hits counter The Poets' Corner: The One-and-Only Poetry Book for the Whole Family - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Poets' Corner: The One-and-Only Poetry Book for the Whole Family

Availability: Ready to download

From listening to his grandmother recite epic poems from memory to curling up in bed while his father read funny verses, award-winning actor John Lithgow grew up with poetry. Ever since, John has been an enthusiastic seeker of poetic experience, whether reading, reciting, or listening to great poems. The wide variety of carefully selected poems in this book provides the p From listening to his grandmother recite epic poems from memory to curling up in bed while his father read funny verses, award-winning actor John Lithgow grew up with poetry. Ever since, John has been an enthusiastic seeker of poetic experience, whether reading, reciting, or listening to great poems. The wide variety of carefully selected poems in this book provides the perfect introduction to appeal to readers new to poetry, and for poetry lovers to experience beloved verses in a fresh, vivid way. William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allan Poe, and Dylan Thomas are just a few names among Lithgow's comprehensive list of poetry masters. His essential criterion is that "each poem's light shines more brightly when read aloud." This unique package provides a multimedia poetry experience with a bonus MP3 CD of revelatory poetry readings by John and the familiar voices of such notable performers as Eileen Atkins, Kathy Bates, Glenn Close, Billy Connolly, Jodie Foster, Morgan Freeman, Helen Mirren, Lynn Redgrave, Susan Sarandon, Gary Sinise, and Sam Waterston. Every reader will enjoy reciting or listening to these poems with the entire family, appreciating how each one comes to life through the spoken word in this superlative poetry collection.


Compare

From listening to his grandmother recite epic poems from memory to curling up in bed while his father read funny verses, award-winning actor John Lithgow grew up with poetry. Ever since, John has been an enthusiastic seeker of poetic experience, whether reading, reciting, or listening to great poems. The wide variety of carefully selected poems in this book provides the p From listening to his grandmother recite epic poems from memory to curling up in bed while his father read funny verses, award-winning actor John Lithgow grew up with poetry. Ever since, John has been an enthusiastic seeker of poetic experience, whether reading, reciting, or listening to great poems. The wide variety of carefully selected poems in this book provides the perfect introduction to appeal to readers new to poetry, and for poetry lovers to experience beloved verses in a fresh, vivid way. William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allan Poe, and Dylan Thomas are just a few names among Lithgow's comprehensive list of poetry masters. His essential criterion is that "each poem's light shines more brightly when read aloud." This unique package provides a multimedia poetry experience with a bonus MP3 CD of revelatory poetry readings by John and the familiar voices of such notable performers as Eileen Atkins, Kathy Bates, Glenn Close, Billy Connolly, Jodie Foster, Morgan Freeman, Helen Mirren, Lynn Redgrave, Susan Sarandon, Gary Sinise, and Sam Waterston. Every reader will enjoy reciting or listening to these poems with the entire family, appreciating how each one comes to life through the spoken word in this superlative poetry collection.

30 review for The Poets' Corner: The One-and-Only Poetry Book for the Whole Family

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I don't care much for poetry, but I think that's due to ignorance & trying to read it incorrectly. I thought this might help me along a bit & it did. Lithgow did a great job listing his favorite poets in alphabetical order. I liked that order since it skipped around in history & separated the various styles so none became burdensome. He makes poetry understandable & accessible, even the weirdest like Gloria Stein, although I'll make sure to avoid her work in the future. One of the things I liked I don't care much for poetry, but I think that's due to ignorance & trying to read it incorrectly. I thought this might help me along a bit & it did. Lithgow did a great job listing his favorite poets in alphabetical order. I liked that order since it skipped around in history & separated the various styles so none became burdensome. He makes poetry understandable & accessible, even the weirdest like Gloria Stein, although I'll make sure to avoid her work in the future. One of the things I liked the best was his introduction where he points out some of the forms & places in which poetry appears like song lyrics, limericks, & catch phrases. Some of the poems he reads are very short - one was only 16 words - while others are very long (Spenser's Fairy Queen runs to 18 volumes, IIRC) but he read me just the best bits. Each poet was introduced with a thumbnail sketch of their lives & times. A couple of short pieces were read by Lithgow or some other fantastic voice & that makes the audiobook the best way to read this, IMO. OTOH, he listed other poems he liked. He often included websites where more of their work could be found, sometimes even free live recordings of the poet reading their own work. For these last items, I suggest buying a print version. I'm buying a used paperback copy for $4 on Abebooks.com. I might reread some of the poems now that he's given me the rhythm. These poets cover a lot of territory in style. I actually liked & understood the bit of Spenser's Fairy Queen that he read. I had to read part of that in school & it was a trudge. Actually, I was surprised by how many of these poets I knew & used to detest, but no longer do. Those I've liked, I liked even better: Poe, Shakespeare, Longfellow, etc. A few will never be favorites. Chaucer in the original Middle English was awful in school due to the language barrier as is Robert Burns. You'd think with my Scottish last name I'd be able to or want to understand their language, but I've always found it incomprehensible. (I gave up on Rob Roy for this reason even though I like most of Scott's other work.) I just don't have a good ear for languages. All in all, it was a grand tour & I think it was really worthwhile. Poets have added a lot to our language especially in allusion & metaphor, so it's good to be able to recognize them. It was nice to know more about them & I was introduced to several I'd never heard of before. Highly recommended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Rollins

