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Maybe Something Beautiful: How Art Transformed a Neighborhood

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What good can a splash of color do in a community of gray? As Mira and her neighbors discover, more than you might ever imagine! Based on the true story of the Urban Art Trail in San Diego, California, Maybe Something Beautiful reveals how art can inspire transformation and how even the smallest artists can accomplish something big. Pick up a paintbrush and join the celebr What good can a splash of color do in a community of gray? As Mira and her neighbors discover, more than you might ever imagine! Based on the true story of the Urban Art Trail in San Diego, California, Maybe Something Beautiful reveals how art can inspire transformation and how even the smallest artists can accomplish something big. Pick up a paintbrush and join the celebration!


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What good can a splash of color do in a community of gray? As Mira and her neighbors discover, more than you might ever imagine! Based on the true story of the Urban Art Trail in San Diego, California, Maybe Something Beautiful reveals how art can inspire transformation and how even the smallest artists can accomplish something big. Pick up a paintbrush and join the celebr What good can a splash of color do in a community of gray? As Mira and her neighbors discover, more than you might ever imagine! Based on the true story of the Urban Art Trail in San Diego, California, Maybe Something Beautiful reveals how art can inspire transformation and how even the smallest artists can accomplish something big. Pick up a paintbrush and join the celebration!

30 review for Maybe Something Beautiful: How Art Transformed a Neighborhood

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    Each year I and my family read and rate all the Goodreads picture book nominees. This one is nominated for 2016. I make a few comments and then add their separate ratings and a comment from each of them. There's 20 (15 first round and 5 new ones for the semi-final round) and this is the seventeenth being rated. My rating might be somewhat influenced by the family, naturally. Dave: 4 stars. Inspirational story based in part on the actual transformation of an East Village neighborhood in San Diego Each year I and my family read and rate all the Goodreads picture book nominees. This one is nominated for 2016. I make a few comments and then add their separate ratings and a comment from each of them. There's 20 (15 first round and 5 new ones for the semi-final round) and this is the seventeenth being rated. My rating might be somewhat influenced by the family, naturally. Dave: 4 stars. Inspirational story based in part on the actual transformation of an East Village neighborhood in San Diego, with a muralist who also does the illustration for this book. It tells the story of Mira, ho thinks her neighborhood is gray and dark, and she adds color tot it, with this muralist and others. Tara (my wife): 5 stars. Loved it! Inspiring. Harry (11): 4 stars. I liked when the policeman stopped and said "excuse me?" and just when you thought he was going to ask them to stop doing it, he joined in. Hank (10): 4 stars. I liked how they used their imaginations. Lyra (9): 4 1/2 stars. Beautiful colors when and after they painted.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Based on the true story of the colorful transformation of the East Village neighborhood in San Diego, California, this picture book shows how art can impact quality of life. Mira is a little girl who loves to create art. She lives in a gray city where she tries to share her art and change things, but her art is too little to make big changes. Then she meets a man who is creating huge murals and who allows Mira to help him. Soon other neighbors are helping and colors begin to fill the streets, cr Based on the true story of the colorful transformation of the East Village neighborhood in San Diego, California, this picture book shows how art can impact quality of life. Mira is a little girl who loves to create art. She lives in a gray city where she tries to share her art and change things, but her art is too little to make big changes. Then she meets a man who is creating huge murals and who allows Mira to help him. Soon other neighbors are helping and colors begin to fill the streets, creating a close-knit neighborhood. There is a sense of joy and hope throughout this picture book, led by little Mira, a girl with the heart of an artist from the very start of the book. Just sharing her art with her neighbors is an act of artistic courage that sets the tone for the rest of the story. The text is accented by “Bams!” and “Pows” that add to the dynamic tone. Everything here is filled with creative energy and a cheery tone. López’s art shows the gray concrete city and then imposes Mira and her own colorful attitude against it. The paint splashes on the page and also creates vibrant rainbows of swirling colors that dance on the page. The diverse neighborhood is captured with a richness that is captivating. As color fills the page, it fills the neighborhood too. A brilliant testament to the power of art and the way it can transform a life and a neighborhood. Appropriate for ages 4-7.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joyce Yattoni

