hits counter What's Right with Islam Is What's Right With America: A New Vision for Muslims and the West - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

What's Right with Islam Is What's Right With America: A New Vision for Muslims and the West

Availability: Ready to download

An American imam offers answers for today's toughest questions about Islam, and a vision for a  reconciliation between Islam and the West. One of the pressing questions of our time is what went wrong in the relationship between Muslims and the West. Continuing global violence in the name of Islam reflects the deepest fears by certain Muslim factions of Western political, cu An American imam offers answers for today's toughest questions about Islam, and a vision for a  reconciliation between Islam and the West. One of the pressing questions of our time is what went wrong in the relationship between Muslims and the West. Continuing global violence in the name of Islam reflects the deepest fears by certain Muslim factions of Western political, cultural, and economic encroachment. The solution to the current antagonism requires finding common ground upon which to build mutual respect and understanding. Who better to offer such an analysis than an American imam, someone with a foot in each world and the tools to examine the common roots of both Western and Muslim cultures; someone to explain to the non-Islamic West not just what went wrong with Islam, but what's right with Islam. Focused on finding solutions, not on determining fault, this is ultimately a hopeful, inspiring book. What's Right with Islam systematically lays out the reasons for the current dissonance between these cultures and offers a foundation and plan for improved relations. Wide-ranging in scope, What's Right with Islam elaborates in satisfying detail a vision for a Muslim world that can eventually embrace its own distinctive forms of democracy and capitalism, aspiring to a new Cordoba - a time when Jews, Christians, Muslims, and all other faith traditions will live together in peace and prosperity.    


Compare

An American imam offers answers for today's toughest questions about Islam, and a vision for a  reconciliation between Islam and the West. One of the pressing questions of our time is what went wrong in the relationship between Muslims and the West. Continuing global violence in the name of Islam reflects the deepest fears by certain Muslim factions of Western political, cu An American imam offers answers for today's toughest questions about Islam, and a vision for a  reconciliation between Islam and the West. One of the pressing questions of our time is what went wrong in the relationship between Muslims and the West. Continuing global violence in the name of Islam reflects the deepest fears by certain Muslim factions of Western political, cultural, and economic encroachment. The solution to the current antagonism requires finding common ground upon which to build mutual respect and understanding. Who better to offer such an analysis than an American imam, someone with a foot in each world and the tools to examine the common roots of both Western and Muslim cultures; someone to explain to the non-Islamic West not just what went wrong with Islam, but what's right with Islam. Focused on finding solutions, not on determining fault, this is ultimately a hopeful, inspiring book. What's Right with Islam systematically lays out the reasons for the current dissonance between these cultures and offers a foundation and plan for improved relations. Wide-ranging in scope, What's Right with Islam elaborates in satisfying detail a vision for a Muslim world that can eventually embrace its own distinctive forms of democracy and capitalism, aspiring to a new Cordoba - a time when Jews, Christians, Muslims, and all other faith traditions will live together in peace and prosperity.    

51 review for What's Right with Islam Is What's Right With America: A New Vision for Muslims and the West

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia

    To moderate muslims, the idea generated by Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf is not exactly new. The fact that the US constitution and Al-Quran have similar values are something familiar to those who cares enough to find out what goes wrong in the practice of both values so the world now recognize the US as Islam's greatest nemesis and vice versa. However, this book is so well researched it might also encourage those the non-believers of the possibility that Islam and the US will one day reach a peace sett To moderate muslims, the idea generated by Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf is not exactly new. The fact that the US constitution and Al-Quran have similar values are something familiar to those who cares enough to find out what goes wrong in the practice of both values so the world now recognize the US as Islam's greatest nemesis and vice versa. However, this book is so well researched it might also encourage those the non-believers of the possibility that Islam and the US will one day reach a peace settlement to side track.

