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Blade of the Immortal, Volume 31: Final Curtain

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The harrowing, bone-crunching finale! Hiroaki Samura's long-running manga series ends with a massive, 280-page volume filled with action and suspense. Who will survive? Disgraced Edo officer Habaki faces the devious Anotsu in a decisive showdown, while Manga, Rin, and only a few others witness the end of an era. Rin's quest concludes with a violent bang--then things get we The harrowing, bone-crunching finale! Hiroaki Samura's long-running manga series ends with a massive, 280-page volume filled with action and suspense. Who will survive? Disgraced Edo officer Habaki faces the devious Anotsu in a decisive showdown, while Manga, Rin, and only a few others witness the end of an era. Rin's quest concludes with a violent bang--then things get weirder! Hiroaki Samura's final volume overflows with heartbreak and bloodshed! Blade has won many awards across the globe, including the Eisner Award in America, the prestigious Media Arts Award of Japan, and multiple British Eagle Awards.


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The harrowing, bone-crunching finale! Hiroaki Samura's long-running manga series ends with a massive, 280-page volume filled with action and suspense. Who will survive? Disgraced Edo officer Habaki faces the devious Anotsu in a decisive showdown, while Manga, Rin, and only a few others witness the end of an era. Rin's quest concludes with a violent bang--then things get we The harrowing, bone-crunching finale! Hiroaki Samura's long-running manga series ends with a massive, 280-page volume filled with action and suspense. Who will survive? Disgraced Edo officer Habaki faces the devious Anotsu in a decisive showdown, while Manga, Rin, and only a few others witness the end of an era. Rin's quest concludes with a violent bang--then things get weirder! Hiroaki Samura's final volume overflows with heartbreak and bloodshed! Blade has won many awards across the globe, including the Eisner Award in America, the prestigious Media Arts Award of Japan, and multiple British Eagle Awards.

30 review for Blade of the Immortal, Volume 31: Final Curtain

  1. 5 out of 5

    John Wiswell

    The last book is as good a place as any to review the entire series. It's been a privlege reading Blade of the Immortal. If you'll call it an Epic Fantasy, then it's one of the most enthralling Epic Fantasies I've ever read. If you'd call it Historical Fantasy because it's set in a real period of Japan despite its immortality worms, then it's probably my favorite Historical Fantasy, with the deepest character arcs. If you foolishly think those sub-genres belong only to prose and this is just a Ma The last book is as good a place as any to review the entire series. It's been a privlege reading Blade of the Immortal. If you'll call it an Epic Fantasy, then it's one of the most enthralling Epic Fantasies I've ever read. If you'd call it Historical Fantasy because it's set in a real period of Japan despite its immortality worms, then it's probably my favorite Historical Fantasy, with the deepest character arcs. If you foolishly think those sub-genres belong only to prose and this is just a Manga, then it's one of the best Manga I've ever read. Every major part of this series works. Hiroaki Samura's art style, moving along a spectrum between hasty and sketch-based to rigorously detailed drawings, works strikingly for all scenes, from tender moments between two lovers to sequences of gruesome warfare. Perhaps my favorite part is how, over the thirty-one volumes, we've watched Rin and Manji realize how small their place in the world is. When it began, Manji was on a selfish all-consuming quest to slay a thousand sinners so that he could break his curse of immortality and rest in peace. Rin was an angry girl barely inside of puberty, who just wanted to track down her father's murderer and restore honor to a family name. They were tragic archetypes of Japanese fiction. At the outset, I never guessed we'd question whether Rin's father had deserved to live, or the national machinations that set up his death. It's been a great pleasure watching Manji's suicidal wishes subsumed by the greater desire to keep other people alive. They became people who would've pitied who they started as. The stages of the bond between the two of them created one of the most poignant relationships in Manga, and by this point, even other characters recognize the two of them have changed each other. So the series has succeeded at the personal, but also at the epic. The final volume is much more interested in the feud between Itto-Ryu and Habaki's faction - really between two would-be conquerers who have visions for what Japan should become. As they cross swords (because of course they do), I couldn't see either as the villain anymore, but I couldn't root for either as the hero. In the background, the last of their surviving loyalists are murdering each other in the name for causes that could be reduced to the egos of their leaders. Here is where Blade of the Immortal succeeds at the epic: it's taken this long to deliver a finale that didn't need its main characters, undermined the notion of main characters in history, and made it enthralling to watch two irredeemable leaders try to carve a future out of each other's throats. You could read this series much faster than I did. Manga notoriously goes by quickly, even when the art is as striking as Samura's. His fight scenes are so fluid that the eyes fly over them without recognizing how much craft they'd consumed, and his characters are so engrossing that I almost always wanted to reach for the next book. I deliberately staggered my reading, trying to cap the number of books in the series I read every year, so it would last. It was fourteen years ago when I read the first one, and even stretching it out as I have, I'm going to miss this in a way that re-reading won't fix. Though I will re-read the hell out of it. I won't spoil who lives or dies. That'd be cruel, especially since the last five volumes have shed so many characters. Instead I'll ask for a moment of reflection that, though the eponymous main character is immortal, I held my breath in uncertainty over whether he would make it out of this alive.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sydneroo