    #bookaday So many possibilities with this book. A great stepping off point for a community service project.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christiane

    Based on a true story of the transformation of the East Village near downtown San Diego. Illustrator Rafael López created the original murals, along with members of the community. The book’s illustrations are vibrant and beautiful, filled with possibility and hope. The text is simple enough this book could be shared for preschool story time, or in a K – 1st grade class. Maybe it will inspire kids to try this in their own neighborhoods!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    This story stars young Mira, a girl who can't stop seeing beauty even though her neighborhood is grey. She draws and paints constantly and shares her art with others. When she meets up with a muralist, the two of them bring something beautiful to the neighborhood and chase away the grey. The book includes a section in the back that tells the true story of Rafael and Candice Lopez, who used murals to transform the East Village neighborhood of San Francisco into something bright and engaging. My da This story stars young Mira, a girl who can't stop seeing beauty even though her neighborhood is grey. She draws and paints constantly and shares her art with others. When she meets up with a muralist, the two of them bring something beautiful to the neighborhood and chase away the grey. The book includes a section in the back that tells the true story of Rafael and Candice Lopez, who used murals to transform the East Village neighborhood of San Francisco into something bright and engaging. My daughter, who is two, ADORED this book. It's a good thing I have already covered the hallway wall with butcher paper, or I'd be dealing with quite the mural, I'm sure... Notes on representation: Mira appears to be Latinx, and the neighborhood is made up of people of all skin colors.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Beth Parmer

    The endpapers and title page art grabbed me immediately, but the beautiful words and illustrations continued to pull me in. I love that Mira views herself as an artist. I love that at one point in the story, music begins playing in my head, and with a single page turn, it abruptly stops. I love that back matter is included to explain the story behind the book. I love that by reading this book I want to hop on a plane to admire the The Urban Art Trail. This will definitely be a book that encourag The endpapers and title page art grabbed me immediately, but the beautiful words and illustrations continued to pull me in. I love that Mira views herself as an artist. I love that at one point in the story, music begins playing in my head, and with a single page turn, it abruptly stops. I love that back matter is included to explain the story behind the book. I love that by reading this book I want to hop on a plane to admire the The Urban Art Trail. This will definitely be a book that encourages re-reading and nonfiction exploration.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jacqui

    "You, my friends,are all artists, he told them. "The world is your canvas."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kendra

    A beautiful, colourful book about the importance of art, and music, and community, and dancing, and kindness.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    A young girl named Mira, who takes pleasure in creating beautiful, vibrantly colorful works of art, and giving them to her neighbors, tapes one of her paintings on a neighborhood wall one day, and the results are magical. A muralist appears the next day, and using her painting as a starting point, creates a gorgeous mural that transforms the gray neighborhood, and involves everybody in the project. From one small idea, maybe something beautiful will arise... Inspired by the true story of Rafael L A young girl named Mira, who takes pleasure in creating beautiful, vibrantly colorful works of art, and giving them to her neighbors, tapes one of her paintings on a neighborhood wall one day, and the results are magical. A muralist appears the next day, and using her painting as a starting point, creates a gorgeous mural that transforms the gray neighborhood, and involves everybody in the project. From one small idea, maybe something beautiful will arise... Inspired by the true story of Rafael López, an artist and muralist who, together with his wife Candice, transformed San Diego's East Village with his Urban Art Trail project, Maybe Something Beautiful: How Art Transformed a Neighborhood pairs an engaging, heartwarming story with absolutely gorgeous illustrations. López is, in fact, not only the inspiration for co-authors F. Isabel Campoy and Theresa Howell's story, he is the illustrator as well, and if his artwork here is anything to judge by, then his murals must be truly beautiful. I appreciated the messages here, both about the power of art to lift up a community, and get people involved in a common project, and about welcoming everyone as a possible positive contributor. I was particularly struck by the latter, and by the fact that the police officer here is depicted in a positive light, as a member of the community. Given that the police have not always been viewed so positively of late, I thought that was an especially welcome element of the story. Recommended to all young artists, and to anyone looking for children's stories about art and its role in the wider community.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Margie

