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Urgent and provocative, We: A Manifesto for Women Everwhere is “part self-help, part social theory, centered in the idea that instead of having it ‘all,’ women can live happier, better lives by becoming more free” (Glamour), from longtime friends Gillian Anderson and Jennifer Nadel. We: A Manifesto for Women Everywhere is an uplifting, timely, and practical manual for creat Urgent and provocative, We: A Manifesto for Women Everwhere is “part self-help, part social theory, centered in the idea that instead of having it ‘all,’ women can live happier, better lives by becoming more free” (Glamour), from longtime friends Gillian Anderson and Jennifer Nadel. We: A Manifesto for Women Everywhere is an uplifting, timely, and practical manual for creating change in women’s lives, with nine universal principles that help you confront life’s inevitable emotional and spiritual challenges. It’s about transitioning from a me-first culture and imagining what a we-based world might look like. In We, Anderson and Nadel ask why so many women are locked in cycles of depression, addiction, self-criticism, and even self-harm. How much more effective and powerful would we all be if we replaced our current patterns of competition, criticism, and comparison with collaboration, cooperation, and compassion? Putting these values at the center of our lives allows each of us to be happier and more empowered, and to replace harmful habits with a more positive, peaceful, and rewarding way of being. We is a rallying cry for “every woman, everywhere on the planet. Open to any page. And there you will find a truth that can set you free” (Christiane Northrup, MD, author of Women’s Bodies, Women’s Wisdom).


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Urgent and provocative, We: A Manifesto for Women Everwhere is “part self-help, part social theory, centered in the idea that instead of having it ‘all,’ women can live happier, better lives by becoming more free” (Glamour), from longtime friends Gillian Anderson and Jennifer Nadel. We: A Manifesto for Women Everywhere is an uplifting, timely, and practical manual for creat Urgent and provocative, We: A Manifesto for Women Everwhere is “part self-help, part social theory, centered in the idea that instead of having it ‘all,’ women can live happier, better lives by becoming more free” (Glamour), from longtime friends Gillian Anderson and Jennifer Nadel. We: A Manifesto for Women Everywhere is an uplifting, timely, and practical manual for creating change in women’s lives, with nine universal principles that help you confront life’s inevitable emotional and spiritual challenges. It’s about transitioning from a me-first culture and imagining what a we-based world might look like. In We, Anderson and Nadel ask why so many women are locked in cycles of depression, addiction, self-criticism, and even self-harm. How much more effective and powerful would we all be if we replaced our current patterns of competition, criticism, and comparison with collaboration, cooperation, and compassion? Putting these values at the center of our lives allows each of us to be happier and more empowered, and to replace harmful habits with a more positive, peaceful, and rewarding way of being. We is a rallying cry for “every woman, everywhere on the planet. Open to any page. And there you will find a truth that can set you free” (Christiane Northrup, MD, author of Women’s Bodies, Women’s Wisdom).

