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Media Circus: A Look at Private Tragedy in the Public Eye

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Imagine losing a loved one in the public eye. A media frenzy ensues and spreads your family name through the news. Reporters ambush you, and across the country, strangers gossip about your personal loss. Welcome to the circus. No one understands better than Kim Goldman the complex emotions of individuals suffering a personal tragedy under the relentless gaze of the media. Dur Imagine losing a loved one in the public eye. A media frenzy ensues and spreads your family name through the news. Reporters ambush you, and across the country, strangers gossip about your personal loss. Welcome to the circus. No one understands better than Kim Goldman the complex emotions of individuals suffering a personal tragedy under the relentless gaze of the media. During the famed O.J. Simpson trial, Kim, whose brother, Ron Goldman, was brutally murdered, became the public poster child for victims suffering in the public eye. In Media Circus, Goldman, now a dedicated victims’ advocate who works with families across the country, presents the first collective look at these ordinary, grieving victims—forced to manage their very private trauma and despair in a very public way. Through candid interviews and detailed, original reporting, Media Circus delivers riveting, humanizing, and inspiring stories from the victims and survivors of violent crimes who found themselves the focus of national media attention. Its heartfelt narratives showcase the unique challenges of coping with and healing from grief when the whole world is watching. In these pages, the families of other victims tell their stories, including: Esaw And Emerald Garner, wife and daughter of police brutality victim Eric Garner (2014) Scarlett Lewis, mother of six-year-old Newtown tragedy victim Jesse Lewis (2012) Debra Tate, sister of Charles Manson murder victim Sharon Tate (1969) Judy Shepard, mother of gay hate-crime victim Matthew Shepard (1998) Mildred Muhammad, ex-wife of the DC Sniper (2002) Tere Duperrault Fassbender, survivor of family’s brutal murder at sea (1961) Collene Campbell, sister of murdered NASCAR driver Mickey Thompson (1988) Marie Monville, wife of the Amish Shooter (2006) Dave And Mary Neese, parents of teen murder victim Skylar Neese (2012) Scott And Kathleen Larimer, parents of Aurora theater shooting victim John Larimer, and Shirley Wygal, mother of Aurora theater shooting victim Rebecca Wingo (2012) Media Circus goes beyond the names and faces to show the real victims behind the stories.


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Imagine losing a loved one in the public eye. A media frenzy ensues and spreads your family name through the news. Reporters ambush you, and across the country, strangers gossip about your personal loss. Welcome to the circus. No one understands better than Kim Goldman the complex emotions of individuals suffering a personal tragedy under the relentless gaze of the media. Dur Imagine losing a loved one in the public eye. A media frenzy ensues and spreads your family name through the news. Reporters ambush you, and across the country, strangers gossip about your personal loss. Welcome to the circus. No one understands better than Kim Goldman the complex emotions of individuals suffering a personal tragedy under the relentless gaze of the media. During the famed O.J. Simpson trial, Kim, whose brother, Ron Goldman, was brutally murdered, became the public poster child for victims suffering in the public eye. In Media Circus, Goldman, now a dedicated victims’ advocate who works with families across the country, presents the first collective look at these ordinary, grieving victims—forced to manage their very private trauma and despair in a very public way. Through candid interviews and detailed, original reporting, Media Circus delivers riveting, humanizing, and inspiring stories from the victims and survivors of violent crimes who found themselves the focus of national media attention. Its heartfelt narratives showcase the unique challenges of coping with and healing from grief when the whole world is watching. In these pages, the families of other victims tell their stories, including: Esaw And Emerald Garner, wife and daughter of police brutality victim Eric Garner (2014) Scarlett Lewis, mother of six-year-old Newtown tragedy victim Jesse Lewis (2012) Debra Tate, sister of Charles Manson murder victim Sharon Tate (1969) Judy Shepard, mother of gay hate-crime victim Matthew Shepard (1998) Mildred Muhammad, ex-wife of the DC Sniper (2002) Tere Duperrault Fassbender, survivor of family’s brutal murder at sea (1961) Collene Campbell, sister of murdered NASCAR driver Mickey Thompson (1988) Marie Monville, wife of the Amish Shooter (2006) Dave And Mary Neese, parents of teen murder victim Skylar Neese (2012) Scott And Kathleen Larimer, parents of Aurora theater shooting victim John Larimer, and Shirley Wygal, mother of Aurora theater shooting victim Rebecca Wingo (2012) Media Circus goes beyond the names and faces to show the real victims behind the stories.

