hits counter HBR Guide to Coaching Employees (HBR Guide Series) - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

HBR Guide to Coaching Employees (HBR Guide Series)

Availability: Ready to download

Help your employees help themselves. As a manager in today’s business world, you can’t just tell your direct reports what to do: You need to help them make their own decisions, enable them to solve tough problems, and actively develop their skills on the job. Whether you have a star on your team who’s eager to advance, an underperformer who’s dragging the group down, or a st Help your employees help themselves. As a manager in today’s business world, you can’t just tell your direct reports what to do: You need to help them make their own decisions, enable them to solve tough problems, and actively develop their skills on the job. Whether you have a star on your team who’s eager to advance, an underperformer who’s dragging the group down, or a steady contributor who feels bored and neglected, you need to coach them: Help shape their goals—and support their efforts to achieve them. In the HBR Guide to Coaching Employees you’ll learn how to: • Create realistic but inspiring plans for growth • Ask the right questions to engage your employees in the development process • Give them room to grapple with problems and discover solutions • Allow them to make the most of their expertise while compelling them to stretch and grow • Give them feedback they’ll actually apply • Balance coaching with the rest of your workload Arm yourself with the advice you need to succeed on the job, from a source you trust. Packed with how-to essentials from leading experts, the HBR Guides provide smart answers to your most pressing work challenges.


Compare

Help your employees help themselves. As a manager in today’s business world, you can’t just tell your direct reports what to do: You need to help them make their own decisions, enable them to solve tough problems, and actively develop their skills on the job. Whether you have a star on your team who’s eager to advance, an underperformer who’s dragging the group down, or a st Help your employees help themselves. As a manager in today’s business world, you can’t just tell your direct reports what to do: You need to help them make their own decisions, enable them to solve tough problems, and actively develop their skills on the job. Whether you have a star on your team who’s eager to advance, an underperformer who’s dragging the group down, or a steady contributor who feels bored and neglected, you need to coach them: Help shape their goals—and support their efforts to achieve them. In the HBR Guide to Coaching Employees you’ll learn how to: • Create realistic but inspiring plans for growth • Ask the right questions to engage your employees in the development process • Give them room to grapple with problems and discover solutions • Allow them to make the most of their expertise while compelling them to stretch and grow • Give them feedback they’ll actually apply • Balance coaching with the rest of your workload Arm yourself with the advice you need to succeed on the job, from a source you trust. Packed with how-to essentials from leading experts, the HBR Guides provide smart answers to your most pressing work challenges.

30 review for HBR Guide to Coaching Employees (HBR Guide Series)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    Mitch Hedberg had a great joke about how weird being promoted is. He said that even though he was a comedian, people always wanted him to write. That’s like going to a chef and asking Hey, can you farm? If you’ve been thrust in a management role because you were good at something that wasn’t management, you can probably relate. HBR’s Guide to Coaching Employees is a helpful, accessible read designed to help you understand how to manage people. Some of the most helpful advice for me was the helpfu Mitch Hedberg had a great joke about how weird being promoted is. He said that even though he was a comedian, people always wanted him to write. That’s like going to a chef and asking Hey, can you farm? If you’ve been thrust in a management role because you were good at something that wasn’t management, you can probably relate. HBR’s Guide to Coaching Employees is a helpful, accessible read designed to help you understand how to manage people. Some of the most helpful advice for me was the helpful reminder that not everyone is like me. We have different career goals, personalities, desires, styles, etc. Just because something would be helpful for me doesn’t mean it would (or SHOULD) be helpful for someone else. It seems like a lot of good managing/coaching is about listening and being proactive in understanding people you’re responsible for (aka “direct reports”, a term I had never heard of until reading this book). It’s funny how seldom it occurs to any of us to simply ask important questions. Lack of engagement from managers leads to lack of engagement from employees, which isn’t good for anyone involved (manager, employee, customers, organization). Another important takeaway that I already implicitly knew, but had never heard articulated, was that managers are models. You treat your direct reports how you want them to treat customers and peers. You encourage not necessarily results, but efforts, especially those efforts pointed towards organizational goals. My favorite question from the book that I’ve already used in a real-world setting is, “If you had my job, what are the first three things you’d do?” That really helped open my eyes to some uncomfortable blindspots in the organization. If you’re new to leadership or otherwise want to do better, I would definitely recommend checking this book out if not purchasing it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lane Anderson

