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30 review for Christian Horror

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Lucia

    First off, it's best to understand this: "Christian Horror" is an apologetic for the validity of the horror genre to Christians: readers, writers, the Christian market and the Christian Publishing industry. It is by no means a treatise on the entire genre. Readers looking for that would be best served reading Stephen King's classic DANSE MACABRE or Noel Carroll's THE PHILOSOPHY OF HORROR. I mention this because, even though I read very little Christian fiction myself, it's always irksome when fo First off, it's best to understand this: "Christian Horror" is an apologetic for the validity of the horror genre to Christians: readers, writers, the Christian market and the Christian Publishing industry. It is by no means a treatise on the entire genre. Readers looking for that would be best served reading Stephen King's classic DANSE MACABRE or Noel Carroll's THE PHILOSOPHY OF HORROR. I mention this because, even though I read very little Christian fiction myself, it's always irksome when folks pick up things obviously Christian in nature, and then review it negatively because it is exactly what it says its. That having been said, this is an excellent examination of the tense, uncomfortable, even "bad" relationship the horror genre has with Christian publishing, despite the early impact of Christianity on the development of the horror genre. It should also be noted that while Duran correctly cites these early influences, he by no means makes claims that the horror genre today is completely Christian, or completely influenced by a Christian worldview. He does, however, examine the potential for the horror tale in serving up stories of morality and the battle between good and evil, making them very valid expressions of faith, indeed. The framework he cites is well known, also cited in DANSE MACABRE and THE PHILOSOPHY OF HORROR, though both those works address this framework in a more oblique fashion: that the classic horror tale features the introduction of something monstrous (or Dionysian, in King's terms) on a Apollonian world, and the bulk of the story is made up of attempts to restore this Apollonian order as an affirmation of goodness over evil, order over chaos. Of course, in this work, that intrusion and struggle is couched in terms of Christianity, but that's to be expected. Duran's done his homework, touching on artistic works of the grotesque that were right at home with early believers, as well as mentioning the work of Charles Williams, Arthur Machen, George MacDonald and even Flannery O'Conner. He traces the development of "safe" Christian entertainment, show how it came about, and why early Gothic works came to be viewed unfavorably by a Christianity that became more and more adept at fashioning a "marketable" image. He also nicely addresses the ambiguity of "ghosts" in scripture (how it's not clear cut that they're ALL just demons), and also addresses the very real potential that ignoring evil/dark/disturbing things is perhaps far more dangerous for the Christian, because it involves buying into a sanitized view of the world. My only quibbles with the work (which are small, really, and may just be me making too much of nothing) are: 1. Duran seems to lump dystopian fiction in with post-apocalyptic fiction, making the statement that both works are all about how humans are broken, and eventually their worlds will fail and break down as well. This may be nit-picky of me, but to me, a closer reading of dystopian fiction is they are stories that warn of a particular trait extant in the world today: obsession with perfection, racism, over-powerful governments, prejudice against people who are different, homophobia, censorship...even religious intolerance...and they imagine a world in which any of these devices are now all-consuming in a repressive, controlling police state. Typically, those stories - Fahrenheit 451, A Brave New World, The Hunger Games, Divergent, Anthem, The Giver (which is a little post-apocalyptic, admittedly) Harrison Bergeron and others, classic Twilight Zone episodes of "The Obsolete Man," "Number 12 Looks Just Like You", "In the Eye of the Beholder" - are certainly horrific, but they're more about easily a police state can form, how quickly freedoms can be taken away and why they're taken away, and the nature of individuality, and how human nature can only be caged for so long before it eventually breaks free. Lumping those works in with The Walking Dead (which is still a show rich with substance, at times), does a disservice to the importance of the dystopian genre. 2. There are mild implications throughout the work that while the Christian writer has something of substance to say (which is why they should "reclaim the horror genre"), the non-Christian writer or materialist or atheist does not. This, in my opinion, is somewhat of a generalization. I wouldn't consider myself supremely well-read in the horror genre, but decently so, enough to say that just because a person isn't Christian or not spiritual doesn't mean they don't have anything to say about good and evil and morality. For the most part - with the exception of those who traffic in exploitation stories filled with gore and little else - the best horror writers most certainly have something to say: about what it means to be a human, about dealing with loss, love, betrayal, about surviving, about living and dying...the whole gamut. And seeing as humans were created by God, (depending on your world view), all those things can been as coming from God, seeing as how he create the world we live in. Even claiming that stories which don't feature "God" as a source of hope fall short in comparison to stories that do ignores that very often those stories paint a much more realistic portrait of life and all its troubles. But again, this work seems to be intended for a Christian audience, not for general readers or those who read primarily in the secular horror market. It does well what it sets out to do: show how Christianity and the horror genre are very much compatible, depending on the stories told. Hopefully it will become wide-read within the Christian market, and will make an impact on those who read, write, and PUBLISH in the that market.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Miller

