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The collection of ten absorbing tales by master psychotherapist Irvin D. Yalom uncovers the mysteries, frustrations, pathos, and humor at the heart of the therapeutic encounter. In recounting his patients' dilemmas, Yalom not only gives us a rare and enthralling glimpse into their personal desires and motivations but also tells us his own story as he struggles to reconcile The collection of ten absorbing tales by master psychotherapist Irvin D. Yalom uncovers the mysteries, frustrations, pathos, and humor at the heart of the therapeutic encounter. In recounting his patients' dilemmas, Yalom not only gives us a rare and enthralling glimpse into their personal desires and motivations but also tells us his own story as he struggles to reconcile his all-too human responses with his sensibility as a psychiatrist. Not since Freud has an author done so much to clarify what goes on between a psychotherapist and a patient.


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The collection of ten absorbing tales by master psychotherapist Irvin D. Yalom uncovers the mysteries, frustrations, pathos, and humor at the heart of the therapeutic encounter. In recounting his patients' dilemmas, Yalom not only gives us a rare and enthralling glimpse into their personal desires and motivations but also tells us his own story as he struggles to reconcile The collection of ten absorbing tales by master psychotherapist Irvin D. Yalom uncovers the mysteries, frustrations, pathos, and humor at the heart of the therapeutic encounter. In recounting his patients' dilemmas, Yalom not only gives us a rare and enthralling glimpse into their personal desires and motivations but also tells us his own story as he struggles to reconcile his all-too human responses with his sensibility as a psychiatrist. Not since Freud has an author done so much to clarify what goes on between a psychotherapist and a patient.

30 review for Love's Executioner and Other Tales of Psychotherapy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Greta G

    Psychiatrist Dr. Irvin D. Yalom is married to a feminist scholar, which is highly surprising considering the fact that he regards women in a very sexualized and demeaning way. Unless they were attractive women, he displayed a worrying degree of contempt towards his patients. He seemed to have one derogatory thought after another about them. In the story ‘The Fat Lady’ he even admits that his contempt for fat ladies ‘surpassed all cultural norms’. But the fat lady, Betty, offered him an opportuni Psychiatrist Dr. Irvin D. Yalom is married to a feminist scholar, which is highly surprising considering the fact that he regards women in a very sexualized and demeaning way. Unless they were attractive women, he displayed a worrying degree of contempt towards his patients. He seemed to have one derogatory thought after another about them. In the story ‘The Fat Lady’ he even admits that his contempt for fat ladies ‘surpassed all cultural norms’. But the fat lady, Betty, offered him an opportunity to improve his personal skills as a therapist. She represented to him the ‘ultimate countertransference challenge’ and for that very reason he offered to be her therapist. “I have always been repelled by fat women. I find them repulsive : their absurd sidewise waddle, their absence of body contour — breasts, laps, buttocks, shoulders, jawlines, cheekbones, everything, everything I like to see in a woman, obscured in an avalanche of flesh. And I hate their clothes — the shapeless, baggy dresses or, worse, the stiff elephantine blue jeans. How dare they impose that body on the rest of us.” “I have always admired, perhaps more than many men, the woman’s body. No, not just admired : I have elevated, idealized, ecstacized it to a level and a goal that exceeds all reason. Do I resent the fat woman for her desecration of my desire, for bloating and profaning each lovely feature that I cherish? For stripping away my sweet illusion and revealing its base of flesh — flesh on the rampage?” Even after finishing this book a few months ago, this fat-lady-case is still on my mind from time to time. Reading about these ten psychotherapeutic cases was interesting ; the repeated denigratory comments on his patients however were often painful to read. To be honest, I wouldn’t want to lie down on his couch! 5/10

