hits counter Goddesses in Older Women - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Goddesses in Older Women

Availability: Ready to download

"Knowing which archetypes are stirring and strong in you will help you to come into your own third phase with additional consciousness," says Jean Shinoda Bolen. When Bolen's earlier book Goddesses in Everywoman was first published, it became a surprise bestseller and an unexpected star in the womens' spirituality movement. Bolen viewed archetypal patterns from a Jungian-f "Knowing which archetypes are stirring and strong in you will help you to come into your own third phase with additional consciousness," says Jean Shinoda Bolen. When Bolen's earlier book Goddesses in Everywoman was first published, it became a surprise bestseller and an unexpected star in the womens' spirituality movement. Bolen viewed archetypal patterns from a Jungian-feminist point of view as they affected the first two phases of a woman's life. Now she has devoted an entire book to the third phase of a woman's life, that of a "green and juicy crone." Here again, the goddesses (Demeter, Artemis, Persephone etc,) as they would age are invoked as role models as well as some non-Western goddesses. All can add perspective and wisdom to any woman's Act III.


Compare

"Knowing which archetypes are stirring and strong in you will help you to come into your own third phase with additional consciousness," says Jean Shinoda Bolen. When Bolen's earlier book Goddesses in Everywoman was first published, it became a surprise bestseller and an unexpected star in the womens' spirituality movement. Bolen viewed archetypal patterns from a Jungian-f "Knowing which archetypes are stirring and strong in you will help you to come into your own third phase with additional consciousness," says Jean Shinoda Bolen. When Bolen's earlier book Goddesses in Everywoman was first published, it became a surprise bestseller and an unexpected star in the womens' spirituality movement. Bolen viewed archetypal patterns from a Jungian-feminist point of view as they affected the first two phases of a woman's life. Now she has devoted an entire book to the third phase of a woman's life, that of a "green and juicy crone." Here again, the goddesses (Demeter, Artemis, Persephone etc,) as they would age are invoked as role models as well as some non-Western goddesses. All can add perspective and wisdom to any woman's Act III.

30 review for Goddesses in Older Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Steve Wiggins

    It may seem strange for a man to read a “women’s book,” and vice-versa, but it seems to me that understanding comes from being willing to be made uncomfortable. Jean Shinoda Bolen has written several books exploring Jungian archetypes of deities, both for men and for women. I haven’t read any of her previous books, but having written my dissertation on Asherah (which is my first book listed on my profile page), I have had a long interest in how goddesses are interpreted. Archetypes are one such It may seem strange for a man to read a “women’s book,” and vice-versa, but it seems to me that understanding comes from being willing to be made uncomfortable. Jean Shinoda Bolen has written several books exploring Jungian archetypes of deities, both for men and for women. I haven’t read any of her previous books, but having written my dissertation on Asherah (which is my first book listed on my profile page), I have had a long interest in how goddesses are interpreted. Archetypes are one such form of interpretation. The book is primarily for post-menopausal women who are trying to sort out their mental and spiritual lives, as I note elsewhere Sects and Violence in the Ancient World. Nevertheless, it is important to listen, across genders. To find this book useful, readers must be willing to credit Jungian archetypes with some kind of reality. Given Bolen’s medical credentials, it is hopefully not too far a stretch for most who would pick up such a book as this. It’s clear from the perspective of someone who has researched goddesses that the author has done considerable work on them, probing ancient stories for modern lessons. Reading this book in the era of Trump and world-wide reactionary governments, it seems as if the optimism put into it only about a decade ago has been set back. Society seemed poised to improve for everyone, but the cold, dark nature of personal profit has shifted everything back to a more masculine paradigm of the worst kind. Books like this are important in such an era as this. There is a wisdom we could gain should the voices of women be given equal volume with that of men. We can only hope the goddesses are still there, for without their leadership there’s not much of a future.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I have a longstanding interest in goddess archetypes and their history, so this book caught my attention in a Totnes second hand bookshop on hols. I wasn't disappointed. It's the perfect companion for women on the threshold fifty, or later, encouraging you to find and live out your juicy crone self. A book to dip into when direction or inspiration is needed. I was already familiar with my dominant archetype but enthralled to see how she is getting left behind as her crone version steps up after I have a longstanding interest in goddess archetypes and their history, so this book caught my attention in a Totnes second hand bookshop on hols. I wasn't disappointed. It's the perfect companion for women on the threshold fifty, or later, encouraging you to find and live out your juicy crone self. A book to dip into when direction or inspiration is needed. I was already familiar with my dominant archetype but enthralled to see how she is getting left behind as her crone version steps up after years of waiting patiently in the shadows because most people couldn't cope with her. Shinola Boden talks about the grief some women experience when they have to reject their natural dominant archetype(s) in this way, saying: Most women of any complexity have several important and active goddess archetypes in them. Depending upon the "climate" of family and culture, some fit in and others spell trouble, even at a time when women are not burned at the stake or stoned for expressing suppressed goddesses. In the first two phases of our adult lives, we may not have been able to embody a particular archetype and yet longed to do so. In the third phase, we may feel grief or depression at this missed possibility. Some women deny that they are older, and in maintaining the illusion of being younger become increasingly inauthentic. Psychological and soul growth comes through the crone archetypes and through the evolution of the "goddesses in everywoman."