    When I was an atheist I think one reason I was such a horror fan is that if filled an intuitive need that life is not just material existence. So I could soak this need in fiction and just pretend. So reading a book on the horror genre from the Christian perspective certainly appealed to me. The book itself was right up my alley as it reasons through while Christian artists should pursue this genre. He gives a partial history of the genre and how much it was shaped by the Christian worldview and When I was an atheist I think one reason I was such a horror fan is that if filled an intuitive need that life is not just material existence. So I could soak this need in fiction and just pretend. So reading a book on the horror genre from the Christian perspective certainly appealed to me. The book itself was right up my alley as it reasons through while Christian artists should pursue this genre. He gives a partial history of the genre and how much it was shaped by the Christian worldview and continues to be. He also gives solid arguments in defense of the genre against Evangelicals who thing it should be totally shunned. I take it that the author is an Evangelical, but he shows a good grasp of the Catholic perspective on this and quotes Saint John Paul II, Flannery O'Connor, and others. Sure there is a lot in the horror genre that is not worthwhile at all. But to paraphrase Sturgeons Law: > 90% of Science Fiction is crap, but 90% of everything is crap.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lou

    A very impressive work! I'm really happy because this book explains a lot of topics that I was worried about. As a lover of Christian horror, I was full of questions, but now I'm completely satisfied with the answers this book provides. Now, I'm looking forward to reading more books by this author. A very impressive work! I'm really happy because this book explains a lot of topics that I was worried about. As a lover of Christian horror, I was full of questions, but now I'm completely satisfied with the answers this book provides. Now, I'm looking forward to reading more books by this author.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Clark Goble

    This book serves as an apologetic for the "Christian-Horror" genre. On its surface, the term Christian-Horror may seem like an oxymoron, however, Duran makes compelling arguments for Christians to embrace the genre. The most logical argument for me is that Christians must first acknowledge the evil in the world to then present the Light. Duran spends a great deal of time examining the history of the horror genre and its close relation to Christianity. From Bram Stoker's Dracula to William Peter This book serves as an apologetic for the "Christian-Horror" genre. On its surface, the term Christian-Horror may seem like an oxymoron, however, Duran makes compelling arguments for Christians to embrace the genre. The most logical argument for me is that Christians must first acknowledge the evil in the world to then present the Light. Duran spends a great deal of time examining the history of the horror genre and its close relation to Christianity. From Bram Stoker's Dracula to William Peter Blatty's The Exorcist, Duran argues that many classic horror stories are deeply spiritual and ultimately redeeming in nature. Duran also points out that the Bible has much in common with these stories of redemption as it refuses to shy away from presenting evil in a way that ultimately glorifies God. I appreciated that Duran was careful to differentiate this type of redemptive horror from the more senseless or grotesque examples of the genre. "Hack and slash" movies that needlessly glorify violence or entertainment that serves to romanticize evil ultimately have no redemptive qualities. Duran also points out the difference between Christian Horror and Naturalistic/Atheist Horror such as H.P. Lovecraft, "Christian horror is based on the God Who Is There while naturalistic horror is based on the God Who Isn't" (p.82). Basically, there is enough variety within the "horror" genre that Christians need to be discerning as they engage it. Christians should be reminded that there are some examples of the genre that could be damaging to their spiritual walk. This book is carefully written. Duran does an excellent job of evaluating the weight of Scripture on the subject. It is obvious he knows both Scripture and the horror genre. My only real complaint with his treatment of the subject is that Duran seems to rail a bit against evangelicals. Duran seems critical of evangelicals who have withdrawn from the horror genre in favor of whitewashed "Christian" media. I must admit there are some "whitewashed" stories I enjoy a great deal. Fireproof, Facing the Giants, and Courageous are among my favorite movies! Perhaps I'm in the minority, but I believe Dracula and Facing the Giants can both be enjoyed and are not mutually exclusive. However, literature and film are ultimately about entertainment. If a Christian chooses one over the other, it is exactly that, a choice. I see no reason to be critical of the Christian who avoids horror stories as a rule. I also see no reason to be critical of a Christian who enjoys a redemptive horror story provided they are engaging their discernment and are actually watching or reading a 'redemptive' story. A Christian who spends their Friday nights enjoying Faces of Death probably needs to be criticized! Overall, I enjoyed this thought-provoking work. Duran has also written several books that I assume fall into the Christian/Redemptive Horror genre and I plan on trying one of them out soon. I recommend this read to any Christian who enjoys a good scary story and is looking for ways to be discerning as they choose their books or movies.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tintinrulz

