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SilverFin: The Graphic Novel

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There’s something in the water at Loch Silverfin. Something deadly. Something that must be kept secret… It’s James Bond’s first day at Elon and already he’s made an enemy. An enemy who will follow him from the school playing fields to the remote shores of Loch Silverfin, where a terrifying new breed of warfare threatens to unleash destruction on the world. Before the name be There’s something in the water at Loch Silverfin. Something deadly. Something that must be kept secret… It’s James Bond’s first day at Elon and already he’s made an enemy. An enemy who will follow him from the school playing fields to the remote shores of Loch Silverfin, where a terrifying new breed of warfare threatens to unleash destruction on the world. Before the name became a legend. Before the boy became the man. See Young Bond in action for the very first time. The legend begins with SilverFin.


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There’s something in the water at Loch Silverfin. Something deadly. Something that must be kept secret… It’s James Bond’s first day at Elon and already he’s made an enemy. An enemy who will follow him from the school playing fields to the remote shores of Loch Silverfin, where a terrifying new breed of warfare threatens to unleash destruction on the world. Before the name be There’s something in the water at Loch Silverfin. Something deadly. Something that must be kept secret… It’s James Bond’s first day at Elon and already he’s made an enemy. An enemy who will follow him from the school playing fields to the remote shores of Loch Silverfin, where a terrifying new breed of warfare threatens to unleash destruction on the world. Before the name became a legend. Before the boy became the man. See Young Bond in action for the very first time. The legend begins with SilverFin.

30 review for SilverFin: The Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alice (Married To Books)