    The title was promising. As a new CEO, this is something I've identified as one of the most important skills I need to work on. The content did not live up to my expectation. It's a series of repurposed articles with a very academic tone, all disjointed from one another, and mostly all repeating the same things: Ask questions; Don't teach; ... trying to think of another example, but those are really my only two memorable takeaways, and neither of them are very revolutionary. Please recommend me a d The title was promising. As a new CEO, this is something I've identified as one of the most important skills I need to work on. The content did not live up to my expectation. It's a series of repurposed articles with a very academic tone, all disjointed from one another, and mostly all repeating the same things: Ask questions; Don't teach; ... trying to think of another example, but those are really my only two memorable takeaways, and neither of them are very revolutionary. Please recommend me a different title that actually delivers a guide to coaching employees if you know one!

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Jervy Ramos

    'HBR Guide to Coaching Employees' has lots of informative and insightful ideas and techniques. I found out how effective my previous manager was when I realized he applied some of this book's techniques. My key takeaways: - "Praise the effort, not the skill." - "Turn dead time into development time." - "Ask before you advise." - "Coaching requires patience." - Proper communication really is the key. Proper time, place, tone, intention. - Efficient & constructive feedback 'HBR Guide to Coaching Employees' has lots of informative and insightful ideas and techniques. I found out how effective my previous manager was when I realized he applied some of this book's techniques. My key takeaways: - "Praise the effort, not the skill." - "Turn dead time into development time." - "Ask before you advise." - "Coaching requires patience." - Proper communication really is the key. Proper time, place, tone, intention. - Efficient & constructive feedback

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alexey

    Quite an insightful collection of valuable advice on how to coach employees and work with teams. Not the strongest HBR's book but still quite useful for an executive. Quite an insightful collection of valuable advice on how to coach employees and work with teams. Not the strongest HBR's book but still quite useful for an executive.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Peter Håkansson

    Brilliant book as most HBR guides, short and concise advice how to be a better coach.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    HBR does not disappoint

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alain Tieu

    I liked : learned the difference between coaching and managing my team.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Lots of useful information.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    This is a short but sweet guide in how to hopefully make the most out of your employees or direct reports. Shouting and threatening them is no longer enough! Today’s employees can be empowered, given some freedoms, encouraged to grow and develop and generally work for the best of the company. All employees are different and you as a manager or supervisor might have been thrown into this seemingly impossible job at the deep end. Most managers and supervisors are not as accomplished at people manag This is a short but sweet guide in how to hopefully make the most out of your employees or direct reports. Shouting and threatening them is no longer enough! Today’s employees can be empowered, given some freedoms, encouraged to grow and develop and generally work for the best of the company. All employees are different and you as a manager or supervisor might have been thrown into this seemingly impossible job at the deep end. Most managers and supervisors are not as accomplished at people management than they may think. We all have room to improve. This coaching guide might give a few hints, tips and underline existing knowledge. Think of it another way. You might have a top-of-the-range sports car or a rusty old banger. Yet both vehicles are capable of being tuned to make them run even better, more efficiently, more effortlessly and to make the most of their individual potential. This is the same with staff at all levels within a company. This book is the sum of combined thoughts of many experts in the field. It seamlessly manages to get under your skin, getting you thinking and considering matters in a non-threatening manner. One senior leader noted how being coached helped him understand that he could make the biggest difference by doing more than everyone else but by empowering other people to do more and motivating them to do their best, letting go of certain responsibilities and recognizing the limits of his expertise. As a leader, he said, “I didn’t need to have all the answers; I just needed to ask the right questions.” That is the sign of confidence and leadership maturity. Yet so many don’t seem to get the benefits of coaching, it is said. Many companies view and use coaching as an investment or perk for the senior staff, others view it as a corrective measure for those who don’t perform. Coaching can be and should be for all. It can create challenges and change within a company yet when harnessed correctly it should be a positive catalyst rather than a threat. Reading this book is not onerous. Each standalone chapter is capable of being read quickly. Digesting and implementing the ideas will take longer. The tone and style encouraged you consider the arguments, selling you to their benefits and underlining the reasons why you might want and need change. It is a great little book. Of course there are no shortage of such coaching resources yet this is a good composite of many ideas and thoughts, parceled up into a very accessible, ready reference type of book. Whether you are thinking of taking your first steps along the route to coaching or you are already an old pro sold on the idea, this could be a great little companion! HBR Guide to Coaching Employees, written by Harvard Business Review and published by Harvard Business Review Press. ISBN 9781625275332, 208 pages. YYYYY