  3. 5 out of 5

    James (JD) Dittes

    I read this book for my Bride's sake. She turned 50 this year, and she really found herself going through the emotional and physical ringer that is perimenopause. She had done me the honor of reading Robert Bly's book, Iron John and discussing it, so I returned the favor to her with this book. I found it really good and really explanatory. In the first section, Bolen goes into Sophia (a goddess alluded to in the Bible), Metis, and Hecate--three goddesses who are most easy to tie to the experience I read this book for my Bride's sake. She turned 50 this year, and she really found herself going through the emotional and physical ringer that is perimenopause. She had done me the honor of reading Robert Bly's book, Iron John and discussing it, so I returned the favor to her with this book. I found it really good and really explanatory. In the first section, Bolen goes into Sophia (a goddess alluded to in the Bible), Metis, and Hecate--three goddesses who are most easy to tie to the experiences of older women. In the book's second section, Bolen revisits Goddesses in Other Women and offers brief synopses of the main goddesses in the Greek pantheon, Artemis, Athena, Hera, Demeter, and others, while imagining the impact of the "third stage of life" on these eternally young, beautiful deities. The short, third section wasn't as strong, but in it Bolen imagines the women's circle as a vehicle for third-wave feminism. The strongest idea that I took from GIOW was this: the crone years are a third stage of life. Moving into them, for women, is as much of an emotional, physical and hormonal mess as it was when they moved from girlhood into womanhood. Yet it is something that almost every woman in every age of human history has gone through. And they archetypes used to explain these transitions for ancients are no less relevant in an age of a single, male god, as they were in ages governed by an array of female goddesses.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Stef Rozitis

    What was I thinking reading this book? It was a bit disappointing and reductive actually I felt. For all that is celebrated women and "womanliness" and had some areas of comfort, normalizing the aging process it still very much had a heteronormative outlook (hard to avoid I suppose living in a hetero-patriarchy where all the goddess traditions stem from patriarchal systems of belief). There was an "and lesbians" acknowledgement from time to time or a refusal to name the gender of the romantic "ot What was I thinking reading this book? It was a bit disappointing and reductive actually I felt. For all that is celebrated women and "womanliness" and had some areas of comfort, normalizing the aging process it still very much had a heteronormative outlook (hard to avoid I suppose living in a hetero-patriarchy where all the goddess traditions stem from patriarchal systems of belief). There was an "and lesbians" acknowledgement from time to time or a refusal to name the gender of the romantic "other" which was cute and a nice try but there was still a conception of woman through lenses such as wifehood and motherhood and those sort of sterotypes (which is quite accurate and true to the concept of any goddess worshipped in any patriarchal context ever so I guess it is fair enough). I want to write my own goddess. One who is not defined by the gender binary at all. One who is not "other" but is herself (like the judaeo Christian concept of "I am" but female) Or maybe I can stick to post-structuralist thought and leave pseudo-pagan spirituality to others. I suspect someone who isn't me might find this book liberating and empowering so please don't be put off by my rant, but for me it was not what I was looking for. I am still aging uncomfortably (I never claimed to be over 50) and angrily and without fitting in. Maybe I am doomed to stay that way