30 review for We: A Manifesto for Women Everywhere

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Bisley

    This book is very much an introduction to self care, moving on from harmful behaviours, setting boundaries, and thinking beyond yourself onto how you can make more of an impact in the world. If you are already familiar with these topics, or already do a lot of activism and volunteering, then I doubt there will be much that is radical or new for you here. That said if you haven't really considered these topics before, and you feel depressed or that something in your life isn't right, I feel this This book is very much an introduction to self care, moving on from harmful behaviours, setting boundaries, and thinking beyond yourself onto how you can make more of an impact in the world. If you are already familiar with these topics, or already do a lot of activism and volunteering, then I doubt there will be much that is radical or new for you here. That said if you haven't really considered these topics before, and you feel depressed or that something in your life isn't right, I feel this would make a great starting point for you. I went to see Gillian and Jennifer's panel at the WOW festival at The Southbank Centre in London recently where the ideas and exercises put forward in their book made for a fascinating, inspiring, and uplifting discussion. However when I read the book afterwards it felt like something was lost a little on the page...it came across as that brand of overly simple, slightly patronising feminism from privileged white women who have plenty of money, stability, childcare, and the ability to control their working hours. It's the kind of writing that I normally try to avoid because it feels very far from the life me and the people I know lead. Where we struggle with housing, poverty, obtaining healthcare, discrimination, family abandonment etc. etc. But I still found some of the exercises helpful and I will keep the book in order to read again someday. I'm really pleased they released this book as they work well together as a writing team and I do think a lot of women will get something out of this. I hope Gillian and Jennifer will write more in the future, especially if it goes more in depth.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    THE BOOK EVERY WOMAN NEEDS!!! It makes you take a hard look at yourself and changes what you see! Change comes from within. Gillian and Jennifer talk about their own experiences throughout, how they are like every woman despite being in the public eye...From menopause, child rearing, self esteem, and relationships -they are human and vulnerable to how they are perceived by the world. They offer 9 basic principles to live by. It is a journey that should not be taken alone...Invite your "sisters" THE BOOK EVERY WOMAN NEEDS!!! It makes you take a hard look at yourself and changes what you see! Change comes from within. Gillian and Jennifer talk about their own experiences throughout, how they are like every woman despite being in the public eye...From menopause, child rearing, self esteem, and relationships -they are human and vulnerable to how they are perceived by the world. They offer 9 basic principles to live by. It is a journey that should not be taken alone...Invite your "sisters" along for the ride! This book is a LIFE CHANGER and I am telling every woman I know that they NEED this book!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    DNF p. 39 There's a lot of good, deep, interesting material in this book. But I'd like it to be four times as concise and less than half as long. WE has LITERALLY SIX PREFACES and right now I just can't. DNF p. 39 There's a lot of good, deep, interesting material in this book. But I'd like it to be four times as concise and less than half as long. WE has LITERALLY SIX PREFACES and right now I just can't.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    This isn't a book I ever would've read, let alone bought in hardcover... but it's got Gillian Anderson's name on it, I adore her (I mean... I organized an entire trip to the US to coincide with her starring in A Streetcar Named Desire , and flew to London for the stage production of All About Eve ), so now I have a pricey and signed first edition on my shelf. I was reasonably excited for it prior to its release, which fell on International Women's Day; the thought of her writing a feminist This isn't a book I ever would've read, let alone bought in hardcover... but it's got Gillian Anderson's name on it, I adore her (I mean... I organized an entire trip to the US to coincide with her starring in A Streetcar Named Desire , and flew to London for the stage production of All About Eve ), so now I have a pricey and signed first edition on my shelf. I was reasonably excited for it prior to its release, which fell on International Women's Day; the thought of her writing a feminist non-fiction book was thrilling to me... but the marketing campaign somehow built it up as something entirely different to what it actually is. As it says in the final part, "this is not a manifesto in the traditional sense of the word. It's a rallying cry to commit to a new way of life: One that is based on spiritual Principles". Essentially, this is an introduction to self-care, with a bit of a (very slight) feminist spin. Which is all well and good, it's just not what I expected, and not something I'm very interested in reading. It sat on my shelf for over a year, and with Gillian's 50th birthday coming up, I figured I'd finally pick it up, and I trudged through, in exactly a month (not in time to finish and post a review of it for her birthday, which had been my intention). Full disclosure: I did not "take the journey". Each chapter has one or more exercises you're encouraged (and supposed) to do before moving on... and I didn't. Reading, for me, is escapism—I'm not going to do writing exercises while I do it. I almost gave up right at the beginning, as there are six introductions/prefaces. SIX. Nothing warrants six introductions. Thankfully, they are short, and Part One, The Essentials, was fine—this is the first self-help book I've read, but a lot of the beliefs in here were familiar to me through my yoga practice. I appreciated the encouragement to take responsibility for your own well-being and emotional and mental health, and the fact that resources are provided at the back of the book, but one of the main messages of the book made me a little sad; not because it's a bad one, but the fact that it apparently must be stressed? Things like, it's okay to like yourself, do nice things for yourself, and to take time out of your day for yourself when you feel the need to recharge. To be frank, that one Parks and Recreation episode unlocked that for me years ago much more effectively, but I suppose it's good that it's spelled out for anyone who might need to read it. Each chapter in Part Two, The 9 Principles, is technically sound stuff rooted in common sense, but it usually devolved into more esoteric and airy-fairy realms. Unfortunately, despite them clearly trying otherwise, a lot of it seemed to come from a white feminism place of privilege rather far removed from the average woman's life and struggles—and that's another thing, I really don't think that these Principles should be specific to the female gender. I got the most out of the practices to let go of resentment, but it lost me towards the end with the whole "prayer works" and "spiritual but not religious" mumbo-jumbo. The nine proposed Principles, which build on each other, are: Honesty, Acceptance, Courage, Trust, Humility, Peace, Love, Joy, and Kindness. Each chapter contains quotes from both authors detailing how applying the specific Principle improved their lives; I did not count, but I'd bet that Nadel has a lot more of these interjections than Anderson. Gillian's bits seemed candid and authentic, while I found Jennifer to come off as rather self-indulgent a lot of the time. I think it's accessible enough as a first introduction to self-care, but it could've been trimmed to half its length and would be the better for it. I'll try and apply some of the principles into my life, mindfully and consciously, but most of it really is common sense; they did not reinvent the wheel. Each chapter challenged me to think and consider my life though (despite my not following along with the actual exercises), and I can see how it could be of real use to someone when read at the right time. I don't have anything to compare it to, so I'm rather torn in my rating between two and three stars; as I'm writing this, I'm feeling generous and rounding up.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Bergin