    With each season of the year, even in those months when the outside world is sleeping, nature sends us color. It may only be a flash of rich red from a swooping cardinal or vivid blue from a chattering jay, but its vibrancy is a message. It's a reminder of associating color with the excitement of being fully alive. Not only does Mother Nature send us little pieces of color when there is nearly none but the burst of hues from one season to the next or from a dry spell ended with a rain storm seems With each season of the year, even in those months when the outside world is sleeping, nature sends us color. It may only be a flash of rich red from a swooping cardinal or vivid blue from a chattering jay, but its vibrancy is a message. It's a reminder of associating color with the excitement of being fully alive. Not only does Mother Nature send us little pieces of color when there is nearly none but the burst of hues from one season to the next or from a dry spell ended with a rain storm seems to happen in hours rather than days. Sometimes people take their lessons from the natural world. They make loveliness bloom where there was none. Maybe Something Beautiful: How Art Transformed A Neighborhood (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, April 12, 2016) written by F. Isabel Campoy and Theresa Howell with illustrations by Rafael Lopez is inspired by a true story of people who did that very thing. My full recommendation: http://librariansquest.blogspot.com/2...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Illustrated by the muralist whose work inspired the book, Maybe Something Beautiful is about the Urban Art Trail in San Diego and the vision of the community there to transform their drab, grey cityscape into something beautiful and meaningful. From calligraphy poems on the sidewalk to murals that "lit up like sunshine," the project involved everyone - from police officers to schoolteachers to children - and is a testimony to the power of art, imagination, creativity, and what people can do when Illustrated by the muralist whose work inspired the book, Maybe Something Beautiful is about the Urban Art Trail in San Diego and the vision of the community there to transform their drab, grey cityscape into something beautiful and meaningful. From calligraphy poems on the sidewalk to murals that "lit up like sunshine," the project involved everyone - from police officers to schoolteachers to children - and is a testimony to the power of art, imagination, creativity, and what people can do when they work together for a common goal and a common good. I love what the muralist told them when they finished: "You, my friends, are all artists. The world is your canvas." Such a beautiful and inspirational picture book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    La Coccinelle

    This is an interesting picture book based on the true story of the Urban Art Trail in San Diego. While I appreciate the story and the illustrations (they're vibrant and highly appealing), I'm a bit disappointed in the way this book doesn't address the legality of painting public spaces. Readers might be left with the impression that you can just go around painting walls, utility boxes, and benches wherever you like (when, in many places, you'd need permits... lest you be charged with vandalism). This is an interesting picture book based on the true story of the Urban Art Trail in San Diego. While I appreciate the story and the illustrations (they're vibrant and highly appealing), I'm a bit disappointed in the way this book doesn't address the legality of painting public spaces. Readers might be left with the impression that you can just go around painting walls, utility boxes, and benches wherever you like (when, in many places, you'd need permits... lest you be charged with vandalism). The result may be beautiful, but is it legal? That said, if parents are willing to sit down and explain these things (and read the authors' note with their kids), this could be a good introduction to urban art. The illustrations are colourful and highlight the contrast between a world with art versus one without.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nicola

    A wonderful picture book about how art, colour, and imagination can revitalise a neighbourhood and bring a community together. Miss 3 and I have read a few picture books with that kind of theme; what sets this one apart is that it is based on a true story. I appreciated the text of the Afterword and Miss 3 liked the photos.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    A touching and hopeful story about how small actions can make a big difference and how about the ways a community can come together through art. The fact that the book is based on true story made it that much better.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dna