  2. 5 out of 5

    miteypen

    Imam Rauf is the main person behind Park51, formerly known as the Cordoba House, and erroneously known as the mosque at Ground Zero. He has come under fire for his supposed support of terrorism. Those who hold this view as well as anyone interested in what one Muslim leader has to say about Islam and the West, should read this book. I liked the book so much I bought it and I plan to refer to it when I write posts for my blog and as I grow as a Muslim. Rauf is an intelligent and thoughtful writer Imam Rauf is the main person behind Park51, formerly known as the Cordoba House, and erroneously known as the mosque at Ground Zero. He has come under fire for his supposed support of terrorism. Those who hold this view as well as anyone interested in what one Muslim leader has to say about Islam and the West, should read this book. I liked the book so much I bought it and I plan to refer to it when I write posts for my blog and as I grow as a Muslim. Rauf is an intelligent and thoughtful writer and well worth listening to. I highly recommend this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Elias

    I give this 4 stars not because the book is especially well written or insightful in itself but because it helps to understand the thinking of the main sponsor of the controversial Islamic Center in Lower Manhattan. Imam Rauf presents the views of a man passionately committed to dialog between America and the Muslim world. He is idealistic (some might say naive), but it's hard to question the sincerity of his commitment. One issue I have is that on the one hand he emphasizes that the Abrahamic fa I give this 4 stars not because the book is especially well written or insightful in itself but because it helps to understand the thinking of the main sponsor of the controversial Islamic Center in Lower Manhattan. Imam Rauf presents the views of a man passionately committed to dialog between America and the Muslim world. He is idealistic (some might say naive), but it's hard to question the sincerity of his commitment. One issue I have is that on the one hand he emphasizes that the Abrahamic faiths share core values, values that are also part of American life. But that leaves open the place of Buddhists and Hindus and of secular humanists. Rauf in some places emphasizes the Abrahamic faiths and at other times includes the values of non-monotheistic religions. He less often includes the values of nontheists, and it's not clear what place he accords them in the grand dialog that he has in mind.

  4. 4 out of 5

    tina

    I learned about God & America & how democratic capitalism fulfills the Abrahamic ethic to love one's neighbor as oneself. I learned about God & America & how democratic capitalism fulfills the Abrahamic ethic to love one's neighbor as oneself.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Simcha York

    What's Right with Islam is an interesting and important book, but is also a book which unfortunately suffers from its attempts to cover a lot of different aspects of the relationship between Islam and the West (and, more specifically sometimes, Islam and secularized modernity), sacrificing depth in favor of breadth. Feisal Abdul Rauf's book is arguably three separate books rolled into one: 1. An apologetics for Islam. 2. An argument for the compatibility of Islam with the other Abrahamic faiths an What's Right with Islam is an interesting and important book, but is also a book which unfortunately suffers from its attempts to cover a lot of different aspects of the relationship between Islam and the West (and, more specifically sometimes, Islam and secularized modernity), sacrificing depth in favor of breadth. Feisal Abdul Rauf's book is arguably three separate books rolled into one: 1. An apologetics for Islam. 2. An argument for the compatibility of Islam with the other Abrahamic faiths and with the West (and, particularly, with the United States). 3. A roadmap for closing the schism between the Muslim world and the West. Admittedly, Imam Rauf has to tread some difficult ground here, at least with regards to this book's American audience. His apologetics is based on a fairly conservative, literal interpretation of Islam and the other Abrahamic faiths and should, in theory at least, be appealing to conservative theologians and evangelical Christians in the United States. His calls for bringing the Muslim world and the West closer together, however, rest on assumptions and attitudes about America's foreign policy and standing in the world that is likely to sit much more comfortably with liberals than with conservatives. His argument for the compatibility of Islam with the West, in turn, straddles the political spectrum - while conservatives may accept (and liberal secularists may reject) his arguments for the compatibility of religion with modern liberal democracy, his support for certain particulars of the full acceptance of Islam in the West (such as the use of sharia law in some cases as a form of arbitration) are likely to be rejected by conservatives (and likely to receive a warmer welcome from liberal multiculturalists). The book's primary weakness, however, is that while it covers a lot of ground, it often does not deal with any particular stretch of ground with any significant depth or intellectual rigor. This is not to say that this is by any means a stupid book. There are plenty of moments where Imam Rauf's wisdom and erudition peek through. Rather, it is just that the book frequently raises issues and questions that one wishes were more thoroughly and rigorously explored. For example, while one can't help but admire Rauf's optimism and his insistence that we must approach the relationship between the Muslim world and the West with a positive attitude that focuses on all that we have in common, no attempt has been made to address more intractable issues such as how to deal with bad actors who will continue to plague both sides of any attempt at moving toward reconciliation and peace. Despite its flaws, however, this book will be of at least some interest to people who are interested in the relationship between Islam and the West, and also to people interested in the "God wars" and the role of religion and faith in the modern world.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ifreet_Mohamed

