hits counter Wandering Realities: Mormonish Short Fiction - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Wandering Realities: Mormonish Short Fiction

Availability: Ready to download

"Wandering Realities gathers together much of the Mormon-themed short fiction of perhaps Mormondom's best living writer," says Michael Austin. "The collection is strange, wonderful, eye opening and amazing. It is a book of revelations and spiritual gifts from an immensely talented author to his religious community, which has long needed somebody to show us how strange and "Wandering Realities gathers together much of the Mormon-themed short fiction of perhaps Mormondom's best living writer," says Michael Austin. "The collection is strange, wonderful, eye opening and amazing. It is a book of revelations and spiritual gifts from an immensely talented author to his religious community, which has long needed somebody to show us how strange and wonderful (and strange) we can actually be." "Wandering Realities is perfectly satisfying, a treat from beginning to end," says Steven Evans. "It is alternatively touching and funny and poignant, with horrors and wonders. Steven Peck is a gift to Mormon literature, and any opportunity to read his stories is not to be missed." "This collection is one of the freshest, most engaging, and most entertaining contributions to Mormon literature that I've seen in a long while," says Jonathan Langford. "Steve Peck is an alien. . . . That's the only explanation I can come up with for how, in this set of 16 stories, he so consistently manages to provide such startlingly different, yet at the same time deeply insightful, perspectives on the culture and religion he has adopted for his own." Peck's highly imaginative stories run the gamut from Mormons reverting to a medieval society on Mars to a bishop who is killing the neighborhood dogs. These stories not only entertain and delight, but they challenge and provoke as well. This collection includes several award-winning stories, including: "Two-Dog Dose"—best short story of 2014, Association for Mormon Letters "A Strange Report from the Church Archives"—second place, Irreantum fiction contest "Avek, Who Is Distributed"—first place, Four Centuries of Mormon Fiction Contest 2012 "When the Bishop Started Killing Dogs"—second place, Four Centuries of Mormon Fiction Contest 2012 "Every story Steven L. Peck writes seems to lead Mormon fiction in exciting and innovative new directions," says Scott Hales. "I hate hyperbole, but Peck might be the Moses of Mormon letters in the twenty-first century." Wandering Realities "may be the book of the year," says Andrew Hall. Peck is "perhaps the most interesting contemporary author of Mormon fiction." "Peck is the best LDS science fiction writer currently out there," says Steven Evans. "Wandering Realities is an immensely enjoyable and powerful collection of short fiction, one that highlights both the possibilities and inevitabilities of Mormonism."


Compare

"Wandering Realities gathers together much of the Mormon-themed short fiction of perhaps Mormondom's best living writer," says Michael Austin. "The collection is strange, wonderful, eye opening and amazing. It is a book of revelations and spiritual gifts from an immensely talented author to his religious community, which has long needed somebody to show us how strange and "Wandering Realities gathers together much of the Mormon-themed short fiction of perhaps Mormondom's best living writer," says Michael Austin. "The collection is strange, wonderful, eye opening and amazing. It is a book of revelations and spiritual gifts from an immensely talented author to his religious community, which has long needed somebody to show us how strange and wonderful (and strange) we can actually be." "Wandering Realities is perfectly satisfying, a treat from beginning to end," says Steven Evans. "It is alternatively touching and funny and poignant, with horrors and wonders. Steven Peck is a gift to Mormon literature, and any opportunity to read his stories is not to be missed." "This collection is one of the freshest, most engaging, and most entertaining contributions to Mormon literature that I've seen in a long while," says Jonathan Langford. "Steve Peck is an alien. . . . That's the only explanation I can come up with for how, in this set of 16 stories, he so consistently manages to provide such startlingly different, yet at the same time deeply insightful, perspectives on the culture and religion he has adopted for his own." Peck's highly imaginative stories run the gamut from Mormons reverting to a medieval society on Mars to a bishop who is killing the neighborhood dogs. These stories not only entertain and delight, but they challenge and provoke as well. This collection includes several award-winning stories, including: "Two-Dog Dose"—best short story of 2014, Association for Mormon Letters "A Strange Report from the Church Archives"—second place, Irreantum fiction contest "Avek, Who Is Distributed"—first place, Four Centuries of Mormon Fiction Contest 2012 "When the Bishop Started Killing Dogs"—second place, Four Centuries of Mormon Fiction Contest 2012 "Every story Steven L. Peck writes seems to lead Mormon fiction in exciting and innovative new directions," says Scott Hales. "I hate hyperbole, but Peck might be the Moses of Mormon letters in the twenty-first century." Wandering Realities "may be the book of the year," says Andrew Hall. Peck is "perhaps the most interesting contemporary author of Mormon fiction." "Peck is the best LDS science fiction writer currently out there," says Steven Evans. "Wandering Realities is an immensely enjoyable and powerful collection of short fiction, one that highlights both the possibilities and inevitabilities of Mormonism."