    A beautiful story about color and community!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Colorful Picture Book A colorful story about a young girl living in a bleak urban community. She and an artist befriend each other and begin creating murals on walls, circuit boxes and anywhere they can brighten up their homes.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    This book tells the story of Mira, a little girl who lived “in the heart of a gray city,” but who loved to draw and fill her room with color. She decided to pass her pictures around to share the joy she got from brightly colored art. One day she encountered an artist and he helped her paint bright colors on a wall, making it light up like sunshine. Other people soon joined in, drawing pictures on the bricks, adding “color, punch, and pizzazz!” As more and more people participated, “Color spread This book tells the story of Mira, a little girl who lived “in the heart of a gray city,” but who loved to draw and fill her room with color. She decided to pass her pictures around to share the joy she got from brightly colored art. One day she encountered an artist and he helped her paint bright colors on a wall, making it light up like sunshine. Other people soon joined in, drawing pictures on the bricks, adding “color, punch, and pizzazz!” As more and more people participated, “Color spread throughout the streets. So did joy.” Mira and the artist went all around the city, painting bright colors, decorating “with poetry and shine.” The artist told the people, “You my friends, are all artists. The world is your canvas.” As we learn in the Authors’ Note at the end of the book, a true story inspired this book. In fact, it is the story of the award-winning illustrator, Rafael López. He and his wife Candice helped form the “Urban Art Trail,” seeking volunteers of all ages, races, and walks of life to revive their community through art. The group transformed their neighborhood in San Diego’s East Village into a place of beauty. The movement spread as far away as Canada and Australia. The joyous and colorful acrylic illustrations in this book by Rafael López himself have an emphasis on primary shapes and colors. The pictures often take up the whole double-page spread, using fluid shapes and movements to cross the seam between pages. At a website based on the book, you can learn more about the Urban Art Trail and about murals used for beautification around the world. The site even includes a montage of pictures showing murals in many cities, including San Diego. Evaluation: I found the “real” story more interesting than the fictional one. I also thought it was not made clear that random painting on walls is not always legal. But the illustrations are vibrant and interesting, and perhaps will inspire readers to learn more about how they, too, can make a difference in their communities. Rating: 3.5/5

  18. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Mayur

    This realistic fiction children’s book is a great option for lower elementary students (kindergarten through second grade). Within the story, you meet Mira, who lives in a gloomy city and enjoys painting colorful pictures for her neighbors. One day, a muralist invites her to paint on the walls of the neighborhood to help “brighten things up”. Pretty soon, various neighbors of different backgrounds and ages are all chipping in and having a blast while making their community beautiful by painting, This realistic fiction children’s book is a great option for lower elementary students (kindergarten through second grade). Within the story, you meet Mira, who lives in a gloomy city and enjoys painting colorful pictures for her neighbors. One day, a muralist invites her to paint on the walls of the neighborhood to help “brighten things up”. Pretty soon, various neighbors of different backgrounds and ages are all chipping in and having a blast while making their community beautiful by painting, singing, dancing, planting plants, but most importantly they are working together in unison towards a common goal: to make their community a beautiful place. I think one of the reasons this is a WOW book for me is because there are so many different things you could do with this book in your classroom. When I read this book aloud to my kindergarten class, every single student was captivated by the engaging illustrations; they absolutely loved this book! I chose to read this book without asking any questions or other interruptions so that my students could fully enjoy and comprehend the story for themselves. The next day we reread the story, and we discussed vocabulary found within the text such as “transformed”, “muralist”, and “pizzazz”. I also shared with my students that this was a realistic fiction book, meaning this type of activity truly took place in a neighborhood. I also showed students various murals in Raleigh and Durham to familiarize themselves with murals in the their own community. We had been studying communities and community helpers, and so this was a great connection to our unit. Maybe Something Beautiful is also a great story to introduce a fun art project or to discuss culture and what this complex idea means. Conversations could also easily form from reading the pictures alone, so taking a picture walk before reading the text would also be a neat idea when reading this to young students.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tricia Douglas

    This book is based on a true story. An area near downtown San Diego, CA was plain and gray. One day Rafael and Candice Lopez had the idea to bring people together to decorate the area. Rafael has done the illustrations for the story and they are wonderful! This would be a great book to have in schools and libraries. "All of us are artists and the world is our canvas."

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lesley Burnap

    "Wherever Mira and the man went, art followed like the string of a kite." Heart-warming story loosely based on true events in a San Diego neighborhood. Beautifully illustrated by the "inspiration for the character of the muralist."

