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Horror Takes Its Time Looking for a thoughtful fright? Or perhaps a frightful thought? Packed with stories selected by one of today's leading esoteric scholars, this book will do more than make your toes curl and your skin crawl. These tales reveal hidden truths, inspire forbidden pursuits, and divulge the secrets of magical initiation in the guise of fiction. Covering topi Horror Takes Its Time Looking for a thoughtful fright? Or perhaps a frightful thought? Packed with stories selected by one of today's leading esoteric scholars, this book will do more than make your toes curl and your skin crawl. These tales reveal hidden truths, inspire forbidden pursuits, and divulge the secrets of magical initiation in the guise of fiction. Covering topics from rituals to hauntings to Satanism, this oneofakind volume includes selections from: Aleister Crowley Ambrose Bierce Arthur Machen Edgar Allan Poe Robert W. Chambers Ralph Adams Cram H.P. Lovecraft Dion Fortune Sir Edward George BulwerLytton Bram Stoker As DuQuette writes in his introduction, horror takes its time. It creeps in, seeps in, and lingers. These stories will take you hours to read, but they will stay with you, biting at your heels from the shadows, eternally. Don't say we didn't warn you...


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Horror Takes Its Time Looking for a thoughtful fright? Or perhaps a frightful thought? Packed with stories selected by one of today's leading esoteric scholars, this book will do more than make your toes curl and your skin crawl. These tales reveal hidden truths, inspire forbidden pursuits, and divulge the secrets of magical initiation in the guise of fiction. Covering topi Horror Takes Its Time Looking for a thoughtful fright? Or perhaps a frightful thought? Packed with stories selected by one of today's leading esoteric scholars, this book will do more than make your toes curl and your skin crawl. These tales reveal hidden truths, inspire forbidden pursuits, and divulge the secrets of magical initiation in the guise of fiction. Covering topics from rituals to hauntings to Satanism, this oneofakind volume includes selections from: Aleister Crowley Ambrose Bierce Arthur Machen Edgar Allan Poe Robert W. Chambers Ralph Adams Cram H.P. Lovecraft Dion Fortune Sir Edward George BulwerLytton Bram Stoker As DuQuette writes in his introduction, horror takes its time. It creeps in, seeps in, and lingers. These stories will take you hours to read, but they will stay with you, biting at your heels from the shadows, eternally. Don't say we didn't warn you...

57 review for The Weiser Book of Horror and the Occult: Hidden Magic, Occult Truths, and the Stories That Started It All

  1. 4 out of 5

    K.J. Charles

    A decent starter pack if you're interested in early to interwar occult stories. Not the Chambers I'd have chosen, and The Testament of Magdalen Blair is a crushing bore. A decent starter pack if you're interested in early to interwar occult stories. Not the Chambers I'd have chosen, and The Testament of Magdalen Blair is a crushing bore.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    The first thing you should know about this anthology of short fiction written in the late 19th and early 20th centuries is that “horror” of that time period does not in any way resemble horror of the modern era. Despite offerings from several, like H. P. Lovecraft and Poe, who are considered early masters of the genre, I didn’t find these stories particularly horrific. In fact, more than once I reached the end of a story and wondered where the plot had disappeared to and what was supposed to be The first thing you should know about this anthology of short fiction written in the late 19th and early 20th centuries is that “horror” of that time period does not in any way resemble horror of the modern era. Despite offerings from several, like H. P. Lovecraft and Poe, who are considered early masters of the genre, I didn’t find these stories particularly horrific. In fact, more than once I reached the end of a story and wondered where the plot had disappeared to and what was supposed to be the big deal. Much of the action revolves around people (generally men) in positions of privilege encountering things outside their experience. While the very idea of such things existing might have been cause for chills during the Victorian era, it falls flat today, when writers in all genres routinely push the boundaries of what we consider possible. The expository style of the time unfortunately renders what could be fascinating rather dry, and the intellectual tone of most of the stories creates such a disconnect between mind and spirit in the reader that it’s hard to care about the characters. At least, it had that effect on me. The second thing to bear in mind is that the stories included have only the most tenuous relationship to “the occult.” Three of the featured authors, Aleister Crowley, Arthur Machen, and Dion Fortune, were indeed practicing occultists. Another, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, had ties to the spiritualist movement. But though the editor claims the rest also were linked with anything from The Rosicrucians to The Golden Dawn, I could find nothing in my own research to substantiate this. The subjects of the stories themselves run the gamut from hauntings, to curses, to telepathy, alchemy, and reanimation—all standard tropes, but again, nothing I consider especially occult. I do not recommend reading the introduction if you appreciate good writing. I myself would rather bang my head repeatedly against a brick wall than go through that again. It’s written in what I guess DuQuette imagines is an imitation of the authors he admires, and it’s so full of hyperbole that I wondered if he intended self-parody. Or maybe he meant to emulate Tales from the Crypt. In the end I concluded that he actually took himself seriously. Do yourself a favor and skip it. A major oversight in my opinion was that, of thirteen stories, only two were written by women. Since I’m active in a community which promotes women writers of horror, I can assure you that there were plenty of women writing in the genre from the 18th century on, and most of them wrote better than the authors collected in this book. There’s no excuse these days for such imbalance, and it's one of my major problem with Modern Occultism and Esotericism. I've never heard of the editor before, though he looks like a nice guy and he seems to be respected in Occult circles. I found the way he fawned over some of the authors he included distasteful, and his limited view irritated me. I guess if you're extremely fond of writers like Lovecraft and Poe (I'm not) you will probably enjoy this book, bearing in mind that it is a narrow sample of what's available. Otherwise, give it a miss.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Lamb