    "Christian Horror: On the Compatibility of a Biblical Worldview and the Horror Genre" by Mike Duran offers a concise, but much needed, treatise on Christian horror. Herein, Duran explores religious themes in horror and horror themes in religion. He looks at evangelical culture and its dysfunctional relationship with the horror genre and then offers an apologetic. Duran concludes by answering many of the key objections to Christian horror. I really enjoyed this book and found myself nodding along "Christian Horror: On the Compatibility of a Biblical Worldview and the Horror Genre" by Mike Duran offers a concise, but much needed, treatise on Christian horror. Herein, Duran explores religious themes in horror and horror themes in religion. He looks at evangelical culture and its dysfunctional relationship with the horror genre and then offers an apologetic. Duran concludes by answering many of the key objections to Christian horror. I really enjoyed this book and found myself nodding along in agreement much of the time. I was familiar with modern Christianity’s uneasy relationship with the horror genre, but this book broadened my horizons. There were plenty of pop-culture examples referenced throughout, from ancient to contemporary, from "Beowulf"* to "Fullmetal Alchemist". This really is a love letter to the horror genre and to the Christian community. If nothing else, this book will help to open the floodgates for much needed dialogue between the two. I highly recommend “Christian Horror”. Get it now. 8.5/10 *Here, "Beowulf" is referenced as being one of the earliest horror stories, and I believe this to be true. But in my reading, I have come to the conclusion that “Beowulf” isn't an early Christian work, as is so commonly promoted. There are no allusions in the epic poem to any event, person or teaching of the New Testament (quite an oversight if this were Christian!) Also, exclusively Christian attitudes or beliefs are nowhere to be found. And yes, it’s true that there are allusions to a number of Old Testament facts and personages, namely God, the Creation, Cain and Abel and the Great Flood, but these aren’t any different than the historical allusions we find in pre-Christian Anglo-Saxon genealogies and records. Finally, the British Isles aren't referenced, nor is any British (or English) king, personage or historical event, because this epic predates the Saxon migration to the isles. Therefore, while the poem references historical knowledge of certain events and personages that also appear in the Book of Genesis, I say that I believe "Beowulf" must predate any knowledge of Christianity amongst the Anglo-Saxons.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Fredösphere

    This is the book I wanted to read when I tried to read Religion and Its Monsters. This one is brief and direct, and supplies two valuable things. It answers the intuitive but often thoughtless blanket rejection of the horror genre by religious people (and does that fairly well). It also mentions a long list of seminal works of horror and works about the horror genre. I highlighted my kindle version extensively and will use those notes as the basis of a reading/watching list for a long time to co This is the book I wanted to read when I tried to read Religion and Its Monsters. This one is brief and direct, and supplies two valuable things. It answers the intuitive but often thoughtless blanket rejection of the horror genre by religious people (and does that fairly well). It also mentions a long list of seminal works of horror and works about the horror genre. I highlighted my kindle version extensively and will use those notes as the basis of a reading/watching list for a long time to come. These two goals are rather modest but this book covers them without excess words. At times I felt the book was a little defensive, but apparently there really are people out there (the Amish Romance readers) whose reading habits are extremely restrictive. Such people, if they were consistent, would have to avoid even parts of the Bible to uphold their principles (and for all I know, they do!).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Peter Bradley