    Rating: 8.00/ 10.00 | 🌕🌕🌕🌕🌗 I wanted more from the ending. (view spoiler)[ I wanted a last moment with Manji and Rin to talk. I didn't think it was logical for a newly immortal being to just let a person go (Rin) and never talk to them ever again after everything they've been through. Especially, if they felt like they had a brother/sister relationship. I did like seeing 90 years later how Manji was still alive and now going to take care of Rin's granddaughter. How her granddaughter gave Manji Rating: 8.00/ 10.00 | 🌕🌕🌕🌕🌗 I wanted more from the ending. (view spoiler)[ I wanted a last moment with Manji and Rin to talk. I didn't think it was logical for a newly immortal being to just let a person go (Rin) and never talk to them ever again after everything they've been through. Especially, if they felt like they had a brother/sister relationship. I did like seeing 90 years later how Manji was still alive and now going to take care of Rin's granddaughter. How her granddaughter gave Manji the carving sword. I wanted more character conclusions but I understood that the actually original story was concluded once Anotsu was killed (the whole point of the story). But because I fell in love with all these characters I just wanted to follow them forever which is very good on Hiroaki part. (hide spoiler)] I can't wait to forget most of this story and read it again an several years.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Maria Shuffit

    I first started collecting this series back in 2001. Close to fifteen years of following it, and now it comes to its end. A truly bittersweet experience for any reader who has been faithfully stalking bookstores and websites, and realized that the waiting is over now. I re-read the entire series to prepare for this last book. My first read-through, I'll admit, it felt like something of a let-down. I do not think this ending was as strong as it could be. It feels sort of forced, as though Samura w I first started collecting this series back in 2001. Close to fifteen years of following it, and now it comes to its end. A truly bittersweet experience for any reader who has been faithfully stalking bookstores and websites, and realized that the waiting is over now. I re-read the entire series to prepare for this last book. My first read-through, I'll admit, it felt like something of a let-down. I do not think this ending was as strong as it could be. It feels sort of forced, as though Samura was just tired of coming up with continued plotlines and decided that this was going to be it, so we better wrap it up all at once. A lot of the dialogue was overdone and cheesy. Aside from that, it was a good ending to the series. We got the major battles, lots of gore, and best of all, absolutely jaw-droppingly beautiful artwork! I was really happy with how the conflict between Anotsu and Rin was resolved - I really wasn't sure what to expect with that, or even how I hoped it would play out, but it was done so very well. I also really loved seeing the weapons cart in one of the final scenes, and picking out who all the different weapons belonged to. I am sad to know that there will be no more Blade of the Immortal to look forward to, but I am grateful that we readers were left with a satisfying ending - only one thing was left up in the air, and I actually kinda liked that we don't get a definite conclusion to that. It's been an excellent adventure reading this series. I'll miss it!

  4. 5 out of 5

    shea

    What an amazing finish for an amazing series. I honestly didn’t know what to expect when I started this, my mother picked it up while I was looking for a friend’s birthday present and we ended up buying the first omnibus because it was pretty and it was big. This has surpassed all my expectations and has been one of the first long running manga series I have read (and finished) in a long time and boy has it been a journey. I’m just in awe. Let’s just leave it at this lest I get repetitive: it’s What an amazing finish for an amazing series. I honestly didn’t know what to expect when I started this, my mother picked it up while I was looking for a friend’s birthday present and we ended up buying the first omnibus because it was pretty and it was big. This has surpassed all my expectations and has been one of the first long running manga series I have read (and finished) in a long time and boy has it been a journey. I’m just in awe. Let’s just leave it at this lest I get repetitive: it’s an astounding series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Craig Sieracki

