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Be Ever Hopeful, Hannalee: Historical Fiction for Teens

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The cannons have finally stopped booming, and the Civil War is over. Hannalee Reed is home from the North, where she and her little brother, Jem, had been taken by Union soldiers to work in a Yankee mill. But the plucky quick-witted heroine of Patricia Beatty’s best-selling novel of the Civil War South, Turn Homeward, Hannalee, must leave again. This time it is for Atlanta The cannons have finally stopped booming, and the Civil War is over. Hannalee Reed is home from the North, where she and her little brother, Jem, had been taken by Union soldiers to work in a Yankee mill. But the plucky quick-witted heroine of Patricia Beatty’s best-selling novel of the Civil War South, Turn Homeward, Hannalee, must leave again. This time it is for Atlanta, where her older brother, Davey is determined to make a new life for his family. However reluctant she is, Hannalee faces this new upheaval and the hardships it brings with the same indomitable spirit and ever-hopeful optimism that saw her through her darkest hours up North. She finds work in a dry-goods store to help support her family She thwarts the efforts of a persistent Yankee officer who is searching for her. And when Davey is arrested for a crime he did not commit, Hannalee unhesitatingly puts herself in danger to prove his innocence. Patricia Beatty weaves drama and suspense into her evocative, historically accurate picture of postwar Atlanta. Be Ever Hopeful, Hannalee is alive with the same type of emotional power, sweeping background, and unforgettable people as its companion volume. "In her sequel to Turn Homeward, Hannalee, Beatty describes the life of her plucky heroine and her family in postwar Atlanta, once again giving her readers a vivid picture of a little-known aspect of the Civil War and its aftermath. When Hannalee’s brother, Davey, returns one-armed and embittered from his service in the Confederacy, he decides that the family must leave the Roswell home for Atlanta’s booming economy. They arrive to find high prices and no place to live—except a refugee camp. Everyone must work, mostly for the hated Yankees, and this—added to the fact that Davey’s disability forces him to train for something other than his carpentry trade—further embitters Davey. His anger, his loneliness for the girl he thinks he has lost, and his involvement with a group of ex-Confederates lead to a near-tragic climax—during which Hannalee’s courage and that of two new friends (one a Yankee and the other a freed black girl) come to the rescue…Beatty’s use of period detail and her well-turned plot give the book texture and excitement. For fans of the brave Hannalee, this will be a welcome follow-up." KIRKUS REVIEW


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The cannons have finally stopped booming, and the Civil War is over. Hannalee Reed is home from the North, where she and her little brother, Jem, had been taken by Union soldiers to work in a Yankee mill. But the plucky quick-witted heroine of Patricia Beatty’s best-selling novel of the Civil War South, Turn Homeward, Hannalee, must leave again. This time it is for Atlanta The cannons have finally stopped booming, and the Civil War is over. Hannalee Reed is home from the North, where she and her little brother, Jem, had been taken by Union soldiers to work in a Yankee mill. But the plucky quick-witted heroine of Patricia Beatty’s best-selling novel of the Civil War South, Turn Homeward, Hannalee, must leave again. This time it is for Atlanta, where her older brother, Davey is determined to make a new life for his family. However reluctant she is, Hannalee faces this new upheaval and the hardships it brings with the same indomitable spirit and ever-hopeful optimism that saw her through her darkest hours up North. She finds work in a dry-goods store to help support her family She thwarts the efforts of a persistent Yankee officer who is searching for her. And when Davey is arrested for a crime he did not commit, Hannalee unhesitatingly puts herself in danger to prove his innocence. Patricia Beatty weaves drama and suspense into her evocative, historically accurate picture of postwar Atlanta. Be Ever Hopeful, Hannalee is alive with the same type of emotional power, sweeping background, and unforgettable people as its companion volume. "In her sequel to Turn Homeward, Hannalee, Beatty describes the life of her plucky heroine and her family in postwar Atlanta, once again giving her readers a vivid picture of a little-known aspect of the Civil War and its aftermath. When Hannalee’s brother, Davey, returns one-armed and embittered from his service in the Confederacy, he decides that the family must leave the Roswell home for Atlanta’s booming economy. They arrive to find high prices and no place to live—except a refugee camp. Everyone must work, mostly for the hated Yankees, and this—added to the fact that Davey’s disability forces him to train for something other than his carpentry trade—further embitters Davey. His anger, his loneliness for the girl he thinks he has lost, and his involvement with a group of ex-Confederates lead to a near-tragic climax—during which Hannalee’s courage and that of two new friends (one a Yankee and the other a freed black girl) come to the rescue…Beatty’s use of period detail and her well-turned plot give the book texture and excitement. For fans of the brave Hannalee, this will be a welcome follow-up." KIRKUS REVIEW

