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Thirty-six stories by the Nobel Prize winner, including some of his most famous such as "Zlateh the Goat," "Mazel and Shlimazel," and "The Fools of Chelm and the Stupid Carp." Stories for Children is a 1984 New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of the Year. Thirty-six stories by the Nobel Prize winner, including some of his most famous such as "Zlateh the Goat," "Mazel and Shlimazel," and "The Fools of Chelm and the Stupid Carp." Stories for Children is a 1984 New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of the Year.


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Thirty-six stories by the Nobel Prize winner, including some of his most famous such as "Zlateh the Goat," "Mazel and Shlimazel," and "The Fools of Chelm and the Stupid Carp." Stories for Children is a 1984 New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of the Year. Thirty-six stories by the Nobel Prize winner, including some of his most famous such as "Zlateh the Goat," "Mazel and Shlimazel," and "The Fools of Chelm and the Stupid Carp." Stories for Children is a 1984 New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of the Year.

30 review for Stories for Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    A whimsical, satisfying collection of short stories for children and adults alike. Many are set in Poland and Russia, but some are set in the Holy Land. Richly steeped in Jewish culture and mythology, and yet no more exclusively for Jewish children than the Brothers Grimm are exclusively for German children. Favorites are difficult to pick, but the stories I particularly liked included "A Tale of Three Wishes," "Menaseh's Dream," and "Topiel and Tekla." The fifth door led to a large hall. It was A whimsical, satisfying collection of short stories for children and adults alike. Many are set in Poland and Russia, but some are set in the Holy Land. Richly steeped in Jewish culture and mythology, and yet no more exclusively for Jewish children than the Brothers Grimm are exclusively for German children. Favorites are difficult to pick, but the stories I particularly liked included "A Tale of Three Wishes," "Menaseh's Dream," and "Topiel and Tekla." The fifth door led to a large hall. It was filled with the characters in the stories his parents had told him at bedtime...They were all there: David the warrior and the Ethiopian princess whom David saved from captivity; the highwayman Bandurek, who robbed the rich and fed the poor; Velikan the giant, who had one eye in the center of his forehead and who carried a fir tree as a staff in his right hand and a snake in his left; the midget Pitzeles, whose beard dragged on the ground and who was jester to the fearsome King Merodach; and the two-headed wizard Malkizedek, who by witchcraft spirited innocent girls into the desert of Sodom and Gomorrah... ..."Where am I?" Menaseh asked. "You are in a castle that has many names. We like to call it the place where nothing is lost." - from "Menaseh's Dream"

  2. 5 out of 5

    Arlo

    I read about a story a night to my children. My six and eight year old would beg each night for me to read more when I finished and alwaysbefore going to bed asked to be read a story from the book. They are old school Eastern European Jewish/ shtetl stories with classical themes. While the kids didn't get all the details of the stories there are fun antidotes through out that kept them on edge. A simple discussion at the end of each story cleared every thing up and perhaps made them the wiser si I read about a story a night to my children. My six and eight year old would beg each night for me to read more when I finished and alwaysbefore going to bed asked to be read a story from the book. They are old school Eastern European Jewish/ shtetl stories with classical themes. While the kids didn't get all the details of the stories there are fun antidotes through out that kept them on edge. A simple discussion at the end of each story cleared every thing up and perhaps made them the wiser since the stories were not written towards the lowest common denominator. This book is a real treasure for the right family.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nathanael Greene Slater