30 review for Wandering Realities: Mormonish Short Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tygan Shelton

    I was introduced to Steven Peck’s Wandering Realities through the first story and a half of the online sample. They were so good I had no choice but to find it in the bookstore, finish it there, buy it, and then insist my friends and family read it. The stories contain LDS culture and conversion mixed with androids and insanity. Some are short and hilarious, like a ghost pirate’s experience getting endowed, or when the spiritual burdens of the bishop find a gruesome outlet. Others are long and t I was introduced to Steven Peck’s Wandering Realities through the first story and a half of the online sample. They were so good I had no choice but to find it in the bookstore, finish it there, buy it, and then insist my friends and family read it. The stories contain LDS culture and conversion mixed with androids and insanity. Some are short and hilarious, like a ghost pirate’s experience getting endowed, or when the spiritual burdens of the bishop find a gruesome outlet. Others are long and thoughtful, such as the story of a member of a Martian Mormon sect who finds himself caught between faith and reason. And some are so mind-blowing that I won’t risk giving anything away besides my high recommendation, like “A Strange Report from the Church Archives.” All contain relatable characters and a fascinating perspective on life. I especially enjoyed the strange mix most of his works had of both fun, sometimes absurd ideas, and serious questions to consider. For example, I enjoyed the detailed Babylonian setting of “The Gift of the King’s Jeweler.” But I also found myself relating to the jeweler’s conflict between divine service and too little time. In “Exactness,” a strict stake president’s response to an electric guitar and a pop song in the chapel was funny because it reminded me of my own past stake presidents, but it was also thought-provoking because it reminded me of how I’ve sometimes acted. Definitely some of the finest Mormon fiction today.

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Harris

    The short stories in this book are divided into two sections, one labeled ‘Other Worlds’ and the other ‘This World’. As these section headers suggest, many of the stories contain science fiction elements. All of the stories reflect or refer to Mormon culture in some way. Some of them poke fun at LDS Church policies such as the prohibition on popular music and on specific musical instruments in sacrament meeting or the pioneer reenactments that the youth organizations sometimes engage in. Reading The short stories in this book are divided into two sections, one labeled ‘Other Worlds’ and the other ‘This World’. As these section headers suggest, many of the stories contain science fiction elements. All of the stories reflect or refer to Mormon culture in some way. Some of them poke fun at LDS Church policies such as the prohibition on popular music and on specific musical instruments in sacrament meeting or the pioneer reenactments that the youth organizations sometimes engage in. Reading these stories reminded me of the exhilaration I felt as a kid when I first encountered science fiction authors like Ray Bradbury and Isaac Asimov. There's a lot of freshness in the quirky ideas presented and explored in the stories. A couple of the stories are a little over the top in the scenarios they present, but that's to be expected in an experimental collection like this, and their inclusion only adds to the value of the collection as a whole in my opinion. One of the most inventive of these short stories is entitled “A Strange Report From The Church Archives.” It explores the mess that we can make of our own lives and, indeed, of the whole world when we are granted the ability to have our wishes fulfilled. The story is cleverly constructed, and I highly recommend it. Other highlights include “Avek Who Is Distributed“, “Best Pinewood Derby Ever” and “The Problem”, a serious exploration of overwhelming lust and how it is dealt with in a religious context. While many of the stories contain an element of humor, some are more serious in nature. At least one addresses the very real moral quandary of how some successful Mormons make their livings and the soul-deadening impact this often has on a person who makes that choice. Another tackles the tricky issue of a suicide pact between elderly friends who fear the debilitating effects of dementia.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    Overall an enjoyable collection of short stories. Some hit the mark, a lot missed it. My favorites included Avek, Who is Distributed, Two-Dog Dose, and The Best Pinewood Derby. What I really appreciated about the book lies in the title: Mormon-ish short fiction. That little -ish is critical to understanding Peck's short stories. Most Mormon literature seems to fall into the feel-good and predictable realm--either too preachy or too culture specific. I feel like Peck was able to dip into the wond Overall an enjoyable collection of short stories. Some hit the mark, a lot missed it. My favorites included Avek, Who is Distributed, Two-Dog Dose, and The Best Pinewood Derby. What I really appreciated about the book lies in the title: Mormon-ish short fiction. That little -ish is critical to understanding Peck's short stories. Most Mormon literature seems to fall into the feel-good and predictable realm--either too preachy or too culture specific. I feel like Peck was able to dip into the wonders of Mormon culture and create something accessible. The characters are all Mormon, and their religion certainly lies at the heart of their decisions, but it isn't essential that the reader shares all their beliefs. Some stories are quite ridiculous (but fun in a quirky way), others are a strange mix of LDS culture with science fiction, but my favorites were probably the more serious ones. At any rate, I feel like LDS culture is starting to find its voice, and Steven Peck is at the heart of it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jami