30 review for Media Circus: A Look at Private Tragedy in the Public Eye

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Fortunately, I've never had to cover a high-profile tragedy, only the lower-profile ones -- which, of course, are no less painful to those suffering. Kim Goldman, sister of Ron Goldman, who was slain along with Nicole Brown Simpson outside her home, talks to other people who have loved ones who were either victims or perpetrators of high-profile crimes. She has a co-author who clearly helped compile the interviews. Each story is presented as its own chapter. What's interesting about this book is Fortunately, I've never had to cover a high-profile tragedy, only the lower-profile ones -- which, of course, are no less painful to those suffering. Kim Goldman, sister of Ron Goldman, who was slain along with Nicole Brown Simpson outside her home, talks to other people who have loved ones who were either victims or perpetrators of high-profile crimes. She has a co-author who clearly helped compile the interviews. Each story is presented as its own chapter. What's interesting about this book is how Goldman has so many people touched by high-profile tragedies presented together; at the same time, she doesn't do quite as much with it as she could've.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Depressing. Let’s get that out of the way up front. The subject matter is inherently depressing and made me cry several times and I had to take breaks away from this book. But interesting, even if I felt voyeuristic at times. That’s mitigated by the author having been in the same situation and thus on solid moral ground. I was thinking about this book at we approached the 1 year anniversary of Parkland. I’m also taking a class on journalism, so I’m thinking far more than usual about the way medi Depressing. Let’s get that out of the way up front. The subject matter is inherently depressing and made me cry several times and I had to take breaks away from this book. But interesting, even if I felt voyeuristic at times. That’s mitigated by the author having been in the same situation and thus on solid moral ground. I was thinking about this book at we approached the 1 year anniversary of Parkland. I’m also taking a class on journalism, so I’m thinking far more than usual about the way media outlets cover tragedy. And of course these situations are so different than a natural disaster. I don’t have a lot of solid thoughts on this one yet. I expect it will affect the way I look at coverage of mass shootings and high profile violent crimes for a while.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Big Time Book Junkie

    From reading the other reviews, I'm wondering if I just totally didn't get this book or what. Everyone seems to think it's fantastic, but I thought it was just okay. I'm sure there will be comments, but that's okay because I stand by what I think. I felt many of the stories that were highlighted were rushed and weren't fully explored as far as how the media impacted the families nor did I think there was enough in-depth discussion with the family members that were interviewed. All of these crimes From reading the other reviews, I'm wondering if I just totally didn't get this book or what. Everyone seems to think it's fantastic, but I thought it was just okay. I'm sure there will be comments, but that's okay because I stand by what I think. I felt many of the stories that were highlighted were rushed and weren't fully explored as far as how the media impacted the families nor did I think there was enough in-depth discussion with the family members that were interviewed. All of these crimes were horrible and I'm sure a lot of media attention makes that worse, but also, in many cases a lot of media attention will help find a missing child or that serial rapist the police are looking for, so it's really a double-edged sword. Kim mostly glides right over that aspect of media attention. I purchased this book because it was highly recommended to me, but I came to feel that this was just another effort by Kim Goldman to stay relevant. No matter how many of us read this, we cannot control how the media handles high profile crime victims and whether or not any of us ever tune in again when a major crime is being covered, it will still go on. I definitely think that Ron Goldman's murder was horrendous and that his murder was overshadowed by the fact that Nicole Brown Simpson was murdered with him and that OJ was dealt with differently than had he been just some average Joe. But none of that can be changed at this point in time and I think some of that is the driving force behind this novel.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    I am-- for better and for worse-- someone who finds unbelievably awful crimes interesting. I'm fascinated by human nature's unpredictability. Simultaneously, I think the way the media flocks around tragedy is horrific. I have enormous compassion for the families whose lives are utterly upended twice by both their personal tragedy and the "media circus." I was familiar with each of the crimes discussed in this book, and I truly, truly treasured the opportunity to see an insider's perspective. I th I am-- for better and for worse-- someone who finds unbelievably awful crimes interesting. I'm fascinated by human nature's unpredictability. Simultaneously, I think the way the media flocks around tragedy is horrific. I have enormous compassion for the families whose lives are utterly upended twice by both their personal tragedy and the "media circus." I was familiar with each of the crimes discussed in this book, and I truly, truly treasured the opportunity to see an insider's perspective. I think this book is an important addition to the true crime genre-- it is not necessarily within the genre, but it is an important counterpoint. I would urge anyone who is interested in true crime to read this book. That being said, the actual writing around the interviews is fairly straightforward and without much personality. I was far less interested in Kim Goldman (who, undoubtedly, has something to add to this book, but perhaps not the role of narrator) than in the people she interviewed. Regardless, I so appreciate her effort, and the courage of those she interviewed, to share their stories. I RECEIVED THIS BOOK FROM NETGALLEY IN EXCHANGE FOR MY HONEST REVIEW.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Cooper