    Ole and Trufa (The Story Of Two Leaves) By Isaac Bashevis Singer [Translated by Joseph Singer; Novelist, story-teller and master of the modern allegory, Isaac Bashevis Singer won the Nobel prize in Literature in 1978.] The FOREST was large and thickly overgrown with all kinds of leaf-bearing trees. Usually, it is cold at this time of the year and it even snows, but this November was relatively warm. You might have thought it was summer except that the whole forest was strewn with fallen leaves – Ole and Trufa (The Story Of Two Leaves) By Isaac Bashevis Singer [Translated by Joseph Singer; Novelist, story-teller and master of the modern allegory, Isaac Bashevis Singer won the Nobel prize in Literature in 1978.] The FOREST was large and thickly overgrown with all kinds of leaf-bearing trees. Usually, it is cold at this time of the year and it even snows, but this November was relatively warm. You might have thought it was summer except that the whole forest was strewn with fallen leaves – some yellow as saffron, some red as wine, some the color of gold and some mixed color. The leaves had been torn down by the rain, by the wind, some by day, some at night, and they now formed a deep carpet over the forest floor. Although their juices had run dry, the leaves still exuded a pleasant aroma. The sun shone down on them through the living branches, and worms and flies which had somehow survived the autumn storms crawled over them. The space beneath the leaves provided hiding places for crickets, field mice and many other creatures who sought protection in the earth. On the tip of a tree which had lost all its other leaves, two still remained hanging from one twig: Ole and Trufa. For some reason unknown to them, Ole and Trufa had survived all the rains, all the cold nights and winds. Who knows the reason one leaf falls and another remains? But Ole and Trufa believed the answer lay in the great love they bore one another. Ole was slightly bigger than Trufa and a few days older, but Trufa was prettier and more delicate. One leaf can do little for another when the wind blows, the rain pours, or the hail begins to fall. Still, Ole encouraged Trufa at every opportunity. During the worst storms, when the thunder clapped, the lightning flashed and the wind tore off not only leaves but even whole branches, Ole pleaded with Trufa: “Hang on, Trufa! Hang on with all your might!” Finest Power. At times during cold and stormy nights, Trufa would complain: “My time has come, Ole, but you hang on!” “What for?” Ole asked. “Without you, my life is senseless. If you fall, I’ll fall with you.” “No, Ole don’t do it! So long as a leaf can stay up it mustn’t let go.” “It all depends if you stay with me,” Ole replied. “By day I look at you and admire your beauty. At night I sense your fragrance. Be the only leaf on a tree? No, never!” “Ole, your words are so sweet but they’re not true,” Trufa said. “You know very well that I’m no longer pretty. Look how wrinkled I am, how shrivelled I’ve become! Only one thing is still left me – my love for you.” “Isn’t that enough? Of all our powers love is the highest, the finest,” Ole said. “So long as we love each other we remain here, and no wind, rain or storm can destroy us. I’ll tell you something, Trufa – I never loved you as much as I love you now.” “Why, Ole? Why? I’am all yellow.” “Who says green is pretty and yellow is not? All colors are equally handsome. And just as Ole spoke these words, that which Trufa had featured all these months happened – a wind came up and tore Ole loose from the twig. Trufa began to tremble and flutter until it seemed that she, too, would soon be torn away, but she held fast. She saw Ole fall and sway in the air, and she called to him in leafy language: “Ole! Come back Ole! Ole!” But before she could even finish, Ole vanished from sight. He blended in with the other leaves on the ground, and Trufa was left all alone on the tree. So long as it was still day, Trufa managed somehow to endure her grief. But when it grew dark and cold and a piercing rain began to fall, she sank into despair. Somehow she felt that the blame for all the leafy misfortunes lay with the tree, the trunk with all its mighty limbs. Leaves fell, but the trunk stood tall, thick and firmly rooted in the ground. No wind, rain or hail could upset it. What did it matter to a tree, which probably lived forever, what became of a leaf? To Trufa, the trunk was a kind of God. It covered itself with leaves for a few months, then it shook them off. It nourished them with its sap for as long as it pleased, then it let them die of thirst. Trufa pleaded with the other tree to give her back her Ole, to make summer again, but the tree did not heed her prayers. Trufa didn’t think a night could be so long as this one – so dark, so frosty. She spoke to Ole and hoped for an answer, but Ole was silent and gave no sign of his presence. Trufa said to the tree: “Since you’ve taken Ole from me, take me too.” But even this prayer the tree didn’t acknowledge. After a while, Trufa dozed off. This wasn’t sleep but a strange languor. Trufa awoke and to her amazement found that she was no longer hanging on the tree. The wind had blown her down while she was asleep. This was different from the way she used to feel when she awoke on the tree with the sunrise. All her fears and anxieties had now vanished. The awakening also brought with it an awareness she had never felt before. She knew now that she wasn’t just a leaf that depended on every whim of the wind, but that she was part of the universe. Through some mysterious force, Trufa understood the miracle of her molecules, atoms, protons and electrons – the enormous energy she represented and the divine plan of which she was a part. Next to her lay Ole, and they greeted each other with a love they hadn’t been aware of before. This wasn’t a love depended on chance or caprice, but a love as mighty an eternal as the universe itself. That which they had feared all the days and nights between April and November turned out to be not death but redemption. A breeze came and lifted Ole and Trufa in the air and they soared with the bliss known only by those who have freed themselves and have joined with eternity. [End] is