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paquita Maria Sanchez

    Your therapist is judging you. Sorry, it sucks. I know the idea is that they are objective observers looking out for your best interest rather than the often hypercritical, dismissive average human being with a capacity for conversational boredom and bad advice, but they're not. Especially not Dr. Yalom. Dr. Yalom hates fat people, he develops a sexual attraction to one of his patients' multiple personalities and encourages her to incorporate this split-self into her overarching self so she'll b Your therapist is judging you. Sorry, it sucks. I know the idea is that they are objective observers looking out for your best interest rather than the often hypercritical, dismissive average human being with a capacity for conversational boredom and bad advice, but they're not. Especially not Dr. Yalom. Dr. Yalom hates fat people, he develops a sexual attraction to one of his patients' multiple personalities and encourages her to incorporate this split-self into her overarching self so she'll be a more entertaining patient (and won't be so pathetic in general), he successfully convinces a lady to euthanize her incontinent dog in order to bolster her sex life (jerk), he sizes his patients up as hopeless human beings, rambling about how annoying certain cases were for him (with details), describing each individual while "masking their identities" to "protect confidentiality" in an almost Deconstructing Harry, Leslie's "not" Lucy sort of way. He is walking a lawsuit razor's edge, and I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if one of these folks showed up at his house with a pistol. There's not a chance in hell that I'd go see him after reading this. I mean, he gets pretty catty, pretty "oh shut up, you whiny little bitch." He reaaally lays into that fat lady. He calls people names. He relays very personal, veryvery embarrassing information, and then scoffs at it. As off-putting as this is, though, it's also one of the things that make the book stick out. Honesty. One of the best scenes in the t.v. Hannibal is where Dr. Lecter's most annoying patient is relaying a fantasy alternate-reality where he saves Michael Jackson from death by being his best friend. The look on Hannibal's face and condescending tone of his voice is priceless: god, you are insufferable, blubbering excuse for a human being. Cannibal or not, shrinkydinks are just people at the end of the day, with the same penchant for annoyance as you or I, the same neuroses and triggers. Just people. (Your therapist is judging you.) To Dr. Yalom's credit, he is not asserting that his preconceived notions about his past patients were fair or accurate. This book is as much about the individual cases he has dealt with as about his growth as a psychiatrist, his separating of his own prejudices from the therapeutic process. In that sense, it is both intriguing, and kinda weirdly narcissistic. This book seems less for people with a passing interest in psychotherapy, and more for future head-docs who need to really understand that in their chosen field, they are as much up against their inherent selves as they are the problems their patients are seeking help facing. The cases are mostly what I'd assume to be pretty garden variety, but they still hold interest. Well, except for that last one where it was all about analyzing some dude's dreams because, snooze. I could fall asleep listening to my loved ones' dreams, let alone those of some average stranger. It wasn't a waste of time at all, but I'm not sure I'd recommend it. Mostly because of that thing with the dog.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    I had originally started Irvin D. Yalom's newest release Becoming Myself, where he mentioned this collection of stories which sounded more fitting because my attention span was slight at the time. Love's Executioner and Other Tales of Psychotherapy offers a keen insight on ten patients, from all walks of life, who turned to therapy, “all ten were suffering the common problems of everyday life: loneliness, self-contempt, impotence, migraine headaches, sexual compulsivity, obesity, hypertension, gr I had originally started Irvin D. Yalom's newest release Becoming Myself, where he mentioned this collection of stories which sounded more fitting because my attention span was slight at the time. Love's Executioner and Other Tales of Psychotherapy offers a keen insight on ten patients, from all walks of life, who turned to therapy, “all ten were suffering the common problems of everyday life: loneliness, self-contempt, impotence, migraine headaches, sexual compulsivity, obesity, hypertension, grief, a consuming love obsession, mood swings, depression. Yet somehow (a “somehow” that unfolds differently in each story), therapy uncovered deep roots of these everyday problems—roots stretching down to the bedrock of existence.” Though the problems may be considered “common problems of everyday life,” Love's Executioner made them seem like anything but. Yalom writes his patients with the utmost respect and interest. I'd like to mention in particular one story that started off the collection on a bang for me with Thelma, “a depressed, suicidal, seventy-year-old woman,” who for the past eight years “could not relinquish her obsessive love for a man thirty-five years younger.” “Perhaps the function of the obsession was simply to provide intimacy: it bonded her to another—but not to a real person, to a fantasy.” My attention was riveted to her. I went through a turmoil of emotions reading her story, and came out of it with a changed perspective of my own. It was such a wild ride that in the end I felt like both the doctor and the patient being treated. The longest piece, deservingly so. “You are you, you have your own existence, you continue to be the person you are from moment to moment, from day to day. Basically your existence is impervious to the fleeting thoughts, to the electromagnetic ripples occurring in some unknown mind. Try to see that. All this power that Matthew has—you’ve given it to him—every bit of it!” ... “What goes on in another person’s mind, someone you never even see, who probably isn’t even aware of your existence, who is caught up in his own life struggles, doesn’t change the person you are.” I was easily swept away into the pensive and therapeutic writing style. It offered an introspective look into moments not many of us get to see represented. The book also had many noteworthy lines that left an imprint on me, such as: “You know, there is no one alive now who was grown-up when I was a child. So I, as a child, am dead. Some day soon, perhaps in forty years, there will be no one alive who has ever known me. That’s when I will be truly dead—when I exist in no one’s memory. I thought a lot about how someone very old is the last living individual to have known some person or cluster of people. When that old person dies, the whole cluster dies, too, vanishes from living memory. I wonder who that person will be for me. Whose death will make me truly dead?” This precise piece of commentary struck me. Speaking of which, this note on experiencing “love at first sight” was so satisfying to agree on: “You don’t know this person. In a Proustian way, you’ve packed this creature full of the attributes you so desire. You’ve fallen in love with your own creation.” At the expense of sounding a bit abrasive, this book was perfect for my nosy self that likes to hear personal stories without having to share something of myself in exchange. And though I did not agree with the tactics used in certain tales, I read on in fascination of the differing views of reality presented. Now, I can move on to Yalom's newest release. Oh, and one last thing I have to highlight upon ending my review, this piece on experiencing "crushes": “At a conference approximately two years prior to meeting Thelma, I had encountered a woman who subsequently invaded my mind, my thoughts, my dreams. Her image took up housekeeping in my mind and defied all my efforts to dislodge it. But, for a time, that was all right: I liked the obsession and savored it afresh again and again. A few weeks later, I went on a week’s vacation with my family to a beautiful Caribbean island. It was only after several days that I realized I was missing everything on the trip—the beauty of the beach, the lush and exotic vegetation, even the thrill of snorkeling and entering the underwater world. All this rich reality had been blotted out by my obsession. I had been absent. I had been encased in my mind, watching replays over and over again of the same and, by then, pointless fantasy. Anxious and thoroughly fed up with myself, I entered therapy (yet again), and after several hard months, my mind was my own again and I was able to return to the exciting business of experiencing my life as it was happening.” Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Love's Executioner, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission! Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris Coffman

