's temple. The Ancient One has passed away, some time ago, but Dr. Strange finds that he has left him one final gift- a strange box. Upon exploring the box, Strange is thrust into the middle of an epic quest. The Lords of Shamballa, powerful spiritual beings, and the soul of the Ancient One want to usher in a Golden Age for man. But, in order to do this Dr. Strange, as Sorcerer Supreme, must be the one who starts the events that will lead to Armageddon. In the aftermath, the new humanity will be more in tune with the ancient ley lines of magic and this new generation of humanity will achieve the pinnacle of human spiritual development and create a near utopia. For obvious reasons, Dr. Strange isn't quite on board with the concept of Armageddon but the source of the quest and it's potential has him conflicted. I shall not spoil the rest, as it is well worth reading. This graphic novel is the quintessential Dr. Strange tale. It's magic is not only spell based by also metaphysical. The writing evokes a feel of reading a magical theory book and the artwork truly does complement the story. Mr. DeMattis explores the inner psyche of Dr. Strange and shows us some other sides to the Ancient Ones retreat and his servants. The prose is very well done. It makes you think and consider many aspects of the Sorcerer Supreme beyond just magic. This is what a Dr. Strange novel should be- strange and exotic magic, powerful entities from many cultures, intelligent and thought provoking concepts of magic and the soul and an art style that works in tandem with this amazing tale. If you are a Dr. Strange fan or enjoy surreal magical tales-then I can not recommend this to you enough.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Nice Dr Strange story. Good art and plot. Recommended

  5. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    It's hard to make long-winded, labyrinthine wanderings into introspection and self-discovery work, in any medium. I'd think it would be even harder in the comics medium, but this was one cool dive down that rabbit hole. and what a cool feeling to come out at the end feeling whole, a little enlightened. J.M. DeMatteis is a great writer. Period. It's hard to make long-winded, labyrinthine wanderings into introspection and self-discovery work, in any medium. I'd think it would be even harder in the comics medium, but this was one cool dive down that rabbit hole. and what a cool feeling to come out at the end feeling whole, a little enlightened. J.M. DeMatteis is a great writer. Period.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Suarezserna

    The artwork is beautiful. I haven't read that many comic books, but this is the closest to weird fiction I've found yet. As other reviewers pointed out, it's a very introspective work. If you showed this comic to someone who didn't know Dr. Strange was a superhero, he could read this story and still wouldn't have a clue about it. It's a tale about a wizard and (what he believes is) his final encounter with his deceased master, who has left him an intriguing gift. The artwork is beautiful. I haven't read that many comic books, but this is the closest to weird fiction I've found yet. As other reviewers pointed out, it's a very introspective work. If you showed this comic to someone who didn't know Dr. Strange was a superhero, he could read this story and still wouldn't have a clue about it. It's a tale about a wizard and (what he believes is) his final encounter with his deceased master, who has left him an intriguing gift.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Don

    What an unusual read! Less a comic and more an illustrated short story, the prose is perhaps a little too steeped in mysticism, with the end being (predictably) little more than philosophical reflection and revelation. That's not necessarily bad, and arguably what a Doctor Strange story should be - and, appropriately, what J.M. DeMatteis is known for. Dan Green's painted artwork is gorgeous (if occasionally too abstract) and somewhat reminiscent of Jon J. Muth's , another frequent DeMatteis coll What an unusual read! Less a comic and more an illustrated short story, the prose is perhaps a little too steeped in mysticism, with the end being (predictably) little more than philosophical reflection and revelation. That's not necessarily bad, and arguably what a Doctor Strange story should be - and, appropriately, what J.M. DeMatteis is known for. Dan Green's painted artwork is gorgeous (if occasionally too abstract) and somewhat reminiscent of Jon J. Muth's , another frequent DeMatteis collaborator. All in all, this graphic novel is probably a great example of why the Doctor has never been able to hold a monthly series for very long: When done right, it's odd and enjoyable - but only in very small doses.

