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The Village Watchtower by Kate Douglas Wiggin, Fiction, Historical, United States, People & Places, Readers - Chapter Books

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One story in The Village Watchtower is about Lucinda Bascome, an elderly woman who sits at her window watching all that happens in the village. She would be lonely, except that people come to her for gossip. Her house and her window are set up in such a way that she sees everything that goes on in the village. Another glimpse is of Tom, a young wild boy who prefers to live One story in The Village Watchtower is about Lucinda Bascome, an elderly woman who sits at her window watching all that happens in the village. She would be lonely, except that people come to her for gossip. Her house and her window are set up in such a way that she sees everything that goes on in the village. Another glimpse is of Tom, a young wild boy who prefers to live in the wilderness than in the shelter of a house. All the stories are set in the same small town. And each glimpse is based on Wiggin's experiences in a small American town. Kate Douglas Wiggin was the author of the famed Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. She was also an advocate in early education and created the kindergarten school in which most American children go to in the modern era.


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One story in The Village Watchtower is about Lucinda Bascome, an elderly woman who sits at her window watching all that happens in the village. She would be lonely, except that people come to her for gossip. Her house and her window are set up in such a way that she sees everything that goes on in the village. Another glimpse is of Tom, a young wild boy who prefers to live One story in The Village Watchtower is about Lucinda Bascome, an elderly woman who sits at her window watching all that happens in the village. She would be lonely, except that people come to her for gossip. Her house and her window are set up in such a way that she sees everything that goes on in the village. Another glimpse is of Tom, a young wild boy who prefers to live in the wilderness than in the shelter of a house. All the stories are set in the same small town. And each glimpse is based on Wiggin's experiences in a small American town. Kate Douglas Wiggin was the author of the famed Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. She was also an advocate in early education and created the kindergarten school in which most American children go to in the modern era.

30 review for The Village Watchtower by Kate Douglas Wiggin, Fiction, Historical, United States, People & Places, Readers - Chapter Books

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Did not like this one at all. It has not aged well.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Perry Whitford

    Pleasantly surprising collection of six short stories set around the folksy inhabitants of a rural community in Maine near the middle of the 19th century. Surprising in so much as I didn't have any particular expectations when I decided to give The Village Watch-Tower a quick read, yet it put a smile on my face and I'm glad I did. Kate Douglas Wiggin was primarily a writer of children's stories, not adult stuff. When the first, title story turned out to be about a nosy old biddy (the Village Watch Pleasantly surprising collection of six short stories set around the folksy inhabitants of a rural community in Maine near the middle of the 19th century. Surprising in so much as I didn't have any particular expectations when I decided to give The Village Watch-Tower a quick read, yet it put a smile on my face and I'm glad I did. Kate Douglas Wiggin was primarily a writer of children's stories, not adult stuff. When the first, title story turned out to be about a nosy old biddy (the Village Watch-Tower in question is the window in her lounge) I thought I was in for a fogeyish, sentimental read, but far from it. Admittedly a bunch of stories featuring an addle-brained village "softy" being carted away to the poorhouse ('Tom o' the Blueb'ry Plains'), or a romance between a blind violin-maker and an old maid with a scarred face ('The Village Stradivarius') are hardly going to free of pathos, but Wiggin didn't over-sweeten the pot. Instead she used good-natured humour to add some spice to the meagre lots of her characters. 'The Joining Tree', about a forlorn husband who sees his runaway wife with another man at a traveling circus was particularly funny, as colloquially told by his workmates. That penultimate tale about the blind and scarred old lovers was really very fine, worth reading on its own, especially welcome after the sad, downbeat endings which preceded it. Impossible not to like.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Greg Stratman

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  5. 4 out of 5

    J.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lynette

  7. 5 out of 5

    Janice

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

  9. 5 out of 5

    Igraine

  10. 5 out of 5

    Yinzadi

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amy Murphy

  12. 4 out of 5

    Candice

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mariyam

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Flowers Frye

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dawn cline

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily Kate

  17. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  18. 4 out of 5

    Richa

  19. 5 out of 5

    Faith

  20. 4 out of 5

    Spargo

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sara Cabrol

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  24. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennie Simmons

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robertson

  28. 5 out of 5

    BobbieJ

  29. 5 out of 5

    TaniaRina

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Hamilton

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