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Crossed Arrows: Mountain Men

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In 1829, Jacob and Martin left Kentucky to become Mountain Men, trappers of the Rocky Mountains. The rugged mountains that lay beyond America’s frontier remained mostly unexplored. In those days, when beaver were plentiful and the buffalo roamed freely, the killing was good. The two young men would also find that life would be hardscrabble in the high frontier. They would In 1829, Jacob and Martin left Kentucky to become Mountain Men, trappers of the Rocky Mountains. The rugged mountains that lay beyond America’s frontier remained mostly unexplored. In those days, when beaver were plentiful and the buffalo roamed freely, the killing was good. The two young men would also find that life would be hardscrabble in the high frontier. They would face grizzly bears and hostile Indians. And they would risk horse wrecks and mountain storms to trade their furs each year at “rendezvous.” Crossed Arrows is the story of two adventurers who lived hard in the earliest days of the Wild West.


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In 1829, Jacob and Martin left Kentucky to become Mountain Men, trappers of the Rocky Mountains. The rugged mountains that lay beyond America’s frontier remained mostly unexplored. In those days, when beaver were plentiful and the buffalo roamed freely, the killing was good. The two young men would also find that life would be hardscrabble in the high frontier. They would In 1829, Jacob and Martin left Kentucky to become Mountain Men, trappers of the Rocky Mountains. The rugged mountains that lay beyond America’s frontier remained mostly unexplored. In those days, when beaver were plentiful and the buffalo roamed freely, the killing was good. The two young men would also find that life would be hardscrabble in the high frontier. They would face grizzly bears and hostile Indians. And they would risk horse wrecks and mountain storms to trade their furs each year at “rendezvous.” Crossed Arrows is the story of two adventurers who lived hard in the earliest days of the Wild West.

30 review for Crossed Arrows: Mountain Men

  1. 4 out of 5

    Barry Lane

    Great read!!! I didn't want to put it down. I strongly recommend this to any American History buffs. Makes one realize how fortunate we are living in the 21 century America.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lee Tyner

    I really don’t understand the strong reviews. When I first started reading it was excellent and I thought I found a solid rip-roaring western. However, the middle 80% of the book was repetitive with a flat story line. Yes, the history and information was good but the story was a hamster wheel. Additional, how about varying the names? With so few characters does Jacob need to be used three times? If I remember correctly there were four iterations of Bear. Add that to the bear clan and great spiri I really don’t understand the strong reviews. When I first started reading it was excellent and I thought I found a solid rip-roaring western. However, the middle 80% of the book was repetitive with a flat story line. Yes, the history and information was good but the story was a hamster wheel. Additional, how about varying the names? With so few characters does Jacob need to be used three times? If I remember correctly there were four iterations of Bear. Add that to the bear clan and great spirit bear, Chief Bear, and the grizzly bears, and it’s unnecessarily noisy. Ditto for the two main characters and their budding families. I won’t describe and have a spoiler but it really lacked basic creativity. Additionally, several things in the story came way too easy to the protagonist. It was a chore to read from about chapter 10 on, and that’s when I anticipated giving two stars. The ending made me consider 1 star but I only do that to books I don’t finish. No way I’m buying the other books in the series, but if you do read it I hope you enjoy it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dale Anderson

    Earlier than most westerns, early mid 1830s. The main characters were born like a few years afore Daniel Boone dies. They go west and get into trapping for furs. It’s just a little bit juvenile like reading the Hardy Boys or something, well that’s a little bit of exaggeration of what I mean. But I really enjoyed it. It’s a nice read. Learned a lot about that style of life back then, also a lot of interesting phrases and vocabulary.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Preston Dannelley

    What a rush! Mr Gross writes two way at the same time. Firstly, he writes as if you are standing right there in the thick of things. Secondly he writes as if you are with the trapper, who is teaching you how to trap and get along in the wilderness and how to "keep yore topknot". Its uncanny, you get some survival training, folklore and history all at the same time. Highly highly recommended.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lutuf Ghantous

    Great story A very interesting plot that spreads for several years showing the life of fur trappers in the boom demand for furs. The book paint a very interesting picture of that life and the association with Indian tribes. Fight killing and revenge was expected and didn't change the informative part of the book. I liked it very much.

  6. 4 out of 5

    MattandCathy Brandley

    This book is quit different from what I usually read. I was intrigued by the journey of a young man as he developed his character a d survival skills in his short life as a mountain man

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ronald E. Kauffman

    Good Reading-Very Engrossing. I thoroughly enjoyed this story. The subjects of this epic had depth and personalities quite like I would have imagined if I had lived during this period. The U.S. during this point in time comes to life through the careful story telling of Mr. Grosz. Recommended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lisa C.

    I couldn't recommend this story to anyone. It reads like a kid wrote it after watching old westerns and Batman on tv. Things like "Pow went his gun." The dialogue is choppy and makes for strange reading. Although I didn't consider it when rating the book, I wasn't prepared for the very graphic beginning, either.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Emery

    Crossed arrows Lots of action. I enjoyed reading this book, but I was a little disappointed with the repetitive explanation of why mutilated warriors couldn't enter the happy hunting grounds. As bad as it sounds, I got it the first time. Wasn't crazy about the ending either.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Christian

    Liked it Similar story line of many other mountain man books. The characters in this book were enjoyable and the author played out their adventures well. Their luck in the wilderness ran the full gambit from beginning to end. Enjoy it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    tom anderson

    Great job of explaining the life of the mountain men. This will hold the attention of the reader who enjoyed any of the rest of the western storeys from this period.,

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mikel Rhodes

    A good book about the Mountain Men of our past. A good book that has the ring of possible truth. I recommend it for anyone wanting to understand the Mountain Man.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Larry Powers

    Mountain Men Great story on the life and death of mountain men. Great ending you need to read to believe. Very well written.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Norma

    Crossed Arrows Good Book, wish I was there. Hated to see Martin and Jacob killed. Sad day I find every book the guy guys die.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sheryl Paul

  16. 4 out of 5

    Denise

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marshall Thompson

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Muller

  19. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  20. 4 out of 5

    Judy Stephen

  21. 5 out of 5

    neville payne

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tom Sharp

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alderson

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eric Coe

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dorean Griffith

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ken Stoos

  27. 5 out of 5

    John Dunbar

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Hornstuen

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amatey C Wensel

  30. 4 out of 5

    harold donald

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