    John Lithgow is my poetry kindred spirit. I loved his selections for this book but what I loved most is the way he talked about each poem. Not once does he slip from synthesis to analysis. He fosters love and I love him for it. I highly recommend the audio. His folksy charm is infectious and do not think any of the famous readers reads the poems better than he does. Thanks to my friend and Patron Alanna for the head's up about this book!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Froglily

    Actor and author John Lithgow presents poems by many of his favorite poets, enhancing the listener’s experience with biographical and critical commentary. Lithgow provides an inviting introduction to the work of his favorite poets. For each poet he sketches a brief biography, including critical comments on the poet’s work and place in the literary world. He follows the biography with a reading and discussion of one poem, and concludes by reading another poem and listing favorite poems of the poet Actor and author John Lithgow presents poems by many of his favorite poets, enhancing the listener’s experience with biographical and critical commentary. Lithgow provides an inviting introduction to the work of his favorite poets. For each poet he sketches a brief biography, including critical comments on the poet’s work and place in the literary world. He follows the biography with a reading and discussion of one poem, and concludes by reading another poem and listing favorite poems of the poet. Lithogow provides a pithy tag for each poet (William Blake is “the mystical visionary”, Matthew Arnold the “serious poet”), and intriguing background details (Ogden Nash was a member of the family for whom Nashville was named). Lithogow narrates the commentary and reads some of the poems; he wisely enlists the aid of others (including Jodie Foster, Morgan Freeman, and Helen Mirren) to vary the poetry readings. Their voices and interpretations keep the listener’s interest. It is both puzzling and unfortunate that Lithgow chose to present the poets in alphabetical rather than chronological order. Using chronological order would have made it easier for listeners to comprehend the influence of poets upon one another and the changes in poetical style and approach over time. It might also have inspired Lithgow to sharpen his focus on this fascinating aspect of his presentation.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ci

