hits counter Chasing Misery: an anthology of essays by women in humanitarian responses - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Chasing Misery: an anthology of essays by women in humanitarian responses

Availability: Ready to download

“What motivates any of us to do the work we do? And more importantly does that work make a difference?” This is the question film producer and founder of filmaid.org, Caroline Baron, reflects on when she calls Chasing Misery an “unblinking” account of what it’s like to be a woman on the front lines of global humanitarian responses. Twenty-one first person essays and 23 stu “What motivates any of us to do the work we do? And more importantly does that work make a difference?” This is the question film producer and founder of filmaid.org, Caroline Baron, reflects on when she calls Chasing Misery an “unblinking” account of what it’s like to be a woman on the front lines of global humanitarian responses. Twenty-one first person essays and 23 stunning photographs give readers a glimpse into the lives of real women who respond to emergencies—their hopes, fears, questions, challenges, frustrations as well as glimpses of the humour, beauty, and hope they find in the midst of misery.


Compare

“What motivates any of us to do the work we do? And more importantly does that work make a difference?” This is the question film producer and founder of filmaid.org, Caroline Baron, reflects on when she calls Chasing Misery an “unblinking” account of what it’s like to be a woman on the front lines of global humanitarian responses. Twenty-one first person essays and 23 stu “What motivates any of us to do the work we do? And more importantly does that work make a difference?” This is the question film producer and founder of filmaid.org, Caroline Baron, reflects on when she calls Chasing Misery an “unblinking” account of what it’s like to be a woman on the front lines of global humanitarian responses. Twenty-one first person essays and 23 stunning photographs give readers a glimpse into the lives of real women who respond to emergencies—their hopes, fears, questions, challenges, frustrations as well as glimpses of the humour, beauty, and hope they find in the midst of misery.

30 review for Chasing Misery: an anthology of essays by women in humanitarian responses

  1. 5 out of 5

    Annelise Burgess

    A beautiful, frank description of field-work. Highly recommend for anyone interested in this field or in international affairs.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Katharine

    This compilation of essays from female humanitarian aid workers isn't about educating the reader about aid work, although that happens along the way. Instead it gives a raw, personal and real glimpse of women with very unconventional lives in hopes of making the world better. To outsiders like me, it's difficult to imagine the daily lives of aid workers. As an expat, how do you cultivate relationships with your national co-workers? How do you bear the emotional burdens of knowing you can leave t This compilation of essays from female humanitarian aid workers isn't about educating the reader about aid work, although that happens along the way. Instead it gives a raw, personal and real glimpse of women with very unconventional lives in hopes of making the world better. To outsiders like me, it's difficult to imagine the daily lives of aid workers. As an expat, how do you cultivate relationships with your national co-workers? How do you bear the emotional burdens of knowing you can leave the tragic situations in which your beneficiaries are trapped? How do you evaluate acceptable personal risk as it relates to your work? And are aid worker parties really as crazy as they are famed to be? While the last question isn't quite answered, many of the other issues are wrestled with in these well-written, sometimes funny, other times shocking, deeply personal essays. Chasing Misery deepened my appreciation and understanding of world tragedies, without suffocating me. It provided glimpses of understanding into some of my own relationships with aid workers. I would recommend it to anyone considering aid work or who cares about someone who does it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I felt as if a bit of myself was in each of these essays. I know I will come back to read this again and again.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Liralen

    Solid—I appreciate the variation of experience here. There's a note at the beginning that it was a struggle to decide how to order these essays: by location, by theme, by something else? Ultimately they're arranged geographically, and while it makes sense, I also wonder what it might have looked like had they been arranged more thematically, with an arc throughout. As with any collection, some of these essays resonate with/interest me more than others, though as a whole they are well selected and Solid—I appreciate the variation of experience here. There's a note at the beginning that it was a struggle to decide how to order these essays: by location, by theme, by something else? Ultimately they're arranged geographically, and while it makes sense, I also wonder what it might have looked like had they been arranged more thematically, with an arc throughout. As with any collection, some of these essays resonate with/interest me more than others, though as a whole they are well selected and edited (if that sounds like thin praise, it's not intended to be—nothing stood out as being notably weak, or even just weaker than the rest, which is a hard goal to reach). I wished for longer essays, though, as often it felt like there wasn't time to explore all of the points being raised. Take this comment, from a woman who was a social worker in Chicago: While this [humanitarian] work was challenging, it reinforced what I had come to believe so well: that I was ill-suited to accompany people through their problems at home in Chicago. It had become clear that I could not take the problems of, for example, a 14-year old high school student seriously, when I knew a little bit about the problems a 14-year old high school student in Southern Sudan faced. ('Beating the Odds', Tracy O'Heir, 72) It's a sentiment I've seen elsewhere from people who have done humanitarian work (most recently, in War Doctor), but it's one I always want more discussion from. Yes: there are problems in Southern Sudan (to use the example above, though offhand I'm not sure whether we're talking South Sudan or the southern part of Sudan) that are much less common in Chicago: child marriage, lack of access to medical care, child soldiers, war. But it's not an either/or thing—either people face terrible atrocities or everything is fine—and while I'm sure the author here would agree, I always want more out of that sort of quick-summary 'X is more pressing and thus Y feels entirely unimportant' (hence my hankering for longer essays, I guess). But it's all very human, isn't it? A satisfying read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Adriana Sierra Leal