    Please give my Amazon review a helpful vote - https://www.amazon.com/gp/review/R2BH... This is a tightly written argument that seeks to persuade Evangelicals that horror - properly done - need not be antithetical to their beliefs, but might actually be consistent with their beliefs. This is mostly a parochial, intra-Evangelical dispute. As a Catholic, I found the cultural dimension fascinating. Catholicism doesn't have the same cultural commitment to "niceness" that Evangelicals do; in fact, much Please give my Amazon review a helpful vote - https://www.amazon.com/gp/review/R2BH... This is a tightly written argument that seeks to persuade Evangelicals that horror - properly done - need not be antithetical to their beliefs, but might actually be consistent with their beliefs. This is mostly a parochial, intra-Evangelical dispute. As a Catholic, I found the cultural dimension fascinating. Catholicism doesn't have the same cultural commitment to "niceness" that Evangelicals do; in fact, much of horror presumes "sacramentality," i.e., the notion that the supernatural and the natural are intermingled on special occasions. Duran makes an interesting point about Evangelicalism's commitment to the nice. Apparently, the romance genre - particularly, the Amish romance - is outrageously popular among Evangelicals. It is understandable that Evangelicals would want a change from the ordinary secular world that is saturated in profanity, nihilism and violence. Evangelicals naturally seeks something "safe" and "clean," as do people in other faith traditions. On the other hand, it is the case that life is not always "nice." Life involves dealing with evil and darkness and ignoring that reality sets up Evangelicals for problems because they can't always be in denial, and might mistake evil for nice. Duran observed: "In my article at Novel Rocket, What’s More Dangerous, Amish Heroines or Christian Vampires? [66], I challenged the idea that Amish fiction is any more “safe” than any other type of fiction. I concluded this way: …“Amish heroines” are just as potentially dangerous as “Christian vampires.” Besides, if the devil appears as an “angel of light” (II Cor. 11:14), there’s more chance he’s lurking under a bonnet than in a coffin. The article produced some interesting comments. Camille’s comment was representative of a theme that emerged in response to my assertion that Amish fiction can become escapist, even idolatrous." Contrarily, Duran explains that horror themes are religious themes. The cross is a classic instrument of horror, it is a torture device, like the iron maiden and the rack, fixtures in Gothic Horror. The bible shows depravity and horror. Duran writes: "Not only does the Bible not shy away from showing us the sin and utter depravities of man, even the greatest of Bible heroes are not exempt from its claim. Whether it’s Noah’s drunkenness, David’s adultery, Samson’s lust, Israel’s whoredoms, Peter’s denial of Christ, or Saul killing Christians, the Bible is very clear to reveal all human beings as deeply flawed... even those it calls saints. Furthermore, there are unflinching depictions of judgment upon sin in Scripture. The Flood of Noah, the plagues of Egypt, the Canaanite extermination, Ananius and Saphira, the Great White Throne judgment, the fiery return of Christ to judge the nations, and hell itself are terrible glimpses of a holy God’s divine right to wield the gavel." Real evil requires that people turn to God: "Along those lines, belief in real evil and real evil beings is essential to both a biblical worldview and the horror genre. Relativism suggests that knowledge, truth, and morality are not absolute but exist only in relation to culture, society, or historical context. However, it is the belief in real existential evil, as opposed to something that is simply a social construct or a perceived threat, which is so important to a compelling expression of horror. Pazuzu, the demon that possessed Regan in The Exorcist, was not just portrayed as a figment of her mother’s imagination or a socio-cultural concoction. Nor was the entity just a threat to the girl. Pazuzu was the personification of Evil, an opponent of all that was Good, True, and Holy. The demon was portrayed as real, which demanded an equally real God to evict it." Not all horror is edifying. A Christian - in the broader sense that includes Catholics - must not make a hero out of evil. Also, Duran writes: "Some will question whether employing evil or focusing on the grotesque is a spiritually healthy thing to do. But for the Christian artist, portraying real Evil is intended to invoke the concept of ultimate Good. Showing moral and spiritual evil is meant to elicit the awareness of Light, not celebrate what is Dark." Here's something I've noticed among "prissy" Evangelicals who seem to think that someone who utters the "F bomb" has demonstrated that they are unChristian: "If Satan disguises himself as an “angel of light” (II Cor. 11:14), he is more likely to deceive us with something that looks good (“clean”), than something that looks evil. Just because some stories are free of profanity, violence, gore, nudity, or the occult, does not make them impervious to spiritual deception. In fact, the desire to consume only what is free of profanity, violence, nudity, etc., may itself be a form of spiritual deception. Which brings us to a final, but crucial response to this objection against horror: Avoiding the horror genre simply because it contains dark, disturbing images is a form of “white magic.” Whereas “black magic” assumes to empower objects, practices and people for nefarious purposes, “white magic” assumes the exact opposite. The belief that not hearing profanity or not seeing the grotesque “protects” one from evil and keeps one holy, is reverse divination. Journalist and editor E. Stephen Burnett noted this while addressing the subject of how some Christians approached Halloween. Many Christians, including many parents, are practicing “white magic” whenever they fear and shun objects, symbols, and Things more than they fear Jesus Christ and hate inner sin. … yes, calling parents’ fears and reactions “white magic” seems harsh. But… I don’t know what else to call it when parents repeat these beliefs: The Devil can own objects, symbols, visual motifs, and Things, and use these things to “get to” your innocent children and to you. Therefore to protect yourself you must fear these objects, shun them, and perform spiritual measures (including rule-following and verse recitations) to stay safe. Folks, this is too close to the kind of divination God condemned in Deuteronomy 18." I don't know if Mr. Duran will be successful with his crusade. I wish the best for him. Evangelical culture must be robust and vital and not afraid.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hayla