  21. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    I was expecting more from this book. The real life description at the end of the book is way more impressive than the picture book itself. It is a nice idea but vague and not very dynamic as a children's book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sue Mosher

    A beautiful true story about a community art project in San Diego. Wonderful!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bethe

    bookaday #53. outstanding art work - by the muralist the book is loosely based upon - urban art trail movement started in San Diego. Wish it was available in Spanish.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Brice

    The book Maybe Something Beautiful is a realistic fiction book that can inspire anyone at any age to be a kind and joyful addition to their community. This book displays magnificent colors and pictures in the illustrations that really draw the reader in. I read this book as an e-book so I can only imagine how the color pops on a page in a book. I really enjoyed this book as an adult, however, for instructional purposes I would recommend this book for a third grade classroom. In this story we see The book Maybe Something Beautiful is a realistic fiction book that can inspire anyone at any age to be a kind and joyful addition to their community. This book displays magnificent colors and pictures in the illustrations that really draw the reader in. I read this book as an e-book so I can only imagine how the color pops on a page in a book. I really enjoyed this book as an adult, however, for instructional purposes I would recommend this book for a third grade classroom. In this story we see a little girl named Mira taking her creative talents to create pictures to hand out to local community members. All of these community members are thrilled to receive her artwork. One day she runs into a local artist who is inspired by what she is doing and wants to take her idea to the next level. Together they start painting wall murals and before you know it everyone in the community is involved, turning the community from grey and dark to bright and splashing with color and positivity. This story displays how when a community works together to create a positive and uplifting environment everyone can benefit from their efforts. One way I would use this in the classroom is to connect it back to social studies and how to be a good citizen. This book gives you the opportunity to have a discussion where students could list out other ways they could uplift their community and be good responsible citizens. We could also turn this into a project based learning activity where they actually implement some of their ideas as a class. This book also gives us the opportunity to have the discussion that no matter how old you are, what you look like, or other life circumstances you can always make a difference. Many students, especially at a young age, believe that they can’t make a difference because of their age or other life circumstances. This book displays how no matter how old or where you come from, as long as you put your mind to it, you can always make a difference whether it be large or small. This book was a wow book for me because of the message it sends across. I have been in many schools where the students don’t believe in themselves or their abilities and this book helps students realize that everyone is capable of making a difference. Another aspect of the book that really drew me in was the progression of color in the illustrations. These illustrations allow us as readers to visualize the message of a community going from dark to full of colorful positivity instead of only understanding the message through the words on the page. It gives some of our students the opportunity to be able to connect more to the story than they would a book where the images were not as intentional.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brianne

    "Maybe Something Beautiful: How Art Transformed a Neighborhood" by F. Isabel Campoy and Theresa Howell (Rivera Book Award: 2017 Award Winner) Concerning a text-to-self connection, Mira reminded me a great deal of my cousin, Megan. This picture book caused me to reflect upon my early childhood, and my longing to be “more like my older cousin.” It was often stated by many family members, that Megan had such promising artistic talents. Each time I stepped into her bedroom, it was as if I was transp "Maybe Something Beautiful: How Art Transformed a Neighborhood" by F. Isabel Campoy and Theresa Howell (Rivera Book Award: 2017 Award Winner) Concerning a text-to-self connection, Mira reminded me a great deal of my cousin, Megan. This picture book caused me to reflect upon my early childhood, and my longing to be “more like my older cousin.” It was often stated by many family members, that Megan had such promising artistic talents. Each time I stepped into her bedroom, it was as if I was transported to a vibrant, lively world. Paintings and sketches adorned her walls, the jewelry she constructed hung off doorknobs, lamps, and laid scattered across her dresser, along with her handmade dreamcatcher resting against her headboard. I was in awe of her creations. The character, Mira, and my cousin, both experienced such delight in presenting their work as gifts to others, and to brighten environments that held meaning to them. For instance, my cousin lived within walking distance to a park. Many visits my sister and I had with our cousin, entailed walking to the park to climb, play games, and “fly” on the swings. Then, one summer, Megan informed the family that she wished to help remodel the park. She wanted to “liven it up,” and proceeded to do the following: plant flowers near the entrance, repaint the roundabout tie-dye colors, as well as asked her father help her install a tire swing. I greatly admired my cousin, for the drive she had to do something she loved, as well as her ability to create “something beautiful” for all to enjoy. Concerning a text-to-text connection, I was able to recall many past readings that dealt with exploring and expressing a person’s individuality through art. This picture book was different in the sense that, Mira and her neighbors collaborated in the creation of an artistic masterpiece, a piece that may be enjoyed by all members of the community. At the end of the story, it was also stated that they continued to “make something more beautiful” and used various locations and objects as their blank canvases. Lastly, in regards to a text-to-world connection, in a vast amount of neighborhoods one may find murals, vibrant colors, designs, poems, and quotes displayed. The art presented to the public delivers a message to inspire, to motivate one’s imagination and passion, and to form connections with those around us. Reference: Campoy, F. I., & Howell, T. (2016). Maybe something beautiful: How art transformed a neighborhood. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Bunemann