    A friend gave me this book a few days ago. My friend is very well-educated, has lived all over the world, and has experienced more than most people. When he gave me the book, he said to me, "This book reflects my vision of the world". How could I help but be intrigued? Opening the book, he then read the following passage from the Preface: "Four givens are particularly relevant for psycho-therapy: the inevitability of death for each of us and for those we love; the freedom to make our lives as we w A friend gave me this book a few days ago. My friend is very well-educated, has lived all over the world, and has experienced more than most people. When he gave me the book, he said to me, "This book reflects my vision of the world". How could I help but be intrigued? Opening the book, he then read the following passage from the Preface: "Four givens are particularly relevant for psycho-therapy: the inevitability of death for each of us and for those we love; the freedom to make our lives as we will; our ultimate aloneness; and, finally, the absence of any obvious meaning or sense to life." When I recently read the novel LIFE AND FATE, which takes its characters through the massive Battle of Stalingrad and Stalin's Great Terror, I couldn't help thinking how poor in material for great novels is the typical life of a prosperous, well-educated professional living today in the OECD. Compared to the intensity of the experiences described in LIFE AND FATE, even wonderful writers like Ian McEwan are boring. But, as the Preface accurately foreshadows, there is nothing boring about LOVE'S EXECUTIONER, because my friend is right-- the four issues described in the Preface do indeed define the human condition. In a sense, LOVE'S EXECUTIONER offers, in the broadest possible sense, the ancient wisdom found in Psalms 90: "Teach us to number our days: that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom." Dr. Yalom is quite frank about what he considers the "magical" thinking and "delusion" involved in religious belief, however. Aside from his commitment to unflinchingly acknowledge the truths he describes in his Preface (and therefore, "Teach us to number our days"), Dr. Yalom's faith resides in the healing potential of the relationship between the therapist and the patient. This could be generalised to incorporate the Second Commandment to "Love thy neighbour as thyself" with its emphasis on human relationships and mutual openness, but one senses that Dr. Yalom would acknowledge this point, at best, with a sardonic shrug--"Whatever gets you through the night." Yalom is his own main character, and LOVE'S EXECUTIONER is a dramatic account of how the "character" Dr. Yalom undergoes dramatic encounters with deeply troubled characters not unlike the way the "character" Dante encounters vividly depicted souls in Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise. Like Dante's DIVINE COMEDY, LOVE'S EXECUTIONER is episodic. The ten tales all vary and will affect individual reader's differently. For some reason, I found the case of the morbidly obsese woman deeply moving, while being most unsettled by the cases of the elderly neurobiologist and the elderly accountant--perhaps because they were the patients most similar to me. (REVIEW CONT'D as COMMENT #1)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Sherman

    There is no adventure more exciting, nothing so wonderful and frightening, and so fraught with danger, as delving into the mind of a human being. On that point alone this book is moving and emotional and funny as few works of fiction can be. When going on such a perilous journey into the true heart of darkness it behooves one to have an experienced and trustworthy guide. Dr. Irving Yalom knows the terrain and the beasts that lurk within... yet I would prefer having Fred C. Dobbs showing me the w There is no adventure more exciting, nothing so wonderful and frightening, and so fraught with danger, as delving into the mind of a human being. On that point alone this book is moving and emotional and funny as few works of fiction can be. When going on such a perilous journey into the true heart of darkness it behooves one to have an experienced and trustworthy guide. Dr. Irving Yalom knows the terrain and the beasts that lurk within... yet I would prefer having Fred C. Dobbs showing me the way in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. At least with Dobbs you know where you stand. Yalom is duplicitous and self aggrandizing, his writing screams contempt and distain for all but his most attractive female patients. At the same time his writing, when keeping to the trail of his client's problems is compelling and insightful. But it is Yalom's incessant and obnoxious inner monologue that ruins this book for me. Yalom is smarmy and lascivious to women he finds attractive, and dismissive and cruel in his descriptions of those who don't match his standards. He compartmentalizes men in the same way. When one women, far below his standards and the first of the ten case studies that make up the book says her last therapist called her on her "...shitty habits" Yalom tells us, “This phrase startled me. It didn’t fit with the rest of her presentation.” That's how I felt about him throughout the book. The insight he shows in the introduction of the book is waylaid time and time again by his incessant, obnoxious, and judgmental inner monologue. This, along with his ego and self-centeredness proved for a very unenjoyable read. If I want to read the musings of a horndog I'll stick with Errol Flynn's "My Wicked Wicked Ways" and be spared the hubris. But wait! What's this, an afterword! Ah, written 25 years after the book was first published. Now I'll see the wisdom of the man who wrote the introduction! Now, matured and distilled by age and experience, I'll see the wise reflections on his egotistic, insulting asides and comments of his freshman book. But what to my wondering eyes do appear? He actually envies and praises his writing. He makes a very backhanded apology for what he wrote about one of his clients but finds room to lionize himself even there. I don't care about his experience, reputation or certifications. "If it looks like a schmuck, swims like a schmuck, and quacks like a schmuck, then it probably is a schmuck."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    "From both my personal and professional experience, I had come to believe that the fear of death is always greatest in those who feel that they have not lived their life fully. A good working formula is: the more unlived life, or unrealized potential, the greater one's death anxiety." In his book Love's Executioner, Irvin Yalom, a psychotherapist with several decades of experience, shares ten stories of individuals he counseled in a professional setting. Each of these tales revolves around differ "From both my personal and professional experience, I had come to believe that the fear of death is always greatest in those who feel that they have not lived their life fully. A good working formula is: the more unlived life, or unrealized potential, the greater one's death anxiety." In his book Love's Executioner, Irvin Yalom, a psychotherapist with several decades of experience, shares ten stories of individuals he counseled in a professional setting. Each of these tales revolves around different presenting problems, ranging from a man whose cancer has left him ravenous for sex to a woman who blames herself for her daughter's death years after her passing. Yalom ties together all of these unique clients with overarching themes pertaining to how we must accept and conquer our fear of death, how we must assume responsibility for the course of our lives, and how we must construct meaning within ourselves in order to thrive. While some of those concepts might sound cliche - "how we must construct meaning," "assume responsibility for the course of our lives," "accept and conquer our fear of death" - Yalom presents them in fascinating, complex, and unpretentious ways. He examines his clients with an insightful lens, treats them like humans in an understanding and open relationship, and uses skilled therapeutic techniques to provoke insight and growth. Not all of his stories end on a clean note, and their ambiguous resolutions exemplify the complex and bumpy nature of therapy, similar to the convoluted quality of humans themselves. Yalom's openness stands out as a strong point in this book. In his afterword, in which he reflects on writing this book at 55 after reading it again at 80, he admits to feeling embarrassed due to some of the content in Love's Executioner. Throughout the ten tales he discloses information such as how he had to work through his prejudice against fat people, how he urged a woman to put her dog to rest, and how he himself would get bored by certain clients. His honesty, his willingness to scrutinize himself, and his commitment to positive self-growth show that therapists, even experienced ones, still remain human. We all progress and learn together, even in a therapist-client relationship. Recommended to those interested in psychology, therapy, and reading about people. A fascinating book that makes me want to read more of Yalom's writing, including his fiction.