    This is a book series that I wanted to read in High School, but sadly never got round to it. The story of a young James Bond! Silverfin is about Bond starting at Eton and almost straight away falling into the path of an enemy. With his Aunt and Uncle living in Scotland, Bond uncovers some dark secrets that could put his life in danger. This was an easy, quick read and something that could easily be approachable for a fast-fix. But for me, it did lack development with characters and the pacing at This is a book series that I wanted to read in High School, but sadly never got round to it. The story of a young James Bond! Silverfin is about Bond starting at Eton and almost straight away falling into the path of an enemy. With his Aunt and Uncle living in Scotland, Bond uncovers some dark secrets that could put his life in danger. This was an easy, quick read and something that could easily be approachable for a fast-fix. But for me, it did lack development with characters and the pacing at times to be a little too fast. I did like the illustrations throughout and was generally spooked towards the end.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Charlie Higson got the less than envious task of writing down the adventures of a young James Bond between the two Big wars. In five books he did a convincing job and we always expected this writer to continue writing the tales of Bond during WWII leading up to the donning of the 007 cape. So far that has not happened and Steve Cole who wrote some Doctor Who books currently writes the current Young Bond series, which I have yet to read, might perhaps never. There is something said for the argume Charlie Higson got the less than envious task of writing down the adventures of a young James Bond between the two Big wars. In five books he did a convincing job and we always expected this writer to continue writing the tales of Bond during WWII leading up to the donning of the 007 cape. So far that has not happened and Steve Cole who wrote some Doctor Who books currently writes the current Young Bond series, which I have yet to read, might perhaps never. There is something said for the argument that James Bond 007 was never an extraordinary person but he happened to grow up to being something special for the British secret service. So these young Bond novels would be somehow be a betrayal to the ordinary background that created a famous secret agent. That said Higson did write some excellent books and his last one actually featured james Bond 007 in a albeit short chapter. Her we meet James Bond arriving at his school Eton after the dead of his parents. And we find him finding his footing in this school system. However he quickly makes the acquaintance of a certain Lord Hellebore and his son George who'll do anything to please his father (think Draco Malfoy & his dad). The big confrontation is a annual sporting event that is about shooting, swimming and cross country running. In which Bond excels and beats the son George Hellebore which is not taken lightly by daddy. Part two takes place in Scotland where James return to his aunt and uncle, who is terminal ill, and finds himself involved in the search for a missing boy. Which brings him on the path again of an wicked Laird Hellebore who doing dark deeds and finds himself up against the young Bond and some unexpected friends. As a graphic novel I find this an excellent drawn comic, visually stunning on occasion. The story is of course a little less complete but does catch the essence of Higsons novel. The only fault I can find in the comic and story is that James Bond is running with a certain number during the sporting event that is way to obvious and felt a bit too much. But each his/her own. For a James Bond literary fun undoubtedly a lot of fun, unless you are purist and consider everything not written by Fleming unworthy. I did enjoy the graphic novel a lot. Anyhow this year turns out to be 007 heavy in my reading, which has been some time that this happened, however the variety is nice and good.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Finally, after all these years, we get to learn what James Bond was like as a 13-year-old boy, to dive into the backstory of this walking pile of cool, delve into what makes a man like this tick, discover how his childhood shaped him into being a cold-blooded killer with a quick wit and a quicker pistol. Just kidding, this is a Nancy Drew novel where they changed her name and gender! I mean, what did I expect this to be, honestly? I guess I wanted a thrilling mystery that also shed a modicum of li Finally, after all these years, we get to learn what James Bond was like as a 13-year-old boy, to dive into the backstory of this walking pile of cool, delve into what makes a man like this tick, discover how his childhood shaped him into being a cold-blooded killer with a quick wit and a quicker pistol. Just kidding, this is a Nancy Drew novel where they changed her name and gender! I mean, what did I expect this to be, honestly? I guess I wanted a thrilling mystery that also shed a modicum of light on how our favorite British spy became the man we've known for decades, and instead I only got a (semi) thrilling mystery. There is no character development to be found here, just a simple story of Bond uncovering a wicked, dastardly plot and doing his best to stop it. I wouldn't even say the plot is particularly Bond-like. The mystery that unfolds is pretty out there, belonging more in the Hellboy universe than the Bond pantheon. There are also no real twists or surprises, no late-game reveals. It just kind of... moves forward. Now, all that said, Kev Walker's art is, as usual, outstanding, and does the heavy lifting in terms of making this book readable. He breathes life into this world, filling it with the mystery and action the writing itself is lacking. I think the art alone bumps this up to three stars for me. Overall, this was an interesting experiment that ended up feeling a little pointless. It's an obvious attempt to cash in on the Bond name without actually delivering much in the way of a Bond story. The few thrilling elements found here aren't enough to elevate this beyond that, unfortunately.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    I haven't read a lot of graphic novels, certainly no expert in artistic creativity, but I must admit that i really enjoyed this one. It made a difference reading a young James bond story rather than a manga style one with rape, murder and return from the dead vengeance. This story was about a young James enrolling in Eaton College and spending time up in Scotland, where he meets his uncle who it turns out was a spy! Shock! THe story is very easy to follow, bully at school has a evil dad, with a s I haven't read a lot of graphic novels, certainly no expert in artistic creativity, but I must admit that i really enjoyed this one. It made a difference reading a young James bond story rather than a manga style one with rape, murder and return from the dead vengeance. This story was about a young James enrolling in Eaton College and spending time up in Scotland, where he meets his uncle who it turns out was a spy! Shock! THe story is very easy to follow, bully at school has a evil dad, with a slightly more evil mad scientist and a nefarious plot to rule the world. Bond arrives, gets the girl and saves the world but doesn't have a martini, shaken but not stirred. The graphics in this was very good, I was impressed and immediately into the book. I found the emotion shown in a lot of the drawings to be very real and certainly added to the story. I am going to look out for more of this type of genre because it makes for nice relaxing change when wanting to read but not being mentally capable of picking up Erikson, Hamilton or Reynolds at night :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Belyea