    “Maybe Something Beautiful” by F. Isabel Campoy and Theresa Howell Genre: Info Texts Grade: K-3 Children love to create and live in a world full of color and that was true for Mira. The main character in “Maybe Something Beautiful” loved to doodle, draw, color and paint. She took every piece of blank paper she saw and filled it with color. Mira gave her works to the shop owner and the woman on the street as she ran to school along with another man and a police officer. To make her gray city a mor “Maybe Something Beautiful” by F. Isabel Campoy and Theresa Howell Genre: Info Texts Grade: K-3 Children love to create and live in a world full of color and that was true for Mira. The main character in “Maybe Something Beautiful” loved to doodle, draw, color and paint. She took every piece of blank paper she saw and filled it with color. Mira gave her works to the shop owner and the woman on the street as she ran to school along with another man and a police officer. To make her gray city a more colorful place she taped her drawings on city walls which caught the attention of a muralist. This book follows the journey of a little girl who brings her drab, gray city to life with the help of all the people in it. “Maybe Something Beautiful” is a great book to bring into the classroom. It can be used to start the discussion of how students could improve the beauty of their classroom. Ask the art teacher to help make their ideas come to life in the classroom. An amazing way to incorporate this into a school would be to create a school mural. Discuss with students how it takes a community to create and build a mural. Ask students what should be represented on it- characters, values and ideas of the school. Another great discussion topic is the difference between murals and graffiti. Reading a book like this is important to introduce community and creativity but it is important to clarify to children they cannot paint whatever they want wherever they want. This is a Wow book because of the beautiful, vibrant imaged that fill the pages. It is also based on a true story of a town near San Diego, California. Their city was also drab and gray but a couple took it into their own hands to clean up the city and make it a happy place. They brought police officers, graffiti artists, teachers, single parents, children and homeless people together to help complete their art project called the Urban Art Trail. Their city was successfully revived through art.

  27. 4 out of 5

    McKenzie Weed

    Maybe Something Beautiful: How Art Transformed a Neighborhood by Isabel Campoy is an inspiring picture book for all ages. Even as a 2o year old I absolutely loved this book, however, I could see this book as best fit in a 3rd grade classroom. Although I read this book as an e-book, the illustrations really made the story come alive. This book focuses on how a small girl's actions brought happiness to an entire town. This is not a true story but it falls under the genre of Realistic Fiction becau Maybe Something Beautiful: How Art Transformed a Neighborhood by Isabel Campoy is an inspiring picture book for all ages. Even as a 2o year old I absolutely loved this book, however, I could see this book as best fit in a 3rd grade classroom. Although I read this book as an e-book, the illustrations really made the story come alive. This book focuses on how a small girl's actions brought happiness to an entire town. This is not a true story but it falls under the genre of Realistic Fiction because all the events in the story could have potentially happened. This book could be a great introduction into a social studies unit on citizenship. This aligns with the standard 3.C&G.2 which states that students will learn how citizens can participate in their communities. This book is an abstract example of how youth can contribute even in what seems like a very small way. Although, Mira just started with drawing and painting pictures for random people in the community, she sparked a whole movement which leads to a spread of happiness in the community. I could also use this book in a unit on diverse cultures. This aligns perfectly with 3rd grade standard 3.C.1.2 which says that students will be able to exemplify how various groups show artistic expression within the local and regional communities. This was a WOW book for me because it inspired me to be an agent of change in the community. In reading, it was evident how much even a small act of kindness like painting pictures can really effect an entire community. I even went back and read this book a second time just to take in all the illustrations within the pages of this text. Overall, this is a wonderful book that I would thoroughly recommend to an audience of all ages.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ivy Armitage