    This is a personal-favorite-collection by Lithgow, organized by the last names of the poets, which rendered this book more suitable as a reference. Since this collection is "family-friendly", it is easy-listening and very little to offend. However, even within its narrowly defined purpose and its gingerly politeness, I have found two merits worth noting: one, succinct references of poets and notable poems; two, its accompanied readings from various actors such as Helen Mirren, Morgan Freedman, a This is a personal-favorite-collection by Lithgow, organized by the last names of the poets, which rendered this book more suitable as a reference. Since this collection is "family-friendly", it is easy-listening and very little to offend. However, even within its narrowly defined purpose and its gingerly politeness, I have found two merits worth noting: one, succinct references of poets and notable poems; two, its accompanied readings from various actors such as Helen Mirren, Morgan Freedman, and many others.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Four stars for the content of the book itself, elevated to five stars for the audiobook version or for print copies that still have the accompanying CD, because trust me, you have not lived until you've heard Billy Connolly reading Robert Burns' "To a Mouse". What an absolute blast that was to listen to. His reading of Edward Lear's "The Owl and the Pussycat" is also lots of fun; I played those tracks easily three or four times over before allowing myself to move on to the next poem. Morgan Free Four stars for the content of the book itself, elevated to five stars for the audiobook version or for print copies that still have the accompanying CD, because trust me, you have not lived until you've heard Billy Connolly reading Robert Burns' "To a Mouse". What an absolute blast that was to listen to. His reading of Edward Lear's "The Owl and the Pussycat" is also lots of fun; I played those tracks easily three or four times over before allowing myself to move on to the next poem. Morgan Freeman's reading of T.S. Eliot's "Rhapsody on a Windy Night" is exceptional, too, and merits attentive listening. Most of the other readings are also quite good, with really only two or three that fell kind of flat. There are 50 poems in this collection. Each poem is preceded by a short biographical sketch of the poet and is followed by a few words of appreciative commentary and a short list of other favorites by that poet. I appreciated that the poets were presented in alphabetical rather than chronological order, which made for a nice variety of tones and styles throughout, rather than having to march through time and read/listen to, say, all the Romantics all at once, which would probably have started feeling a bit tedious, at least for me. For full enjoyment, grab the audiobook version, as John Lithgow's reading sets the stage nicely for the reading of the poems themselves by such "friends" as Billy Connolly, Morgan Freeman, Helen Mirren, Gary Sinise, and Kathy Bates, among others. I'll definitely be coming back to this one before too long.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tommy

    I'm not sure there are adequate superlatives to describe this treasure. John Lithgow talks us through the lives and works of fifty of history's greatest poets. From Shakespeare to Yeats, Dylan Thomas to Edna St. Vincent Millay. Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsburg, Whitman, Dorothy Parker, Eliot, e.e. cummings... It's an embarrassment of riches. Sure, there are noticeable omissions, but as a primer for adults and young people, I can't imagine a more accessible, fun volume. Lithgow is I'm not sure there are adequate superlatives to describe this treasure. John Lithgow talks us through the lives and works of fifty of history's greatest poets. From Shakespeare to Yeats, Dylan Thomas to Edna St. Vincent Millay. Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsburg, Whitman, Dorothy Parker, Eliot, e.e. cummings... It's an embarrassment of riches. Sure, there are noticeable omissions, but as a primer for adults and young people, I can't imagine a more accessible, fun volume. Lithgow is joined by some notable friends (Morgan Freeman, Jodie Foster, Gary Sinise, Sam Waterston, Susan Sarandon, Glenn Close, Helen Mirren, Billy Connelly, and others). Hearing these gifted actors perform these poems makes for an incredibly entertaining experience, even for those skeptical or phobic of verse. I loved the audiobook so much, I've ordered a print version so I can go back and dig in again more selectively. Truly, I cannot say enough about how enjoyable this audiobook was. Seek it out!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Finished: 02.11.2018 Genre: poetry Rating: B Conclusion: Relaxing audio book perfect for bed-time listening!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shae

    I've never really been a John Lithgow fan, but after listening to him read his book, I count him as an enriching friend in my life. Ha! He starts off with an introduction about why he compiled this book of 50 poets and their poems. Then he give a little biography of each poet, reads 1-2 poems (or has famous people read them), and then concludes with a little explanation of why he loves it. I can not describe how soothing and sometimes thrilling and touching it was to listen to this in my car ove I've never really been a John Lithgow fan, but after listening to him read his book, I count him as an enriching friend in my life. Ha! He starts off with an introduction about why he compiled this book of 50 poets and their poems. Then he give a little biography of each poet, reads 1-2 poems (or has famous people read them), and then concludes with a little explanation of why he loves it. I can not describe how soothing and sometimes thrilling and touching it was to listen to this in my car over a long period of time. Each section is so short that it worked for my errands around town. I've already started listening to this again. I don't know if it would have had nearly the same impact just reading it, but that is one of the major parts of poetry -- it is meant to be read aloud. I don't necessarily think this would appeal to children, but is more for a beginner adult poetry learner, though there was nothing objectionable in it. *Feb. 2020: Recommended this to my husband for his long drives to work (he didn't finish it) and then I started craving it for myself and checked out again for myself. Re-listened to it and am reading it now too. It has so much appeal for me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Penny