    An interesting read and if your first dip into self help etc not a bad one. It does borrow heavily from others works and I did find the authors personal contributions a tad self indulgent, in fact at one point I renamed the book ME. That said there are some good exercises and principles within.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

    It started out reasonably well, but they lost me in the last two chapters with the old "spiritual but not religious" chestnut, going on about a higher power (that may or may not be God) and things like "prayer works!" Statements like "In place of the value systems that religions once provided for most of us is a gaping spiritual void," (the old religion=values equivalence) and a mention of tithing as a way that people once gave what they could to those who needed it. Really? You think that tithe It started out reasonably well, but they lost me in the last two chapters with the old "spiritual but not religious" chestnut, going on about a higher power (that may or may not be God) and things like "prayer works!" Statements like "In place of the value systems that religions once provided for most of us is a gaping spiritual void," (the old religion=values equivalence) and a mention of tithing as a way that people once gave what they could to those who needed it. Really? You think that tithes went to people who needed it? Overall, some of the basic principles are sound, but it wanders into woo.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erica Deb

    There were some interesting parts in here, and some things that resonated, but halfway through I just couldn't do it anymore. It was too preachy, too obvious... If this book was a women's weekend workshop, it would probably be awesome. But as a book? I just couldn't stay interested. There were some interesting parts in here, and some things that resonated, but halfway through I just couldn't do it anymore. It was too preachy, too obvious... If this book was a women's weekend workshop, it would probably be awesome. But as a book? I just couldn't stay interested.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    To be honest, I picked this up because Gillian Anderson co-authored it, but I liked it and found it helpful. (I ACTUALLY GOT TO MEET GILLIAN WHILE I WAS IN THE MIDDLE OF READING THIS BOOK, VIA VIRTUAL CHAT. She’s been a huge influence in my life since I was 12 & it was so surreal and amazing.) This is definitely a self-help book with a feminist slant, so if you don’t like the self-help genre, you probably won’t like it. But it has a lot of simple, age-old advice, stuff my therapist would encourag To be honest, I picked this up because Gillian Anderson co-authored it, but I liked it and found it helpful. (I ACTUALLY GOT TO MEET GILLIAN WHILE I WAS IN THE MIDDLE OF READING THIS BOOK, VIA VIRTUAL CHAT. She’s been a huge influence in my life since I was 12 & it was so surreal and amazing.) This is definitely a self-help book with a feminist slant, so if you don’t like the self-help genre, you probably won’t like it. But it has a lot of simple, age-old advice, stuff my therapist would encourage me to do. And I’ve already found it helpful when I’ve actually applied it. Some people said they couldn’t relate to it, but it mostly just talked about being grateful, loving others and yourself, being kind and taking action against injustice. It was about finding unity and inner peace, and I’m down with all those things. It’s kind of introductory level to doing self-work, or a good reminder for others who have already done this work. It was good for me because my life is a literal mess of misery and pain, lol, so I’m always looking for any positive changes I can make to help myself and the world around me. I have the hardback but I listened to the audiobook & really enjoyed it, as GA reads part of it. I found more connection to the authors that way. If you follow even just a couple of these principles, I think it could make a positive impact on your life.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeimy

    This book is a self-help guide that reminds me of Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Anderson and Nadel offer visualization exercises, meditations, and action plans to reach the top of Maslow's pyramid, self-actualization. Throughout the book they propose the idea that there is one step above self-actualization and that is stop thinking of self and start helping others. This book came into my life in a moment when I needed certain reminders, which is why I gave it a high rating, but the truth of the ma This book is a self-help guide that reminds me of Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Anderson and Nadel offer visualization exercises, meditations, and action plans to reach the top of Maslow's pyramid, self-actualization. Throughout the book they propose the idea that there is one step above self-actualization and that is stop thinking of self and start helping others. This book came into my life in a moment when I needed certain reminders, which is why I gave it a high rating, but the truth of the matter is that the authors' advice is commonsensical. Read at the right moment, the book will be useful.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Holtzclaw

    i picked this up because i love ms. gillian anderson, but when it came down to it, this book just wasn't what i thought it was, what i wanted it to be. i thought it would involve more stories from ms. anderson & her co-authors lives, but instead it was more... of a self-help book? which is fine! it's just not what i was wanting to read! (and it was a little cringey in places... and i skimmed entire sections in others.... also five introductions is a LITTLE much!) anyway, i think this is a case of i picked this up because i love ms. gillian anderson, but when it came down to it, this book just wasn't what i thought it was, what i wanted it to be. i thought it would involve more stories from ms. anderson & her co-authors lives, but instead it was more... of a self-help book? which is fine! it's just not what i was wanting to read! (and it was a little cringey in places... and i skimmed entire sections in others.... also five introductions is a LITTLE much!) anyway, i think this is a case of "it's not you, it's me."

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bea Elwood

    Wish I had a book club that we were doing this in, it's all the things we have been learning about (Flow/ Mindfulness/ Embracing Imperfection) but all in one location. I skimmed big parts of it because I felt like I had already been doing the work but it would have been nice to have that female group to meet with and help each other empower each other. Wish I had a book club that we were doing this in, it's all the things we have been learning about (Flow/ Mindfulness/ Embracing Imperfection) but all in one location. I skimmed big parts of it because I felt like I had already been doing the work but it would have been nice to have that female group to meet with and help each other empower each other.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elle

    This book was far better than I expected. I picked it up inititally, because it was co-authored by Gillian Anderson, and I have been a huge fan of hers for the past 23 years of my life. But I ended up loving it for far more than its author. Many of the concepts and techniques introduced in the book were already familiar to me, since I have spent a great deal of time studying and practicing yoga, meditation, amygdala retraining, neurolinguistic programming, relgion, etc.. But the presentation her This book was far better than I expected. I picked it up inititally, because it was co-authored by Gillian Anderson, and I have been a huge fan of hers for the past 23 years of my life. But I ended up loving it for far more than its author. Many of the concepts and techniques introduced in the book were already familiar to me, since I have spent a great deal of time studying and practicing yoga, meditation, amygdala retraining, neurolinguistic programming, relgion, etc.. But the presentation here was fresh, and the honesty and real-life relatability of the narrative was powerful and potentially life-changing. There were segments of this book that honestly and openly acknowledged aspects of my inner life and experience I have never heard voiced by another woman, and it was very moving to feel that sense of connectedness and solidarity with other souls out there seeking their truths. I highly recommend reading this book and doing the work and exercises it asks of you. If you are new to this type of path, it may change your life completely. If you've dabbled already like me, you may find it's just the fresh, concise, and honest structured approach to jump you ahead on your path. Edit: I've just finished a reread of this, this time via the audiobook (read by the authors). At first I thought that upon coming back to this book it wasn't quite as good or useful as I remembered (I've continued to cover many of the same basic concepts elsewhere), but as I got into the later chapters, I was again reminded of the beautiful personal and intimate stories that make this book so wonderfully relatable and actionable in one's own life. Still highly recommend.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lee Braden