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    A wonderful collection with several five star stories. I bought this as a gift for my nephew's 7th birthday, so beforehand I read a copy from the library to see how many of the stories would be age-appropriate. (He's a "young" turning-seven year old.) Nearly all of them were (see list below). Some of these stories I remembered from my own childhood, and others were new to me. I was surprised how many had a Chanukkah setting--it didn't used to be a very important holiday in the Jewish calendar unt A wonderful collection with several five star stories. I bought this as a gift for my nephew's 7th birthday, so beforehand I read a copy from the library to see how many of the stories would be age-appropriate. (He's a "young" turning-seven year old.) Nearly all of them were (see list below). Some of these stories I remembered from my own childhood, and others were new to me. I was surprised how many had a Chanukkah setting--it didn't used to be a very important holiday in the Jewish calendar until the influence of Christmas in the U.S. spurred making Channukkah a bigger deal. Maybe it always used to be a big deal to children, though? Unlike most short story collections, in which I only read one or two before taking a break because they are jumping between characters and settings and it's overwhelming to rapidly start over mentally, mainly these stories take place in an Eastern European pre-WWII shtetl context, and I could read as many as I wanted at a time. Only a handful of the stories repeat characters, but because the general world in which the stories took place stayed relatively the same, I could read a handful of stories in a row happily. They are mostly only about three pages each, so they'll be perfect for bedtime stories. A couple of my favorites were "Zlateh the Goat" and "Menashe & Rachel" (which my Mom always read to us from the Singer collection of Hanukah stories "The Power of Light) but there are really a ton of wonderful stories in here that I know my nephews will find hilarious such as the ones with the Wise Men of Chelm (the Jewish equivalent of the Keystone Cops). Here's my list of what is age appropriate for a childish/not-mature for his age kid turning 7: 1) Elders of Chelm: Yes 2) A Tale of Three Wishes: Not yet 3) The Extinguished Lights: No 4) Mazel & Shlimazel: Yes 5) Why Noah chose the dove: Yes 6) Zlateh the Goat: Yes, definitely 7) A Hanukkah Eve in Warsaw: Yes, this is the first long one with sections 8) The Fools of Chelm: Yes 9) The Wicked City: no, and not even a good story 10) Rabbi Leib: Yes, except edit out the "fat midget" on page 94 11) The Parakeet Named Dreidel: Yes 12) Lemel & Tzipa: Maybe, I'm uncomfortable with making fun of dumb people who can't read 13) The Day I got lost: Yes 14) Menashe & Rachel: Yes, definitely 15) Shlemiel the Businessman: Yes 16) Joseph & Koza: Yes 17) A Hanukkah Evening in my Parents' House: Yes 18) Tsirtsur & Peziza: Yes 19) Naftali the Storyteller: Yes 20) Hershele & Hanukkah: Yes 21) When Shlemiel Went to Warsaw: Yes 22) Elijah the Slave: yes, but odd story 23) The Power of Light: when kids have learned about the Holocaust in school (5th grade?) then they can hear this story, but I wouldn't personally beforehand 24) Growing Up: No 25) The Lantuch: Yes 26) Utzel & His Daughter, Poverty: maybe 27) The Squire: Yes 28) Ole & Trufa: Yes 29) Dalfunka, Where the Rich Live Forever: Yes 30) Topiel & Tekla: No 31) Hanukkah in the Poorhouse: this one is sad, maybe wait? 32) Shrewd Todie & Lyzer the Miser: Yes 33) The Fearsome Inn: yes, but could also wait--an interesting Jewish twist on Eastern European fairy tale, including a she-devil named Lilith 34) The Cat who thought she was a dog: Yes 35) Menaseh's Dream: Yes 36) Tashlik: I'm guessing age 12 and up 37) essay on literature: no

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Good for an intermediate reader or pre-teen

