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New X-Men, Volume 4: Riot at Xavier's

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In a world where humans have made mutants the victims of horrible discrimination, Professor Xavier's School For The Gifted is a sanctuary, a safe haven for oppressed mutant youth. But the unimaginable happens when a student reinvents himself as Kid Omega and decides to take over the school. It's mutant vs. mutant...will the school ever be the same? Collecting: New X-Men (20 In a world where humans have made mutants the victims of horrible discrimination, Professor Xavier's School For The Gifted is a sanctuary, a safe haven for oppressed mutant youth. But the unimaginable happens when a student reinvents himself as Kid Omega and decides to take over the school. It's mutant vs. mutant...will the school ever be the same? Collecting: New X-Men (2001) 134-138


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In a world where humans have made mutants the victims of horrible discrimination, Professor Xavier's School For The Gifted is a sanctuary, a safe haven for oppressed mutant youth. But the unimaginable happens when a student reinvents himself as Kid Omega and decides to take over the school. It's mutant vs. mutant...will the school ever be the same? Collecting: New X-Men (20 In a world where humans have made mutants the victims of horrible discrimination, Professor Xavier's School For The Gifted is a sanctuary, a safe haven for oppressed mutant youth. But the unimaginable happens when a student reinvents himself as Kid Omega and decides to take over the school. It's mutant vs. mutant...will the school ever be the same? Collecting: New X-Men (2001) 134-138

30 review for New X-Men, Volume 4: Riot at Xavier's

  1. 5 out of 5

    ⭐Anni⭐ (Book Princess)

    3.5 stars The story again was good and thought provoking, but I didn't like the students at all. I also missed Jean, but I guess we'll see more of her soon, considering the ending of this volume... 3.5 stars The story again was good and thought provoking, but I didn't like the students at all. I also missed Jean, but I guess we'll see more of her soon, considering the ending of this volume...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dimitris Papastergiou

    Fun times at Xavier's High! Fun times at Xavier's High!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    A bunch of snotty students decide to overthrow the teachers, while an almost equally snotty group of students try to learn to work together and the heroes, the actual X-men are pretty ineffectual and too mired in their own personal problems to feel much like heroes. A huge new cast has been introduced and 90% of them are teenagers, written by someone who thinks all teenagers are jerks, but speak in really clever bits of dialogue. and to hurt the story further, we finally find what Scott and Emma h A bunch of snotty students decide to overthrow the teachers, while an almost equally snotty group of students try to learn to work together and the heroes, the actual X-men are pretty ineffectual and too mired in their own personal problems to feel much like heroes. A huge new cast has been introduced and 90% of them are teenagers, written by someone who thinks all teenagers are jerks, but speak in really clever bits of dialogue. and to hurt the story further, we finally find what Scott and Emma have been up to and it's incredibly stupid and out of character. Grant had some good ideas, but is trying too hard and forcing characters to fit his story, rather than the other way around, like it should be. A really over rated run of a classic series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Miguel

    YES! I liked it a lot! This was the first volume of the serie you didn't need to know anything about x-men history! So for me its something amazing! Its a complete and unique story. The only thing i didn't like is the cover with jean grey... (has nothing to do with the plot). Really really exciting to read vol 5!! Fav characters: Xorn and Emma Frost!!!! YES! I liked it a lot! This was the first volume of the serie you didn't need to know anything about x-men history! So for me its something amazing! Its a complete and unique story. The only thing i didn't like is the cover with jean grey... (has nothing to do with the plot). Really really exciting to read vol 5!! Fav characters: Xorn and Emma Frost!!!!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jay DeMoir

    So I was about 35 pages into this when I realized it was getting too weird too fast. So I had to hit the brakes.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Get X Serious