  7. 4 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣

    Executing love, rationally. Overcoming the fear of death. Accepting one's mortality... Psychologists get some interesting tasks in their workdays, don't they? Q: That's when I will be truly dead - when I exist in no one's memory. (c) Q: I think my quarry is illusion. I war against magic. I believe that, though illusion often cheers and comforts, it ultimately and invariably weakens and constricts the spirit. (c) Q: I do not like to work with patients who are in love. Perhaps it is because of envy—I, to Executing love, rationally. Overcoming the fear of death. Accepting one's mortality... Psychologists get some interesting tasks in their workdays, don't they? Q: That's when I will be truly dead - when I exist in no one's memory. (c) Q: I think my quarry is illusion. I war against magic. I believe that, though illusion often cheers and comforts, it ultimately and invariably weakens and constricts the spirit. (c) Q: I do not like to work with patients who are in love. Perhaps it is because of envy—I, too, crave enchantment. Perhaps it is because love and psychotherapy are fundamentally incompatible. The good therapist fights darkness and seeks illumination, while romantic love is sustained by mystery and crumbles upon inspection. I hate to be love’s executioner. (c) Q: One of the great paradoxes of life is that self-awareness breeds anxiety. (c) Q: Some people are wish-blocked, knowing neither what they feel nor what they want. Without opinions, without impulses, without inclinations, they become parasites on the desires of others. (c) Q: People who feel empty never heal by merging with another incomplete person. On the contrary, two broken-winged birds coupled into one make for clumsy flight. No amount of patience will help it fly; and, ultimately, each must be pried from the other, and wounds separately splinted. (c) Q: ... the fear of death is always greatest in those who feel that they have not lived their life fully. A good working formula is: the more unlived life, or unrealized potential, the greater one’s death anxiety. (c) Q: Я был так уверен в своей правоте. Боже, какое высокомерие! А сейчас что за истину я преследую? Думаю, моя добыча иллюзорна. Я борюсь против магии. Я верю, что хотя иллюзия часто ободряет и успокаивает, она в конце концов неизбежно ослабляет и ограничивает человеческий дух. Но всему свое время. Никогда нельзя отнимать ничего у человека, если вам нечего предложить ему взамен. Остерегайтесь срывать с пациента покров иллюзии, если не уверены, что он сможет выдержать холод реальности. И не изнуряйте себя сражениями с религиозными предрассудками: это вам не по зубам. Религиозная жажда слишком сильна, ее корни слишком глубоки, а культурное подкрепление слишком мощно. Но я не считаю себя неверующим. Моя молитва – это высказывание Сократа: «Непознанная жизнь не стоит того, чтобы быть прожитой». Но Дэйв не разделял мою веру. Поэтому я обуздал свои порывы. Дэйв не был способен понять подлинное значение своей привязанности к письмам и сейчас, зажатый и ранимый, не выдержал бы такого расследования. Оно не принесло бы пользы – сейчас, а, возможно, и никогда. Кроме того, мои вопросы не были искренними. Я знал, что у нас с Дэйвом много общего и моему лицемерию есть пределы. У меня тоже была пачка писем от давно утраченной возлюбленной. Я тоже хитроумно прятал их (по моей системе на букву "X", означающую «Холодный дом», мой любимый роман Диккенса, чтобы читать, когда жизнь покажется совсем унылой). Я тоже никогда не перечитывал письма. Всякий раз, когда я пытался делать это, то испытывал боль вместо утешения. Они лежали нетронутыми пятнадцать лет, и я тоже не мог уничтожить их. (c)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steven Doyle

    A more fitting title would be 'How counter-transference, insidious prejudice and sexism destroys the therapeutic process'. The man's a creep and from what I can tell in these vignettes a poor to average psychotherapist. Though, I can see how one could become seduced by his writings and spurious analysis to believe there is some insights to be gleamed from this book. A more fitting title would be 'How counter-transference, insidious prejudice and sexism destroys the therapeutic process'. The man's a creep and from what I can tell in these vignettes a poor to average psychotherapist. Though, I can see how one could become seduced by his writings and spurious analysis to believe there is some insights to be gleamed from this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    April

    The stories of 10 patients' experiences in psychotherapy - but they feel like much more. The stories offer a surprisingly engaging window to peek into the struggles of patients w/ the very same existential pains and miseries everyone experiences. The author is a practicing therapist, and he based these stories on his patients (suitably amended to ensure anonymity). He reflects much on his own role in the therapeutic relationship, and these reflections are often as interesting as the stories of hi The stories of 10 patients' experiences in psychotherapy - but they feel like much more. The stories offer a surprisingly engaging window to peek into the struggles of patients w/ the very same existential pains and miseries everyone experiences. The author is a practicing therapist, and he based these stories on his patients (suitably amended to ensure anonymity). He reflects much on his own role in the therapeutic relationship, and these reflections are often as interesting as the stories of his patients. Each person's story is engaging - their narrative just as intriguing as fiction. They each come to therapy to, somewhat, deal with their issues, and get better and move on. But some are really ready to see - and take in even painful insights about themselves; and ready to take painful steps to change. Others...sadly...are not. In this sense, these stories represent very nicely the same phenomenon in the rest of the human race. We are all getting older; and a few....are growing up.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cassian