30 review for Be Ever Hopeful, Hannalee: Historical Fiction for Teens

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Another one that I read as a kid and never forgot (except for the title...It has taken me some time to find it again). I didn't realize it was a series so now...I shall be on a mission to read the first one. Another one that I read as a kid and never forgot (except for the title...It has taken me some time to find it again). I didn't realize it was a series so now...I shall be on a mission to read the first one.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I purchased this book as a possible placement in the reading section of our gift shop for kids. It is the story of a young girl growing up during and after the Civil War in my community. It is well written and researched. I felt the plot less compelling than the book Ms. Beatty wrote chronologically just before this one, Turn Homeward Hannalle. Unfortunately, after deciding it would be a good fit for us, I discovered it is no longer in print and the author has passed. Too bad. American History is I purchased this book as a possible placement in the reading section of our gift shop for kids. It is the story of a young girl growing up during and after the Civil War in my community. It is well written and researched. I felt the plot less compelling than the book Ms. Beatty wrote chronologically just before this one, Turn Homeward Hannalle. Unfortunately, after deciding it would be a good fit for us, I discovered it is no longer in print and the author has passed. Too bad. American History is being lost to our students and this book would have been a history lesson as well as a good read for them.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cassiejoan

    I read this growing up but had no recollection of it and wanted to see if it was something that we might enjoy in our homeschool or just as a read aloud. I totally missed that this was a sequel until I was half way through my reread, so there's that. This is a story of the South after losing the Civil War and the main characters are very "pro South" yet do not support slavery. I found this a bit *too* convenient, especially since no other explanation for their position is given. This could be va I read this growing up but had no recollection of it and wanted to see if it was something that we might enjoy in our homeschool or just as a read aloud. I totally missed that this was a sequel until I was half way through my reread, so there's that. This is a story of the South after losing the Civil War and the main characters are very "pro South" yet do not support slavery. I found this a bit *too* convenient, especially since no other explanation for their position is given. This could be valuable for discussing the tension between North and South that remained after the war and the destruction that was done, but in discussing the reasons for the Civil War, I found it lacking.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Rucker

    I enjoyed this sequel to Turn Homeward,Hannalee!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Riley

    Read this over Thanksgiving break, I did not like it it was way way way way way!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! To easy.... Yeah.. :D

  6. 4 out of 5

    Books Kids Like

    After the war, the Reed family moves to Atlanta hoping for a new start in life. The oldest brother, Davey, thinks he can use his carpentry skills to help rebuild the city, but he is soon disappointed. No one will hire a man with one hand. Mrs. Reed becomes a housekeeper, Hannalee works as a clerk in a cloth store, and Jem sells advertising for the newspaper. Life is hard but pleasant enough. The only dark cloud is Davey's habit of staying out late each night. Mrs. Reed and Hannalee suspect that After the war, the Reed family moves to Atlanta hoping for a new start in life. The oldest brother, Davey, thinks he can use his carpentry skills to help rebuild the city, but he is soon disappointed. No one will hire a man with one hand. Mrs. Reed becomes a housekeeper, Hannalee works as a clerk in a cloth store, and Jem sells advertising for the newspaper. Life is hard but pleasant enough. The only dark cloud is Davey's habit of staying out late each night. Mrs. Reed and Hannalee suspect that he has joined the Regulators, a group of Confederates that stir up trouble for the Yankee occupiers. When Davey gets arrested for murdering a Yankee officer, Delie Brackett holds the key to Davey's freedom. She works at the hotel and witnessed the shooting. Hannalee and Mary Anne Herrick (the shop owner's daughter) go to find Delie and bring her back to Atlanta after the black girl runs away.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Another gift in a book exchange, I almost stopped reading this. The writing was only so-so (lots of exclamation points--never a good thing). But the story kept me going--it's about the immediate aftermath of the Civil War in the heart of Atlanta. Not a usual topic for a young adult book, and definitely deals with the mess that was Reconstruction. Another gift in a book exchange, I almost stopped reading this. The writing was only so-so (lots of exclamation points--never a good thing). But the story kept me going--it's about the immediate aftermath of the Civil War in the heart of Atlanta. Not a usual topic for a young adult book, and definitely deals with the mess that was Reconstruction.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Janice

    I recently bought a bunch of this author's books on-line at used bookstores. This is a sequel to Turn Homeward Hannalee and I think I liked it better than the first one. Both stories deal with poor white southerners and what they dealt with during the Civil War. I recently bought a bunch of this author's books on-line at used bookstores. This is a sequel to Turn Homeward Hannalee and I think I liked it better than the first one. Both stories deal with poor white southerners and what they dealt with during the Civil War.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Summer Moeller

    Fascinating, first-person story of living through the Civil War. It's especially interesting if you live in Georgia and can visit some of the spots, including the mill in Roswell, mentioned in the book. Fascinating, first-person story of living through the Civil War. It's especially interesting if you live in Georgia and can visit some of the spots, including the mill in Roswell, mentioned in the book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Ali

    this book is amazing!!!!!!! :D

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shaina Arnoux

    This book is awesome!!!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Curtis

    I love these books!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katy Lovejoy

    You never really think about how much the south suffered post civil war...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin Amber

    Talks more about surviving and living in Atlanta after the war than her finding love, there is a small bit about a boy in the last chapters but that is all. Thought the first book was better

  15. 5 out of 5

    Leia-Catherine

    This book is really, really, really good. It is about the time right after the Civil War. The end is really good!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Kensak

  17. 5 out of 5

    Monica Schulte

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cmf

  21. 5 out of 5

    José Miguel

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shirley

  23. 4 out of 5

    JW Rounsaville

  24. 5 out of 5

    Trey

  25. 5 out of 5

    SwirlingSnow

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jill Sherwood

  27. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

  28. 5 out of 5

    Robin Mullin

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tina

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