    It seems as if Jason Aaron modeled his Wolverine and the X-Men run after this particular collection. Which can only be a good thing. I love one, so why wouldn't I love the other? I'm pretty interested in figuring out how exactly Quentin Quire can go from leading a Magneto-esque riot, kidnapping Professor X, inadvertently killing two students, and attempting to kill others, to being the whacky, lovable bad boy in Wolverine and the X-men. (view spoiler)[Meanwhile, his co-conspirators end up in some It seems as if Jason Aaron modeled his Wolverine and the X-Men run after this particular collection. Which can only be a good thing. I love one, so why wouldn't I love the other? I'm pretty interested in figuring out how exactly Quentin Quire can go from leading a Magneto-esque riot, kidnapping Professor X, inadvertently killing two students, and attempting to kill others, to being the whacky, lovable bad boy in Wolverine and the X-men. (view spoiler)[Meanwhile, his co-conspirators end up in some sort of prison... That doesn't really make any sense, but okay. (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[Also of note, there were 5 Stepford Cuckoos, now there's 4, but in the most recent X-Men run there's only 3... Still waiting to who dies next and how. (hide spoiler)] Seriously though, how many students gotta die before this school gets shut down?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Riot at Xavier's (#134-138). In his second year, Morrison tried to expand the scope of the X-Men. His work with the X-Corps in the previous arc wasn't entirely successful, because they were just too scattered, but his depiction here of the new students at Xavier's is magnificent. That's in large part thanks to Quintin Quire, one of the best characters to originate in the New X-Men, who first appears here as a young rebel without a cause. But, the Specials, the Cuckoos, and Quintin's gang all get Riot at Xavier's (#134-138). In his second year, Morrison tried to expand the scope of the X-Men. His work with the X-Corps in the previous arc wasn't entirely successful, because they were just too scattered, but his depiction here of the new students at Xavier's is magnificent. That's in large part thanks to Quintin Quire, one of the best characters to originate in the New X-Men, who first appears here as a young rebel without a cause. But, the Specials, the Cuckoos, and Quintin's gang all get great attention here, any many would recur for years afterward (though the Cuckoos and Glob Herman are the only other two to make a real impact). Beyond all that, this is a great story about the conservative old fighting the rebellious young that feels like it really goes to the core of what the X-Men are about [5/5].

  8. 4 out of 5

    M

    Civil unrest is brewing amongst the Xavier Institute student body. Led by Omega-level mutant - and social hothead - Quentin Quire, a gang of students puts their displeasure into action. The aptly titled riot is actually fairly short, showcasing when the X-Men are the teachers and the kids still need discipline. New addition Xorn begins to make the rounds, and the wheels start turning towards something bigger.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is what happens when tens grow up with genius intellects and superpowers. They get shirty. Plus also, Cyclops and Emma Frost start getting it on psychically, which considering Jean Grey's on the edge of going Phoenix is playing with fire - literally. Awesome story. And it made Xavier cry. Good. This is what happens when tens grow up with genius intellects and superpowers. They get shirty. Plus also, Cyclops and Emma Frost start getting it on psychically, which considering Jean Grey's on the edge of going Phoenix is playing with fire - literally. Awesome story. And it made Xavier cry. Good.

  10. 4 out of 5

    C.

    Quitely's back, so the art rocks, and the story is dark and compelling. Xavier's dream is often questioned, but this take on rebellious doubt is very well done, serious, yet with Morrison's trade-mark sardonic tone. Quitely's back, so the art rocks, and the story is dark and compelling. Xavier's dream is often questioned, but this take on rebellious doubt is very well done, serious, yet with Morrison's trade-mark sardonic tone.

  11. 5 out of 5

    AJ Kallas

    Now THIS is X-Men. Relationships. Action. Drama. I also love the dialectic between Quinten Quire's New X-Men and Xorn's class of "Losers". These are all children. They might be rude and entitled, but they are still just children. And the implicit impact of Xorn's kindness and protection (even if a little negligent) goes in stark contrast to Quinten being told he was adopted. It's subtle and not even a major point of this volume. But that speaks to Morrison doing a great job of writing. (I might Now THIS is X-Men. Relationships. Action. Drama. I also love the dialectic between Quinten Quire's New X-Men and Xorn's class of "Losers". These are all children. They might be rude and entitled, but they are still just children. And the implicit impact of Xorn's kindness and protection (even if a little negligent) goes in stark contrast to Quinten being told he was adopted. It's subtle and not even a major point of this volume. But that speaks to Morrison doing a great job of writing. (I might have sounded harsh in the previous volumes, but I really didn't like them, especially with how much I'm enjoying his X-Men moving forward).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Christopher (Donut)

