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Managing the Dragon: How I'm Building a Billion-Dollar Business in China

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The first book by a westerner who built a company in China from scratch The emergence of China as a world economic power is one of the biggest stories of our time. Every business that intends to be an important part of the fast-changing global economy needs to know how to play the game in China. Who better to be your guide than Jack Perkowski, the pioneer who went to China The first book by a westerner who built a company in China from scratch The emergence of China as a world economic power is one of the biggest stories of our time. Every business that intends to be an important part of the fast-changing global economy needs to know how to play the game in China. Who better to be your guide than Jack Perkowski, the pioneer who went to China in the early 1990s. Equipped with just a concept, he built a company step-by-step from the ground up-ASIMCO Technologies-that became a major player in China's fast-growing automotive business. Perkowski's story is as rich, involving, and improbable as those of nineteenth-century titans such as Rockefeller and Carnegie or of twentieth-century ones like Michael Dell and Bill Gates, but with one obvious difference: They and others built their companies when America was emerging or dominant. Perkowski built his at the dawn of the Chinese century. Perkowski's insights about the challenges and potential of western involvement in today's great Chinese expansion-gained on the ground in China itself over the past fifteen years-are of inestimable value and relevance to us all. For instance: - The good news about China: Everything is possible. The bad news: Nothing is easy. - To build a business in China, you must develop a local management team-avoiding both former bureaucrats of the state-run enterprises and the country's new breed of wildcat entrepreneurs. - You must learn the real reason why China is able to produce goods so cheaply. - Forget your notions about the Chinese economy being rigidly controlled by Beijing-it is, in fact, highly decentralized and locally driven. As the Chinese say, "The mountains are high and the emperor is far away." Perkowski tells his story with clarity, lots of humor, and a gripping sense of adventure. He takes us along on his own version of the Long March, when he visited two factories a day for nine months, hitting every province, going through endless rounds of dinners and the inevitable drinking games, and eating what seemed like every part of every animal. He vividly describes what it's like to be a westerner living and working in China and the dramatic transformation he's seen in the country, from a place left behind by the modern world to a place where a new world is being born. Filled with hard-nosed lessons for anyone with ambitions of breaking into the Chinese market, and a rich source of practical wisdom about the realities of China today, "Managing the Dragon" answers the questions people ask Perkowski most often about his unique experience, as well as those they never think of asking-but should.


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The first book by a westerner who built a company in China from scratch The emergence of China as a world economic power is one of the biggest stories of our time. Every business that intends to be an important part of the fast-changing global economy needs to know how to play the game in China. Who better to be your guide than Jack Perkowski, the pioneer who went to China The first book by a westerner who built a company in China from scratch The emergence of China as a world economic power is one of the biggest stories of our time. Every business that intends to be an important part of the fast-changing global economy needs to know how to play the game in China. Who better to be your guide than Jack Perkowski, the pioneer who went to China in the early 1990s. Equipped with just a concept, he built a company step-by-step from the ground up-ASIMCO Technologies-that became a major player in China's fast-growing automotive business. Perkowski's story is as rich, involving, and improbable as those of nineteenth-century titans such as Rockefeller and Carnegie or of twentieth-century ones like Michael Dell and Bill Gates, but with one obvious difference: They and others built their companies when America was emerging or dominant. Perkowski built his at the dawn of the Chinese century. Perkowski's insights about the challenges and potential of western involvement in today's great Chinese expansion-gained on the ground in China itself over the past fifteen years-are of inestimable value and relevance to us all. For instance: - The good news about China: Everything is possible. The bad news: Nothing is easy. - To build a business in China, you must develop a local management team-avoiding both former bureaucrats of the state-run enterprises and the country's new breed of wildcat entrepreneurs. - You must learn the real reason why China is able to produce goods so cheaply. - Forget your notions about the Chinese economy being rigidly controlled by Beijing-it is, in fact, highly decentralized and locally driven. As the Chinese say, "The mountains are high and the emperor is far away." Perkowski tells his story with clarity, lots of humor, and a gripping sense of adventure. He takes us along on his own version of the Long March, when he visited two factories a day for nine months, hitting every province, going through endless rounds of dinners and the inevitable drinking games, and eating what seemed like every part of every animal. He vividly describes what it's like to be a westerner living and working in China and the dramatic transformation he's seen in the country, from a place left behind by the modern world to a place where a new world is being born. Filled with hard-nosed lessons for anyone with ambitions of breaking into the Chinese market, and a rich source of practical wisdom about the realities of China today, "Managing the Dragon" answers the questions people ask Perkowski most often about his unique experience, as well as those they never think of asking-but should.