  6. 5 out of 5

    A

    You need to read this, what a classic.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I especially liked Mazel and Shlimazel (Good Luck and Bad Luck try to prove who is stronger, reminded me of the story of Job) Why Noah Chose the Dove Zlateh the Goat Ole and Trufa: 2 leaves wait to fall off the tree. reminded me of "The Fall of Freddy the Leaf" The Fools of Chelm and the Stupid Carp (obnoxious fish punished by drowning!) A Tale of Three Wishes (3 children wish for beauty, wisdom and learned in religion but find they must work hard for their wishes to come true) Whe Shlemiel Went to Wa I especially liked Mazel and Shlimazel (Good Luck and Bad Luck try to prove who is stronger, reminded me of the story of Job) Why Noah Chose the Dove Zlateh the Goat Ole and Trufa: 2 leaves wait to fall off the tree. reminded me of "The Fall of Freddy the Leaf" The Fools of Chelm and the Stupid Carp (obnoxious fish punished by drowning!) A Tale of Three Wishes (3 children wish for beauty, wisdom and learned in religion but find they must work hard for their wishes to come true) Whe Shlemiel Went to Warsaw (tricked into thinking that there is another Chelm in between Chelm and Warsaw) Elijah the Slave Dalfunka, Where the rick LIve forever (no rich people die in poor Dalfunka (b/c no rich live there to begin with) therefore the rich can live there forever) Shrewd Todie and Lyzer the Miser (Todie convinces Lyzer to lend him his good silver spoon. Todie returns it along with another spoon saying Lyzer's spoon gave birth. Greedy Lyzer agrees to lend him all eight of his silver candlsticks, Todie sells them and tells Lyzer he can't return his candlesticks b/c they died) quotes p207 "Even while waiting for a miracle, it's god to do something. Man must begin and God will help him." p333 "Long after literature for adults has gone to pieces, books for children will constitute the last vestige of storytelling, logic faithin in the family, in God and in real humanishm."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Daniel L.

    Stories for Children - And Grown-ups Who Have a Children's Curiosity for a Good Story Having read Isaac Bashevis Singer's stories for adult readers, along with his charming autobiographical writings, the title "Stories for Children" on a book of this beloved author certainly caught my attention. After all, I believe that much children's fiction is more interesting than that for adults. With this anthology, the reader who appreciates "children's literature" will get the best of both: the masterful Stories for Children - And Grown-ups Who Have a Children's Curiosity for a Good Story Having read Isaac Bashevis Singer's stories for adult readers, along with his charming autobiographical writings, the title "Stories for Children" on a book of this beloved author certainly caught my attention. After all, I believe that much children's fiction is more interesting than that for adults. With this anthology, the reader who appreciates "children's literature" will get the best of both: the masterful writing of I.B. Singer with even more of the mystery for which he is so famous. The stories take place both in the old-world shtetls and modern-day New York City, though time in either case appears suspended even though the stories of the former category take place much further back in time. Many of the stories, among them "Why Noah Chose the Goat," "Rabbi Leib & the Witch Cunegunde," "Hanukkah in the Poorhouse," and "Dalfunka, Where the Rich Live Forever," show the Hasidic morality and mystery of Singer's childhood, which he infuses in these and other stories, both in this volume and anthologies of stories for adults. Then there are stories that rank among the finest that Yiddish (Jewish) folklore has to offer, such as "A Tale of Three Wishes," "Zlateh the Goat," and "Elijah the Slave." Singer's humor is often there, as well, especially in such stories as Mazel & Schiimazel," "The Fools of Chelm & the Stupid Carp," "Schlemiel the Businessman," "And When Schlemiel Went to Warsaw." With this anthology, one experiences all elements that make up the magic of the stories of Isaac Bashevis Singer."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    1968 Newbery Honor Book (for The Fearsome Inn) I picked up this book from the library to try to read the Newbery Honor books by Singer. However, most of the stories in When Shlemiel Went to Warsaw and other Stories and Zlateh the Goat and Other Stories besides the title stories are not contained in this volume. The Fearsome Inn is part of this anthology so I can count that particular story as being "read." In "The Fearsome Inn," three young men end up at a cursed inn run by a witch and her half-de 1968 Newbery Honor Book (for The Fearsome Inn) I picked up this book from the library to try to read the Newbery Honor books by Singer. However, most of the stories in When Shlemiel Went to Warsaw and other Stories and Zlateh the Goat and Other Stories besides the title stories are not contained in this volume. The Fearsome Inn is part of this anthology so I can count that particular story as being "read." In "The Fearsome Inn," three young men end up at a cursed inn run by a witch and her half-devil husband. The witch is about to ensnare the young men when one of them decides to try to outsmart them. I thought it was an interesting story with a good ending. It reminded me of Stardust (although this came first). I also read "Zlateh the Goat," in which a young man taking his goat off to be sold gets caught in a snow storm. My favorite has to be "When Shlemiel Went to Warsaw" where Shlemiel, a lazy man, sets off for Warsaw, only to take a mid-afternoon nap. During his nap, the blacksmith, changes the direction his shoes are pointing, causing him to come back the way he came. He is convinced that he is now in "Chelm 2" and not "Chelm 1" where he started. Apparently, Chelm is a city populated with fools. I liked the few stories I read enough to want to sneak a peek at the others and I am curious to read the other stories in the two other Newbery collections. I am glad that Newbery chose to add some ethnic folktales to their list. It is always interesting to read folk stories from other cultures.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joel Simon