    Elegantly brutal is the best way to describe this series and its final chapter. Samura's work is spot on as usual. It is not perfect,I feel that there are jumps from page to page that can be hard to follow, but it is a great farewell to some of the most creative and wonderful characters in manga. I will miss the excitement of getting a new volume, but will enjoy rereading this series for the rest of my life. Elegantly brutal is the best way to describe this series and its final chapter. Samura's work is spot on as usual. It is not perfect,I feel that there are jumps from page to page that can be hard to follow, but it is a great farewell to some of the most creative and wonderful characters in manga. I will miss the excitement of getting a new volume, but will enjoy rereading this series for the rest of my life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    The final chapter and the artwork, the story is so much more than what has happened. It was amazing and the end, you can hope to see Manji again in a future episode.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    This is a review of the entire series. Manji is a ruthless ronin stricken with the curse of immortality. To undo his curse, he must take the lives of a thousand sinners. He's a wandering sword for hire that kills without mercy and hunts down evil warriors all over feudal Japan. He wanders and kills without purpose for quite some time, but his long journey to end his own life takes an unexpected turn when he meets a compassionate young girl named Rin who is seeking revenge for her parents after th This is a review of the entire series. Manji is a ruthless ronin stricken with the curse of immortality. To undo his curse, he must take the lives of a thousand sinners. He's a wandering sword for hire that kills without mercy and hunts down evil warriors all over feudal Japan. He wanders and kills without purpose for quite some time, but his long journey to end his own life takes an unexpected turn when he meets a compassionate young girl named Rin who is seeking revenge for her parents after they were murdered by members of a brutal new sword school called the Itto-ryu. Manji accepts the role of Rin's guardian and their drastically different ideals and personalities begin to change each other in ways neither of them could've foreseen as they clash with one merciless sinner after another. The story cycles between several groups of samurai warriors each with their own moral codes and objectives. Other than Manji and Rin, there is Anotsu Kagehisa; the leader of the Itto-ryu and his band of rogues that openly defy old traditions as they seek to revolutionize the way of the samurai through force. Hyakurin and her partner Giichi who work as government cutthroats under a faction called the Mugai-ryu along with a serial killer named Shira, and so on. There are also hundreds of assassins, criminal gangs and shady individuals that wish to learn the secrets of Manji's immortality for their own nefarious purposes. With so many vicious people on the loose, it's no surprise that this ends up being one of the most brutal and bloody samurai tales ever told. Blade of the Immortal makes ultra-violence look like a poetic art form. Blood and limbs fly like scarlet paint. Blades cut through flesh and bone like knives through butter. The use of clever battle poses and finishing techniques against the backdrop of hyper-stylized Edo period art makes for some museum-worthy battle and death scenes. Despite how glamorized violence and bloodshed is throughout the series, it does not shy away from exploring the aftermath of said violence and how it impacts the psychological state of the characters. A sweet girl like Rin seeks revenge against Anotsu of the Itto-ryu for leading an assault that resulted in the murder of her family and slowly grows accustomed to the constant brutality that the path of revenge leads to. Anotsu himself isn't the one-dimensional evil monster that Rin believes him to be as he is driven by a sense of revenge himself; his revolution against outdated traditions begins only because people he loved were hurt, killed and outcasted by the harsh rules and teachings of the old sword schools. Even those who live through vicarious swindling and assassination such as Hyakurin and her partner Giichi have very traumatic upbringings and take no joy in their work. We see how violence warps these