    I received a copy of this book from a Goodreads giveaway and was excited to read it. The book contains several famous names (Poe, Lovecraft, Stoker, Doyle) and a lot of other authors from the late 1800s and early 1900s. My favorite story in the book was from Aleister Crowley (turn of the century) with The Testament of Magdelan Blair in which the narrator takes us into the mind of a dying man and travels beyond the grave. It was also great to read the early work by Lovecraft (written as a teenage I received a copy of this book from a Goodreads giveaway and was excited to read it. The book contains several famous names (Poe, Lovecraft, Stoker, Doyle) and a lot of other authors from the late 1800s and early 1900s. My favorite story in the book was from Aleister Crowley (turn of the century) with The Testament of Magdelan Blair in which the narrator takes us into the mind of a dying man and travels beyond the grave. It was also great to read the early work by Lovecraft (written as a teenager) and A Dream of Red Hands by Bram Stoker. DuQuette chose a nice range of stories to include and introduced authors with a succinct biography. It is clear that he has a passion for the genera and communicates that well. As noted by several other reviewers, I wouldn't really classify these works as "horror" in the modern sense of the word. Quite a few of the tales fall into the trope of "scientists comes around to believing in the occult", though keeping in mind that these are really the forerunners of this trope help. The most that can be said about some of them is that they are "eerie" or "odd"...not particularly horror. Further, from the introductions of authors, it seems that most, if not all, of them were evidently members of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, a 19th century magician's society. On an unrelated note - it would be nice if the Goodreads page for this book would include all of the authors as "contributing author" rather than simply listing DuQuette. I would like to be able to quickly click to the GR page of the individual authors.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lysa

    First off, I have to mention (by the rules) that I received a copy of this book through a giveaway Weiser hosted on GoodReads.com With my reading being halfway taken with literature textbooks, this book fits in perfectly. The set-up is a short introduction of the author and then a key piece of literature by them in the horror genre with occult tones but not focused in one movement (Realism, Naturalism, Gothic, etc). Going through the book made me wish more of these stories had made into the Norto First off, I have to mention (by the rules) that I received a copy of this book through a giveaway Weiser hosted on GoodReads.com With my reading being halfway taken with literature textbooks, this book fits in perfectly. The set-up is a short introduction of the author and then a key piece of literature by them in the horror genre with occult tones but not focused in one movement (Realism, Naturalism, Gothic, etc). Going through the book made me wish more of these stories had made into the Norton Anthologies of English and American Literature because they add so much more depth the literary movements covered. Not including the horror elements through all literary movements makes the subjects covered in classes very bland. The only hint of horror is the study of the Gothic movement in a short section. While this text doesn't go into the movements of the time they were written, there are mentions of the periods. This text is going on my literature study shelf. Aside from the occult tones, which is often overlooked when talking about spiritualism that inspired society, the horror aspects are additions to what inspired authors outside of the mainstream. Many studies in literary movements forget the darker aspects of human life and works. In this collection, you'll find a contemporary to Louisa May Alcott who wrote horror and was a lead female author often overlooked. Included is also a story by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle of Sherlock fame.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sistermagpie

    This is a collection of classic Gothic stories, some of which I'd read before, and all by excellent authors so what's not to like? I also actually enjoyed the intro by the editor where he talks about the day he first discovered horror in a book of Poe stories while a miserable 9-year-old uprooted from California to Nebraska in the 1950s. That day he not only discovered horror but started searching for his own writing voice, which is pretty great. This is a collection of classic Gothic stories, some of which I'd read before, and all by excellent authors so what's not to like? I also actually enjoyed the intro by the editor where he talks about the day he first discovered horror in a book of Poe stories while a miserable 9-year-old uprooted from California to Nebraska in the 1950s. That day he not only discovered horror but started searching for his own writing voice, which is pretty great.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    This is a collection of the very best spooky stories with occult flavors. Each story is a perfect gem chosen from the work of the selected masterful storyteller. I loved every minute spent in this “other” world. I’m so sad now that it’s done. But I have a new list if authors and I’ve launched my quest to seek them out and read more of their work! Excellent!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Leah Crowley