  8. 4 out of 5

    KK

    Amazing artwork!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tony Calder

    This Dr Strange story doesn't really fit with the standard offerings of Dr Strange in his bi-monthly magazine. This is a journey of introspection, of discovery, and in many respects it completes the journey that Stephen Strange began in Strange Tales #110 in 1963. J.M. DeMatteis gives us a story steeped in Eastern spirituality and mysticism, which sends Strange on a journey of self-discovery or, more correctly, allows him to finish the journey he started in the first appearance of the character. This Dr Strange story doesn't really fit with the standard offerings of Dr Strange in his bi-monthly magazine. This is a journey of introspection, of discovery, and in many respects it completes the journey that Stephen Strange began in Strange Tales #110 in 1963. J.M. DeMatteis gives us a story steeped in Eastern spirituality and mysticism, which sends Strange on a journey of self-discovery or, more correctly, allows him to finish the journey he started in the first appearance of the character. If Marvel had never published another Dr Strange story after this, it would have been a fitting end to his story - except, of course, then we wouldn't have got the very enjoyable Dr Strange movie with Benedict Cumberbatch :) Dan Green provides beautifully evocative artwork to accompany it. Instead of the usual pencil, ink, and colours of a standard comic, Green seems to have pencilled and painted each panel and it certainly suits this story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Johnson

    An absolute wonder. One of the most beautiful experiences of art and words I've ever had. Beyond the fact that I am Doctor-Strange-All-the-Things, I got so much out of this piece, even on a spiritual level. I really hope I can buy a print copy of this someday! An absolute wonder. One of the most beautiful experiences of art and words I've ever had. Beyond the fact that I am Doctor-Strange-All-the-Things, I got so much out of this piece, even on a spiritual level. I really hope I can buy a print copy of this someday!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    Ugh. This was some 'spiritual journey' story that -- while it contained great art -- was completely uninteresting. Doctor Strange was not different at the end of the book than he was in the beginning -- thus leaving me wondering why they wasted energy on producing a special graphic novel on this subject at all. Ugh. This was some 'spiritual journey' story that -- while it contained great art -- was completely uninteresting. Doctor Strange was not different at the end of the book than he was in the beginning -- thus leaving me wondering why they wasted energy on producing a special graphic novel on this subject at all.

  12. 4 out of 5

    শুভঙ্কর শুভ

    fabulous arts with narratives

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adrya Ribeiro

    Nunca li nada sobre Doctor Strange, mas essa viagem foi muito boa.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katarina (poleksya)

    This was something completely different then the previous story (I've read a bind up of this and Doctor Strange, Doctor Doom: Triumph and Terror) and I enjoyed it a bit more, although I had to go back a few times and read it again to understand. Into Shamballa isn't a typical super hero story, but an exploration of Doctor Strange's character and a story of self discovery. It has gorgeous artwork, just the kind I love, dreamlike and weird. This might not be for everyone's taste, but if you are a This was something completely different then the previous story (I've read a bind up of this and Doctor Strange, Doctor Doom: Triumph and Terror) and I enjoyed it a bit more, although I had to go back a few times and read it again to understand. Into Shamballa isn't a typical super hero story, but an exploration of Doctor Strange's character and a story of self discovery. It has gorgeous artwork, just the kind I love, dreamlike and weird. This might not be for everyone's taste, but if you are a fan of Doctor Strange, I encourage you give this one a go.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Letizia Loi

    Bellissimo! Ogni pagina - tutte in acquerello! - è un vero e proprio pezzo d'arte. La particolarità dei fumetti migliori di Doctor Strange, poi, è che sono sempre un viaggio, un avventura mistica, alla fine della quale impara qualcosa. Perché nonostante sia uno degli eroi più potenti dell'universo, al suo nocciolo rimane un uomo che viene costantemente tentato dai suoi difetti; la parte più realistica del personaggio, con la quale chiunque si può immedesimare. Bellissimo! Ogni pagina - tutte in acquerello! - è un vero e proprio pezzo d'arte. La particolarità dei fumetti migliori di Doctor Strange, poi, è che sono sempre un viaggio, un avventura mistica, alla fine della quale impara qualcosa. Perché nonostante sia uno degli eroi più potenti dell'universo, al suo nocciolo rimane un uomo che viene costantemente tentato dai suoi difetti; la parte più realistica del personaggio, con la quale chiunque si può immedesimare.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Doctor Alpha