characters into killing machines and then we see how the violence they inflict on others leads to more tragedy and bloodshed. Whether it be physical, mental or sexual, the violence throughout the series never goes unexplored or unpunished. It somehow manages to be brutally elegant and mature at the same time, the bloody battles are fantastic and the effects it has on the characters is even more so. What seems to be a cliche samurai revenge story subtly transforms into an exploration of the psychological effects that violence has on many different types of individuals. Some are defined by it, some are bound to it, some love it while others allow themselves to grow from it or be destroyed by it. Violence and revenge are never fully justified nor condemned. It's presented from a very neutral and realistic point of view, allowing you to see it from every angle possible and judge for yourself whether it can be justified or not. The story is simple, but the webs of conflict between many groups of complex and dangerous characters is where it truly shines. Strong development, elegant violence, moral ambiguity and an unusually modern punk tone in the dialogue and mannerisms of the characters offers a unique way of exploring a feudal-era drama that defies the expectations of a traditional revenge story. *** My Social Media My YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPPs... My Instagram Account: https://www.instagram.com/michael_sor... My Wattpad Account: https://www.wattpad.com/user/Michael-... My Twitter Account: https://twitter.com/SorbelloHorror My Facebook Account: https://www.facebook.com/michael.sorb...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    What a bittersweet ending. "Revenge isn't really to honour the dead. It's all about yourself. I think you become convinced that if you don't get revenge you won't move forward. So you seek vengeance. But I wonder if it works that way? If I'd drowned that woman, would I have lived in total peace from that day on? ... What was the right thing for her to do? And me? I have no idea." I'm not sure how I feel about the endings for everyone. I guess they got the endings they deserved. I've been thinking What a bittersweet ending. "Revenge isn't really to honour the dead. It's all about yourself. I think you become convinced that if you don't get revenge you won't move forward. So you seek vengeance. But I wonder if it works that way? If I'd drowned that woman, would I have lived in total peace from that day on? ... What was the right thing for her to do? And me? I have no idea." I'm not sure how I feel about the endings for everyone. I guess they got the endings they deserved. I've been thinking about the title of this series -- 無限の住人, those who live in eternity -- it's a lot more ambiguous than the English version. I suppose you go into it thinking it's referring to Manji, the one with immortal regenerative powers. But I wonder, what would this phrase have meant to Anotsu? To Rin? To Makie, who could never quite figure out if she wanted to live or die? What does it mean to the Edo era? To the Shogunate? To the lessons one passes on to one's descendants? I don't think it's a coincidence that the ending closes with (view spoiler)[a time jump (hide spoiler)] . It's a common way to end a series. But here, I think it's particularly poignant if you read this series as being more than just a slasher revenge narrative. Rather, it was always about the death of an era. The ending of the old ways. Anotsu cutting down the traditions of the sword schools; Kagimura, both an aberration from the kogi and the truest believer of the old concept of honour. I thought the 'end' this series foreshadowed was an end to the old traditions. That held true. But I guess I was naive in not realising that time is relentless on everyone. After 90 years have passed, what of their ambitions remain? Anotsu, Shira, Kagimura. Who is even left to remember? "Into a peaceful world wanting for nothing came some fools who went mad heralding the ascendance of the martial arts, the restoration of the sword with their own blades. Did anything change? Even the tiniest bit?" I think that's what Samura was ultimately trying to ask us. -- Bonus: Manji carrying the weapons for the characters we've gown attached to throughout the series on a cart through the streets of (view spoiler)[Tokyo (hide spoiler)] . A nostalgic fanservice moment that made me smile.