    An insightful, easy read not only about the glare of media on tragedy, but also about grieving, a fundamental experience for all people. The voices and views of the survivor/victims interviewed come through clearly, with compassion. Readers come to know them, their pain and how they cope with it and the media. They have different approaches to grief and the media. Each chapter on a particular survivor/victim is comparable to others in scope as the author seems to have asked each person the same An insightful, easy read not only about the glare of media on tragedy, but also about grieving, a fundamental experience for all people. The voices and views of the survivor/victims interviewed come through clearly, with compassion. Readers come to know them, their pain and how they cope with it and the media. They have different approaches to grief and the media. Each chapter on a particular survivor/victim is comparable to others in scope as the author seems to have asked each person the same set of questions. It's almost a research project, though it does not read that way. This book should be useful to courses in media studies and also to bereavement support groups, besides individuals who face grief in the media glare or empathize with those who do.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Staci

    There is so much tragedy in the world and it seems the media is dedicated to bringing every last, personal detail to the public. We rarely think how our interest in a case will impact the family. This book explains how families touched by violence have managed to live with their new normal and in many cases, turn heartbreak into something good and powerful. Well written and touching. Thanks to the families for sharing your stories and experiences so the public can potentially have a small unders There is so much tragedy in the world and it seems the media is dedicated to bringing every last, personal detail to the public. We rarely think how our interest in a case will impact the family. This book explains how families touched by violence have managed to live with their new normal and in many cases, turn heartbreak into something good and powerful. Well written and touching. Thanks to the families for sharing your stories and experiences so the public can potentially have a small understanding of what you are going through and hopefully not add to the pain.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Caffeinated Fae

    Oh man, what do I say about this book. It was my time to pick a book club book so I figured it was finally time to dust off my signed copy and finally read this book. I have put this book on the back burner simply because I knew that I was going to cry reading it. I've been reading some heavier books but with the recent tragedies that have happened in the past few years I knew I needed to finally read this book. Media Circus by Kim Goldman was really interesting. It kept me turning the pages & I Oh man, what do I say about this book. It was my time to pick a book club book so I figured it was finally time to dust off my signed copy and finally read this book. I have put this book on the back burner simply because I knew that I was going to cry reading it. I've been reading some heavier books but with the recent tragedies that have happened in the past few years I knew I needed to finally read this book. Media Circus by Kim Goldman was really interesting. It kept me turning the pages & I enjoyed how different this book was. I loved that it focused on the media and I loved that it brought victims in that many people leave out when thinking of victims. I also enjoyed seeing what each person was up to at the time that this book was written. It was very inspiring to see how many of them are using their voice to help others. The only thing that I felt was lacking was a conclusion. I really felt that each story needed a conclusionary paragraph. It seemed to just not flow properly. I really would have loved to have the conclusion that could then pull in the next story. It would have helped the book progress instead of jumping to the next story. All in all, I enjoyed this book. It was hard to read & I cried many times while reading this book. I was heartbroken, I was inspired, I was angry. This book sits under the skin & I think it will stay with me for a while.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kari Williams