    This book gave a lot of insights into the therapeutic process, but I found the guy a total putz--very self-aware of his own reactions to the patients he describes, but not so concerned about their own experience of the process that he wouldn't describe them in great detail to the world at large. Also, just comes off as self-satisfied; it made the reading distasteful, and I didn't finish in the end. I couldn't stand the supercilious sense he gives of being in some way, better than his clients. This book gave a lot of insights into the therapeutic process, but I found the guy a total putz--very self-aware of his own reactions to the patients he describes, but not so concerned about their own experience of the process that he wouldn't describe them in great detail to the world at large. Also, just comes off as self-satisfied; it made the reading distasteful, and I didn't finish in the end. I couldn't stand the supercilious sense he gives of being in some way, better than his clients.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

    Ugh, I am so disappointed. I very, very badly wanted to love this book. Staring at the Sun was revolutionary, and The Gift of Therapy unequivocally changed who I am as a mental health professional. One of Yalom's greatest assets is that he has always been very open about his flaws, judgments, and humanness. But in this book, he reveals that he has many flaws and more judgments than most people I know. I started reading (well, listening, actually - I did this one on audiobook and managed to mostl Ugh, I am so disappointed. I very, very badly wanted to love this book. Staring at the Sun was revolutionary, and The Gift of Therapy unequivocally changed who I am as a mental health professional. One of Yalom's greatest assets is that he has always been very open about his flaws, judgments, and humanness. But in this book, he reveals that he has many flaws and more judgments than most people I know. I started reading (well, listening, actually - I did this one on audiobook and managed to mostly ignore mispronunciations of words like "Rogerian" and "Marin County") with stars in my eyes. I was excited to be reading Yalom, who I've always placed on a pedestal as a therapy role model. And I was good for the first 3 or so stories... until "Fat Lady". Maybe it's because I'm coming off the tails of "Shrill" by Lindy West, where she beautifully depicts the radical notion that a woman of any size has value. One of the best lines in Shrill, to paraphrase, is when Lindy says that her entire body is her - when she is at her thinnest, her body is all her. When she is at her fattest, her body is all her - there is not a thin lady waiting to come out. She talked about fat as a feminist issue, and how it plays into the objectification of women, and how women are taught that to have value, they have to deprive themselves, to hate their bodies, to tailor make themselves for the male gaze. By contrast, Yalom's story of the "Fat Lady" describes, in detail, the disgust he has always felt towards obese women. I was with him at the beginning - a lot of people feel this way, and after all, everyone loves a reformed sinner, right? Yalom is known for telling stories of learning from the experiences of working with his clients. But the thing is... he never got reformed. As he tells the story of working with this fat woman, he talks about how she got motivated, joined the eating disorders program at a hospital he's affiliated with, and went on a liquid diet - ate literally no food for 6 months. HOW IS THAT OK??? (Also, how can a place that purports that this is healthy call itself an eating disorders treatment facility??) Yalom then goes on to describe how the pounds began to fall off this woman - she went from about 240 pounds to about 150 - and how she got more and more depressed as this happened, even having flashbacks of things that happened to her at the point in her life when she was at each weight as she hit it. But his description of her weight loss? "Slowly, I noticed a person was beginning to emerge." She was a person when she came to see you, you misogynistic jerk! I tried listening to the stories after that, but I felt myself skipping parts, and forcing myself to pick up the book. It was really hard, because I saw everything through the lens of his telling of this story. I started to notice themes in other stories that told tales of his objectification of women: his counseling a man who viewed women as sex objects to think of women as human not in their own right, but because he has a daughter... his sexual attraction to several of his female clients, and his decision to keep difficult clients who were possibly beyond his scope of competence, simply because he found them physically attractive. It's genuinely disappointing, because Yalom is a huge part of my therapy home. His ideas - the idea that therapy is a relationship (and works for that very reason), that authenticity and genuineness are key... these are the things I learned from reading his books and seeing him speak when I was a brand new baby therapist. I hope I can manage not to throw the baby out with the bathwater - to keep The Gift of Therapy and Staring at the Sun on my bookshelf, and maybe even reread them. Maybe even to try one of his other books. But I'm not sure I can compartmentalize how appalled I was at this book, and I'm not 100% sure I should.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I could get long winded here (in fact my colleagues and I half joked about writing a response to this book called “Yalom’s Executioner” in which we deconstruct everything wrong with it) but I won’t. Instead I’ll just say that Yalom, while a phenomenal writer, is a despicable and morally repugnant person. As a counselor I felt repulsed by how he described his clients. His hubris and inability to check his privilege made this incredibly difficult to read. In fact, I stopped reading it halfway thro I could get long winded here (in fact my colleagues and I half joked about writing a response to this book called “Yalom’s Executioner” in which we deconstruct everything wrong with it) but I won’t. Instead I’ll just say that Yalom, while a phenomenal writer, is a despicable and morally repugnant person. As a counselor I felt repulsed by how he described his clients. His hubris and inability to check his privilege made this incredibly difficult to read. In fact, I stopped reading it halfway through because it was so upsetting, and I’m someone who hates leaving things unfinished. The fact that this is used in educational settings and that Yalom is well renowned and holds so much power in the field... WHY?! I actually regret buying this book because I put more money into this man’s pockets.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jason Pettus