    (audible) Oh my. Get this as an audio book. With guest readers like Morgan Freeman, Susan Sarandon, Gary Sinese and Helen Mirren this is an amazing anthology. Some of these poems I studied over 40 years ago and yet with the first line or title, it came back to me and the joy of listening to really excellent readers was unexpected and invigorating. Lithgow's unapologetic admiration for the poetry form and his love of many, diverse poets is much appreciated. The book is laid out alphabetically by au (audible) Oh my. Get this as an audio book. With guest readers like Morgan Freeman, Susan Sarandon, Gary Sinese and Helen Mirren this is an amazing anthology. Some of these poems I studied over 40 years ago and yet with the first line or title, it came back to me and the joy of listening to really excellent readers was unexpected and invigorating. Lithgow's unapologetic admiration for the poetry form and his love of many, diverse poets is much appreciated. The book is laid out alphabetically by author with brief musical interludes between sections. Lithgow gives a short bio of the author, including tidbits you might not be aware of; a poem is read by a guest reader and then Lithgow shares why he selected this particular poem, what it means to him, what delights him, confuses him, engages him. There may be one or two other short poems or quotes and then it's time for the next poet. Time periods bounce around which adds to the delight of this book. I started each commute with a sense of adventure, "Who are we going to listen to today!" I'm sad the book is over, but I suspect this will be one I return to several times in the future. It makes for a really great drive. HIGHLY recommend.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Angelina

    This is an excellent collection of poetry and quick sketches of poets' lives. I enjoyed it very much, though of course I would have chosen slightly different poems in certain cases--I think everyone loves the poems they first encountered from a poet best, even if other poems might be "better."

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hope

    I suppose the word “family” is in the title because there is some nonsense poetry included and because of Lithgow’s grandfatherly tone. But if I were trying to introduce my children to poetry, this is not the selection I would choose because of the inclusion of modern poetry with its clunky rythms and obtuse meanings. (If someone has to explain a poem to you before you can like it, you have already missed much of the magic, soul-touching quality of poetry.) The positive side of this mixture of ol I suppose the word “family” is in the title because there is some nonsense poetry included and because of Lithgow’s grandfatherly tone. But if I were trying to introduce my children to poetry, this is not the selection I would choose because of the inclusion of modern poetry with its clunky rythms and obtuse meanings. (If someone has to explain a poem to you before you can like it, you have already missed much of the magic, soul-touching quality of poetry.) The positive side of this mixture of old and new poems is that you can compare them for yourself. As you listen/read, it becomes increasingly clear that the “new” is, in fact, very much like the story of the “Emperor’s New Clothes,” pretending to be well-dressed, but sadly naked. One poem was so awful that I laughed outloud. If I had known how much modern poetry was in this book, I probably would not have purchased it. On the other hand, I was glad to have such a painless, crash course on the “greats” of Western poetry. I even learned to appreciate some poets that I hadn’t liked before.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    This was a very good read—a romp in the amusement park, as it were. It rekindled the love of poetry (and the writing thereof) that I had as a kid. The best thing about this book is that I got a chance to hear some brilliant poetry brilliantly read by brilliant interpreters. I read the book as well as listened to the audiobook. My only wish was to have had more of the guest readers read these works and have Lithgow moderate and read an occasional piece or two. John rounded off each chapter by rea This was a very good read—a romp in the amusement park, as it were. It rekindled the love of poetry (and the writing thereof) that I had as a kid. The best thing about this book is that I got a chance to hear some brilliant poetry brilliantly read by brilliant interpreters. I read the book as well as listened to the audiobook. My only wish was to have had more of the guest readers read these works and have Lithgow moderate and read an occasional piece or two. John rounded off each chapter by reading one of each of the 50 featured poets, but the 12 or so actors who read, brought a whole new level to vitality to these works. These actors brought a breathtakingly dynamic reading to each of the poems. Lithgow also gives the websites where several of the more contemporary poets can be heard reading their work. Well done. If you like poems or are even mildly interested in them, this will kindle your interest for sure.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I was curious to see Lithgow's take on classic poetry. He has included a good selection of the usual English language poets (mostly white, all dead, but not all men) with 1-2 poems from each. Lithgow uses a folksy, personal experience-with-each-poet narrative that would especially appeal to his fans. It's billed as book that will help families read poetry together, but some of his choices of poems seemed odd for that. I was often disappointed not to find MY favorite of a particular poet's work, I was curious to see Lithgow's take on classic poetry. He has included a good selection of the usual English language poets (mostly white, all dead, but not all men) with 1-2 poems from each. Lithgow uses a folksy, personal experience-with-each-poet narrative that would especially appeal to his fans. It's billed as book that will help families read poetry together, but some of his choices of poems seemed odd for that. I was often disappointed not to find MY favorite of a particular poet's work, but then, I didn't put the collection together. What I enjoyed most was reading many of the poems aloud to myself. Most fun to read aloud: "Love Unrequited or the Nightmare Song" by William S. Gilbert (of Gilbert and Sullivan).