    This is a fantastic set of stories for children, by one of Israel's finest writers of books for children, Isaac Bashevis Singer. The characters are unusual, the stories are varied and they are mixed with humor, fun and new things to learn. Because all the stories take place in foreign places with what to children are funny sounding names (and the same can be said of all the characters too!) my kids were skeptical at first that the stories would interest them. But with patient explaining and answ This is a fantastic set of stories for children, by one of Israel's finest writers of books for children, Isaac Bashevis Singer. The characters are unusual, the stories are varied and they are mixed with humor, fun and new things to learn. Because all the stories take place in foreign places with what to children are funny sounding names (and the same can be said of all the characters too!) my kids were skeptical at first that the stories would interest them. But with patient explaining and answering lots of questions, they quickly got absorbed into the stories and couldn't wait for more. Also, several of the characters appear in more than one story, which is also good for kids because it reminds them of the prior stories and they like making the connections across the different stories and comparing the experiences the characters have from one to the next. Many of the stories involve characters who think they are very intelligent and wise, but they really are not. Others involve miracles or something mysterious. But they all have one thing in common -- they open up a world of wonder for children and bring smiles to their faces. Highly recommended for parents to read out loud to their kids, from age 6 and up.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    These classic folktales from Isaac Bashevis Singer are often hilarious stories in the tradition of the "wise men" of Chelm, as well as more modern stories My favorites are Shlemiel and Shlmazel and A Parakeet named Dreidel. The former is a male cinderella tale that features the eponymous spirits who represent good and bad luck. A series of fortunate and unfortunate events are experienced by the male protagonist, Tam, as he unexpectedly wins the king's good favor and falls in love with the prince These classic folktales from Isaac Bashevis Singer are often hilarious stories in the tradition of the "wise men" of Chelm, as well as more modern stories My favorites are Shlemiel and Shlmazel and A Parakeet named Dreidel. The former is a male cinderella tale that features the eponymous spirits who represent good and bad luck. A series of fortunate and unfortunate events are experienced by the male protagonist, Tam, as he unexpectedly wins the king's good favor and falls in love with the princess. But who will prevail? There are fascinating twists and turns in the plot that make this tale great material for inference as well as DRTA's. The events in a Parakeet named Dreidl renew one's faith in "beshert," or knowing that one's true love is out there, and that fate is the most effective matchmaker.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    We were given this book as a gift and I had never heard of it. I had a peek and decided to use it in our homeschool- what a treat it turned out to be! This is such a beautiful, interesting, and endlessly entertaining collection of short stories for children. We read it as a literature supplement and a read-aloud and the entire family enjoyed them tremendously. These tales are strongly moral, left us with interesting discussion points, and Singer is an amazing storyteller. Many of the stories include We were given this book as a gift and I had never heard of it. I had a peek and decided to use it in our homeschool- what a treat it turned out to be! This is such a beautiful, interesting, and endlessly entertaining collection of short stories for children. We read it as a literature supplement and a read-aloud and the entire family enjoyed them tremendously. These tales are strongly moral, left us with interesting discussion points, and Singer is an amazing storyteller. Many of the stories included made us giggle out loud, and best of all they were clear and understandable by even the youngest ones in our house. Although they will be of special interest to Jewish children, they can be enjoyed by anyone. Highly recommended!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    I read this book because I'm looking for stories to tell at Toastmasters, and I found a couple of possibilities. But, my problem with the book is that most of the characters had Hebrew or Yiddish (I think) names, and that I was missing some aspect of the story because I didn't understand the meaning of the names. Still, there were some very good stories. Some were funny, and some made me think. And, as a bonus, the book ends with an essay titled Are Children the Ultimate Literary Critics?, which I read this book because I'm looking for stories to tell at Toastmasters, and I found a couple of possibilities. But, my problem with the book is that most of the characters had Hebrew or Yiddish (I think) names, and that I was missing some aspect of the story because I didn't understand the meaning of the names. Still, there were some very good stories. Some were funny, and some made me think. And, as a bonus, the book ends with an essay titled Are Children the Ultimate Literary Critics?, which I highly recommend.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeniann