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    Would recommend reading "Goddesses in Everywoman" first to understand the premise and how the archetype plays out over the lifespan before reading "Goddesses in Older Women". The insights rang true, as do the inner conflicts described. At 47 and perimenopausal, I am ready to embrace being a juicy crone! Loved what she had to say about womens' circles and transformation. Would recommend reading "Goddesses in Everywoman" first to understand the premise and how the archetype plays out over the lifespan before reading "Goddesses in Older Women". The insights rang true, as do the inner conflicts described. At 47 and perimenopausal, I am ready to embrace being a juicy crone! Loved what she had to say about womens' circles and transformation.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Denise Larson

    Sometimes very special books come to you in unexpected ways. I picked this used book up at the Big Book Sale for Friends of the San Francisco Library. The insight I got from reading about archetypes in women over fifty was wonderful. From intellectual to spiritual to psychic to meditative wisdom Jean Shinoda Bolen beautifully defines the roles older women embrace. But the recounting of the myths of Sekhmet, a Goddess of wrath, and Bawdy Baubo, a Goddess of laughter, hit my center core. The stori Sometimes very special books come to you in unexpected ways. I picked this used book up at the Big Book Sale for Friends of the San Francisco Library. The insight I got from reading about archetypes in women over fifty was wonderful. From intellectual to spiritual to psychic to meditative wisdom Jean Shinoda Bolen beautifully defines the roles older women embrace. But the recounting of the myths of Sekhmet, a Goddess of wrath, and Bawdy Baubo, a Goddess of laughter, hit my center core. The stories were parallel to work I did in my theater group Les Nickelettes in the '70s. Strong stuff. From one "juicy crone" to other "juicy crones" - read this book!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Josephine Ensign

    Oh my goddess! I never would buy or otherwise read this book as it is over-the-top New Age-ish, but it was hanging out on a bookshelf here at a remote island cottage where I've been staying and I just had to read it while in the hot tub. I discovered that the Statue of Liberty is really Kuan Yin, the goddess of compassion. And I discovered my inner Artemis with the shadow aspect of righteous destructiveness. Useful perhaps. But I have re-shelved this book next to one by Shirley MacLaine (unread) Oh my goddess! I never would buy or otherwise read this book as it is over-the-top New Age-ish, but it was hanging out on a bookshelf here at a remote island cottage where I've been staying and I just had to read it while in the hot tub. I discovered that the Statue of Liberty is really Kuan Yin, the goddess of compassion. And I discovered my inner Artemis with the shadow aspect of righteous destructiveness. Useful perhaps. But I have re-shelved this book next to one by Shirley MacLaine (unread).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I get why this is so, but the book often addresses itself solely to Baby Boomers. As someone from a later generation coming to 50/menopause looking for guidance, many parts of the book don't seem relevant to my life experiences. I get why this is so, but the book often addresses itself solely to Baby Boomers. As someone from a later generation coming to 50/menopause looking for guidance, many parts of the book don't seem relevant to my life experiences.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kylene Jones

    I actually wasn't sure I would like this book when I first started it but once I was into it, I did really enjoy it. It was interesting reading about the different mythical goddesses and their strengths. It was actually inspiring to think about how they are in all of us to some extent. It wasn't a quick read but it was an interesting one. I definitely could relate to some of the ideas about the power of women after fifty. I am embracing my third stage of life and am going to live it to the fulle I actually wasn't sure I would like this book when I first started it but once I was into it, I did really enjoy it. It was interesting reading about the different mythical goddesses and their strengths. It was actually inspiring to think about how they are in all of us to some extent. It wasn't a quick read but it was an interesting one. I definitely could relate to some of the ideas about the power of women after fifty. I am embracing my third stage of life and am going to live it to the fullest.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    It has some interesting stuff on myths and legends from across all cultures, but really, I'm not spending much time figuring out what feminine archetype I'm currently in. There's too much mumbo-jumbo in it for my taste. It has some interesting stuff on myths and legends from across all cultures, but really, I'm not spending much time figuring out what feminine archetype I'm currently in. There's too much mumbo-jumbo in it for my taste.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Georgia

    couldn't get though it...... couldn't get though it......

