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The Big God Theory: A Layman's Journey in the American Christian Church

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Like John Bunyan's famous book, Pilgrim's Progress (but without all the metaphorical fiction!), The Big God Theory takes readers along on the author's journey from being a forth generation member of a conservative American Presbyterian church for 40 years, through his being rejected as a monstrous liar when he and his teenaged daughter came to their church leaders for help Like John Bunyan's famous book, Pilgrim's Progress (but without all the metaphorical fiction!), The Big God Theory takes readers along on the author's journey from being a forth generation member of a conservative American Presbyterian church for 40 years, through his being rejected as a monstrous liar when he and his teenaged daughter came to their church leaders for help when his wife had an affair, through the resulting depression that arose after being utterly rejected by his life-long "church family," to a renewed interest in and study of all things "Christian" in America. This is a trip back to joy. Robinson shows, step-by-step, where the average American Christian church has seemingly left the rails of Christ's actual teachings in favor of regional dogma and a comfortable (but imagined) status quo. Robinson's bottom line is that "God is bigger," and that a "spiritual life," according to Christian principle, is supposed to manifest loving joy. The Big God Theory is Robinson's "return to the highlighted route," and provides one possible road map for other American church members who know in their heart that the real joy and peace of mind that Jesus said he was offering may still be missing in their lives.


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Like John Bunyan's famous book, Pilgrim's Progress (but without all the metaphorical fiction!), The Big God Theory takes readers along on the author's journey from being a forth generation member of a conservative American Presbyterian church for 40 years, through his being rejected as a monstrous liar when he and his teenaged daughter came to their church leaders for help Like John Bunyan's famous book, Pilgrim's Progress (but without all the metaphorical fiction!), The Big God Theory takes readers along on the author's journey from being a forth generation member of a conservative American Presbyterian church for 40 years, through his being rejected as a monstrous liar when he and his teenaged daughter came to their church leaders for help when his wife had an affair, through the resulting depression that arose after being utterly rejected by his life-long "church family," to a renewed interest in and study of all things "Christian" in America. This is a trip back to joy. Robinson shows, step-by-step, where the average American Christian church has seemingly left the rails of Christ's actual teachings in favor of regional dogma and a comfortable (but imagined) status quo. Robinson's bottom line is that "God is bigger," and that a "spiritual life," according to Christian principle, is supposed to manifest loving joy. The Big God Theory is Robinson's "return to the highlighted route," and provides one possible road map for other American church members who know in their heart that the real joy and peace of mind that Jesus said he was offering may still be missing in their lives.

32 review for The Big God Theory: A Layman's Journey in the American Christian Church

  1. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Robinson

  3. 4 out of 5

    Godwin

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  6. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  7. 4 out of 5

    GoodGlory

  8. 4 out of 5

    Julia Conway

  9. 5 out of 5

    Walt Bristow

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  11. 5 out of 5

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  12. 5 out of 5

    Jen Zidak

  13. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gail

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Pooser

  17. 5 out of 5

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  18. 4 out of 5

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  19. 4 out of 5

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  20. 5 out of 5

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  21. 5 out of 5

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  22. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

  23. 4 out of 5

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  24. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Cole Marie Mckinnon

  25. 5 out of 5

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  26. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  29. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Zitsch

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lynette

  31. 4 out of 5

    NormaCenva

  32. 5 out of 5

    Kate

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