  14. 4 out of 5

    Diana Long

    This work really has me excited...I absolutely loved every minute of this just over 6 hour audio. I should have dubbed it a history of poetry and very educational as well. Not only is this a wonderful introduction to poetry but also highlights the writers who felt compelled to write beautiful inspiring words that have lasted through time. Some of the poets featured have been gone some 400 plus years but their words transcend time. Listen to the poems performed by such notable entertainment pers This work really has me excited...I absolutely loved every minute of this just over 6 hour audio. I should have dubbed it a history of poetry and very educational as well. Not only is this a wonderful introduction to poetry but also highlights the writers who felt compelled to write beautiful inspiring words that have lasted through time. Some of the poets featured have been gone some 400 plus years but their words transcend time. Listen to the poems performed by such notable entertainment personalities like Susan Sarandon, Gary Sinese, Morgan Freeman, Helen Mirren, Glen Close plus others. Highly recommend this to everyone of all ages.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Perry

    “Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.” Leonardo da Vinci It was such a pleasure reading this eclectic collection of poetry, ranging from sparkling to somber, from Auden and Blake to Wordsworth and Yeats. It's really a great gift for a dad to share with the family. Each of the 50 chapters provides a short back story on a famed poet, one, two or three of her/his poems, followed by a brief epilogue. These poems and poets reminded me of “Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.” Leonardo da Vinci It was such a pleasure reading this eclectic collection of poetry, ranging from sparkling to somber, from Auden and Blake to Wordsworth and Yeats. It's really a great gift for a dad to share with the family. Each of the 50 chapters provides a short back story on a famed poet, one, two or three of her/his poems, followed by a brief epilogue. These poems and poets reminded me of the tremendous value of art / poetry to a life worth living.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ray Otus

    If you want an introduction to poetry, you could hardly do better than picking this up as an audiobook. Lithgow gives you a short biography of dozens of poets, followed by a poem or two (read by himself or other voices), followed by suggestions for other poems to read if you happened to like the samples. A great survey, perfectly read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Aloha

    Good and enjoyable introduction to poetry While this may be basic to lovers of poetry, the intent is to give an enjoyable overview much like an album of classical music's greatest hits.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Simon Bullock

    Beautiful assortment of poems from an eclectic range of sources and periods. While Gertrude Stein may be revered for her editorial clout, I can't say I'm a fan of her poetic works after my brief introduction in this compendium.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David West

    This was a good audiobook. Lithgow has gathered a wonderful collection of poems and some very good voice actors and put them together. His commentary on the poems was very helpful. I found some poems in here that I want to memorize.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maeve

    This is a delightful collection. I listened to the audiobook and Lithgow recruited many friends to read the poems beautifully. I highly recommend.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

    This was a 5 star book from the very first page to the very last! Cannot recommend it highly enough, especially on audiobook!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Summer

    While I didn’t love all the poems, this book, on audio expanded my poetry experience and I loved that. John Lithgow is great! He gives a bit of a biography on each poet and why he enjoys their poetry and reads one or two poems and then gives further recommendations! I look forward to diving into some new poets to me! This was stellar on audio because he reads them, Morgan Freeman, Jodie Foster, Kathy Bates, and many, many other familiar voices. It was a lot of fun!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Really nice collection and discussion of poetry and poets. The poems on the audiobook are also read by a stellar cast. Great audiobook.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Listened to the audible and loved every minute of this.