30 review for Managing the Dragon: How I'm Building a Billion-Dollar Business in China

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This book provides a great story of the trials and tribulations of doing business in China. I felt like it was not only a book about doing business in China, but a great book on business issues overall. An excellent read!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mauro Cunha

    Excellent. Timely, insightful and well written

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

    I am rereading this at the same time I reread Mr. China (will re-update when I have finished). Perkowski makes some very valid points in his book. Unfortunately, I cannot get over how he seems to gloss over many significant issues he faced in his first decade. I am a fan of neither overly optimistic nor overly pessimistic books on China. The best books show the overall experiences of the writer, which will be a combination of both good and bad. Managing the Dragon does not say China is all peach I am rereading this at the same time I reread Mr. China (will re-update when I have finished). Perkowski makes some very valid points in his book. Unfortunately, I cannot get over how he seems to gloss over many significant issues he faced in his first decade. I am a fan of neither overly optimistic nor overly pessimistic books on China. The best books show the overall experiences of the writer, which will be a combination of both good and bad. Managing the Dragon does not say China is all peaches and flowers, yet I felt it did not do enough to impart the rarity and hardships faced in the writer's time in China.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    A very interesting and at times quite entertaining tale of Mr. Perkowski's Great Adventure In China. The author seems to be a good sport (though not a pushover), which I'm sure had a lot to do with his success in China. I think it's universal: people do business with people they like. Really loved the stories about baijiu. Also appreciated the insights into doing business in China (which are also relevant to investing in China). I haven't yet read "Mr. China" - will be interesting to compare the t A very interesting and at times quite entertaining tale of Mr. Perkowski's Great Adventure In China. The author seems to be a good sport (though not a pushover), which I'm sure had a lot to do with his success in China. I think it's universal: people do business with people they like. Really loved the stories about baijiu. Also appreciated the insights into doing business in China (which are also relevant to investing in China). I haven't yet read "Mr. China" - will be interesting to compare the two books so that one's definitely on my to-read list.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bishop

    The author of this book was the subject of the book "Mr. China" which is one of the so-called classics in the foreign-guy-doing-business-in-China genre. Jack Perkowski's book is surprisingly well (ghost)written and entertaining, with an account of eating deer penis to boot. My full review of this book, along with an interview with Jack, will appear in the April edition of the China Economic Review. I'll probably mention the deer penis thing in the review. How can you not? The author of this book was the subject of the book "Mr. China" which is one of the so-called classics in the foreign-guy-doing-business-in-China genre. Jack Perkowski's book is surprisingly well (ghost)written and entertaining, with an account of eating deer penis to boot. My full review of this book, along with an interview with Jack, will appear in the April edition of the China Economic Review. I'll probably mention the deer penis thing in the review. How can you not?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rajesh

    This book clearly elaborates the difficulties one might face while starting up a business in China. It gives us an insight about the Chinese culture and traditions. An awesome read for a management student!!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bpatoosk

    This book was exceptional. It's incredibly engaging and super-informative, a must for any one interested in the Chinese business world. I checked it out of the library and 15 pages in was wishing I had bought it. This book was exceptional. It's incredibly engaging and super-informative, a must for any one interested in the Chinese business world. I checked it out of the library and 15 pages in was wishing I had bought it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lifeng Wu

    This bOOk upgraded my view on China. Though I grew up in China in the seventies and eighties of the twentieth century , Jack has taught me a lot on the economic sense.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Josin Chin-sang

  10. 5 out of 5

    David

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  12. 4 out of 5

    Casey Hingtgen

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ken

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pier Francesco Gagliardo

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Pendleton

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bernard Teo

  18. 5 out of 5

    A T

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dov

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  21. 5 out of 5

    Badruz Nasrin

  22. 5 out of 5

    Khaother

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ross Hoffman

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alex Gover

    Excellent first hand account of the do's and don'ts of taking on China. Excellent first hand account of the do's and don'ts of taking on China.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kadota

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joel Harding

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  30. 4 out of 5

    Spenser

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