    James Bond has begun his life at Eton, but quickly finds himself at odds with not only another student, but with a dangerous force seeking to change the world, leading him on an adventure riddled with deadly twists, all surrounding the mysterious Loch Silverfin. Kev Walker brings young Bond to life with beautiful illustrations that are fast-paced and unforgettable. Will James be able to figure out the secrets of Silverfin before the secrets can nab him?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karen Henspeter

    o Your full name: Karen Henspeter o APA citation: Higgson, H. & Walker, K. (2008). Silverfin: A James Bond adventure. New York, NY: Hyperion Books. o Genre: Adventure o Format: Graphic novel o Selection process: The Best, Notable, and Recommended 2008. (2009). Teacher Librarian, 36(4), 8-21. o Review: Young Bond, an adventure series launched in 2005, tells the background history of the infamous James Bond. In Silverfin, author Charles Higson and illustrator Kev Walker work together to create a capt o Your full name: Karen Henspeter o APA citation: Higgson, H. & Walker, K. (2008). Silverfin: A James Bond adventure. New York, NY: Hyperion Books. o Genre: Adventure o Format: Graphic novel o Selection process: The Best, Notable, and Recommended 2008. (2009). Teacher Librarian, 36(4), 8-21. o Review: Young Bond, an adventure series launched in 2005, tells the background history of the infamous James Bond. In Silverfin, author Charles Higson and illustrator Kev Walker work together to create a captivating story that gives readers insight into the early life of Bond, including how his parents passed away and how he processed their deaths. Part One also introduces readers to Eton, the boarding school where he is sent as a teenage orphan. There he meets a bully named George Hellebore, the son of an evil villain who used to know Bond’s father. James and Hellebore quickly form an enmity that rears its head throughout the story. Bond travels to Scotland to visit his aunt and dying uncle. Along the way, he meets a boy named Jimmy who is searching for his missing cousin, and James offers his help. In Scotland, his uncle warns him—based on personal experience—never to become a spy. Ironically, James and his new friend, Jimmy, soon stumble upon Hellebore’s mysterious castle while searching for the missing cousin. They investigate and uncover some frightening clues about Hellebore's true self. The two boys also find that George has realized his father’s treachery and wants to put a stop to it. Together, they meet Hellebore face-to-face, discover that he is more of a monster than they imagined, and put up a vicious fight. The close of the story finds James, bruised by triumphant, back at his relative’s house. Sadly, his uncle passed away in his absence. His warnings echo in James’ ears. Readers are left with the uncanny realization that James has begun the work that his uncle warned against—he has tasted the work of an undercover agent, and more is sure to come. Higson and Walker do a commendable job of revealing how Bond’s youth may have helped to create the legend that is 007. o Recommendation level: Recommended* *The past-faced plot pairs with clever illustrations to create an interesting story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    An enjoyable story, but I had a hard time believing that this character would ever turn into James Bond. The artwork was interesting, and reminded me of Mignola's art in Hellboy, but the characters tended to be a bit too cliched. Oddly, there was no character development. A few hints of influences, but that was it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    I really enjoyed the novel and thought I'd take a look at the graphic novel to booktalk to students as an alternative. This GN does a very poor job of condensing the book into a smaller format. There's no character building, scenes rapidly change, and while the art is decent the dialogue is really lacking. I'd highly recommend reading the actual book over this graphic novel.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dallin Green

    "We think were at the top of the food chain, but compared to eels, were nowhere." This book is a very fun adventure with a lot of thrill and suspense. I am not a big reader but this book was really fun to read because it has so many interesting pictures that correlate with the story very well. This book is about a young James Bond, who is spending his time in Scotland and Eaton College. While he is in Scotland, he ends up meeting his Uncle who is a spy. Also near the time he meets his uncle, he m "We think were at the top of the food chain, but compared to eels, were nowhere." This book is a very fun adventure with a lot of thrill and suspense. I am not a big reader but this book was really fun to read because it has so many interesting pictures that correlate with the story very well. This book is about a young James Bond, who is spending his time in Scotland and Eaton College. While he is in Scotland, he ends up meeting his Uncle who is a spy. Also near the time he meets his uncle, he meets another main character that is the school bully. The bully George competes with James and they grow into enemies very fast. George's dad (Lord Hellebore) has plans to rule the world with his friend who is an evil genius scientist. James works hard against Hellebore and pushes towards the saving of the world. This is a great book and I love how detailed and fun the pictures are that really connect you to the story. I really loved this book and would recommend it to anyone who is looking for a relaxing story with a lot of plot twists.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Raven Black