    I almost gave it a 3 - but I didn’t because a book like this is important, and it could have been so much more. I was disappointed by the majority of entries - they were Eurocentric, shallow, and uncritically privileged, not to mention poorly written. However, these entries show the realities of humanitarian work and the sometimes problematic perspectives of the people who do it. On the other hand, there were hidden gems in this book - entries where authors subtly touch on the controversies surr I almost gave it a 3 - but I didn’t because a book like this is important, and it could have been so much more. I was disappointed by the majority of entries - they were Eurocentric, shallow, and uncritically privileged, not to mention poorly written. However, these entries show the realities of humanitarian work and the sometimes problematic perspectives of the people who do it. On the other hand, there were hidden gems in this book - entries where authors subtly touch on the controversies surrounding humanitarian work, and where they are able to grapple with the absurdities of their privilege in some of the worlds most difficult places. For these entries, I recommend this book. The development world could use this kind of self reflection and empathy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lorrie

    I received this book free of charge in a Goodreads giveaway. The information in this book was an eye opener for me. The short stories were by various women who serve abroad in 3rd world countries in a humanitarian capacity. I admit I always heard of the Peace Corps but wasn't really sure what that lifestyle entailed. The organizations in this book were varied. This book allowed me a glimpse into the life of the female humanitarian. I know that I do not have the inner voice for this. I always had I received this book free of charge in a Goodreads giveaway. The information in this book was an eye opener for me. The short stories were by various women who serve abroad in 3rd world countries in a humanitarian capacity. I admit I always heard of the Peace Corps but wasn't really sure what that lifestyle entailed. The organizations in this book were varied. This book allowed me a glimpse into the life of the female humanitarian. I know that I do not have the inner voice for this. I always had wondered if I did. To live in war torn, impoverished countries and have to walk around a dead young boy lying face down in the road, to eat only boiled yucca root for dinner, to stand in the middle of a ceremonial tribal dance with the tip of the spear poked through my lips and touching my tongue without flinching, to watch babies die due to improper care.....no thanks. I know that I don't have the fortitude for this lifestyle. The reader can't help but be a little in awe of those who do.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Susi

    In Chasing Misery, the authors focus on different aspects of their relief work experience, including their fear in the face of danger, the emotional numbness developed by so many aid workers, the climate of uncertainty and volatility, the daily discomforts and the difficulty of maintaining an intimate relationship while carrying out relief work. Some essays focus on the people that were helped through the authors' work, others shine a light on someone whose life couldn’t be saved. As with just a In Chasing Misery, the authors focus on different aspects of their relief work experience, including their fear in the face of danger, the emotional numbness developed by so many aid workers, the climate of uncertainty and volatility, the daily discomforts and the difficulty of maintaining an intimate relationship while carrying out relief work. Some essays focus on the people that were helped through the authors' work, others shine a light on someone whose life couldn’t be saved. As with just about any anthology, some pieces are more compelling than others, but for the most part, they feel honest and unvarnished and don’t seek to glorify the work of humanitarian aid workers. For a full review, follow this link: http://peacecorpsworldwide.org/pc-wri...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    I was drawn in by the title and the idea of women sharing their raw experiences from the field. I have been using this book as part of my mediation place over the last few weeks. These stories (essays) are connection points with the suffering + struggle of helping + being helped. In reading, I feel more in touch with realities of humanitarian work. The book goes beyond glossy ideals of changing the world + helping others to show you a fuller picture of aid work. I think this is the kind of text I was drawn in by the title and the idea of women sharing their raw experiences from the field. I have been using this book as part of my mediation place over the last few weeks. These stories (essays) are connection points with the suffering + struggle of helping + being helped. In reading, I feel more in touch with realities of humanitarian work. The book goes beyond glossy ideals of changing the world + helping others to show you a fuller picture of aid work. I think this is the kind of text college classrooms + training fields need to employ. These are the stories you really need to know before entering the field (full with depth + richness).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    I received a free copy of this book through a Goodreads Giveaway. I really liked this book. The author of each essay provides amazing details into their world of providing humanitarian aid to many societies in this world. Chasing Misery is an eye-opener to the many struggles that various cultures deal with, as well as the struggles of those that are there to help them. It also opened my heart to the great deal of respect that these workers should have, although they are not always given. I am th I received a free copy of this book through a Goodreads Giveaway. I really liked this book. The author of each essay provides amazing details into their world of providing humanitarian aid to many societies in this world. Chasing Misery is an eye-opener to the many struggles that various cultures deal with, as well as the struggles of those that are there to help them. It also opened my heart to the great deal of respect that these workers should have, although they are not always given. I am thankful for this read, and will definitely share this with my family.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Caelin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Yejin Oh

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jen Steele

  13. 5 out of 5

    Johanna

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eva Mowat

  15. 5 out of 5

    Poliana Radu

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stine Chen

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dianelly Zamorano

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anuszka Mosurska

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andy Evans

  22. 4 out of 5

    Fi Wilson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

  26. 5 out of 5

    Irinel Cocos

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alaska

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

  30. 5 out of 5

    Grace

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...