    Last year I started seeing a therapist for the first time in my life, although not by deliberate choice but rather as a side benefit of something else -- namely, I attended one of those "computer coding bootcamp" programs here in Chicago, and one of the things they provide for their students for no cost is a licensed therapist on staff for weekly sessions. I ended up responding so well to the process, though, that I've continued seeing her in private practice ever since. As part of this therapy p Last year I started seeing a therapist for the first time in my life, although not by deliberate choice but rather as a side benefit of something else -- namely, I attended one of those "computer coding bootcamp" programs here in Chicago, and one of the things they provide for their students for no cost is a licensed therapist on staff for weekly sessions. I ended up responding so well to the process, though, that I've continued seeing her in private practice ever since. As part of this therapy process, I've recently become fascinated with the idea of how my particular experience has compared to others; and it turns out that my own therapist is what's known as an "existential therapist," and decided to start loaning me books on the subject by one of her heroes, Irvin Yalom who essentially coined the phrase and was the first one to define it. The great thing about Yalom (for patients of psychotherapy, that is) is that he's written a series of narrative-based books over the years about his various experiences with his patients, ostensibly designed for fellow therapists but well-written enough and entertaining enough for general audience members like myself. "Love's Executioner" is the second such book of his I've read, after the illuminating 1970s experiment "Every Day Gets a Little Closer" (in which he invited a patient who's a creative writer to write a journal about what each of her sessions was like for her, then wrote such a journal himself, not comparing each other's notes until the entire year-long experiment was over), and both are hugely eye-opening experiences for those like me who are going through existential-type therapy themselves. Yalom talks candidly about the various problems that come with certain therapy sessions, and how these can become exacerbated by the biases and weaknesses of the therapists themselves; and unlike what you might expect from a book like this, not all the ten case studies presented here have happy endings, Yalom being quite clear about the various breakdowns on both his and his patients' parts when one of them ends up leaving therapy without being "cured" (however you want to define that). Illuminating like a textbook but engrossing like a novel, all of his books are highly recommended to those who are curious to learn more about how the psychotherapeutic process actually works, and I'm now looking forward to making my way through more of his oeuvre as 2016 continues.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maxime

    Love's Executioner. God that's a good title. Vaguely profound statements are the best. (Fortune cookies anyone?) In this book, Yalom gives accounts of patients he has had. I am not sure what criteria were used in picking the case studies he did for the book; I imagine he has rich history of intriguing patients and these are no exception. In Love's Executioner you will read about interesting characters and their neuroses and watch from behind the scenes as Yalom applies his psychological scalpel Love's Executioner. God that's a good title. Vaguely profound statements are the best. (Fortune cookies anyone?) In this book, Yalom gives accounts of patients he has had. I am not sure what criteria were used in picking the case studies he did for the book; I imagine he has rich history of intriguing patients and these are no exception. In Love's Executioner you will read about interesting characters and their neuroses and watch from behind the scenes as Yalom applies his psychological scalpel (or in some cases sledge hammer). It all feels very voyeuristic, not only from peering inside Yalom's office, but also from experiencing his inner dialogue. Understanding the intense challenge of psychotherapy is interesting, especially for those who enjoy psychology, but it is Yalom's refreshing honesty, bordering on the uncomfortable, that makes this book such a great read. You do not need to point out that the statement he just made regarding his patient might be egotistical or potentially inaccurate. He knows it. And he will proceed to lay out counter arguments to himself better articulated than you ever could have. Reading Love's Executioner, you are given an inside view of someone who has made a successful career at trying to understand and categorize something that cannot ever be understood or explained: the human mind. Ironically, while Love's Executioner strongly demonstrates psychology's ineptitude at understanding the mind, the book also shows that when applied in therapy, psychology remains mysteriously effective.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Love's Executioner is a wonderful collection of psychotherapy tales of master psychiatrist Irvin Yalom. Although the book does have a sort of instructional focus, I believe anyone could enjoy the content. Yalom describes treating patients with a multitude of symptoms and presentations, and his intelligent and thoughtful approach to them all. Even though his theory of choice doesn't align with my own, I really do have to awe at and truly appreciate the true mastery of the therapeutic process. I r Love's Executioner is a wonderful collection of psychotherapy tales of master psychiatrist Irvin Yalom. Although the book does have a sort of instructional focus, I believe anyone could enjoy the content. Yalom describes treating patients with a multitude of symptoms and presentations, and his intelligent and thoughtful approach to them all. Even though his theory of choice doesn't align with my own, I really do have to awe at and truly appreciate the true mastery of the therapeutic process. I remember reading this in graduate school and enjoying it, but it's not until I am here, three years removed from my master's and working in the field, do I actually grasp the WORK involved with these people. I did have a personal problem with the book, however. I did tire of the near constant focus on dream work, death anxiety, and deep exploration, but I did have to anticipate that from an existential psychotherapist, I suppose. I personally prefer a more behavior centered approach, but then I know I have to find a different author. So although I consider those reasons to have enjoyed the book less, I certainly cannot fault the book for their existence. 4/5

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Oh man. Did I hate this book. Yalom is a turd. I really tried. I really did, but I cannot. We're meant to appreciate his honesty and study his counter-transference, but I'm telling you right now. Any other therapist could have written a brutally honest account of their work, and not come off as such a whiny, self-aggrandizing putz. All Yalom does is piss and moan that he's bored in sessions because his client is ugly, or a fatty, or whatever else is not the height of entertainment for him. Then Oh man. Did I hate this book. Yalom is a turd. I really tried. I really did, but I cannot. We're meant to appreciate his honesty and study his counter-transference, but I'm telling you right now. Any other therapist could have written a brutally honest account of their work, and not come off as such a whiny, self-aggrandizing putz. All Yalom does is piss and moan that he's bored in sessions because his client is ugly, or a fatty, or whatever else is not the height of entertainment for him. Then he pats himself on the back for whatever nonremarkable accomplishment he does make. I'm told he's one of the greatest psychotherapists in all the land, but this book does nothing to illustrate that, as far as I can tell. I like to donate books, not ever throw them away, but this one here....pfffffft. Guinea pig litter. Everyone always says things in reviews like, "I wish I could give such-and-such book negative stars!" Well this time, I'm deathly serious. No, really.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jack M