    One interpretation of how James Bond became *the* James Bond. Sanctioned by Fleming's estate, the original novel of a young Bond during his first year at Eton, was adapted into a graphic novel soon after. Traditional graphic novel illustrations, traditional format/setup and traditional adventure/action story for ages 10-14 (while younger readers can read, some bullying scenes and some graphic death scenes, might be too much for the sensitive reader). All the elements of an adventure story are th One interpretation of how James Bond became *the* James Bond. Sanctioned by Fleming's estate, the original novel of a young Bond during his first year at Eton, was adapted into a graphic novel soon after. Traditional graphic novel illustrations, traditional format/setup and traditional adventure/action story for ages 10-14 (while younger readers can read, some bullying scenes and some graphic death scenes, might be too much for the sensitive reader). All the elements of an adventure story are there: bullies, missing boys, pretty girls, good friends and sports. If you forget that this is James Bond and just take it as a young man who is at a fine school who gets into a mystery, it is fine. If you try and tie it into Fleming's novels or movies, you will be disappointed.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alvaro Villegas

    The central idea is don't keep secrets because people still find them out and don't make weird animals that are your family and making them to monsters. An aspect of the book I liked was that the main character cause he was brave to anything because he would do insane stuff that is risking his life. Another part i liked is when he meet a beautiful girl. An aspect of the book I disliked was when the main character parents died going to an adventure and then its grandpa died. Another part i didn't The central idea is don't keep secrets because people still find them out and don't make weird animals that are your family and making them to monsters. An aspect of the book I liked was that the main character cause he was brave to anything because he would do insane stuff that is risking his life. Another part i liked is when he meet a beautiful girl. An aspect of the book I disliked was when the main character parents died going to an adventure and then its grandpa died. Another part i didn't like was when he had competition with this bad kid and he was rude.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    Young James Bond starts College and while going home for vacation in Scotland gets involved in the mysterious disappearance of a young man who was fishing close by a castle. The beginning already shows what happened there which already takes part away of the mystery. I liked the first half of the book better as the second half. The book felt more like a superhero story instead of a spy/adventure type novel which I had expected. The story got too unrealistic and felt over the top. Artwork was fine Young James Bond starts College and while going home for vacation in Scotland gets involved in the mysterious disappearance of a young man who was fishing close by a castle. The beginning already shows what happened there which already takes part away of the mystery. I liked the first half of the book better as the second half. The book felt more like a superhero story instead of a spy/adventure type novel which I had expected. The story got too unrealistic and felt over the top. Artwork was fine and the whole mood was a little bit dark and gritty.

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Wardrop

    Not really much of a James Bond fan but I found this graphic novel of a young James Bond to be pretty good.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jill Kenna

    This was such a great story! The artwork was beautiful as well.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    I have read the novel of this several times and I adore it. This is the perfect little addition. I really enjoyed sitting down with it

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vinay Mehta

    3 stars. Not enough good story and the narration seemed to have missing pieces in the sequence.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Angela Oatham

    I don't like eels. And now I know why ....