    A book of Jewish folktales for children is not normally a genre that I would be interested in, but this is a great collection of stories. Some have subtle moral lessons, some are sweet and touching, and some are laugh out loud funny. Some stories were more dark, though, and this is definitely a collection for older children since there are no pictures. I read my favorite one, "The Fools of Chelm and the Stupid Carp" to my husband and we were just rolling. I would have enjoyed these as a kid, and A book of Jewish folktales for children is not normally a genre that I would be interested in, but this is a great collection of stories. Some have subtle moral lessons, some are sweet and touching, and some are laugh out loud funny. Some stories were more dark, though, and this is definitely a collection for older children since there are no pictures. I read my favorite one, "The Fools of Chelm and the Stupid Carp" to my husband and we were just rolling. I would have enjoyed these as a kid, and I'm sure I'll be sharing these stories with them.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Handermann

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Interesting -- I really like his writing style, and "slavic fairy tale" tone that many of his stories have. Some of the stories seemed a little dark for children -- a story about a young mother who drowns herself and her baby, for instance -- and would take a bit of explaining to be good. But I've found the same thing in other collections of his children's stories. Anyway, the good ones are always good enough that I keep reading them. Interesting -- I really like his writing style, and "slavic fairy tale" tone that many of his stories have. Some of the stories seemed a little dark for children -- a story about a young mother who drowns herself and her baby, for instance -- and would take a bit of explaining to be good. But I've found the same thing in other collections of his children's stories. Anyway, the good ones are always good enough that I keep reading them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This was a pretty good read for class. I liked hearing all the familiar Jewish names in the stories, and seeing some of the twists on the tales. I could have done without so much of the very patriarchal ideals that are sometimes inherent in the stricter Jewish culture, but there were plenty of stories without it, so that was good.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aryeh

    Wonderful. Some stories I knew and some I didn't. Although it is called 'stories for children', there are several of these I wouldn't really read to a younger child as they are much more suited to teens. Really love his writing, this translation, and the huge variety of contents in this collection. Something for everyone. Recommended. Wonderful. Some stories I knew and some I didn't. Although it is called 'stories for children', there are several of these I wouldn't really read to a younger child as they are much more suited to teens. Really love his writing, this translation, and the huge variety of contents in this collection. Something for everyone. Recommended.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pardis Parto

    Thirty-six stories by the Nobel Prize winner, including some of his most famous such as "Zlateh the Goat," "Mazel and Shlimazel," and "The Fools of Chelm and the Stupid Carp." Stories for Children is a 1984 New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of the Year. Thirty-six stories by the Nobel Prize winner, including some of his most famous such as "Zlateh the Goat," "Mazel and Shlimazel," and "The Fools of Chelm and the Stupid Carp." Stories for Children is a 1984 New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of the Year.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Renske

    Dit is voor mij absoluut een boek dat niet meer weg gaat. De verhalen zijn erg prettig geschreven en het is nog heel interessant om wat van de Joodse cultuur te leren kennen. Zoals in veel sprookjesachtige verhalen komen er veel universele thema's in voor. Dit is voor mij absoluut een boek dat niet meer weg gaat. De verhalen zijn erg prettig geschreven en het is nog heel interessant om wat van de Joodse cultuur te leren kennen. Zoals in veel sprookjesachtige verhalen komen er veel universele thema's in voor.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julia Glassman

    I love Singer's folktales and parables, and look forward to reading stories from this book to my daughter (who shares a name with one of the collection's minor characters!). I didn't find the slice-of-life stories quite as interesting, but there was no story I didn't enjoy. I love Singer's folktales and parables, and look forward to reading stories from this book to my daughter (who shares a name with one of the collection's minor characters!). I didn't find the slice-of-life stories quite as interesting, but there was no story I didn't enjoy.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    May be for children but the stories are endlessly fascinating.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    You simply must get to know Mazel and Shlimazel, Lyzer the Miser, and the girl named Poverty--they're all delightful company. You simply must get to know Mazel and Shlimazel, Lyzer the Miser, and the girl named Poverty--they're all delightful company.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    I read it, but it was ... - I don't kno what to say. It wasn't my pair of shoes. I read it, but it was ... - I don't kno what to say. It wasn't my pair of shoes.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Krista

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ava

  26. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Giles

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