  25. 4 out of 5

    JZ

    What a joy and a delight. Many poems that I studied in school, and didn't give a damn about then, but they mean something else again to me now, in my advanced years. The author writes a thumbnail sketch of each poet, a summary of some favorite poems not read here, and even some recommendations for other readings by other presenters, to accompany each poem read. Many famous voices come along to read some poems, too. Billy Connolly was my favorite, but there are others as good. Ogden Nash, Edward Le What a joy and a delight. Many poems that I studied in school, and didn't give a damn about then, but they mean something else again to me now, in my advanced years. The author writes a thumbnail sketch of each poet, a summary of some favorite poems not read here, and even some recommendations for other readings by other presenters, to accompany each poem read. Many famous voices come along to read some poems, too. Billy Connolly was my favorite, but there are others as good. Ogden Nash, Edward Lear, e. e. cummings, and Dorothy Parker are there for me, and so many others that I remember, and yet, didn't really know. So much to enjoy.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alexánder Obando

    A TREASURE OF GREAT VERSE Not a run off the mill anthology. Lithgow and the cast of readers have given true life to this collection of masterpieces. It has been a true pleasure to read and listen to it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This audiobook was a very high 4 for me. Lithgow attempted quite a feat of popular appeal with poetry, and I greatly respect his welcoming approach. Like others, I thought "The one-and-only poetry book for the whole family" was immodest and misleading. The poems here include language made difficult both by historical distance and by modern and unwelcoming styles. The "family" he refers to would need to include children no younger than high-school, I'd say. Still, I found Lithgow's concise biograph This audiobook was a very high 4 for me. Lithgow attempted quite a feat of popular appeal with poetry, and I greatly respect his welcoming approach. Like others, I thought "The one-and-only poetry book for the whole family" was immodest and misleading. The poems here include language made difficult both by historical distance and by modern and unwelcoming styles. The "family" he refers to would need to include children no younger than high-school, I'd say. Still, I found Lithgow's concise biographical and artistic summaries (which preceded the reading of each of the 50 poets work) to be fantastically economical and informative. I learned something new about Elizabeth Bishop, whose complete works I've read, including the much longer biographical notes at the beginning, and yet still I remember being surprised by something Lithgow said. And the inclusion of his own experiences with poems were not overwhelming or self-aggrandizing, but rather tasteful and sweet and affectionate. Some reviewers seemed to fault the collection for the moderns (specifically Gertrude Stein and William Carlos Williams, I expect, rather than, say, Dylan Thomas and Frost). Personally I get less from reading Gertrude Stein than I would from staring at a like amount of computer router use guidelines, and WCW is a bit like the Talking Heads--doing weird things that are enjoyable only if you don't take them too seriously. But Lithgow makes his case for their greatness and tries to give them the best presentation that he can, and I applaud his inclusion of them. The greatest measure of this audiobook is if it motivates readers to pick up the work of poets they might not otherwise. I have been encouraged by it to take Edna St. Vincent Millay and Andrew Marvell off my long list and put them on my short list of poets whose collections I should read soon. For that I thank Mr. Lithgow, and felt compelled to bump the review up to five stars.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    DEFINITELY listen to the audio book version. John Lithgow reads ~60+% of the poems, but also has some excellent guest-readers. The audio book is very well put together. For each of the 50 poets, when a new poem begins, a new track begins, so you can 'go back' and listen to it again. I would listen to a poem followed by John Lithgow's heartfelt and well-thought critique, and then listen to it again, and then move on. Most poets have a 2nd poem read. These are great examples for everyone to listen DEFINITELY listen to the audio book version. John Lithgow reads ~60+% of the poems, but also has some excellent guest-readers. The audio book is very well put together. For each of the 50 poets, when a new poem begins, a new track begins, so you can 'go back' and listen to it again. I would listen to a poem followed by John Lithgow's heartfelt and well-thought critique, and then listen to it again, and then move on. Most poets have a 2nd poem read. These are great examples for everyone to listen to. John then lists 4-5 more great poems by each poet to explore next. And occasionally a website to listen to more. After listening to this from my library, I now know I need both the audio book and the hard-copy to satisfy my full enjoyment. Someone on Amazon listed the 50 poets & poems, so I'll cut/paste them here: Poets' Corner : main text read by John Lithgow including most 2nd poems Individual poems listed by title, author and read by other guest performers 