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dana Jennings

    I just could not make it past the first 25 pages.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

    Jean Shinoda Bolen reprises her discussion of how the archetypes of Ancient Greek goddesses affect women in their lives past the age of 50. She adds also, that there are additional archetypes, unknown in Classical Greek Mythology, that also are important to the psyches of older women. It is helpful to have read Goddesses in Everywoman for reference, but the author offers a summary of how the goddesses tend to manifest in our personalities in the second half of this book. I didn't find this boo Jean Shinoda Bolen reprises her discussion of how the archetypes of Ancient Greek goddesses affect women in their lives past the age of 50. She adds also, that there are additional archetypes, unknown in Classical Greek Mythology, that also are important to the psyches of older women. It is helpful to have read Goddesses in Everywoman for reference, but the author offers a summary of how the goddesses tend to manifest in our personalities in the second half of this book. I didn't find this book as life-changing for me as Goddesses in Everywoman was, but I do think that this book has value in reminding women that we continue to develop and grow as we move beyond child-rearing years. Thoughtful reading for anyone looking for an alternate contemplation of the ageing process and appreciating the value of one's life experiences. It would be great to see a companion volume for men.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Narariel

    This was an interesting look at feminine archetypes. Focused on a more Jungian psychological perspective than a purely spiritual one, it included goddesses from multiple cultures. I found the historical aspects interesting though a bit unfamiliar in some cases; I felt that the author's representation of history was rather biased, or at least very focused on certain concepts. I picked up the book despite not being of the age it's geared towards in hopes of finding something to connect with. But i This was an interesting look at feminine archetypes. Focused on a more Jungian psychological perspective than a purely spiritual one, it included goddesses from multiple cultures. I found the historical aspects interesting though a bit unfamiliar in some cases; I felt that the author's representation of history was rather biased, or at least very focused on certain concepts. I picked up the book despite not being of the age it's geared towards in hopes of finding something to connect with. But it's definitely aimed at a particular audience and I didn't quite "fit in"... yet. I may reread it when I'm older. There did seem to be a lot of information and perspective that could be useful at a later date.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tara Neale

    As a woman approaching the half-way mark of her fifth decade and the end of over thirty years as 'mother', I looked to this book for answers...for purpose. For that elusive question...so what next? Yes, in its pages, I found those answers. I won't add spoilers because this is a book that must be interpreted through each individual's lense. What touched me might not you and vice versa. Nonetheless, if you are a woman entering those later years in your life, seeking to find meaning in the surprisi As a woman approaching the half-way mark of her fifth decade and the end of over thirty years as 'mother', I looked to this book for answers...for purpose. For that elusive question...so what next? Yes, in its pages, I found those answers. I won't add spoilers because this is a book that must be interpreted through each individual's lense. What touched me might not you and vice versa. Nonetheless, if you are a woman entering those later years in your life, seeking to find meaning in the surprisingly decades that stretch before you, then might I recommend you give this book a try... Still not convinced, then I recommend you whet your appetite with her shorter, more comical, and less intense, Crones Don't Whine.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lou

    This volume was drier in content than I had expected. However, it still offered great insights into the archetypes that are within all women and how they are activated and reveal themselves as we move into the final third of live. Not being well-educated in mythology, I was glad to have the author explain the roles of these mythical goddesses and how they help women understand the nature of our feelings and the challenges we face to lead, create and nurture. I would recommend reading Jean Shinoda This volume was drier in content than I had expected. However, it still offered great insights into the archetypes that are within all women and how they are activated and reveal themselves as we move into the final third of live. Not being well-educated in mythology, I was glad to have the author explain the roles of these mythical goddesses and how they help women understand the nature of our feelings and the challenges we face to lead, create and nurture. I would recommend reading Jean Shinoda Bolen's first volume, Goddesses in Every Woman, before this one to enrich your experience. As a Jungian, Bolen, has a full grasp of the significance of the collective unconscious in each of us and uses dreams and symbols to help us navigate our way.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Geri Degruy

    This book is about archetypes of older women, of "juicy crones." I found it to be both inspiring and empowering. Our culture tends to discount older women and women buy into that to some extent. This book is a reminder of the amazing power of older women who have gained wisdom and experience to stand clearly and strongly in themselves and reach out to others in healthy healing ways. This book is about archetypes of older women, of "juicy crones." I found it to be both inspiring and empowering. Our culture tends to discount older women and women buy into that to some extent. This book is a reminder of the amazing power of older women who have gained wisdom and experience to stand clearly and strongly in themselves and reach out to others in healthy healing ways.