  18. 4 out of 5

    Roisin

    I really liked the story, but if I hadn't have read the original book beforehand, I think I'd have found it really hard to follow. The pictures were really good

  19. 4 out of 5

    Matt Bird

    Fantastically illustrated and great story! I wish they had made the other novels in the series into graphic novels.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alex Boyle

    IMPROVED REVIEW OK, I am positive that if my uncle did not gift me this novel through the post, I would have surely not read it. Any book about James Bond as a child would not have placed an interesting thought in my mind. And I was right, for about the first half of the book. The category that this graphic novel fits into is 'A Graphic Novel', obviously. One thing about this category, is that it's interesting to view the perspective of the illustrator, how they saw the image of the book in th IMPROVED REVIEW OK, I am positive that if my uncle did not gift me this novel through the post, I would have surely not read it. Any book about James Bond as a child would not have placed an interesting thought in my mind. And I was right, for about the first half of the book. The category that this graphic novel fits into is 'A Graphic Novel', obviously. One thing about this category, is that it's interesting to view the perspective of the illustrator, how they saw the image of the book in their mind, although I can't mark them down if the tree I imagined had brown leaves instead of dark green leaves, as I have not read the actual book. My favorite quote from this book is the final quote as it teaches you a moral, the quote and moral is "Don't ever be a spy" The reason I admire this quote is because at around the middle of the novel, Bond's uncle was explaining how he was beaten and tortured by German Soldiers then said. "Don't ever be a spy". So once James Bond had experienced his bit of being a spy he agreed with his uncle and it wrapped up the novel nicely. Something new I learnt from this book is NEVER be a spy just like the quote, because if you do, you will probably, get Eel serum injected to your body, have a narrow escape from flesh peeling eels, nearly get shot in the face by a double barrel shotgun, and experience a narrow escape from a purple eyed beast who ( SPOILER ALERT SO DON"T SAY I DIDN'T WARN YOU, OK?! ) kills the evil possessed madman. Something that was rather thought provoking in this book was not a character or setting, but a piece of paper on James Bond's back. If your push the "Zoom In" button near your eyes, you can see '007' on Bond's back, just before he enters a race. Hmmm...? could this be the reason you see '007' on nearly every DVD under 'Action' in Video Ezy? [image error] Well, if so that's pretty stupid. Overall, at the start of this novel, my eyes weren't glued to the pages of this book because it was anything but amazing, but because I forced them there, I wanted to know why I had seen this book in the hands of so many students, why it was popular. The most knuckle-white, page gobbling experience was near the end, before the climax, but I won't say why as that would be a spoiler I definitely wouldn't want to ruin the secret that some evil scum was creating a formula, a serum so powerful that it could threaten the whole mankind, no I won't tell you that. So... since the novel kept me on the couch to the end, (And the end was surprisingly good) I'll have to give it four stars, since I don't give fives. Although , it was extremely hard to believe they would have had modern, science facilities in Adolf Hitler's time so I'd have to mark it down to three stars. Actually, since the first half of the book was utterly boring, I would have to slice off a star again. So my final and last score for this novel is a two out of five, yes two stars. I would recommend this novel to anyone between the age of twelve and sixteen as I think anyone under the age of twelve would not appreciate seeing some blood-thirsty eels gnaw viciously at a fat man, watch a kid nearly get pushed off a train, see blood spill as there are a ton of knuckle-bleeding' fights, and experience viewing a man who was transformed into an ugly deformed beast, throw some hits at a villainous, monster. (He wasn't literally a monster) And guess what? This was published by Disney.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    for later, when I come back to see if this is good for Daniel - there's some language.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Silverfin: The Graphic Novel, by Charlie Higson and Kev Walker, is a adventure-packed graphic novel that follows James Bond in his adolescent years. As a young boy, James's parents passed away in a climbing accident leaving him an orphan. Because of this tragic death, James is forced to go live with his Aunt Charmian and Uncle Max in the Scottish countryside. Upon reaching his teenage years, Bond leaves home to attend Eton boarding school where he participates in many important events. On his f Silverfin: The Graphic Novel, by Charlie Higson and Kev Walker, is a adventure-packed graphic novel that follows James Bond in his adolescent years. As a young boy, James's parents passed away in a climbing accident leaving him an orphan. Because of this tragic death, James is forced to go live with his Aunt Charmian and Uncle Max in the Scottish countryside. Upon reaching his teenage years, Bond leaves home to attend Eton boarding school where he participates in many important events. On his first day at Eton, James comes across Lord Hellebore's (the headmaster's) son, George, who is very abusive and cruel to James. After months of this abuse, Bond is finally able to visit home during a break from school. While on the train ride to Scotland, he meets Red, a mischievous young man who is attempting to find his lost cousin, Alfie. Until they meet up again, James splits off from Red in order to visit his aunt and uncle. As Uncle Max is very sick, James is especially worried but still eager to go help Red search for his cousin. Ultimately, Bond and Red go out camping meeting several new acquaintances along the way. However, what they find is altogether different than Alfie Kelly. Along the lakeside the boys had been searching, they find the Hellebore Castle, setting into motion a very dangerous and life-threatening series of events for Bond. As an avid movie watcher, I enjoyed this spectacular graphic novel! Since I have watched almost every 007 movie, I was definitely not let down. Not only did the author successfully integrate the Bond we know and love, but he was also able to develop a new and interesting plot. I loved it when James encountered the biggest danger of all but was soon saved by the most unexpected hero of them all. Plus, Red constantly provided a witty sense of humor, a characteristic that made him my favorite character. Even though the main plot of the story was intriguing, the several side-plots (e.g.. the Hellebore Cup, a race that took up much of Part I) were hard to follow and in the end, unnecessary. Despite the confusing subplots, I still highly recommend Silverfin to anyone who enjoys graphic novels, adventure-filled books, or just loves James Bond (like I do). ✭✭✭✭✩ 4/5 STARS! -Ryan Unikel