    Somehow or another, I'd not realized this is a collection of short stories, so my experience with the second story was one of great confusion. (How's he going to pull that together?) Once I got that all sorted out, I found this collection to be delightfully diverse, humorous, thought-provoking, inspirational, heartbreaking, a bit skeevy in spots. "Two-dog Dose" and "The Gift of the King's Jeweler" were my faves. Though even just typing that makes me wonder if I didn't like "The Best Pinewood Der Somehow or another, I'd not realized this is a collection of short stories, so my experience with the second story was one of great confusion. (How's he going to pull that together?) Once I got that all sorted out, I found this collection to be delightfully diverse, humorous, thought-provoking, inspirational, heartbreaking, a bit skeevy in spots. "Two-dog Dose" and "The Gift of the King's Jeweler" were my faves. Though even just typing that makes me wonder if I didn't like "The Best Pinewood Derby" or "When the Bishop Started Killing Dogs" more. Hard to say. Anyhow, do take the "ish" in the subtitle seriously. It's certainly not an orthodox set of stories.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Sebesta

    I was giggling by the end of this book. I clapped my hands, turned to my wife, and said, "That was SO good!" I guess that given this is a book of short stories, it should be helpful that the particular story eliciting this response was "The Gift of the King's Jeweler," a story so wonderfully told about faith, a suspense and mystery at parts as clues dropped here and there connect the characters to the story of Mormonism in wonderful ways. (Read it! It's amazing.) And yes, this is a book of "Mormo I was giggling by the end of this book. I clapped my hands, turned to my wife, and said, "That was SO good!" I guess that given this is a book of short stories, it should be helpful that the particular story eliciting this response was "The Gift of the King's Jeweler," a story so wonderfully told about faith, a suspense and mystery at parts as clues dropped here and there connect the characters to the story of Mormonism in wonderful ways. (Read it! It's amazing.) And yes, this is a book of "Mormonish Short Fiction." It's a strange book, at parts: an Artificial Intelligence wants to be baptized, and the Elders wonder what to do? A Church with a prophet and Quorum of the 12 on Mars, and what to do when war comes but you're convinced it's not right? And what does that war have to do with the Prophet? (I'll let you read it to figure it out.) Some stories are four pages long; some are long, like "Let the Mountains Tremble" and "For the King's Jewelers" and "Two Dog Dose." But they ask fascinating questions about Mormon culture and future. I couldn't recommend this book more. Check it out!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Heiss

    Wandering Realities is a collection of Mormonish short stories by Steven Peck. My favorite one, I think, was Two Dog Dose. It was really sad, but I loved the way that it was written. My favourite thing about this collection is that it’s not a lot of feel-good, hyper religious stories like the Mormon fiction that I’ve seen before (and I say this as a Mormon). The characters weren’t perfect, so it didn’t feel like it was crazy and made up (at least the Our World section didn’t). Overall, I really Wandering Realities is a collection of Mormonish short stories by Steven Peck. My favorite one, I think, was Two Dog Dose. It was really sad, but I loved the way that it was written. My favourite thing about this collection is that it’s not a lot of feel-good, hyper religious stories like the Mormon fiction that I’ve seen before (and I say this as a Mormon). The characters weren’t perfect, so it didn’t feel like it was crazy and made up (at least the Our World section didn’t). Overall, I really liked this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John

    I feel as did Abinadom when he was given the plates from his father Chemish, i.e. "that which is sufficient is written." So read the comments by others regarding this book. I say only that I greatly appreciated "The Gift of the King's Jeweler" as it revealed how the Liahona came to the mouth of Lehi's tent.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Cranney