    I appreciate this conversation. I also appreciate the encouragement to take responsibility for your mental and emotional health. I feel too often it’s become the cultural norm to assign responsibility elsewhere, typically in the form of an excuse or blame. It’s also encouraged me to evaluate how much time I devote to things in my life. As a result I find myself spending less and less time on social media, which I’ve discovered is something that is quite a relief. I’ve been focusing on filling my I appreciate this conversation. I also appreciate the encouragement to take responsibility for your mental and emotional health. I feel too often it’s become the cultural norm to assign responsibility elsewhere, typically in the form of an excuse or blame. It’s also encouraged me to evaluate how much time I devote to things in my life. As a result I find myself spending less and less time on social media, which I’ve discovered is something that is quite a relief. I’ve been focusing on filling my time with other things rather than immediately reaching for my phone. “Presence of mind is peace of mind” is a quote taken from Principle 6 in this book and I really took that element to heart. I’ve begun making sure that I am consciously listening during conversations, not to just to react and respond but to actually hear and be present in the conversation. I feel that’s very important especially to the other party involved in the conversation. I’ve also realized that I have a habit of caring for others needs far before my own. And as a result I’m disappointed and resentful when others don’t do the same. This is unfair and it is exhausting. I’m a naturally enthusiastic and positive person and recently I noticed my tendency to shift towards a more negative thought process. Working through We has helped me steer myself back to the mindset I’m trying to maintain. I didn’t fully connect with all the principles, but they all challenged me to think and consider. I anticipate I’ll continue returning to this as a guiding manual.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    DNF over halfway. This book is the self-helpiest self-help book I've ever encountered, almost comically so. I found some gems early on, but mostly there's nothing too groundbreaking here. Still, it did spur action from me to start up journaling again. I think that the more challenging parts of this book are: 1) that the title doesn't seem to be reflective of the content, and 2) this book helped me understand white privilege as it plays into feminism, which was ultimately the reason I put it down DNF over halfway. This book is the self-helpiest self-help book I've ever encountered, almost comically so. I found some gems early on, but mostly there's nothing too groundbreaking here. Still, it did spur action from me to start up journaling again. I think that the more challenging parts of this book are: 1) that the title doesn't seem to be reflective of the content, and 2) this book helped me understand white privilege as it plays into feminism, which was ultimately the reason I put it down.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tina Milledge

    So good I gave the library book back and bought a second hand copy from amazon to keep for dipping into often. It’s another one of those self care books that’s perfect for reading on rising in the morning or reading before bed to go to sleep with promise for the coming days. Who’d have thought X Files’ Gillian Anderson would inspire women through a hardback book?! Well she does and she does it well.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Paula Sullivan

    This was a great book to end the year on! I really enjoyed the journalling exercises throughout this book, it really helped to reinforcing the principles this book is based upon, principles such as kindness, honesty, joy and love. I read it along side of Girl, Wash Your Face by Hollis, but We goes so much further and deeper. Great read!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    I picked this up because I admire Gillian Anderson and I thought this would be more about women's activism. I knew I'd wandered into the wrong book when it mentioned about lighting candles to do 'exercises'. While this is a well-written book, it just wasn't for me. I picked this up because I admire Gillian Anderson and I thought this would be more about women's activism. I knew I'd wandered into the wrong book when it mentioned about lighting candles to do 'exercises'. While this is a well-written book, it just wasn't for me.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Johnson

    It was a perfectly fine self help book, though I didn't really feel they covered any new ground. It was a perfectly fine self help book, though I didn't really feel they covered any new ground.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Megan Crusante

    I wasn't completely sold on everything in here, but I got a lot out of the topics of dealing with resentment and adding kindness to your life. I wasn't completely sold on everything in here, but I got a lot out of the topics of dealing with resentment and adding kindness to your life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    G. Lawrence

    So many beautiful ideas, a manual of self care, dealing with harmful elements in life and with a wider perspective on the world and helping others. I shall refer to it many times in the future.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nadia