    I've always admired and appreciated the esoteric works of Lon Milo Duquette and when i came across The Weiser Book of Horror and the Occult I knew that this collective book would be something special, something keepsake. I wasn't wrong. Mr Duquette weaves you into each story with an introduction that grabs you with excitement. The storytelling Ringmaster with his tent of surprises. The stories included are special gems of classic horror literature and occult fiction from some of the most admired I've always admired and appreciated the esoteric works of Lon Milo Duquette and when i came across The Weiser Book of Horror and the Occult I knew that this collective book would be something special, something keepsake. I wasn't wrong. Mr Duquette weaves you into each story with an introduction that grabs you with excitement. The storytelling Ringmaster with his tent of surprises. The stories included are special gems of classic horror literature and occult fiction from some of the most admired and respected writers within the field of both horror and esoteric subjects, such as, Dion Fortune, Aleister Crowley, Edgar Allan Poe, Howard Phillips Lovecraft, plus many more. Personally, there aren't many people with the knowledge and expertise in both occult and literature to introduce a superb collection like this than the likes of Lon Milo Duquette. I highly recommend this book to the horror fan, the spiritual seeker, the student. The book will also appeal to anyone wanting to write horror or literature in general. This collective literary treasure will be a very educative tool. x

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carly Laughlin

    If you're looking for a good collection of horror stories (as I was), I wouldn't recommend this book. There are a few good things about it: it features some of the well-known horror & occult authors; it covers a range of subjects (ghosts, psychics, runes, curses, etc), and it is a good introduction to early horror. However, I didn't find most of the stories particularly scary. I expected some good horror stories with authors like Edgar Allen Poe, H.P. Lovecraft, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Bram If you're looking for a good collection of horror stories (as I was), I wouldn't recommend this book. There are a few good things about it: it features some of the well-known horror & occult authors; it covers a range of subjects (ghosts, psychics, runes, curses, etc), and it is a good introduction to early horror. However, I didn't find most of the stories particularly scary. I expected some good horror stories with authors like Edgar Allen Poe, H.P. Lovecraft, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Bram Stoker, but the stories of theirs that Duquette chose were definitely not their best work. It's a decent collection of stories, but I don't feel that it lives up to its title.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mina Khan

    I have to agree with the other reviewer in that the stories included here don't meet with modern reading expectations. The old-fashioned language and the expository stories (more telling than showing) distanced me as a reader from the stories. I found myself skimming a lot. Also, these now seem very tame, and somewhat simplistic. I did enjoy some of the stories. So an interesting read (from a writer's point of view, where you want to see some of the foundations of the genre), but not a haunting I have to agree with the other reviewer in that the stories included here don't meet with modern reading expectations. The old-fashioned language and the expository stories (more telling than showing) distanced me as a reader from the stories. I found myself skimming a lot. Also, these now seem very tame, and somewhat simplistic. I did enjoy some of the stories. So an interesting read (from a writer's point of view, where you want to see some of the foundations of the genre), but not a haunting one.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Fantastic anthology. Every story was good. Definitely pick it up if you like supernatural horror.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael Brown

    some old tales that I have liked before and some that were new to me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Good stories, but dense. Not an especially casual reach.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Edric Unsane

    A fairly good anthology of short stories that tie into the horror and occult genres. If you are a fan of either horror or occult fiction, you may well enjoy this book. I know I did.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jdan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Diandra

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Garlington

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stefano

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shabazz Pizazz

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steven Wooten Jr

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emma Addis

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ian Whalen

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna Chapman

  23. 5 out of 5

    The-May-Queen

  24. 5 out of 5

    ladycavendish

  25. 4 out of 5

    J Simpson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Red Wheel/Weiser, LLC

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jules

  28. 5 out of 5

    Margot Nikiforova

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emily Percival

  30. 5 out of 5

    Saskia

  31. 5 out of 5

    Pieter-Jan Beyul

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

  33. 4 out of 5

    Hailey

  34. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  35. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  36. 5 out of 5

    Dalar P

  37. 4 out of 5

    Rachella Baker

  38. 4 out of 5

    Carla

  39. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  40. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  41. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Reader

  42. 4 out of 5

    Lena

  43. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  44. 5 out of 5

    Brian Mossa

  45. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Cobb Sabatini

  46. 4 out of 5

    Dana

  47. 4 out of 5

    Marsha

  48. 5 out of 5

    Joy Adams

  49. 4 out of 5

    Vykki

  50. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Bingham

  51. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Carnes

  52. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Sternby

  53. 4 out of 5

    Tarran

  54. 5 out of 5

    Anna Tea

  55. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Mick

  56. 4 out of 5

    Rennie

  57. 4 out of 5

    Sheryl

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