    Damn near perfect. I think I read it too fast, but it will be a pleasure to re-read when the time comes.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I don't understand all the positive reviews. I mean, at least the art is better than the previous volume, but nearly every character is unlikable. Especially Quentin and his X-brats. Teenagers throwing tantrums because the world isn't fair that only make the world worse -- my faaaaaaaaaaaavorite. There's still this weird thing going on where Beast is telling the world he's gay while he's not, which feels a bit icky. Also, Wolverine has a soul patch. Why. What do I like? Xorn. He's interesting and I don't understand all the positive reviews. I mean, at least the art is better than the previous volume, but nearly every character is unlikable. Especially Quentin and his X-brats. Teenagers throwing tantrums because the world isn't fair that only make the world worse -- my faaaaaaaaaaaavorite. There's still this weird thing going on where Beast is telling the world he's gay while he's not, which feels a bit icky. Also, Wolverine has a soul patch. Why. What do I like? Xorn. He's interesting and seems like he has a soul. I like when the X-brats get sassed back. Some of the art I really like, and the rest is fine. Overall, though, I didn't really enjoy this and don't recommend.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Quitely's back, and I can get behind revolutionary punk rock mutants on drugs. Quitely's back, and I can get behind revolutionary punk rock mutants on drugs.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Xavier

    quentin quire is annoying as fuck

  16. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    Grant Morrison's first few storyarcs as an X-Men writer helped reinvigorate a title which had grown completely stale under the hands of Scott Lobdell and Fabien Nicieza. His new characters were fascinating, his focus on secondary mutations, and the character growth of Emma Frost seemed to be going somewhere important. This collection is fine. I like the idea of Quentin Quire starting a revolution with the next generation of mutants. I still love Frank Quitely's art, as well as Keron Grant's. I re Grant Morrison's first few storyarcs as an X-Men writer helped reinvigorate a title which had grown completely stale under the hands of Scott Lobdell and Fabien Nicieza. His new characters were fascinating, his focus on secondary mutations, and the character growth of Emma Frost seemed to be going somewhere important. This collection is fine. I like the idea of Quentin Quire starting a revolution with the next generation of mutants. I still love Frank Quitely's art, as well as Keron Grant's. I read these volumes separately, as opposed to in New X-Men by Grant Morrison: Ultimate Collection, Book 2 because I liked separating the Riot At Xavier's and Assault On Weapon Plus storyline from New X-Men, Volume 3: New Worlds because they have a different focus and feel. The downside is that this storyarc really does blend right into New X-Men, Volume 5: Assault on Weapon Plus, to the point where separating them seems arbitrary. I recommend this for anyone who was enjoying the Morrison run, and people curious about Quentin Quire's journey.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Definitely the highlight of Morrison’s run on New X-Men for me. After a scattershot third volume which occasionally felt like a collection of one-shots instead of a unified arc, “Riot at Xavier’s” is wonderfully cohesive. I especially love how the B-story (featuring Xorn and the Special Class) comments on and eventually folds into the main action of the A-story. The focus on younger students (Beak, Angel, the Stepford Cuckoos, Basilisk, Glob Herman, etc.) is such a welcome shot in the arm; Morri Definitely the highlight of Morrison’s run on New X-Men for me. After a scattershot third volume which occasionally felt like a collection of one-shots instead of a unified arc, “Riot at Xavier’s” is wonderfully cohesive. I especially love how the B-story (featuring Xorn and the Special Class) comments on and eventually folds into the main action of the A-story. The focus on younger students (Beak, Angel, the Stepford Cuckoos, Basilisk, Glob Herman, etc.) is such a welcome shot in the arm; Morrison does a great job capturing subtle notes of self-consciousness and insecurity which accompany developing self-identity during adolescence. His characterization of Quentin Quire as a scared, precocious teen reinventing himself after a newfound disillusionment with authority feels more vital and fresh than anything else in New X-Men...the X-Men will always be fundamentally tied with otherness of adolescence to me, and the umpteenth rehash of recycled conflicts with middle-aged stalwarts like Scott, Jean, and Logan frequently feel disconnected from that. “Riot at Xavier’s” taps into all kinds of adolescent traumas in real, genuine ways, and that’s a big part of why it’ll always be a personal favorite.