    By far one of the best books I've ever read. This changed the way I view the news entirely. They really should make this book required reading for anyone looking into a career in media. The way a story is reported is so important and this book sheds light on the rush to report and the total disregard for the pain families are going through. As a reader of some of the stories Kim mentions in this book, it made me think of my role in the frenzy. We want the news when we want it, but do we want it By far one of the best books I've ever read. This changed the way I view the news entirely. They really should make this book required reading for anyone looking into a career in media. The way a story is reported is so important and this book sheds light on the rush to report and the total disregard for the pain families are going through. As a reader of some of the stories Kim mentions in this book, it made me think of my role in the frenzy. We want the news when we want it, but do we want it so bad that we don't care if its the truth? I have recommended this book to everyone I know and will continue to do so.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    My blog: www.publishedmoments.co.uk I would like to thank Kim Goldman, Tatsha Robertson and BenBella Books Inc. for giving me the opportunity to read this book prior to its release date. Behind every story is a human being… Every day news makes headlines, and unfortunately we live in a world and a society where we cannot live in peace and harmony; there is always a tragic event occurring somewhere around the world. The media play a vital role in us knowing this, because without them how else would My blog: www.publishedmoments.co.uk I would like to thank Kim Goldman, Tatsha Robertson and BenBella Books Inc. for giving me the opportunity to read this book prior to its release date. Behind every story is a human being… Every day news makes headlines, and unfortunately we live in a world and a society where we cannot live in peace and harmony; there is always a tragic event occurring somewhere around the world. The media play a vital role in us knowing this, because without them how else would we know about what is happening in neighbouring countries? Do the media sometimes take a step too far? Do the victims of these crimes, the families at the centre of it all, really need this attention just for us all to be a little nosey at what is happening? Kim Goldman, sister of Ron Goldman a victim of OJ Simpson, decided to interview individuals and families who have had tragic events happen to them and been at the heart of what we all fear to find out if the media circus is an act that should be waited for or if it in fact helps. Along with Tatsha Robertson, a former editor for People Magazine, a professional who knows all too well what it is like to be on the other foot and who’s job is to capture the nations imagination. Together they have teamed up to make one of the most incredible, laid bare books about how the media affects these people. In this book, the below individuals have been interviewed, I have linked the Wikipedia articles (on my blog) on each in case you are not familiar with the crimes related to these people (yet another way the media provides us with sometimes sensitive information which we may not need to know, but want to know). Debra Tate – sister of the Charles Manson victim, Sharon Tate (1969) Mildred Muhammad – ex-wife of the DC Sniper (2002) Judy Shepard – mother of Matthew Shepard, gay-hate victim (1998) Marie Monville – wife of the Amish Shooter(2006) Dave & Mary Neese – parents of murder victim, Skylar Neese (2012) Scarlett Lewis – mother of Newtown tragedy shooting, Jesse Lewis (2012) Collene Campbell – sister of murdered NASCAR driver, Mickey Thompson (1988) Scott & Katherine Larimer – parents of Aurora theater shooting victim, John Larimer (2012) Shirley Wygal – mother of Aurora theater shooting victim, Rebecca Wingo (2012) Esaw & Emerald Garner – wife and daughter of police brutality victim, Eric Garner (2014) Tere Duperrault Fassbender – survivor of her families brutal murder at sea (1961) As you can see, these crimes range through the years so it really gives you the best insight in to how the media has changed over the years, whether this is for better or for worse. What did I take from this book? I don’t want to go in to the ins and outs of this book too much, because then I would be telling you the contents in a way it shouldn’t be told. The book is written brilliantly, the interviews ask the questions you would want to know the answers to. The individuals interviews were open and honest even after they have all been hounded and interrogated by the media. Two parts that majorly stood out for me in this book, for all of the wrong reasons, were how some of these suffering families were treated. Some received numerous death threats and still to this day do not feel safe, and some have lost their individuality and are only ever known as the wife of a mass-murderer. This is downright wrong, our society should not reject these brave individuals who have already been to hell and back. Is this down to the media or is it just the human race choosing what they want to know, and what they think they know? Think about it, the media are there to do their job, this is their way of making a living; but should they really be approaching the victims families so soon? Does this stop their healing process or does it actually make them come to terms with exactly what ordeal they have just been a part of? Has the media desensitised us? Is it really worth the potential hurt and trauma just for a headline news article, just to satisfy those lucky enough to not be in this situation? As a Forensic Science graduate, murder cases and the like really interest me. I feel guilty for it after reading ‘Media Circus’. Why should I be interested in other peoples misfortune? It’s not as if someone has just tripped over on the curb or someone slipped on a banana peel. This is murder, the worst part of the human race. This is not human instinct, it is a choice. The media give the public what they want to know but do they always take the families in to account when they go about this? In all the books I have read on murderers and tragedies, it is very rare that you hear about the families and the horrific ordeal they have been through. So why do the media hound these people? So they can post a picture of their lost one? So they can get a quick one liner for their article? On the other hand, the media often do good things. They help promote charities in memory of the victims, they help get the word out about these crimes and how heinous they really are. Does the positive outweigh the negative, or is this something that can only be determined from person to person? Are the media becoming better or worse as the years pass? I strongly urge you to read this book. A lot of the questions I have asked have already been answered in there. It is a brilliant read and it really does make you look at the media in a different light, and yourself for that matter. My Rating? ♥♥♥♥