  9. 5 out of 5

    fonz

    Terminé este último volumen con una vaga sensación de insatisfacción, algo que creo inevitable cuando Samura consigue que inviertas un capital emocional importante en los personajes, a los que has acompañado en sus desventuras durante las casi siete mil páginas de este intensísimo folletín dramático de época (no me quiero imaginar como se sintió quien siguió la serie según se iba publicando, a lo largo de nada menos que veinte años). En una especie de acto de magia blanca, uno querría que los pr Terminé este último volumen con una vaga sensación de insatisfacción, algo que creo inevitable cuando Samura consigue que inviertas un capital emocional importante en los personajes, a los que has acompañado en sus desventuras durante las casi siete mil páginas de este intensísimo folletín dramático de época (no me quiero imaginar como se sintió quien siguió la serie según se iba publicando, a lo largo de nada menos que veinte años). En una especie de acto de magia blanca, uno querría que los protagonistas se casasen, se hipotecasen, criasen media docena de hijos y fuesen felices para siempre, vamos, que la ficción ordenase la realidad. Como Samura es un artista y no un tendero, esto no puede ser así, y los personajes y la historia han de seguir la lógica interna que les ha guiado durante toda la historia, hasta su conclusión. La inmortalidad de Manji le condena a la soledad y ni siquiera se nos concede una despedida emotiva a modo de catársis, sólo un torrente de lágrimas desconsoladas. Incluso, con el tiempo, Manji se olvidará del nombre de Rin, de quien era ella. Y esta intensidad emocional que he invertido en los personajes es con lo que me quedo, a pesar de que "La espada del Inmortal" es un tebeo que trata multitud de temas de forma muy inteligente y sensible, desde ese violento mundo de samurais y espadachines que se acaba (y quien se enfrente al devenir inevitable del cambio está condenado a morir), hasta el sentido de la venganza como acto profundamente egoísta, la redención, las relaciones entre hombres y mujeres, la amistad y las consecuencias que nuestros actos tienen en otras personas. A pesar de su irregularidad (o quizás gracias a ella), "La espada del Inmortal" es uno los tebeos más memorables que he leído; violentísimo, dinámico, brutal, extenuante incluso, emotivo, sensible y excelentemente dibujado. Ha sido un gran placer y lo echaré mucho de menos.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    This epically long series ends pretty much where I thought it would after the first volume, which is Hugely Disappointing. All the twists, turns, and evolutions of characters were interesting, but ultimately hit all the inevitable storybeats to reach the tired trope of In The Future We See A Character Finally Deal With Their Ghosts And Start A New Adventure. I had started reading this series, hoping it would inspire me to read more manga. It just reinforced that manga isn't necessarily a genre I This epically long series ends pretty much where I thought it would after the first volume, which is Hugely Disappointing. All the twists, turns, and evolutions of characters were interesting, but ultimately hit all the inevitable storybeats to reach the tired trope of In The Future We See A Character Finally Deal With Their Ghosts And Start A New Adventure. I had started reading this series, hoping it would inspire me to read more manga. It just reinforced that manga isn't necessarily a genre I enjoy. I think I'll go back and read the vastly different toned, The Kurosagi Corpse Delivery Service, Volume 1 next. I'm glad I started this series, but I also wished I had bailed on it when my interest waned.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    Well I guess it had to end eventually. After such a lengthy epic there were high expectations for the ending, and I think it ended about as well as it could have. I really enjoyed the future epilogue and thought that made the ending. Some things surprised me, others were sort of expected, although it was far from predictable. Much respect to Samura for crafting such an exceptional body of work, something which he spent most of his adult life creating. If you are a fan of Japanese period pieces fe Well I guess it had to end eventually. After such a lengthy epic there were high expectations for the ending, and I think it ended about as well as it could have. I really enjoyed the future epilogue and thought that made the ending. Some things surprised me, others were sort of expected, although it was far from predictable. Much respect to Samura for crafting such an exceptional body of work, something which he spent most of his adult life creating. If you are a fan of Japanese period pieces featuring samurai, and enjoy a little bit of fantasy mixed in with the fact, this series is definitely something you should check out.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    SPOILERS What a bittersweet ending. I'm sad that the main characters went separate ways, I had thought from earlier comments that something might change between them, and in some ways I'm disappointed with the ending, but all in all it's been resolved. SPOILERS What a bittersweet ending. I'm sad that the main characters went separate ways, I had thought from earlier comments that something might change between them, and in some ways I'm disappointed with the ending, but all in all it's been resolved.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bene Vogt

    A worthy finish to an excellent series with some serious flaws in the last third.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Drizztl

    8.5/10

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nidah (SleepDreamWrite)

    Good volume.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Olga

    Recap: (view spoiler)[The peasant guy with odd hair lived. Ren killed Anotsu after he was defeated by Manji. Hagimura (?) was also killed. Shira became immortal because of Manji's arm, but eventually, he was eaten by dogs. Makie was shot to death, but not before she showed just how badass she was. Rin moved on with her life. Manji in the distant future meets her grand-daughter. (hide spoiler)] Since I don't feel like adding all 31 volumes to my to-read shelf, this volume will serve just fine to a Recap: (view spoiler)[The peasant guy with odd hair lived. Ren killed Anotsu after he was defeated by Manji. Hagimura (?) was also killed. Shira became immortal because of Manji's arm, but eventually, he was eaten by dogs. Makie was shot to death, but not before she showed just how badass she was. Rin moved on with her life. Manji in the distant future meets her grand-daughter. (hide spoiler)] Since I don't feel like adding all 31 volumes to my to-read shelf, this volume will serve just fine to add my review, rating and reading dates. I'm usually quite bad at finishing series, so the fact that I've completed this one says something. The plot is rather simple: a girl seeks revenge for the death of her parents. It doesn't really matter, because the manga is not about plot, it's about characters and ideas. And if there is something I like the most about art, it's how it's able to explore concepts through narrative. Of course, I wouldn't have loved Blade of the Immortal the way I loved it if it wasn't for the fact that it features some of my favorite things to read about: samurai! sword fights! immortal characters! strong women! gray morality! This fact surely earns an extra star, because the manga by itself is by no means perfect. Sometimes the plot is just too convenient (how many times would Rin have died if it wasn't for someone to show up at the exact right moment?). Also, I personally think it could have been shorter but then again I don't like long series so maybe it's just me. Speaking about the plot, in the end, it wasn't a simple story about revenge. The focus shifts to the clash between Itto-Ryu and Habaki, or essentially between two views on Japan's future. There's still the 'personal' storyline about Manji and Rin and a bunch of side plots. I can't believe how epic and complex the story was, how many characters there were. Still, every storyline, every character got attention and development. Wow. Finally, I have to mention the gorgeous art style! For me the art is very important; if it's ugly and/or doesn't work, I can't read no matter how awesome all the other parts are. No need to say that it wasn't the case here.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad AbdulMuttaleb

