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Crepax: Dracula, Frankenstein, and Other Horror Stories

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This book collects short comics in which the famed erotic Eurocartoonist takes on the classic Universal monsters, and much more. Italy’s Guido Crepax is one of the most acclaimed cartoonists in the world. In the 1960s and '70s, he created and chronicled the adventures of Valentina, arguably the strongest and most independent female character in European comics up until that This book collects short comics in which the famed erotic Eurocartoonist takes on the classic Universal monsters, and much more. Italy’s Guido Crepax is one of the most acclaimed cartoonists in the world. In the 1960s and '70s, he created and chronicled the adventures of Valentina, arguably the strongest and most independent female character in European comics up until that time, and legitimized the erotic genre. Crepax: Dracula, Frankenstein, and Other Horror Stories features, in addition to the artist’s unique take on the eponymous literary works by Bram Stoker and Mary Shelley, a half dozen Valentina stories, several never before published, and influenced by the French New Wave. Black & white


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This book collects short comics in which the famed erotic Eurocartoonist takes on the classic Universal monsters, and much more. Italy’s Guido Crepax is one of the most acclaimed cartoonists in the world. In the 1960s and '70s, he created and chronicled the adventures of Valentina, arguably the strongest and most independent female character in European comics up until that This book collects short comics in which the famed erotic Eurocartoonist takes on the classic Universal monsters, and much more. Italy’s Guido Crepax is one of the most acclaimed cartoonists in the world. In the 1960s and '70s, he created and chronicled the adventures of Valentina, arguably the strongest and most independent female character in European comics up until that time, and legitimized the erotic genre. Crepax: Dracula, Frankenstein, and Other Horror Stories features, in addition to the artist’s unique take on the eponymous literary works by Bram Stoker and Mary Shelley, a half dozen Valentina stories, several never before published, and influenced by the French New Wave. Black & white

30 review for Crepax: Dracula, Frankenstein, and Other Horror Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Not everything shining is golden. Crepax's work at this first volume may be extremely progressive for it's time, but it didn't age well storywise. The scripts make the comic seem like glorified porn. Art, apart from female anatomy and dresses/objects that are masterfully drawn, wasn't extraordinary as expected. I'll keep this in mind as an artbook, more than anything else. Not everything shining is golden. Crepax's work at this first volume may be extremely progressive for it's time, but it didn't age well storywise. The scripts make the comic seem like glorified porn. Art, apart from female anatomy and dresses/objects that are masterfully drawn, wasn't extraordinary as expected. I'll keep this in mind as an artbook, more than anything else.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    via NYPL - Striking artwork, yes, absolutely, but choppy and disjointed narratives, underdeveloped characters, and clumsy hidden society motifs do nothing at all for me. I gave up around 300 pages in, about halfway through the "Dracula" adaptation. via NYPL - Striking artwork, yes, absolutely, but choppy and disjointed narratives, underdeveloped characters, and clumsy hidden society motifs do nothing at all for me. I gave up around 300 pages in, about halfway through the "Dracula" adaptation.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chloe A-L

    I honestly don't really like the old school European erotic comics, they're usually just sexist and boring, but Valentina has proven to be a horse of a different color. Though gorgeously drawn and erotically charged, the stories are actually interesting (if intentionally confusing). that plus the honest to god GORGEOUSNESS of Crepax's pen and ink art work makes this something I want to own, and read again. I honestly don't really like the old school European erotic comics, they're usually just sexist and boring, but Valentina has proven to be a horse of a different color. Though gorgeously drawn and erotically charged, the stories are actually interesting (if intentionally confusing). that plus the honest to god GORGEOUSNESS of Crepax's pen and ink art work makes this something I want to own, and read again.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lily

    VERY MUCH INTO THIS AESTHETIC. Bondage, black and white illustration, 60s Euro chic, surrealism, dreams! What is not to love? Part sci-fi, part history, part retelling of the classics. Gorgeous work of a hypersexual mind, monsters included! And AYE AYES!!!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elvis Cosovic

    Half way through, I skipped the written word and was better for it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mjspice

    These were way too zany for my taste. Dracula & Frankenstein were drawn as creepy as the books were tho.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    To be fair I too this out from the library to look at the art and only read a bit here and there of the stories. Excellent art though.

  8. 4 out of 5

    John

    It is great that Crepax is getting a prestige reprint edition. It is great that they are grouping thematically rather than chronologically. It is great that it is thick with essays and commentary and annotations. It is great that somebody said, Let's start with erotic horror! What follows is several Valentina stories from the late 60s with incredible line work. The stories are more fantastic than horrific, dealing with journeys to the secret worlds under the earth's surface. There is easy slippag It is great that Crepax is getting a prestige reprint edition. It is great that they are grouping thematically rather than chronologically. It is great that it is thick with essays and commentary and annotations. It is great that somebody said, Let's start with erotic horror! What follows is several Valentina stories from the late 60s with incredible line work. The stories are more fantastic than horrific, dealing with journeys to the secret worlds under the earth's surface. There is easy slippage to and from the dream world and Valentina's dreams are surreal horrors of sadism and fascism. But this is no Little Nemo and for the most part we are in a series of fantasy excursions with some story problems, plotting problems, and not much chemistry in the love triangle. As eye-candy alone I can recommend it, and who knows, maybe you won't share my issues with the story side. The back half of volume one are terrific adaptations of Dracula and Frankenstein. The primary weakness here is that these are late efforts and Crepax is declining in his talents. There is still some smart invention in the presentation of the story, the dynamism of the panels, the breakup of the pages into panels, but the draftsmanship has diminished by Dracula and by Frankenstein the art has almost a sketch like looseness. These are long and thorough treatments of the source material, and I would put them against any other graphic treatment of those works. It is regrettable that Crepax did not get to them, particularly Frankenstein, when his powers were more considerable. But nonetheless he is an incomparable talent, and these volumes must be seen to be believed.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bill Wallace

    A lovely book. I'd only seen a smattering of Crepax's work in early issues of Heavy Metal, where it always seemed fascinating if fragmentary. The presentation here is excellent, about half the book is made up of early Valentina stories, presented sequentially, which makes them about as coherent as they will ever be. Who wouldn't love a fetishized Louise Brooks lookalike in a world equal parts Verne and McCay? The second half includes Crepax's adaptations of Dracula, beautiful, creepy, and full A lovely book. I'd only seen a smattering of Crepax's work in early issues of Heavy Metal, where it always seemed fascinating if fragmentary. The presentation here is excellent, about half the book is made up of early Valentina stories, presented sequentially, which makes them about as coherent as they will ever be. Who wouldn't love a fetishized Louise Brooks lookalike in a world equal parts Verne and McCay? The second half includes Crepax's adaptations of Dracula, beautiful, creepy, and full of Expressionist charm, and Frankenstein, a late-life work much cruder but effective in its sketchy simplicity. This is only the first volume of 10 and I can already tell that a year between them will be way too long.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ivo

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chloe White

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  13. 4 out of 5

    Daniele

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nick Bateman

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eero Laitila

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tom Shapira

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sebastiao Silva

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cristian

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eddie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tore KS

  21. 4 out of 5

    Antti Kurko

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  23. 5 out of 5

    Josiane Robidas

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bob

  25. 4 out of 5

    Reece

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mary Spears

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gj Echternkamp

  28. 4 out of 5

    Meta 666

  29. 5 out of 5

    John Roberson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Allen

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