  18. 4 out of 5

    William Johnson

    Things "Kick" (haha, you'll get it if you read it) back into gear with this impressive story-arc where the stakes are small but personal. Arcs covered: Kid Omega (#134): A famous mutant designer named Jumbo Carnation is presumed murdered in the streets of Mutant Town in NYC by humans. At Xavier's, a number of students, including Omega level telepath Quentin Quire, begin to question the ideals of the school. Riot at Xavier's (#135-#138): Quentin Quire forms a protest group that slowly escalates fro Things "Kick" (haha, you'll get it if you read it) back into gear with this impressive story-arc where the stakes are small but personal. Arcs covered: Kid Omega (#134): A famous mutant designer named Jumbo Carnation is presumed murdered in the streets of Mutant Town in NYC by humans. At Xavier's, a number of students, including Omega level telepath Quentin Quire, begin to question the ideals of the school. Riot at Xavier's (#135-#138): Quentin Quire forms a protest group that slowly escalates from peaceful protests (like adopting provocative clothing and haircuts, getting matching tattoos) to vigilante justice and, eventually, a revolution at Xavier's, thanks in part to a new drug going around called Kick. Meanwhile, Xorn has a special class of misfits he takes care of (including Beak and Angel) that he takes camping, the U-Men return, Xavier's prepares for "Open Day", in which human students and families are welcome, and Emma turns up the heat on her seduction of Cyclops.

  19. 4 out of 5

    C

    Probably my favorite volume of Morrison's run so far. It still feels a little unsettling, like I missed a few years of storyline, but the story was well-written and interesting. Beast's recent weirdness is dialed back a bit and somewhat explained so that was good. I still maintain that this would be a much better book if it was not the X-men. Morrison is a heck of a writer but he doesn't seem to want to stick with the existing personalities of the main characters. I think that is why I enjoyed t Probably my favorite volume of Morrison's run so far. It still feels a little unsettling, like I missed a few years of storyline, but the story was well-written and interesting. Beast's recent weirdness is dialed back a bit and somewhat explained so that was good. I still maintain that this would be a much better book if it was not the X-men. Morrison is a heck of a writer but he doesn't seem to want to stick with the existing personalities of the main characters. I think that is why I enjoyed this story more than the earlier volumes as it spent the most time with characters that didn't have as much history.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joey

    This series started out as a modern take on The X-men, and the first few volumes were as compelling as any of Grant Morrison's works. Xorn and Fantomex's backstory, as well as Emma Frost and Jean Grey taking on Cassandra Nova were essential reads. All of that head of steam came to a grinding halt with this volume though. The uprising at Xavier's school came across as contrived. The students' squabbles may be indictative of classic X-men themes to some, but I found it difficult to power through s This series started out as a modern take on The X-men, and the first few volumes were as compelling as any of Grant Morrison's works. Xorn and Fantomex's backstory, as well as Emma Frost and Jean Grey taking on Cassandra Nova were essential reads. All of that head of steam came to a grinding halt with this volume though. The uprising at Xavier's school came across as contrived. The students' squabbles may be indictative of classic X-men themes to some, but I found it difficult to power through such a contextually menial disturbance when compared to all the previous conflicts enacted.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Judith Groen

    I liked this story okay, the riot thing was interesting and they made some good points. But I keep finding this run lackluster. People on the internet go all crazy about it, as if it's the best thing ever written. It's not bad, sure. But I am not amazed by it, like some other comics actually did. Also the art is still terrible. It was better than the previous, yes... But it still wasn't great. I will continue this series, as I am already half way through, but I don't think I will ever revisit it I liked this story okay, the riot thing was interesting and they made some good points. But I keep finding this run lackluster. People on the internet go all crazy about it, as if it's the best thing ever written. It's not bad, sure. But I am not amazed by it, like some other comics actually did. Also the art is still terrible. It was better than the previous, yes... But it still wasn't great. I will continue this series, as I am already half way through, but I don't think I will ever revisit it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Theo Kallström