    It was an honor to read that manga,it's been a long time since I was drawn that much to samurai-featuring-manga since vagabond. the way rin developed from a crybaby to a mature woman despite her young age. maybe, because manji accompanying her she became aware of losing and striving to protect rather than protected. The quarrel between the Shogunate and Itto-ryu was a climax and when you think it can't get bloodier; be prepared to be proved wrong. a lot of people died and you feel bad for every d It was an honor to read that manga,it's been a long time since I was drawn that much to samurai-featuring-manga since vagabond. the way rin developed from a crybaby to a mature woman despite her young age. maybe, because manji accompanying her she became aware of losing and striving to protect rather than protected. The quarrel between the Shogunate and Itto-ryu was a climax and when you think it can't get bloodier; be prepared to be proved wrong. a lot of people died and you feel bad for every death. you can't pick sides because everyone is right, maybe methods are wrong but you're not going to be able to choose a side and either sides loss is going to sadden you. a heart-breaking conclusion and feeling sympathy towards manji because of how lonely he is going to be as long as he lives yet it's satisfactory.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Woowott

    This is really for the entire series. I discovered it in IL whilst visiting a friend fifteen years ago. I accidentally started with volume 6, because Dark Horse didn't number the volumes clearly at the time. And the art was the most amazing art. The story and characters were wonderful, even though I was totally confused. I knew I had to read the rest. And I did. It is one of those manga that owns my soul. I have spent fifteen years reading and rereading, and I'm actually sorta depressed that it' This is really for the entire series. I discovered it in IL whilst visiting a friend fifteen years ago. I accidentally started with volume 6, because Dark Horse didn't number the volumes clearly at the time. And the art was the most amazing art. The story and characters were wonderful, even though I was totally confused. I knew I had to read the rest. And I did. It is one of those manga that owns my soul. I have spent fifteen years reading and rereading, and I'm actually sorta depressed that it's finished now. And the ending--GOOD LORD, the ending. So much amazing in this series. Yeah, it's gruesome and bloody and cussy. And it is AWESOME. I feel the need to reread coming on very soon.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Boquiren

    I love Hiroaki Samura's artwork. His draughtsmanship is something I strive for. The way he draws feet and hands are astonishingly true to life. That having said Volume 31 finally ends a saga that should have ended 10 issues prior. Issues 20-31 were a slog to read. Perhaps this is an inaccurate assumption but the last 10 issues felt like he was playing to his fanbase keeping the storyline on life-support. I love Hiroaki Samura's artwork. His draughtsmanship is something I strive for. The way he draws feet and hands are astonishingly true to life. That having said Volume 31 finally ends a saga that should have ended 10 issues prior. Issues 20-31 were a slog to read. Perhaps this is an inaccurate assumption but the last 10 issues felt like he was playing to his fanbase keeping the storyline on life-support.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I love this series, and the final volume wraps things up nicely, with a bittersweet ending that didn't pander to its fans. I love this series, and the final volume wraps things up nicely, with a bittersweet ending that didn't pander to its fans.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Yamen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah ~Sehrenity~

  23. 5 out of 5

    Justin McCalla

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erlend

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  27. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Albertson

  28. 4 out of 5

    Iskariot

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alyson Kent

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marko Jovanovic

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