    Another reviewer called this book "fluffy" and he is correct as it is a little too feel good. I am impressed with the individualism of Rauf but his brand of Islam is tending towards the relativist and seems to make Islam into nothing more than a form of gnosticism. His stated principles of openness, inter-Faith, and re-assertion of the ethic of want for your neighbor what you want for yourself are a part and parcel of the Islamic tradition but must be pursued without diluting the differences and Another reviewer called this book "fluffy" and he is correct as it is a little too feel good. I am impressed with the individualism of Rauf but his brand of Islam is tending towards the relativist and seems to make Islam into nothing more than a form of gnosticism. His stated principles of openness, inter-Faith, and re-assertion of the ethic of want for your neighbor what you want for yourself are a part and parcel of the Islamic tradition but must be pursued without diluting the differences and distinctions. I do believe he makes compelling points that for any faithful reader of both civilizations are obvious about the convergence between Democratic principles and Islamic principles. I understand the scope of this book was limited but it should call for a new "We" as Tariq Ramadan says in which we understand the crisis is not just amongst Muslims but Westerners as well. His call for constitutional monarchy in Saudia Arabia is naive and wrong headed as what's needed there is not monarchy in any form and constitutional monarchy is a Western phenomenon in my opinion that will not be accepted in the Muslim world.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    Terrific, and just as relevant (unfortunately) in 2013 as in 2005 when it was published, Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf presents his faithful understanding of Islam and the best of American traditions and promises. His recommendations for action seeking understanding, building peace, and honoring our different gifts is particularly excellent, for their practicability and because they summarize well his imagining and solutions that would create a more tolerant and peaceful world. Recommended for small gr Terrific, and just as relevant (unfortunately) in 2013 as in 2005 when it was published, Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf presents his faithful understanding of Islam and the best of American traditions and promises. His recommendations for action seeking understanding, building peace, and honoring our different gifts is particularly excellent, for their practicability and because they summarize well his imagining and solutions that would create a more tolerant and peaceful world. Recommended for small group study.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Genie McFate

    I live in a community where many of my neighbors are Muslim. I'm also very curious about different religions and what commonalities they share. This book provides an excellent explanation of the how Islam, Christian and Judaism intersect.It also answered a lot of questions I had about Islam, too, in regards to women. Rauf does an excellent job at explaining what originated from the Quaran and what originated from an area's culture. I live in a community where many of my neighbors are Muslim. I'm also very curious about different religions and what commonalities they share. This book provides an excellent explanation of the how Islam, Christian and Judaism intersect.It also answered a lot of questions I had about Islam, too, in regards to women. Rauf does an excellent job at explaining what originated from the Quaran and what originated from an area's culture.