  23. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Young James Bond is a student at Eton. His guardian and aunt invites him to her Scotland home for a holiday break, as his uncle’s health continues to decline. On the train, Bond meets a stowaway who is traveling to investigate the disappearance of a friend, and James agrees to help investigate. Things get dangerous when Bond discovers that the school bully and his ruthless father live next to Loch Silverfin, where all of the mystery is going down. Thus begins the illustrious career of young 007. Young James Bond is a student at Eton. His guardian and aunt invites him to her Scotland home for a holiday break, as his uncle’s health continues to decline. On the train, Bond meets a stowaway who is traveling to investigate the disappearance of a friend, and James agrees to help investigate. Things get dangerous when Bond discovers that the school bully and his ruthless father live next to Loch Silverfin, where all of the mystery is going down. Thus begins the illustrious career of young 007. The storyline is a bit farfetched, which is expected in a James Bond story, I suppose. But it seemed even more futuristic than typical, so it ended up with more of an Austin Powers vibe than a spy and adventure story. The story held a lot more emotion than I expected. I’m used to James Bond keeping his distance, but this younger version of him is still developing that skill. He reaches out for help here and there, specifically from his ailing uncle, who shares a lifelong secret. There were some cheesy additions, such as Bond’s participant number being 007 in an athletic event, that were cute, but didn’t really make much sense. The artwork is well done, using strong lines and muted colors to create an intense feel. It was easy to follow the action, of which there was quite a bit. Because of all of the action, this story will appeal to middle grade male readers, and likely teen readers, too. It is a graphic adaptation of a novel with the same name, so it would be a good supplemental material or introduction for struggling readers, English language learners, etc. Of course, it will also appeal to graphic novel fans. As many graphic adaptations of novels, the pacing of the story is extremely fast, which tends to appeal more to younger readers and reluctant readers, but can be frustrating to someone who wants to “fall into” the book. The pace works nicely with the subject matter, however, I expect spy stories to move quickly. • No language or sexual issues • Violence includes bullying, fistfights, murders, and animal cruelty • No drinking • Drug use includes an experimental serum