    He's a little preoccupied with Bishops. Still, the image of a Bishop going around killing the neighborhood dogs brought a smile to my face.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I am a Steven Peck fangirl and I loved all of these stories. They were funny, poignant, creative, and resonant. A few stories were written in different styles; one was in the style of a 19th-century ghost story, and another was hard-boiled detective style. I was afraid "in the style of" would be gimmicky, but it made for an interesting variety in the types of stories in this collection. Many of the stories have clever background details that come up in amusing ways. I especially enjoyed the stor I am a Steven Peck fangirl and I loved all of these stories. They were funny, poignant, creative, and resonant. A few stories were written in different styles; one was in the style of a 19th-century ghost story, and another was hard-boiled detective style. I was afraid "in the style of" would be gimmicky, but it made for an interesting variety in the types of stories in this collection. Many of the stories have clever background details that come up in amusing ways. I especially enjoyed the stories where faithful characters felt discouraged in their faith (...most of them). Their doubts in themselves and in God felt real to me. I identified with that cycle of receiving a prompting or revelation, acting on it for some time, and then doubting if it was real after you've forgotten that feeling. There are still other Steven Peck stories out there that I really enjoyed that aren't in a collection yet, so I wonder if there will be another collection later (I hope so!). If not I might have to start collecting more earnestly and make my own collection!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    I harbor a cynical, condescending attitude toward Mormon fiction. Let's face it, a large majority of it is poorly written, contrived, saccharine drivel. However, Steven L. Peck has redeemed LDS authors for me. His writing is splendid. Unfortunately, "Wandering Realities" fell a little short for me. But that is largely due to personal taste. Sci-fi just isn't really my thing and the first half of this book is solidly in that genre. Not to mention, I prefer a novel to a short story any day. Howeve I harbor a cynical, condescending attitude toward Mormon fiction. Let's face it, a large majority of it is poorly written, contrived, saccharine drivel. However, Steven L. Peck has redeemed LDS authors for me. His writing is splendid. Unfortunately, "Wandering Realities" fell a little short for me. But that is largely due to personal taste. Sci-fi just isn't really my thing and the first half of this book is solidly in that genre. Not to mention, I prefer a novel to a short story any day. However, as I said, the writing is excellent. I still generally enjoyed the book and there were a couple real gems in there. I may go on a binge now and read the rest of his work.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Clarice

    I must be a purely unimaginative person as I barely made it through the first story, and I kept pushing on and on, because his other book was pure genius to me. I thought for sure I would get something amazing from this book. I don't know, maybe you have to be LDS to appreciate this one. Since I no longer consider myself to be LDS, this one pushed up against my reality and I never quite got relief from that. Props to the author for creating these works of fiction though. We need more brave, uniq I must be a purely unimaginative person as I barely made it through the first story, and I kept pushing on and on, because his other book was pure genius to me. I thought for sure I would get something amazing from this book. I don't know, maybe you have to be LDS to appreciate this one. Since I no longer consider myself to be LDS, this one pushed up against my reality and I never quite got relief from that. Props to the author for creating these works of fiction though. We need more brave, unique ideas in the world. Each story isn't going to be for everyone though.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Trevor Price

    What if the Star Trek crew encountered a planet populated with Mormons? What if there were a Twilight Zone episode centered on James E. Talmadge? That's the kind of stories in this collection, most of which are written for people familiar with Mormonism or its culture. Most were great, though one story comprising 1/4 of the book was atypically kitchy and cartoonish (it was obviously when he was much less developed as a writer).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Austin

    Steve Peck does it again. This collection runs the gamut from peculiar religious sci-fi (Adoniha; Avek, Who is Distributed), to Serious Literature (Two Dog Dose), to affecting faith promotion (The Gift of the King's Jeweler) to goofy (Question Four; Bishop, Banker, Grocer, Fry) to hilarious (Best Pinewood Derby Ever: Rennact), and more. Can't recommend this enough.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    Wow. I didn't love every story in this collection but I was profoundly moved by several, and they were all SO interesting. Steve provides new lenses for examining Mormonism--but also the human experience.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    Strange but interesting. The title is apt. Some of the stories were pretty strange to me, especially the first section of the book, which deals more in science fiction (not my favorite genre). But most if not all were thought provoking, some very amusing, some very fun. I am glad I read it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Yee

    My amazing cousin wrote this book so I HAD to read it. Very out there.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    A great collection of stories that helps to get away from Mormon stereotypes and take some fun (and some serious) "what if?..." journeys.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Steve Peck's imagination astonishes me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lonnlitchfield

  20. 5 out of 5

    Luana Uluave

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jared Cook

  22. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Smith

  23. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Johnson

  25. 4 out of 5

    April

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pier Larsen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Walker Frahm

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gordon

  29. 5 out of 5

    MCOH

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.