  18. 4 out of 5

    M.J. Greenwood

    Bolen is a psychiatrist who writes in an easily accessibly manner, friendly, informative, fun. I read this as a way of helping me with characters for my novel-writing. It's also fun to read it you want to check out which Goddess archetypes are operating in women you meet. Bolen is a psychiatrist who writes in an easily accessibly manner, friendly, informative, fun. I read this as a way of helping me with characters for my novel-writing. It's also fun to read it you want to check out which Goddess archetypes are operating in women you meet.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Not my usual thing. Not awful. As long as you can keep the mindset that the concepts are descriptive, and not prescriptive, it's pretty interesting. Minimal woo-woo. Not my usual thing. Not awful. As long as you can keep the mindset that the concepts are descriptive, and not prescriptive, it's pretty interesting. Minimal woo-woo.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    A fascinating look at human archetypes through the lens of Greek, Roman, and other Goddesses. A useful tool for self-exploration. Enjoyable to read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Annalisa Colbert

    A very helpful book for any woman struggling with how to psychospiritually navigate perimenopause/menopause.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Too much mythology

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katja

    Read this for bookgroup, enjoyed more than I thought I would.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. So much to think about, and I am recommending it to the new wise women circle that I have just formed with friends.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Hammond

    It was OK. Kinda jumped around and flipped back and forth on the chapters but eventually read the whole thing. I like the whole female archetype idea so found it mostly interesting.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Helynne

    Jean Shinoda Bolen is a scholar of the sacred feminine or the traditions of goddesses in ancient religion. This is a fascinating and enlightening study of how sacred feminine figures virtually all disappeared from religions centuries ago. Why? Because certain dominant--and patriarchal-- societies of the day demanded that all figures of deity become male. Bolen quotes Merlin Stone in When God was a Woman: "Why is it continually inferred that the age of 'pagan religions,' the time of worship of f Jean Shinoda Bolen is a scholar of the sacred feminine or the traditions of goddesses in ancient religion. This is a fascinating and enlightening study of how sacred feminine figures virtually all disappeared from religions centuries ago. Why? Because certain dominant--and patriarchal-- societies of the day demanded that all figures of deity become male. Bolen quotes Merlin Stone in When God was a Woman: "Why is it continually inferred that the age of 'pagan religions,' the time of worship of female deities (if mentioned at all) was dark and chaotic, mysterious and evil without the light of order and reason that supposedly accompanied the later male religions, when it has been archelogically confirmed that the earliest law, government, medicine, agriculture, architecture, metallurgy, wheeled vehicles, ceramics, textiles and written language were intially developed in societies that worshipped the Goddess?" (14-15). What a powerful question! Bolen notes that from Crete to Celtic Ireland, goddess worship was universal until the invasion of Indo-European peoples from the north and east who were patrifocal. The result was that "goddesses were swallowed by male gods" from about 4300-2800 B.C. Bolen discusses the invasion of Canaan by the Israelties in 1200 B.C., when Yahweh's prophets were determined to eliminate the goddess Asherah and her "sacred grove of trees." One of the 10 commandments, "Thou shalt have no other god before me," (Exodus 20:2-3) indicates Yahweh's refusal to tolerate the mention of a goddess. Bolen also mentions the goddess Sophia, a sacred deity of the Old Testament, who must be disguised as an abstraction--Wisdom (See Proverbs, Chapter 8). "In monolithic society, Sophia was problematic. The solution has been to deny the existence of feminine divinity and consider references to her a poetic expression" (37). Another interesting ancient deity is Hecate, goddess of the crossroads, who stands before a person at a figurative fork in his/her road. Hecate can see the person's past, as well as the results of taking either road, and can guide the person to the best path. People who pay attention to dreams, synchronicities, and their stores of past experiences will feel the guidance of Hecate. Bolen's subsequent chapters discuss other goddesses from the ancient Hebrew, Hopi, Chinese, Greek and many other cultures, and how these goddesses traditionally have offered inspiration and compassion. This book is so interesting and so enlightening, and such a testament to all we have missed since the advent of male-dominated societies and religions!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Leila Mota