    Wow, what a fast-paced issue! It's all action and shenanigans, with drug issues, rebellion and feelings of loneliness taking center stage. The opening issus is a bit of a filler one, but the rest is pure gold. And the art style is beautiful and stays consistent all the way through. I am really starting to like Xorn, while the story focuses on the wrong new students (Beak is bland). But overall, the most interesting and consistent run of the New X-Men up to this point. Wow, what a fast-paced issue! It's all action and shenanigans, with drug issues, rebellion and feelings of loneliness taking center stage. The opening issus is a bit of a filler one, but the rest is pure gold. And the art style is beautiful and stays consistent all the way through. I am really starting to like Xorn, while the story focuses on the wrong new students (Beak is bland). But overall, the most interesting and consistent run of the New X-Men up to this point.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Clint

    Vol4 focuses on an interesting ideological threat within the mutant student body and growing complication within the Cyclops/Jean Grey/Emma Frost dynamic; I really enjoyed the switch to internal drama over external villains, though I hope to see Fantomex again next volume. Frank Quitely doing the art on nearly all of these issues is a nice return, too.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Henry Blackwood

    I don’t really have superlatives for how good this run is right now. Morrison’s putting his hands deep into what I’ve always seen as the most interesting topics in X-Men. The Scott/Emma/Jean love triangle is a SO SPICY too. I can’t get enough.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    Loving the "losers" gang and the new "bad guy". Great stuff. Loving the "losers" gang and the new "bad guy". Great stuff.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Will Cooper

    Really great look at what happens when a mutant in the school starts becoming anti-human.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Don Flynn

    Art was more consistent in this volume. As a team, it's hard to beat Morrison and Quitely. Art was more consistent in this volume. As a team, it's hard to beat Morrison and Quitely.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Soriano

    what the fuck is this shit

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Fischer

    I read these issue by issue rather than the combined volume. Excellent.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mersini

    I'm really enjoying this series. It keeps doing some interesting things. This time, it has one student who challenges Charles Xavier's doctrine, and poses the question "what if Magneto was right?" So sure, it might not be the most original story that anyone has ever concocted for the X-Men universe, especially considering that Magneto keeps coming back, but when it takes a bunch of kids who start to branch out by themselves, and who don't consider Xavier's School for the Gifted and Talented as t I'm really enjoying this series. It keeps doing some interesting things. This time, it has one student who challenges Charles Xavier's doctrine, and poses the question "what if Magneto was right?" So sure, it might not be the most original story that anyone has ever concocted for the X-Men universe, especially considering that Magneto keeps coming back, but when it takes a bunch of kids who start to branch out by themselves, and who don't consider Xavier's School for the Gifted and Talented as the only options they have for themselves, it starts to get interesting. So take some mutant teenagers, who are already going through their own issues because they're teenagers, and then chuck some drugs that amplify their powers into the mix, and you get this book. We have dangerous kids who feel like gods running around who think their ultimate purpose in life is to kill humans and quicken the evolutionary cataclysm that is the take over of homo superior. And while I don't think they went about things the right way, I do think it raises the interesting question of what happens to the kids who don't want to grow up to be X-Men. Would the X-Men let them go to forge their own way in life, or would they force them to stay among them, claiming the threat of Homo sapiens to mutants? I do hope it's a question that comes up again, albeit handled somewhat differently, and with a bunch of kids who aren't so keen to kill everyone they meet. Having said that, there are a few things I really don't care about, or that I find incredibly irritating. First, the Emma-Scott-Jean triangle is infuriating. I understand that the point is that Scott and Jean's relationship is having some trouble, but surely there are better ways of handling it. Plus, Emma trying to force Scott into an affair by claiming that it's telepathic nature means it's not really cheating doesn't make much sense, especially considering that Jean is an Omega class mutant and telepath herself. The mind isn't a goddamn safe space to hide your secrets. It's so dumb, and the logic of it isn't really logic. On top of that, this volume continues the thing that the previous one started, with Beast claiming he's gay, even though he's not. Considering that X-Men has for so long been seen as a metaphor for various minority groups, gay people among them, it seems disrespectful and also heavy handed for Morrison to have this plot point exist. It's infuriating the reasons Beast gives for not admitting to the media that he really isn't gay, which basically boils down to "why can't I be a spokesperson for gay people?". I really hope this plot goes really badly for him, and that it doesn't continue to be incredibly disrespectful. Other than that, it's not so bad.

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