  10. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    I can’t even imagine what this family went through. I never thought about this from this angle even though the title is apt.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marcia

    Released on 22 September 2015, by BenBella Books, Kim Goldman recounts her media battles after the infamous trials of OJ Simpson for the murders of her brother and his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson in the mid-1990s, while showing the world she is not alone by telling the stories of others who share her battles with the media to grieve privately but telling the facts of her brother’s legacy rather than something that the media would make up to make a story. While each story held its own power, ea Released on 22 September 2015, by BenBella Books, Kim Goldman recounts her media battles after the infamous trials of OJ Simpson for the murders of her brother and his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson in the mid-1990s, while showing the world she is not alone by telling the stories of others who share her battles with the media to grieve privately but telling the facts of her brother’s legacy rather than something that the media would make up to make a story. While each story held its own power, each story interconnected with the others. The survivors all share a common bond, of sorts: 1. They wanted to keep the legacy of their loved ones story alive 2. They (or the vast majority of them anyway) want the media to tell the true story of their loved ones demise rather than some fictional story to make it seem more “media worthy”. Goldman not only recounts her own stories, but those of others. Some of the other stories she recounts-in their survivors own words-are: • Esaw And Emerald Garner, wife and daughter of police brutality victim Eric Garner (2014) • Scarlett Lewis, mother of six-year-old Newtown tragedy victim Jesse Lewis (2012) • Debra Tate, sister of Charles Manson murder victim Sharon Tate (1969) • Judy Shepard, mother of gay hate-crime victim Matthew Shepard (1998) • Mildred Muhammad, ex-wife of the DC Sniper (2002) • Tere Duperrault Fassbender, survivor of family’s brutal murder at sea (1961) • Collene Campbell, sister of murdered NASCAR driver Mickey Thompson (1988) • Marie Monville, wife of the Amish Shooter (2006) • Dave And Mary Neese, parents of teen murder victim Skylar Neese (2012) • Scott And Kathleen Larimer, parents of Aurora theater shooting victim John Larimer, and • Shirley Wygal, mother of Aurora theater shooting victim Rebecca Wingo (2012) Goldman’s book goes beyond just the victims themselves, and tells the stories of those left behind. The book was a very eye opening read. This book was recieved via a GoodReads contest, and reviews were also published on amazon.com, and laruedubac.fr.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Serena

    I highly recommend this book! The accounts of those who lost loved ones through violence and were forced to suffer the losses in front of glaring cameras, provided a rare, important perspective. The Chapter on Mildred Muhammad, ex-wife of the DC Sniper, left an indelible impression on me due to her raw honesty and the minute details associated with the chain of events involving the DC Sniper -- including those not discussed in the mainstream media -- and her and her children's life thereafter. I w I highly recommend this book! The accounts of those who lost loved ones through violence and were forced to suffer the losses in front of glaring cameras, provided a rare, important perspective. The Chapter on Mildred Muhammad, ex-wife of the DC Sniper, left an indelible impression on me due to her raw honesty and the minute details associated with the chain of events involving the DC Sniper -- including those not discussed in the mainstream media -- and her and her children's life thereafter. I was not familiar with some people in the book, including Tere Duperrault Fassbender, the survivor of her family's brutal murder at sea in 1961. By speaking of her relatives, Fassbender invoked them; keeping their memories alive and informing or reminding readers about them. It was interesting contrasting the tactics of the media in the 1960s versus the present. It was remarkable reading about Jesse Lewis, the six-year-old Newton tragedy victim who, in his last moments of life, became a hero who directed several other of his classmates to "Run!" from the gunman. Prior to reading this book, I had not heard of Lewis' heroic acts. I had, however, heard of the heroic acts of John Larrimer, the Aurora shooting victim who shielded his girlfriend during the deadly theater attack. I found powerful Larrimer's parent's description of learning of his death and his heroism. In sum, "Media Circus" exposes the oft-untold experiences of people dragged in the spotlight while suffering unbelievably tragic losses, and encourages readers -- both members and non-members of the media -- to be aware of how these people are impacted, sensitive to their plights, and to show humanity, restraint, and respect. The book is well-organized and respects the contributors. I recommend this book without reservation. Thank you.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kirsti