  24. 4 out of 5

    James Venkatrao

    Why i decided to read this book: I actually was given this book luckily by my friend Alex at last moment when this review was due in today and i hadn't finished the book that i was going to put on. Yeah so thats my story. Which category this book fits: This book fits under "A Graphic Novel" on my bingo board. I found this category interesting because since i had read some of the Novel of this book this gave me a clear idea in illustration of what was really going on. And unlike comics, Graphic N Why i decided to read this book: I actually was given this book luckily by my friend Alex at last moment when this review was due in today and i hadn't finished the book that i was going to put on. Yeah so thats my story. Which category this book fits: This book fits under "A Graphic Novel" on my bingo board. I found this category interesting because since i had read some of the Novel of this book this gave me a clear idea in illustration of what was really going on. And unlike comics, Graphic Novels really have plot and the concepts of a Novel book with meaning. My favourite quote from this book: My favourite quote from this book was at the end of the book when James (the main character) was remembering his conversation with his uncle when he said "Don't ever be a spy". I liked this quote because it really related to some of the events that happened throughout the time that James was spying and how hard being a spy really can be. Something new i learnt from this book was: Something new that i learnt was that spying isnt as easy as we see it on tv or in movies and not only affects you physically but mentally as well. A character or setting in this book that was interesting to me: A character that was interesting to me was James Bond because he had a major life change throughout this book and was interesting to see. One thing that was interesting to me about him was that he helped George Hellebore even after every bad thing that he did to James and pretty much forgave him.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Spencer

    Silverfin is written by Charlie Higson and depicts a young teenage James Bond in 1930. I chose to read this book because it was recommended to me by my Librarian. I have read most of it and, in my opinion, it is an interesting book, though it does get a little bit boring at times. The main characters of the book are: James Bond, Tommy Chong, Pritpal, Red, Randolph & George Hellebore. The story is split into three parts. The first part depicts Bond going to Eton college, one of the best schools Silverfin is written by Charlie Higson and depicts a young teenage James Bond in 1930. I chose to read this book because it was recommended to me by my Librarian. I have read most of it and, in my opinion, it is an interesting book, though it does get a little bit boring at times. The main characters of the book are: James Bond, Tommy Chong, Pritpal, Red, Randolph & George Hellebore. The story is split into three parts. The first part depicts Bond going to Eton college, one of the best schools in England. Bond fits in by doing the Hellebore competition. The second part is when Bond goes to visit his Aunt & Uncle in Scotland. Bond gets more information about his parents death and he befriends a boy named Red Kelly, who is looking for his missing cousin. They both meet a detective who is investigating Hellebore and his estate due to the fact that Hellebore is a suspect of a murder. I have read up to Part 2 and for now, I enjoy the book due to it's interesting and detective-style way. I am occasionally not very interested in what's going on like with Red. I would recommend this book to young audiences who are interested in James Bond & detective comics/graphic novels.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy H

    Silverfin is part of the Young Bond series, charting the escapades of Bond before he realised his true path. The format (being a graphic novel) works extremely well with the story, as the more filmic elements can be easily portrayed and it lends itself to some of the more gruesome elements in the tale. It also helps mirror the films in that the dialogue typically isn't the central focus, giving way to effects and setting which works equally well in this medium. While these are it's merits, I foun Silverfin is part of the Young Bond series, charting the escapades of Bond before he realised his true path. The format (being a graphic novel) works extremely well with the story, as the more filmic elements can be easily portrayed and it lends itself to some of the more gruesome elements in the tale. It also helps mirror the films in that the dialogue typically isn't the central focus, giving way to effects and setting which works equally well in this medium. While these are it's merits, I found some of it a little laboured; too much exposition on the Eton setting and relationships, when more punch could have been put into the plot development later on. It was definitely seeming like a slow burner with the main events playing out very fast in comparison. It would be suitable for KS2 pupils, and could be a good route in for those that are more reluctant readers given that it is not so text-rich. It could also be used to explore different mediums and their merits, inviting comparison between stories or even film.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mike Jozic