  9. 4 out of 5

    pshurst

    Written by the Imam of the controversial Cordoba House (aka "Ground Zero Mosque") the book pleads for Jews, Christians and Muslims to put aside their differences and work together, as members of the Abrahamic faith, to make the world a better place. I started this book to better understand Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf's ideology. This book and his moderate views make me even more passionate about our need to reach out to America's moderate Muslims. Written by the Imam of the controversial Cordoba House (aka "Ground Zero Mosque") the book pleads for Jews, Christians and Muslims to put aside their differences and work together, as members of the Abrahamic faith, to make the world a better place. I started this book to better understand Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf's ideology. This book and his moderate views make me even more passionate about our need to reach out to America's moderate Muslims.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    A great discussion and analysis of what Islam is and what it is not. Islam is so closely aligned to to our Western religions--belief in one God and unbending love of that God and do not do to others what you would not have them do to you. Democracy, good deeds, and religious tolerence. Islam is not an alien religion. We have just made it alien because the bad guys have co-opted Islam for their own use. Resist.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I thought this book was good at laying out some of the reasons for culture clash between Muslims and non-Muslims in America, but I could not agree with some of his policy suggestions. I'd recommend it for someone who does not know much about Islam and is interested in learning more. I thought this book was good at laying out some of the reasons for culture clash between Muslims and non-Muslims in America, but I could not agree with some of his policy suggestions. I'd recommend it for someone who does not know much about Islam and is interested in learning more.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tuah Pengembara

    A Good Book..trying to give a clear defination of Islam especially in America.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aspasia

    Rauf is an imam in the US. He gives the average American reader an education in Muslim/Islamic and American history and how the histories of the US and Middle East converge.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Powers

    Written to answer popular demand after 9/11, a New York-based Islamic Imam compares cultures and religions: Indo-Europeans are "nouns" and Arabs are "verbs." Written to answer popular demand after 9/11, a New York-based Islamic Imam compares cultures and religions: Indo-Europeans are "nouns" and Arabs are "verbs."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris Miles

    An excellent analysis of major issues in the world today and ideas on possible peaceful solutions.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    His account of western history is awful, but who cares? The underlying message is not thereby diminished. This would have been better if a shorter work could have offered comparable prestige.

  17. 4 out of 5

    amandra

    Very interesting.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Arif nur

    Buku keren... aku dapat versi Bahasa Indonesianya...dan lumayan dapet juga tanda tangan imam feisalnya langsung

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hashim El-Tinay

    A must read for anyone interested in bridging the gap between Jews, Christians, Muslims and other people of faith.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Islamic Society of Augusta

    Current events

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daughters Of Abraham

    A look at the ways that Islam and American democracy meet philosophically.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    A little dissappointing. Perhaps this is a better book for those who are new to Islam or interested in learning more, but I felt it was a little too 'fluffy'. A little dissappointing. Perhaps this is a better book for those who are new to Islam or interested in learning more, but I felt it was a little too 'fluffy'.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

    This book is an amazingly insightful explanation of what Islam is really about to the majority of Muslims and how so many Americans uphold American values in large part due to their Muslim faith--because the values of Islam and America are the same in so many very important ways.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Fahd

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karen Daniel

  26. 4 out of 5

    HarperOne (an imprint of HarperCollins)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dalia

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sadiq Kazi

  29. 5 out of 5

    Thalhah Fakhrizal

  30. 4 out of 5

    SC

  31. 4 out of 5

    Yantisa Akhadi

  32. 4 out of 5

    JsjKindle Justianto

  33. 4 out of 5

    Novi

  34. 4 out of 5

    Fatima

  35. 5 out of 5

    Ibrahim

  36. 4 out of 5

    Danial

  37. 5 out of 5

    Ian Colte

  38. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

  39. 5 out of 5

    Ilana

  40. 5 out of 5

    Sumayyah

  41. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  42. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  43. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  44. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  45. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  46. 4 out of 5

    Anika Qing

  47. 4 out of 5

    Claire S

  48. 5 out of 5

    Raneem

  49. 5 out of 5

    Sairah

  50. 4 out of 5

    Abdolhossein

  51. 4 out of 5

    Sara Shroff

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...