    text-to-text Maybe Something Beautiful reminds me of the book City Shapes by Diane Murray. The characters in both of these books are little girls with creative minds. The character in Maybe Something Beautiful finds a way to make her city and neighborhood more colorful and beautiful to look at by creating art and painting murals on buildings. The character in City Shapes also finds beauty when looking at her city, but she does so by focusing on all the different shapes surrounding her that make t text-to-text Maybe Something Beautiful reminds me of the book City Shapes by Diane Murray. The characters in both of these books are little girls with creative minds. The character in Maybe Something Beautiful finds a way to make her city and neighborhood more colorful and beautiful to look at by creating art and painting murals on buildings. The character in City Shapes also finds beauty when looking at her city, but she does so by focusing on all the different shapes surrounding her that make the city to her look like art just the way it is. text-to-self The muralist in this book reminds me of my high school art teacher, and my classmates and I were the little girl and the rest of the people in her neighborhood who helped paint the murals in their city/neighborhood. When I was a junior in high school my entire art class took on a project at a local fish hatchery to paint underwater scenes on the sides of ugly, old water tanks so that they would be more interesting to look at when students came to the hatchery for field trips. text-to-world There are different forms of art and many art museums all over the world that offer people things of beauty to look at. This book made me think about Japan's Naoshima Island. It is known for its indoor outdoor museum, with contemporary works of art scattered all over the community, making the entire island a site to behold. Murray, D. (2016). City Shapes. Boston, NY: Little, Brown And Company.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    This book is considered realistic fiction because it is not real but could happen in todays society. I would also recommend this book for elementary students grades 1st to 4th. Text-to-Text: While reading this book I connected it to many shows off of HGTV. This book and the shows both talk about transforming different places, houses, and communities. Text-to-Self: I related to this book because during high school many organizations I was in would volunteer within our community. We worked on proj This book is considered realistic fiction because it is not real but could happen in todays society. I would also recommend this book for elementary students grades 1st to 4th. Text-to-Text: While reading this book I connected it to many shows off of HGTV. This book and the shows both talk about transforming different places, houses, and communities. Text-to-Self: I related to this book because during high school many organizations I was in would volunteer within our community. We worked on projects like planting flowers and cleaning up our park to make the places in our community more appealing and beautiful. Text-to-World: I think this book can relate to many painter in the world. These people are making beautiful art that makes our world a better place. It also helps others to be inspired to make something and help make our world beautiful.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Annette Wimmer

    Revised Review: This book is about a little girl named Mira who loved to draw, and she spread her joy by giving people her artwork in order to make her town less “gray.” She met a muralist who, with the help of the community, transformed her town into a vibrant, happy, colorful place. This is based on a true story about a majority Hispanic area near downtown San Diego, CA where Rafael and Candice Lopez (R. Lopez is the illustrator of this book), designed a plan to create art in their own communit Revised Review: This book is about a little girl named Mira who loved to draw, and she spread her joy by giving people her artwork in order to make her town less “gray.” She met a muralist who, with the help of the community, transformed her town into a vibrant, happy, colorful place. This is based on a true story about a majority Hispanic area near downtown San Diego, CA where Rafael and Candice Lopez (R. Lopez is the illustrator of this book), designed a plan to create art in their own community. The trend caught on and now many neighborhoods across the country are using art to brighten neighborhoods and bring communities together. I would recommend this book’s use in the classroom to show how a community can work together, cooperate, and make positive changes. Ask questions such how they might identify with the main character, if they have a special talent that they like to share with others, if they can think of a time when their community has come together for something special (ie parade, raise awareness/money for a local cause, charity 3k walk/run, block party) that built up the community. Discussion of any unfamiliar words in the text (such as muralist) would increase the students’ vocabulary.

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