    Turns out it's no fun reading about peoples mental afflictions or a creepy psychoanalyst therapy session. Here's what you'll get in every chapter: The author introducing a patient, then berating them (with the exception of if they are a 'sexy' attractive women - then author will muse if he is helping the patient out of the goodness of his heart or because the patient is a sexy woman). God help you if you're a fat woman, Mr. Yalom is absolutely sickened by this filth. You'll hear the patient desc Turns out it's no fun reading about peoples mental afflictions or a creepy psychoanalyst therapy session. Here's what you'll get in every chapter: The author introducing a patient, then berating them (with the exception of if they are a 'sexy' attractive women - then author will muse if he is helping the patient out of the goodness of his heart or because the patient is a sexy woman). God help you if you're a fat woman, Mr. Yalom is absolutely sickened by this filth. You'll hear the patient describe vividly a dream they had (yawn), at which point Mr. Yalom goes on to analyze this dream and self-proclaim his genius.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This is not the book to read while you are actually in therapy. Although I think Love's Executioner Other Tales of Psychotherapy was meant to show people the "behind the scenes" of psychology, Dr. Yalom will make you question the motives of any practitioner, no matter how saintly. That's not to say that the book isn't intriguing, informative, or balanced; it is all of those things. It's just that Yalom comes across as unbearably arrogant in many of the case studies, which belies the work he's tr This is not the book to read while you are actually in therapy. Although I think Love's Executioner Other Tales of Psychotherapy was meant to show people the "behind the scenes" of psychology, Dr. Yalom will make you question the motives of any practitioner, no matter how saintly. That's not to say that the book isn't intriguing, informative, or balanced; it is all of those things. It's just that Yalom comes across as unbearably arrogant in many of the case studies, which belies the work he's trying to do. According to him, he hides his feelings well, to which I say, I hope so, because if I knew a therapist was looking at me with the same sort of misogyny, boredom, and disgust, I'd certainly never be back. The book is a compilation of ten case studies of ten patients, although some patients do pop up in more than one place. Each has a unique problem, ranging from the insufferable Carlos, dying of cancer but hoping to nail every woman he sees, to Thelma, with her obsession with a month-long fling she had eight years prior, to the obese Betty (here the disgust is palpable). Their stories are all compelling, in the same way that true crime books are compelling: we can relate to the victims - they're just normal people - but it's still the kind of thing that we love to read about but never live through. Ultimately, I think my problems with the book stem from the fact that Dr. Yalom expresses feelings that are just so very human (he even fantasizes about a patient at one point - the only beautiful one, of course), and I'm not used to thinking of psychologists as anything other than their professional fronts. It's like finding out that your grade school teacher doesn't actually live in the classroom. Of course not, but it's strange nonetheless. Admirably, he admits to having these faults, so kudos to him for that. Still, you get the feeling that he's descended from his alabaster tower to bestow this book on the reading populace. First lines: "I do not like to work with patients who are in love. Perhaps it is because of envy - I, too, crave enchantment. Perhaps it is because love and psychotherapy are fundamentally incompatible. The good therapist fights darkness and seeks illumination, while romantic love is sustained by mystery and crumbles upon inspection. I hate to be love's executioner." Other lines: "Every one of my notes of these early sessions contains phrases such as: 'Another boring session'; 'Looked at the clock about every three minutes today'; 'The most boring patient I have ever seen'; 'Almost fell asleep today - had to sit up in my chair to stay awake'; 'Almost fell off my chair today.'" "My quarry when I was a novitiate was the truth of the past, to trace all of a life's coordinates and, thereby, to locate and to explain a person's current life, pathology, motivation, and actions. I used to be so sure. What arrogance!...[now:] my quarry is illusion. I war against magic. I believe that, though illusion often cheers and comforts, it ultimately and invariably weakens and constricts the spirit."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Petrovic

    As a psychology student with plenty of knowledge about mental health but zero experience with what actually happens in real life therapy, this book was incredibly interesting and helpful for me. Yalom is refreshingly honest about his own thoughts and experiences in therapy, openly admitting to instances where he made wrong decisions and sharing his darker thoughts - thoughts that one would expect highly trained psychologists to be above as they operate in their supernatural realm free of judgeme As a psychology student with plenty of knowledge about mental health but zero experience with what actually happens in real life therapy, this book was incredibly interesting and helpful for me. Yalom is refreshingly honest about his own thoughts and experiences in therapy, openly admitting to instances where he made wrong decisions and sharing his darker thoughts - thoughts that one would expect highly trained psychologists to be above as they operate in their supernatural realm free of judgement, discrimination and egocentrism. Yalom shares all of this with us in with a degree of honesty that is at times shocking, but after reading on, his humility and growing love for his patients over the course of therapy are revealed, strongly emphasising his role as a therapist - not as the fixer of all issues, but rather a person who bonds and begins a journey with the patient, working collaboratively to help them discover how to overcome or simply cope with their own problems. This book is something special and I believe that students, experienced therapists, or just about anyone interested in the therapy process could benefit from it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    D'Argo Agathon