    I picked this up on a whim based entirely on the strength of Kev Walker's artwork. I never had any interest in exploring the life of a young James Bond, and when the novels by Charlie Higson came out, I dutifully ignored them. Having now read this graphic novel adaptation of the first book, I may have to go back on that particular stance and check the originals out. This was cracking good stuff! Again, Walker's art was superb and I'd be hard pressed to think of anyone who could have pulled it of I picked this up on a whim based entirely on the strength of Kev Walker's artwork. I never had any interest in exploring the life of a young James Bond, and when the novels by Charlie Higson came out, I dutifully ignored them. Having now read this graphic novel adaptation of the first book, I may have to go back on that particular stance and check the originals out. This was cracking good stuff! Again, Walker's art was superb and I'd be hard pressed to think of anyone who could have pulled it off better than he could. It was suitably period and atmospheric when it needed to be. The script was top notch and if Higson's prose work is as good, I'm going to delight in the full-length book versions of these stories. If you like Bond, or just a good old adventure/youth/spy-like story, this is one worth checking out.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mowalski

    "Silverfin: The Graphic Novel" happens to be a very condensed version of its source material and, while not entirely spectacular, it may definitely deliver for young readers. I'm no Bond fan and I grabbed this book completely on a whim at the local shop, only later finding out that it was, in fact, "a James Bond adventure". The reason I recommend this for young readers? I think it can certainly appeal to non-Bond fans and comic book junkies, but otherwise, the amount of pages compared to the orig "Silverfin: The Graphic Novel" happens to be a very condensed version of its source material and, while not entirely spectacular, it may definitely deliver for young readers. I'm no Bond fan and I grabbed this book completely on a whim at the local shop, only later finding out that it was, in fact, "a James Bond adventure". The reason I recommend this for young readers? I think it can certainly appeal to non-Bond fans and comic book junkies, but otherwise, the amount of pages compared to the original novel lead me to believe this might not fare as well with actual Bond fans. Otherwise, I think this adaptation by Kev Walker is pretty decent, with art that is vaguely reminiscent to Mike Mignola's "Hellboy" series. The artist's depiction of Bond and related characters seems consistent.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Neville Ridley-smith

    I expected a lot more from Young James Bond. I can only imagine that the book is better than this comic adaptation. This was a bore. Cliched, not compelling in any way. At times confusing. There's some use of that close-up camera technique where you can't see what's going on. At other times, what the characters do doesn't seem to make any sense. I generally hate thought bubbles but this is one instance where they could have been good because the panels certainly don't convey enough information. Tow I expected a lot more from Young James Bond. I can only imagine that the book is better than this comic adaptation. This was a bore. Cliched, not compelling in any way. At times confusing. There's some use of that close-up camera technique where you can't see what's going on. At other times, what the characters do doesn't seem to make any sense. I generally hate thought bubbles but this is one instance where they could have been good because the panels certainly don't convey enough information. Towards the end it's clear that we're following the James Bond archetype of having Bond trapped in the villain's lair. Where's the white cat for stroking? And then there's a bunch of sci-fi type gobbledegook. I was glad when it ended.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aimee

    This graphic novel follows James Bond as a teen, attending Eton College; it is well written and has excellent illustrations that help the story come alive. There is accuracy and truth in the telling of the events leading to James Bond becoming a member of the CIA. There is strength in the visual and the dialogue between the characters, which help the reader to become engaged in the graphic novel. There are few weaknesses, except for some of the action scenes, which may be hard to follow for thos This graphic novel follows James Bond as a teen, attending Eton College; it is well written and has excellent illustrations that help the story come alive. There is accuracy and truth in the telling of the events leading to James Bond becoming a member of the CIA. There is strength in the visual and the dialogue between the characters, which help the reader to become engaged in the graphic novel. There are few weaknesses, except for some of the action scenes, which may be hard to follow for those new to graphic novels.

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