    "This is not a manifesto in the traditional sense of the word. It's a rallying cry to commit to a new way of life: one that is based on spiritual Principles. It's a call to apply the tools we've now learned to every aspect of our lives: at home, at work, in the polling booth. To let them govern how we live, how we do business, how we raise our families, how we deal with our neighbors. It's a call to a values-led existence that puts love at its center. One that refuses to discriminate on the basi "This is not a manifesto in the traditional sense of the word. It's a rallying cry to commit to a new way of life: one that is based on spiritual Principles. It's a call to apply the tools we've now learned to every aspect of our lives: at home, at work, in the polling booth. To let them govern how we live, how we do business, how we raise our families, how we deal with our neighbors. It's a call to a values-led existence that puts love at its center. One that refuses to discriminate on the basis of race, class, creed, or gender. It's a call for love to become a way of life. To let it dictate our choices, our actions, and our interactions. This manifesto will take commitment on your part. It will mean practicing these Principles on a daily basis. Like swimmers in deep water, we have to keep moving in order to stay afloat. Any time we stop using them, we'll start to slip back into old patterns of criticism, competition, and judgment. But if you continue walking this path and practicing the Principles in your daily life, they will keep you resilient and focused, and build your compassion and connection... This journey has no end - we'll be working on ourselves, our attitudes, and our actions for the rest of our days - but if we walk forward together, one woman at a time, amazing things will come to pass both for us individually and for the world in which we live." Part 3, pgs 294-295 This book ROCKED my World in the most Inspiring, Uplifting and Powerful way!! Gillian and Jennifer performed an invaluable & exquisite service in Writing this resource for Women. And that's what it is a resource, a rudder for steering your Healing, Loving yourself, growing into the best possible version of who you're meant to be in a tangible and rigorous manner. For those who haven't yet committed to a Healing Path, the Authors straightforward and concise methodology enables you to engage in a way which will benefit you immediately with application and tenacity. The 9 Principles are accompanied by the personal and unguarded experiences of the Authors and include actions and affirmations which aid you in embodying the Principles from a place of Empowerment. And it all begins with the Essentials; Gratitude for everything, Gentleness for ourselves, Responsibility for our care, and Meditation to create safe & sacred space, as a starting point and foundation upon which the Principles get built. We: A Manifesto for Women Everywhere should be compulsory reading for every Woman, regardless of age! It has become my rallying cry and beacon of Hope in these times where every moment seems to bring another blow to the Feminine Spirit! Luminous in every way and perfectly timed!!!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    In some ways, I'm sad that this book has to exist, but happy that it does for those who need it. Basically, it says that it's okay to like yourself, do nice things for yourself, take time out of your day for yourself when you're sick or just need a moment to breathe. Listening to the authors stress that you should try to find something you're grateful for every day and that you should do something fun at least once a week kind of heart my heart a little. Well, here it goes... I'm grateful that I In some ways, I'm sad that this book has to exist, but happy that it does for those who need it. Basically, it says that it's okay to like yourself, do nice things for yourself, take time out of your day for yourself when you're sick or just need a moment to breathe. Listening to the authors stress that you should try to find something you're grateful for every day and that you should do something fun at least once a week kind of heart my heart a little. Well, here it goes... I'm grateful that I don't need a book to tell me that I should feel grateful about good things in my life. I do think I'm worth it. And now, I'm going to go pour myself a glass of wine and watch an episode of a series that I'm enjoying at the moment (that actually combines the "do something nice for yourself" and "take time for yourself" portions- yay me!).

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jenb16

    A great introduction to mindfulness and self-help. This feminist manifesto is structured to incorporate a holistic approach to living better and is geared primarily toward women, but can obviously include men as well. While I didn't find any of the 9 Principles revolutionary, I still enjoyed reading about these positive attitudes to adopt and refresh my mind with things I already know and should reinforce in my own life. I found this book very easy to understand and simple to follow. This is why A great introduction to mindfulness and self-help. This feminist manifesto is structured to incorporate a holistic approach to living better and is geared primarily toward women, but can obviously include men as well. While I didn't find any of the 9 Principles revolutionary, I still enjoyed reading about these positive attitudes to adopt and refresh my mind with things I already know and should reinforce in my own life. I found this book very easy to understand and simple to follow. This is why it would be a great choice for someone looking to delve into self-help but doesn't want something complex or difficult to understand.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    Even though I saw Anderson and Nadel talking about this book when it was released, it was still not the book I was expecting. It's much more about tools for finding your authentic self so that you can be effective and motivated by the right things so you can change the world in whatever way seems right. I was concerned that there would be more woo than I can stomach but actually they handle that pretty well. I didn't do the work in the book (each section has exercises) I just read it to see if th Even though I saw Anderson and Nadel talking about this book when it was released, it was still not the book I was expecting. It's much more about tools for finding your authentic self so that you can be effective and motivated by the right things so you can change the world in whatever way seems right. I was concerned that there would be more woo than I can stomach but actually they handle that pretty well. I didn't do the work in the book (each section has exercises) I just read it to see if that would be something I would give time to, but I think I will.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julia Rice