  10. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    Giving feedback or coaching is one of the most important skills our managers and leaders need to learn for their respective organizations to flourish and succeed. I’ve seen countless of articles, books, videos as well as audio materials catering to the development of this important competency in our leadership. Nevertheless, the campaign to make our leaders better in coaching is far from over since this is a skill that needs to be continuously honed no matter how seasoned our leaders are. Harvard Giving feedback or coaching is one of the most important skills our managers and leaders need to learn for their respective organizations to flourish and succeed. I’ve seen countless of articles, books, videos as well as audio materials catering to the development of this important competency in our leadership. Nevertheless, the campaign to make our leaders better in coaching is far from over since this is a skill that needs to be continuously honed no matter how seasoned our leaders are. Harvard Business Review has recently published the book entitled HBR Guide to Coaching Employees. This is part of the HBR Guide Series of books which delves into the important skills our business leaders need to hone to be effective in delivering results. This particular book on coaching is written like a compilation of articles written by different experts on the field of leadership coaching. You will get to feel the different styles in writing for each individual as they contribute to the development of the ideas in the book. Some of the things that readers may particularly appreciate are the following: 1. Includes great insights on coaching which many are violating most of the time. All throughout the book, experts sight many important things to consider when coaching that are usually violated such as inability to make a follow up; not setting aside time for coaching; and, etc. More importantly the book provides numerous ways on how to do it right. 2. Different perspectives. Since many experts contributed to this book, readers will see different perspectives which put the subject into a more holistic way. Different writing styles also make reading more engaging. 3. Most importantly, this book acknowledges the fact that individual differences are important considerations on how one coach. There are many important lessons here in this book. I am sure that for those who are engaged in developing individuals not just from the rank-and-file employee level but more importantly in leadership level, this book is a must read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Donna Maguire

    I was delighted to received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I have in the past been involved in quite a bit of employee coaching, and training and I wanted to see what tips and hints I could get. The book has an excellent extract from a questionnaire which is ideal to get o the bottom of the thought process and wants of the employees so that you can tailor any training that needs to be given. It is also very good at making clear the difference between coaching, and training I was delighted to received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I have in the past been involved in quite a bit of employee coaching, and training and I wanted to see what tips and hints I could get. The book has an excellent extract from a questionnaire which is ideal to get o the bottom of the thought process and wants of the employees so that you can tailor any training that needs to be given. It is also very good at making clear the difference between coaching, and training/teaching which I do believe can be blurred by a lot of people. The book has some excellent sections, the are clear and concise with just the right amount of detail needed.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mike Ncube

    One of the best books I’ve read on coaching. It’s surprising how we confuse coaching and teaching and apply both inappropriately. This book has helped me solve that problem and I’m continuing to learn more as I apply the concepts

  13. 5 out of 5

    Vasyl Pasternak

    A set of highly theoretical articles. Some of them are interfere, and provide complex theories.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    it's a good book - good guidelines in it it's a good book - good guidelines in it

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Small case study type chapters from different executive coaches.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ashani Gordon

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gina Diederich

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennie Toren

  19. 5 out of 5

    Randy Lim

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jason Smylie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mallory

  23. 4 out of 5

    Erica

  24. 5 out of 5

    Roger Wessel

  25. 5 out of 5

    SaberSnail

  26. 5 out of 5

    Delanalbeads

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Mack

  28. 5 out of 5

    Juan C Valverde Solano

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ramon

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...