    The fact that I couldn't finish this 64-pages short story speaks volumes about its real quality. It's more a glorified artist portfolio by Dan Green than an actual comic with proper and engaging storyline(s). Justice League International this is not. Extremely - and I mean EXTREMELY - boring read. Avoid paying the crazy amount of money it is sold on ebay or on the collector's market, it is not worth it. More like a 50 cents bargain bin than anything else. The fact that I couldn't finish this 64-pages short story speaks volumes about its real quality. It's more a glorified artist portfolio by Dan Green than an actual comic with proper and engaging storyline(s). Justice League International this is not. Extremely - and I mean EXTREMELY - boring read. Avoid paying the crazy amount of money it is sold on ebay or on the collector's market, it is not worth it. More like a 50 cents bargain bin than anything else.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Zare

    Art in this book is one of the most beautiful I ever saw (in same vein as The Redeemer (Elektra vs Logan) but more epic in my opinion). Story is intriguing and ending more than satisfying. I had an opportunity to purchase this one together with one other Dr Strange graphic novel. If you manage to get your hands on a copy I wholeheartedly recommend it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Laroche

    The plot is extremely difficult to follow and I wouldn't call it well-written. However, the combination of the uniquely beautiful art and the abnormal story structure give this book a rare feeling of mysticism that makes it worth the read. The plot is extremely difficult to follow and I wouldn't call it well-written. However, the combination of the uniquely beautiful art and the abnormal story structure give this book a rare feeling of mysticism that makes it worth the read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gui Schmidt

    It has great human x wizard divergent questions and it show us, in a few pages, how unprepared Strange is to handle things despite of him thinking that he is ready for anything being the Mage Supreme.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ítalo Medeiros

    Belíssimas ilustrações

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alec Vangelis

    Indispensable para cualquiera que aprecie el arte de los cómics.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jorge Schumacher

    A história é bem filosófica, e se assemelha mais a um conto ilustrado que a um quadrinho. A arte é muito bela.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Reyel2107

    a great dr Strange graphic novel !!! the art is magic !!!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rizzie

    This one's pretty cool. Very simple, weird little story, but told in an unusual way. It works quite well, and the art is gorgeous. This one's pretty cool. Very simple, weird little story, but told in an unusual way. It works quite well, and the art is gorgeous.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Víctor Segovia

    Primera historia del buen doc que leo, pero no es la primera que leo de su autor. Creo que fue el indicado para redactarla, ya que todo ese asunto de la búsqueda de Shamballa era el que mejor le quedaba. Ciertamente no es la típica historia de algún usuario de super mallas de la Casa de las Ideas y eso la convierte en una lectura recomendable

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rick Davis

    Kind of disappointed here after hearing a lot of good things about this one. Beautiful art. Fairly interesting concept. But the attempts to be Very Deep and Thoughtful and Philosophical just come off as shallow and hokey. I like the Lee/Ditko era Strange that is more self aware of its hammy and campy nature and doesn't seriously try to impart second-hand, quasi-Buddhist, spiritual truth to the reader. Kind of disappointed here after hearing a lot of good things about this one. Beautiful art. Fairly interesting concept. But the attempts to be Very Deep and Thoughtful and Philosophical just come off as shallow and hokey. I like the Lee/Ditko era Strange that is more self aware of its hammy and campy nature and doesn't seriously try to impart second-hand, quasi-Buddhist, spiritual truth to the reader.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Wright