    Kim Goldman, sister of murder victim Ron Goldman, met Debra Tate, younger sister of murder victim Sharon Tate, backstage at Larry King Live. Both were protesting the fact that Los Angeles County was mounting a museum exhibit of the area's most notorious murders. Not only was the county displaying the personal property of the murder victims, it never even contacted the victims' families to alert them. Goldman decided to interview Tate and other family members of murder victims and of murderers. To Kim Goldman, sister of murder victim Ron Goldman, met Debra Tate, younger sister of murder victim Sharon Tate, backstage at Larry King Live. Both were protesting the fact that Los Angeles County was mounting a museum exhibit of the area's most notorious murders. Not only was the county displaying the personal property of the murder victims, it never even contacted the victims' families to alert them. Goldman decided to interview Tate and other family members of murder victims and of murderers. To me, what was most intriguing about this book is that Kim Goldman despised journalists and then became one. She set up interviews, checked facts, and struggled to create accurate depictions of the facts and of the family members' feelings. The most interesting interview was with Tere Duperrault Fassbender, the sole survivor of a horrific spree killing at sea in 1961. (Details are here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluebel... ) Little Terry Jo, as she was known then, was briefly the most famous girl in the world but then went into seclusion with her aunt, uncle, and cousins. The adults thought that the kindest thing to do was to pretend the whole thing never happened and forbid everyone to speak to Terry Jo about the crime. This shocks me, but I guess it was a different time. Overall, this isn't the most polished or in-depth account of these crimes, but Goldman's perspective and compassion make this a worthwhile read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Denise A, Healy

    Enlightening story about families who have gone through tragedy I read this book knowing some cases and learning about others. Miss Goldman covers situations we all followed in the press. It was very interesting to learn what many of the families experienced after the death of a loved one. I can not imagine living through the difficult times all these people lived through but on top of that the day to day hounding of the press. I highly recommend this book to everyone who follows stories such as t Enlightening story about families who have gone through tragedy I read this book knowing some cases and learning about others. Miss Goldman covers situations we all followed in the press. It was very interesting to learn what many of the families experienced after the death of a loved one. I can not imagine living through the difficult times all these people lived through but on top of that the day to day hounding of the press. I highly recommend this book to everyone who follows stories such as these. It was compelling and I must say I learned a great deal.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shana Dennis

    Amazing insight into what the survivors of infamous crimes go through. Each person interviewed were forced to mourn, or hide their mourning, in the the public eye and had to learn quickly how to deal with the media that clamor end for their side of the story. I especially admire how the authors also consider loved ones of perpetrators victims of crime, and the kind of strength they have to persevere in the face of an often judgmental public.

  16. 4 out of 5

    YPM

    Sitting back watching frenzied news and social media, it’s often easy to get caught up in the sensationalism that surrounds victims and their families without ever really considering what their reality is truly all about. Media Circus gives us the very real, and very inspiring, story behind what these people experience when they are trying to grieve and heal while being unexpectedly thrown into the public eye. It’s an important book that sticks with you long after you’ve read it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    This book is eye-opening. I've always seen the families on the news and felt bad when I see their privacy being invaded. And even the families of the killers who are thrust into a spotlight. I hope that this will give people perspective and remind them that these families are real people dealing with grief. This book is eye-opening. I've always seen the families on the news and felt bad when I see their privacy being invaded. And even the families of the killers who are thrust into a spotlight. I hope that this will give people perspective and remind them that these families are real people dealing with grief.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Kim Goldman had a first hand experience with handling the media under difficult circumstances. Interesting and entertaining. Would definitely recommend.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Deb Letourneau

    I like this book very much. It is well written and allows a very different view of the tragedy each of us saw unfold. It gives a face to the "other side" of the word victim. I like this book very much. It is well written and allows a very different view of the tragedy each of us saw unfold. It gives a face to the "other side" of the word victim.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karen Miles

    I received this ARC from NetGalley.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brandi Simmons

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  23. 5 out of 5

    C0NTENTH0MEB0DY

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Hall

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erin Hayes

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ann

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lucilletln

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie LaChapelle

  29. 4 out of 5

    Natty

  30. 4 out of 5

    Megan

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