    Both a self-help 'guidebook' and a feminist 'call to action'. The authors discuss candidly their struggles with depression and mental health issues. They offer a new approach to a more meaningful life. First, there are what they cal the 'essential daily practices' of showing gratitude, being gentle with ourselves and others, taking responsibility for self-care, and meditation. Then there are the nine principles: honesty, acceptance, courage, trust, humility, peace, love, joy and kindness, each o Both a self-help 'guidebook' and a feminist 'call to action'. The authors discuss candidly their struggles with depression and mental health issues. They offer a new approach to a more meaningful life. First, there are what they cal the 'essential daily practices' of showing gratitude, being gentle with ourselves and others, taking responsibility for self-care, and meditation. Then there are the nine principles: honesty, acceptance, courage, trust, humility, peace, love, joy and kindness, each of which is discussed in a separate chapter. It's very much a practical book, with exercises throughout. I enjoyed the book and found it motivating and encouraging.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    In full disclosure I read this because it's Scully, and I was interested to see what she had to say on pre menopause, based on her Lenny letter. That said, it was not a book about that, but about self care. I did learn a few things, but it was long-winded and I ended up skimming a lot. In full disclosure I read this because it's Scully, and I was interested to see what she had to say on pre menopause, based on her Lenny letter. That said, it was not a book about that, but about self care. I did learn a few things, but it was long-winded and I ended up skimming a lot.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    A must read for young women which covers many topics with the goal of allowing you to become your best, most kind self. Not a perfect self, but a good self. Loved this read. Brought a sense of calm to my lunch breaks.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cath Rodkoff

    Some interesting stuff but also a lot of regurgitated claptrap. And I was most put off by the section on 'God'. Some interesting stuff but also a lot of regurgitated claptrap. And I was most put off by the section on 'God'.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Since I'm an X-Files Fan, I picked this out of curiosity to hear what Gillian had to say. I was very impressed. I have read and listened to all kinds of self-help/new age books before. Most share the same principles, this one is different. Thankfully no sugar and syrupy talk, and sticks to spiritual talk rather than religious. I think it appeals to a more educated brain. One item I found very interesting was the scientific proof (in animal's anyway) that a person's inner behaviors (fears or habi Since I'm an X-Files Fan, I picked this out of curiosity to hear what Gillian had to say. I was very impressed. I have read and listened to all kinds of self-help/new age books before. Most share the same principles, this one is different. Thankfully no sugar and syrupy talk, and sticks to spiritual talk rather than religious. I think it appeals to a more educated brain. One item I found very interesting was the scientific proof (in animal's anyway) that a person's inner behaviors (fears or habits) might be passed down through DNA... and not of an individual's creation. A real eyebrow raiser for me. The two authors were quite thorough in their approach of what to do, as well as sharing their own stories. An excellent book for all women!!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dani Kass

    I was surprised at how much I liked this book, especially given that I bought it only to get into an event with Gillian (or, really, because I thought it came with a book signing — it didn’t, the book was presigned). However I came to own it, it was sitting on my bookshelf and I overpaid for it, so I figured I might as well read it. Self-help books aren’t something I’d ever touched before (excluding the glorious Tiny Beautiful Things by Cheryl Strayed), so this was uncomfortable for me to read. B I was surprised at how much I liked this book, especially given that I bought it only to get into an event with Gillian (or, really, because I thought it came with a book signing — it didn’t, the book was presigned). However I came to own it, it was sitting on my bookshelf and I overpaid for it, so I figured I might as well read it. Self-help books aren’t something I’d ever touched before (excluding the glorious Tiny Beautiful Things by Cheryl Strayed), so this was uncomfortable for me to read. But when I started it a few months ago, I was in a weirdly open mindset. I tried to take everything they wrote to heart and make an effort, instead of just rolling my eyes as I normally would. And y’know what happened? It worked. I didn’t sit there dwelling on spirituality or doing all the exercises as described, but I at least let myself think through the concepts and try to get the idea. As I read, I found myself focusing on good habits and trying to make myself fall into them more, whether that be a short meditation, fighting my naturally-angry-and-resentful state of mind, appreciating random beauty in the world or just taking care of myself more than usual. That’s really the best I could ask out of a book like this. As for the text itself? It didn’t do much for me. There were something like six intro chapters, which is insane. The rest was a hot mess of quotes, unhelpful personal examples, exercises, random facts and then general explanatory texts. It was very scattered, but the format made it quick to get through. I’m giving it a surprising four stars (late readjusted to three) because I finished it in a weirdly good mood and feeling positive about the world, which is pretty much how I’d expect these books are supposed to make you feel. [Reivew posted here]

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