    Women are not respected. Some could say that things have changed since Middle Age, or that there are differences between countries more or less developed. It's true. But when we watch statistics that show growing violence toward women, domestic or not, differences in the working places, attacks agains women's civil rights, then we can say that it's happening right in the middle of developed countries. Let's not talk about slavery and torture of women and little girls, because it's something that Women are not respected. Some could say that things have changed since Middle Age, or that there are differences between countries more or less developed. It's true. But when we watch statistics that show growing violence toward women, domestic or not, differences in the working places, attacks agains women's civil rights, then we can say that it's happening right in the middle of developed countries. Let's not talk about slavery and torture of women and little girls, because it's something that's been happening for a long time and growing. Ever since men decided to abolish matriarchy and started to fear the power of the goddesses, that's when things started to go wrong. "Olympian gods raped mortal women and goddesses in a mythology in which obsessive or possessive sexual passion rather than compassion was emphasized." And the god of jews, muslims and christians is a god that goes after blood, a god that sheltered prejudice against women, and still does. Going back through feminine religious archetypes to try to better understand our old selves is enlightining. What I don't know is if it will change anything in a world where men are getting more aggressive toward women.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    I was amazed at this book. It was about the menopausal years, but filled with advice about growing older with grace and wisdom. Jean Shinoda Bolen is a Jungian anaylist, and gave many tips for what she called "the third act" of life for women, now that their childbearing years and family duties have diminished, leaving them more time to pursue interests. She describes lives of many women we will recognize, and some that are ourselves. I think she is a wonderful author, and highly recommend this I was amazed at this book. It was about the menopausal years, but filled with advice about growing older with grace and wisdom. Jean Shinoda Bolen is a Jungian anaylist, and gave many tips for what she called "the third act" of life for women, now that their childbearing years and family duties have diminished, leaving them more time to pursue interests. She describes lives of many women we will recognize, and some that are ourselves. I think she is a wonderful author, and highly recommend this book! Ms. Bolen offers different ideas for different types of women who may want to find new interests. She understands the difficulties of growing older and having friends who may have problems about this that you do not have, who act old and depressed, when you want to move forward to experience new things. I look forward to "my next act" and hope to surround myself with others who feel the same way!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    The truth of the matter is that I am an old woman: 58 this past December. I am having difficulty accepting this state of affairs. Once, when I was a young woman, I read the Goddesses in Every Woman. In fact, I took an 8 week workshop with several other women led by a Jungian Psychologist. It really helped me find and celebrate my spiritual me, my place in the grand scheme of things. At the moment, I can't find my place. Where do I fit? What has become of me? So I have decided to return to a study The truth of the matter is that I am an old woman: 58 this past December. I am having difficulty accepting this state of affairs. Once, when I was a young woman, I read the Goddesses in Every Woman. In fact, I took an 8 week workshop with several other women led by a Jungian Psychologist. It really helped me find and celebrate my spiritual me, my place in the grand scheme of things. At the moment, I can't find my place. Where do I fit? What has become of me? So I have decided to return to a study of the archetypes. I will let you know what I think at the end, but I should warn you. I am a huge fan of Jean Shinoda Bolen.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bev Siddons

    For those of us post-50, this book is a reminder that with age comes wisdom--collective wisdom from the pre-patriarchal goddesses. Our country needs to think about honoring the aged, male or female, not just worshipping the young. People gain wisdom through their experiences, and I think women are particularly prone to this as we tend to be more introspective. Men I know think about and fear mortality while women seek ways to give back to society, to become more creative, to live life to its ful For those of us post-50, this book is a reminder that with age comes wisdom--collective wisdom from the pre-patriarchal goddesses. Our country needs to think about honoring the aged, male or female, not just worshipping the young. People gain wisdom through their experiences, and I think women are particularly prone to this as we tend to be more introspective. Men I know think about and fear mortality while women seek ways to give back to society, to become more creative, to live life to its fullest. (Please. I know this is a generalization.) Bolen raises awareness of and encourages us to honor our feminine wisdom. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and I think I'll go write some poetry.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...