1. Dover Beach, by Matthew Arnold; Read by Eileen Atkins 2. Musée des Beaux Arts, by W.H. Auden; Read by Jodie Foster 3. Dream Song 76 : Henry's Confession, by John Berryman ; Read by Gary Sinise 4. Filling Station, by Elizabeth Bishop ; Read by Glenn Close 5. The Tyger, by William Blake ; Read by Helen Mirren a. The Lamb, by William Blake; Read by John Lithgow 6. We Real Cool, by Gwendolyn Brooks ; Read by Morgan Freeman 7. Sonnet 43 ( How Do I Love Thee ), by Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Read by Helen Mirren a. The Best Thing in the World, by Elizabeth Barrett Browning Read by John Lithgow 8. To a Mouse, by Robert Burns; Read by Bill Connolly a. A Red, Red Rose, by Robert Burns; Read by John Lithgow 9. I Would I Were a Careless Child, by Lord Byron ; Read by Robert Sean Leonard a. She Walks In Beauty , by Lord Byron; Read by John Lithgow 10. Jabberwocky, by Lewis Carroll ; Read by Eileen Atkins 11. The General Prologue, by Geoffrey Chaucer ; Read by Lynn Redgrave 12. Kubla Khan , by Samuel Coleridge; Read by Robert Sean Leonard 13. To Brooklyn Bridge, by Hart Crane ; Read by Sam Waterston a. Chaplinesque, by Hart Crane ; Read by John Lithgow 14. If Everything Happens That Can't Be Done, by E.E. Cummings ; Read by Eileen Atkins 15. There Is No Frigate Like A Book (1263) , by Emily Dickinson ; Read by Glenn Close a. The Most Triumphant Bird I Ever Knew or Met ( 1265 ) , by Emily Dickinson ; Read by John Lithgow 16. Song , by John Donne ; Read by John Lithgow a. The Sun Rising, by John Donne; Read by John Lithgow 17. Rhapsody On A Windy Night , by T.S.Elliot ; Read by Morgan Freeman 18. Birches, by Robert Frost; Read by John Lithgow 19. The Nightmare Song , by W.S.Gilbert ; Read by John Lithgow 20. A Supermarket In California , by Allen Ginsberg; Read by Gary Sinise 21. The Beggar to Mab, The Fairy Queen, by Robert Herrick; Read by Billy Connolly a. Be My Mistress short or tall, by Robert Herrick ; Read by John Lithgow 22. Pied Beauty , by Gerard Manley Hopkins ; Read by Kathy Bates a. God’s Grandeur, by Gerard Manley Hopkins; Read by John Lithgow 23. Thirteen, When I Was One-and-Twenty , by A.E.Housman ; Read by Robert Sean Leonard a. Reveille, by A.E.Housman; Read by John Lithgow 24. The Weary Blues , by Langston Hughes; Read by Morgan Freeman 25. The Death of The Ball Turrett Gunner , by Randall Jarrell ; Read by Gary Sinise 26. Inviting A Friend To Supper , by Ben Johnson ; Read by Robert Sean Leonard a. To Celia, by Ben Johnson ; Read by John Lithgow 27. To Autumn , by John Keats ; Read by Lynn Redgrave a. La Belle Dame Sans Merci, by John Keats; Read by John Lithgow 28. Days, by Philip Larkin ; Read by Susan Sarandon 29. The Owl and The Pussycat , by Edward Lear; Read by Billy Connolly a. The Jumblies, by Edward Lear; Read by John Lithgow 30. A Psalm of Life , by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow ; Read by John Lithgow a. The Children’s Hour, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; Read by John Lithgow 31. The Public Garden , by Robert Lowell ; Read by Billy Connolly 32. To His Coy Mistress , by Andrew Marvell ; Read by John Lithgow a. The Mower’s Song, by Andrew Marvell; Read by John Lithgow 33. Love is Not All, by Edna St Vincent Millay; Read by Jodie Foster 34. Poetry, by Marianne Moore; Read by Kathy Bates 35. No Doctors Today, Thank You, by Ogden Nash; Read by John Lithgow 36. Afternoon , by Dorothy Parker ; Read by Glenn Close 37. Annabel Lee , by Edgar Allan Poe; Read by Sam Waterston a. Alone, by Edgar Allan Poe; Read by John Lithgow 38. The River Merchant's Wife: A Letter , by Ezra Pound ; Read by Jodie Foster 39. Up-Hill , by Christina Rossetti; Read by Eileen Atkins a. An Apple Gathering, by Christina Rossetti; Read by John Lithgow 40. Chicago, by Carl Sandburg; Read by Gary Sinise a. Honky Tonk In Cleveland ,Ohio , by Carl Sandburg; Read by John Lithgow 41. Fear No More The Heat of the Sun , by William Shakespeare ; Read by Lynn Redgrave a. Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day, by William Shakespeare ; Read by John Lithgow 42. To A Skylark , by Percy Bysshe Shelley; Read by Glenn Close a. Mutability, by Percy Bysshe Shelley; Read by John Lithgow 43. Sonnet LXXV ( One Day I Wrote her Name upon The Strand ) , by Edmund Spenser ; Read by Susan Sarandon a. Sonnet VIII ( from Amoretti ), Edmund Spenser; Read by John Lithgow 44. If I Told Him: A Completed Portrait of Picasso, by Gertrude Stein; Read by Kathy Bates 45. The Emperor of Ice-Cream, by Wallace Stevens ; Read by Kathy Bates 46. Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night,, by Dylan Thomas; Read by Susan Sarandon 47. There Was A Child Went Forth , by Walt Whitman; Read by Sam Waterston a. Song Of Myself, by Walt Whitman; Read by John Lithgow 48. The Red Wheelbarrow, by William Carlos Williams ; Read by Jodie Foster a. This Is Just To Say & To a Poor Old Woman, by William Carlos Williams; Read by John Lithgow 49. Daffodils , by William Wordsworth ; Read by Helen Mirren a. Surprised By Joy, by William Wordsworth; Read by John Lithgow 50. The Lake Isle of Innisfree, by William Butler Yeats; Read by Eileen Atkins a. Sailing To Byzantium, by William Butler Yeats; Read by John Lithgow Guest Performers : Eileen Atkins, Kathy Bates, Glenn Close, Billy Connolly, Jodie Foster, Morgan Freeman, Helen Mirren, Lynn Redgrave, Susan Sarandon, Gary Sinise, and Sam Waterston.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lilly

    Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine; Or leave a kiss but in the cup, And I’ll not look for wine. The thirst that from the soul doth rise Doth ask a drink divine; But might I of Jove’s nectar sup, I would not change for thine. The Poets’ Corner is a compilation of poems across different centuries. I love how I was introduced to all these poets whom I have never heard of before (which I’m quite sorry for) and how there were familiar ones whom I have already grown Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine; Or leave a kiss but in the cup, And I’ll not look for wine. The thirst that from the soul doth rise Doth ask a drink divine; But might I of Jove’s nectar sup, I would not change for thine. The Poets’ Corner is a compilation of poems across different centuries. I love how I was introduced to all these poets whom I have never heard of before (which I’m quite sorry for) and how there were familiar ones whom I have already grown to love. John Lithgow’s commentaries were also a welcome addition. I like to listen to his thoughts on the poems, and to be honest, the way he feels about them and how he put his feelings into words felt like poetry in itself. This is a very enjoyable audiobook, perfect for when you just want to sit around and relax.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Clare

    What a delightful book! Not only are we treated to some fine poetry but also a glimpse into the poets' lives. John Lithgow somehow manages, in just a few paragraphs, to give us some insight into what might have shaped each poets writing. Some of the poems featured were old favorites of mine (The Tyger by William Blake, Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll and The Red Wheelbarrow by William Carlos Williams to name a few). Others, completely new to me, were just as riveting. That's not to say I liked them What a delightful book! Not only are we treated to some fine poetry but also a glimpse into the poets' lives. John Lithgow somehow manages, in just a few paragraphs, to give us some insight into what might have shaped each poets writing. Some of the poems featured were old favorites of mine (The Tyger by William Blake, Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll and The Red Wheelbarrow by William Carlos Williams to name a few). Others, completely new to me, were just as riveting. That's not to say I liked them all but each had its literary merits and poetry is subject to personal interpretation like any good art. As an added bonus the book I borrowed from the library also had a cd in the back of the book which contained famous people reading most of the poems in the book. It was interesting to see how they chose to read the poems with their individual inflections showing their take on the poets' works.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.