    SPOILERS Doctor Strange: Into Shamballa is a puzzle, a poem, a prayer, and a dream. It is a mirror about mirrors. In some ways, it’s an act of magic in and of itself. The antagonist is the embodiment of illusion herself, blocking Doctor Strange’s efforts to see the ultimate reality, yet the story itself is an illusion that aims to reveal reality. As DeMatteis puts it here, “Our illusions will be the very means… of our purification.” This is one of the great DeMatteis themes, one that crops up aga SPOILERS Doctor Strange: Into Shamballa is a puzzle, a poem, a prayer, and a dream. It is a mirror about mirrors. In some ways, it’s an act of magic in and of itself. The antagonist is the embodiment of illusion herself, blocking Doctor Strange’s efforts to see the ultimate reality, yet the story itself is an illusion that aims to reveal reality. As DeMatteis puts it here, “Our illusions will be the very means… of our purification.” This is one of the great DeMatteis themes, one that crops up again and again in his more personal stories and one that will come to fruition in his autobiographical Brooklyn Dreams. In the great DC vs. Marvel debate, I’ve been a DC guy since the days of Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing. But even I have to admit that superheroes as we know them would not exist without Stan Lee. I can say, without hyperbole, that Stan Lee did for American comics what Shakespeare did for English drama; he gave the characters a psychological and emotional depth they never had before. In short, he gave them inner turmoil. While Spider-Man is the poster boy for inner turmoil in the Marvel U, I’ve always been drawn to Stan’s philosophical and even spiritual seekers. While Silver Surfer’s soliloquies covered the philosophical end of the spectrum, Marvel’s Sorcerer Supreme was always the most mystical of the Marvel heroes. Enter J.M. DeMatteis, hot off the heels of the groundbreaking Moonshadow (and only a year away from his career-defining run on JLI and his classic Spider-Man story Kraven’s Last Hunt), chomping at the bit to tell the kind of deep and meaningful stories that kept him up at night. As big of a comics fan as DeMatteis was as a young man, his writing is more influenced by writers like Bradbury and Dostoyevsky and, most importantly for this story, Hermann Hesse. Doctor Strange: Into Shamballa reads very much like a comic book adaptation of Hermann Hesse’s Journey to the East, with its Eastern mysticism motif and themes of deep spiritual searching.There’s even an apparently simple servant who turns out to be more than what he seems. Interestingly, there’s also a plot parallel between this and Watchmen, which has just begun its serialized publication when Into Shamballa hit shelves. Much like Ozymandias, Doctor Strange is put in a position where he decides to save the world by committing mass murder. Here, the voice of his master, the Ancient One, tells him that he must purge humanity so that it can enter the golden age of enlightenment. So Doctor Strange sets off on a quest to enact a spell that will revive the magical energy in the mystical ley lines that cross the globe and, incidentally, kill most of mankind. But while DeMatteis does introduce the moral ambiguity of so many grim-and-gritty post-Watchmen comics, he resolves it, not with violence, but with enlightenment. The eloquence of DeMatteis’ prose is matched, if not exceeded, by Dan Green’s awe-inspiring painted artwork. Green (who also gets a story credit) is a veteran inker of almost every Marvel book there ever was, and most recently contributed to Jeff Lemire’s revamped Animal Man series. But, to my knowledge, he’s never painted anything else in comics, and that’s a real shame. Green’s surreal imagery and ethereal palette establish the mystical and illusory tones of the story’s theme. Doctor Strange is on an interior journey, but Green externalizes his quest for enlightenment in a series of symbolic images that takes the reader on the same journey to the center of the mind, heart, and soul.

  28. 4 out of 5

    New Frontiersnerd

    TRILHA SONORA DA ENYA Se eu não fosse partidário do RESENHISMO MIL FOLHAS, te definiria Dr. Estranho: Em Shamballa assim, ó: 1986. Originalmente publicada em setembro de 1986 [ainda que só chegasse ao Brasil, pelas mãos da Abril, em novembro de 1989], exatamente um mês antes da última edição de Watchmen: a graphic novel é a cara de sua década. [+] http://www.newfrontiersnerd.com.br/20... TRILHA SONORA DA ENYA Se eu não fosse partidário do RESENHISMO MIL FOLHAS, te definiria Dr. Estranho: Em Shamballa assim, ó: 1986. Originalmente publicada em setembro de 1986 [ainda que só chegasse ao Brasil, pelas mãos da Abril, em novembro de 1989], exatamente um mês antes da última edição de Watchmen: a graphic novel é a cara de sua década. [+] http://www.newfrontiersnerd.com.br/20...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Winston Blakely

    This graphic novel is an hidden treasure and something that I have cherished over the years. A deep spiritual journey is involved that takes Doctor Strange, Master of the Mystic Arts in realms of occult awareness that will make him truly The Sorcerer Supreme. Its beautiful illustrated in a watercolor mode of storytelling.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    This is the sort of deep, philosophical comic that JM DeMatteis does so often, and he's good at it. Normally, however, it's not really my cup of tea. However, Dan Green's art makes this work in a way that I don't think it would work if it were a more traditional comic. In this case, the format is perfect for the story, which meshes well with the art. This is the sort of deep, philosophical comic that JM DeMatteis does so often, and he's good at it. Normally, however, it's not really my cup of tea. However, Dan Green's art makes this work in a way that I don't think it would work if it were a more traditional comic. In this case, the format is perfect for the story, which meshes well with the art.

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