    "Horror movies are created by disturbed and evil people, by the inspiration of the devil, for the purpose of manifesting demonic wickedness and evil in a tangible, visible and audible way." Have you ever had someone tell you this? If your answer is yes, you should give them this book. Duran has written a powerful defence for Christian artists who work within the horror genre as well as defining for those who are ignorant of it, what Christian horror means. I, myself, believe in the God of the Bi "Horror movies are created by disturbed and evil people, by the inspiration of the devil, for the purpose of manifesting demonic wickedness and evil in a tangible, visible and audible way." Have you ever had someone tell you this? If your answer is yes, you should give them this book. Duran has written a powerful defence for Christian artists who work within the horror genre as well as defining for those who are ignorant of it, what Christian horror means. I, myself, believe in the God of the Bible and I enjoy reading and watching horror. In fact, I owe my start in the genre to writers such as Peretti, and Dekker. This book provided me with well-written rebuttals for the next time a judgemental a-hole decides to lecture me about what kind of art I am allowed to enjoy. Because this book is written to the God of the Bible believers, I don't think those of other religions will get the same amount of enjoyment out of it. Overall, 5 stars from me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Janeen Ippolito

    Mike Duran does a solid job in sifting through all of the hubbub around the integration of faith and horror, and puts forth a clear and logical argument as to why horror as a real place in the Christian reader and writer's life. A must-have for any discussion on Christian worldview and philosophy in art! Mike Duran does a solid job in sifting through all of the hubbub around the integration of faith and horror, and puts forth a clear and logical argument as to why horror as a real place in the Christian reader and writer's life. A must-have for any discussion on Christian worldview and philosophy in art!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Leigh

    Very interesting. The first part just covers the state of what horror is and how its perceived; the really interesting stuff is after that. Very Bible-centred take on it. Raises a lot of good points about the complexity and nature of reality. Well worth a read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Pretty good argument on both sides, though it feels to retread Mike's blog at times. 4.5/5 Pretty good argument on both sides, though it feels to retread Mike's blog at times. 4.5/5

  12. 5 out of 5

    Fire

    This was a really thought provoking book. I am really glad that I read this. I will admit that at first I was thinking this book was going to be weird and that I would disagree with what it said, but Duran makes some incredibly valid points. I love his books and while I know that Christian Horror isn't anywhere near mainstream I do enjoy it and I wanted to see his take on this so I read it. This really was eye opening when you think about it. There is a lot of similar things throughout the Bible This was a really thought provoking book. I am really glad that I read this. I will admit that at first I was thinking this book was going to be weird and that I would disagree with what it said, but Duran makes some incredibly valid points. I love his books and while I know that Christian Horror isn't anywhere near mainstream I do enjoy it and I wanted to see his take on this so I read it. This really was eye opening when you think about it. There is a lot of similar things throughout the Bible and Duran really makes a good case for why there is a place for Christian Horror in the market. I really enjoyed this read and can't recommend it enough, it will really get you thinking. 5 Stars!

  13. 5 out of 5

    K.M. Carroll

    Deeply thoughtful When I picked up this book, I was thinking, "Why do I need to read this? I don't watch horror or enjoy it in any way." Then I started reading. And I realized that I did indeed enjoy horror. Vampires, werewolves, zombies--all horror tropes, all individually fascinating. And it's okay to use these tropes to tell a larger narrative of redemption and degeneration. After all, without the horror of sin, what do we need to be redeemed from? A thoughtful stroll through the horror genre, f Deeply thoughtful When I picked up this book, I was thinking, "Why do I need to read this? I don't watch horror or enjoy it in any way." Then I started reading. And I realized that I did indeed enjoy horror. Vampires, werewolves, zombies--all horror tropes, all individually fascinating. And it's okay to use these tropes to tell a larger narrative of redemption and degeneration. After all, without the horror of sin, what do we need to be redeemed from? A thoughtful stroll through the horror genre, from classical art to Lovecraft, from slasher films to the Exorcist. Highly recommended, especially if you don't think you like horror.

  14. 4 out of 5

    C.O. Bonham

    Believe it or not. Mike Duran offers up a tantalizing theological discussion on the compatibility of Christanity and the horror genre. As someone who has never been into the creepy or morbid, I wasn't sure about his thesis. I picked this book up out of curiosity. I wondered what arguments the author would make in favor of horror. I confess Duran won me over. His arguments aren't just compelling, they are well researched and supported. I challenge everyone to read this, both Christians and horror lov Believe it or not. Mike Duran offers up a tantalizing theological discussion on the compatibility of Christanity and the horror genre. As someone who has never been into the creepy or morbid, I wasn't sure about his thesis. I picked this book up out of curiosity. I wondered what arguments the author would make in favor of horror. I confess Duran won me over. His arguments aren't just compelling, they are well researched and supported. I challenge everyone to read this, both Christians and horror lovers. Read it with an open mind. You might learn something you never knew about yourself.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brystan

    This was a short but very thorough introduction into the Christian entertainment market - horror theory- biblical study - and the emergence of the Christian Horror genre. Like any faith based writings, there were things I didn’t 100% agree with (everyone interprets faith in their own way) but overall I really enjoyed this work and as both someone who defines themselves as a Christian and a horror writer/reader - this affirmed that there is a place for me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    I was provided this review copy audiobook in exchange for an honest review and have voluntarily left this review. I found this an excellent and very interesting listen. As a fan of horror and several of the authors that were mentioned I was delighted with the views given. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in a great number of things. Horror, history. religion. I found this five stars all around. Great listen! 

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shylock

    As a Christian that likes some horror stories I can appreciate this novel. Durhan brings out very good points. One of the things I must have missed in his presentation is the topic of hubris a prime theme in horror novels. Either I didn't read this as thoroughly as I should have, or he left the topic out. As a Christian that likes some horror stories I can appreciate this novel. Durhan brings out very good points. One of the things I must have missed in his presentation is the topic of hubris a prime theme in horror novels. Either I didn't read this as thoroughly as I should have, or he left the topic out.

  18. 4 out of 5

    T. Gray

    This is a very in-depth and well researched essay on the appropriateness of the horror genre in the faith community. A very good read for anyone interested in this subject.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Guilherme Gontijo

    The book is good, but has a few problematic parts. In chapter two one could say the author denies the doctrine of Sola Scriptura... But he doesn't. It demands some wisdom from the reader. The book is good, but has a few problematic parts. In chapter two one could say the author denies the doctrine of Sola Scriptura... But he doesn't. It demands some wisdom from the reader.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Stieffel

    I don't normally read the horror genre. This book did an excellent job of explaining the characteristics of the genre and how they fit into a Christian worldview. Duran does a very good job of making the case that Christians should be more likely to produce and read this genre than others. I don't normally read the horror genre. This book did an excellent job of explaining the characteristics of the genre and how they fit into a Christian worldview. Duran does a very good job of making the case that Christians should be more likely to produce and read this genre than others.

  21. 5 out of 5

    T.V. Tramel

    I can not recommend this book enough! Very well written and gives you a lot to think about. Wonderful book!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Roger Leonhardt

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rebel Rider

  24. 5 out of 5

    S.N. Hudak

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jake Litwin

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stoney Setzer

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Elliott

  29. 5 out of 5

    Eila

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bro

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