    I started reading this book with the expectation that I would find an interesting but nonetheless mechanical look into the brass tacks of psychiatry... and found something far more dangerous and intriguing: Dr. Yalom is a creative writer. And he's utterly brilliant. Starting with the prologue, this work is filled with deep and genuine originality, taste, and introspection. Dr. Yalom's prose is sagaciously crafted, and a pleasure to read and reread. The entirety of the collection is used as an abs I started reading this book with the expectation that I would find an interesting but nonetheless mechanical look into the brass tacks of psychiatry... and found something far more dangerous and intriguing: Dr. Yalom is a creative writer. And he's utterly brilliant. Starting with the prologue, this work is filled with deep and genuine originality, taste, and introspection. Dr. Yalom's prose is sagaciously crafted, and a pleasure to read and reread. The entirety of the collection is used as an abstract for Dr. Yalom's belief that "existential psychotherapy" -- an operative stance where existential issues are the patient's core complications -- can be one of the most effective and multi-purposed tools in the psychiatrist's arsenal. Each case-study illustrates the mechanics -- and the spirit -- of this approach in fascinating detail. One of the most interesting facets of this book is how candid Dr. Yalom is about his own feelings, biases, and reactions. The propositions that doctors are explicitly human, that therapy depends dramatically upon the manipulation of cause-and-effect, that the identity of the therapist is not (and cannot be) unaffected by the exchange, and that psychotherapy is, for the lack of a better phrase, significantly driven by trial and error, are all huge areas of discussion. And what's more, when it comes to the individual stories themselves, there is no shortage of emotional impact. We really live these sessions along with patient and doctor, and each climax and culmination leaves the reader more in touch with their own reality. ("Therapeutic Monogamy," for instance, left me with tears.) A radical and radiant piece of scientific, creative nonfiction. Definitely a 5 star read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Meg Bee

    I really, really do not like this guy. He used racial slurs completely casually for one thing, and he is so judgemental of his patients' physical appearance, it's difficult to take him seriously. He can't muster empathy for a woman because she's obese? Really? Not until she becomes "interesting" to him as a patient. If there's one thing I've taken from this, it's that therapists are judgemental assholes too sometimes. In this guy's case, often. I can only imagine how it must feel to have been a I really, really do not like this guy. He used racial slurs completely casually for one thing, and he is so judgemental of his patients' physical appearance, it's difficult to take him seriously. He can't muster empathy for a woman because she's obese? Really? Not until she becomes "interesting" to him as a patient. If there's one thing I've taken from this, it's that therapists are judgemental assholes too sometimes. In this guy's case, often. I can only imagine how it must feel to have been a patient of his and read what his actual thoughts have been.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    I finished this in one sitting and then bought every other book the author has ever written. Reading this book was a trip.

  23. 4 out of 5

    ☘︎ elisabet ☘︎

    i thank this book for motivating me to keep pursuing my studies to become a good therapist i will start reading ALL of Yaloms books from now now.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fereshteh

    nothing / just read it when you are alone and nobody cannot listen to you. in different situation you can imagine " mayde it happened for me or my family.... nothing / just read it when you are alone and nobody cannot listen to you. in different situation you can imagine " mayde it happened for me or my family....

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    In "Love's Executioner", Yalom describes the presentation and treatment of 10 patients of his real-life from his psychotherapy practice. This is a book I selected on my own free will, but it ended up feeling more like a school assignment as I trudged to the ending. I chose the book for the play-by-play of the therapy hour, for Yalom's well-documented experience in psychotherapy and for my intimate knowledge of my own inexperience here at the beginning of my career. The motivation to read the boo In "Love's Executioner", Yalom describes the presentation and treatment of 10 patients of his real-life from his psychotherapy practice. This is a book I selected on my own free will, but it ended up feeling more like a school assignment as I trudged to the ending. I chose the book for the play-by-play of the therapy hour, for Yalom's well-documented experience in psychotherapy and for my intimate knowledge of my own inexperience here at the beginning of my career. The motivation to read the book was more or less to voyeuristically (but legally) violate HIPAA and be a fly on the wall during Yalom's work, all to placate the hateful little troll inside screaming at the top of her lungs, "HELP I AM GRADUATING I DONT WHAT THE HELL IM DOING". For these purposes, this book had a lot of good stuff. For example, this is what he said about theoretical perspectives: "How I long at such junctures for the certainty that orthodoxy offers. Psychoanalysis, to take the most catholic of the psychotherapy ideological schools, always posits such strong convictions about the necessary technical procedures- indeed, analysts seem more certain of everything that I am of anything. How comforting it would be to feel, just once, taht I know exactly what I'm doing in my psychotherapeutic work- for example that I am dutifully traversing, in proper sequence, the precise stages of the therapeutic process. But of course, it is all illusion. If they are helpful to patients at all, ideological schools with their complex metaphysical edifices succeed because they assuage the therapist’s, not the patient’s, anxiety (and thus permit the therapist to face the anxiety of the therapeutic process). The more the therapist is able to tolerate the anxiety of not knowing, the less need there is for the therapist to embrace orthodoxy. The creative members of an orthodoxy, any orthodoxy, ultimately outgrow their disciplines. Though there is something reassuring about an omniscient therapist who is always in control of every situation, there can be something powerfully engaging about a fumbling therapist, a therapist willing to flounder with the patient until they, together, stumble upon an enabling discovery." This wonderful to me and quieted and comforted that anxious troll inside. I said, "see? Yalom is a fumbling therapist too. It's right here in this book you made me buy. He admitted it RIGHT THERE." There are several other good examples of practice techniques as he is really good to reflect on both content and process as he tells the story of the patient. Professionally, this was a beneficial read; Personally, I struggled with his tone and some other nuances of the writing. I did an independent study last semester with a male professor, who loved Yalom, and 8 female students. I'm pretty sure we shocked him one day when all eight of us basically point-blank told him: "We think Yalom is kind of a dick." I can't put my finger what it is exactly, but his writing just feels like is laced with something like misogyny or arrogance or narcissism. This does not make the reading unbearable, but it also does not go unnoticed. I experienced whatever it is in this book more strongly than in his others. I sort of forgot about the book at one point but picked it back up on principle (that being the "I finish books" principle, and the "my mama didn't raise no quitter" principle). So this was basically a labor of love for me, or maybe a labor of duty and of knowledge of my own inexperience. I'm glad it read it. I'm glad it's done.

  26. 4 out of 5

    stephanie

    this is a series of essays, based on yalom's private practice. yalom is a freakin' massive genius is the world of psychology - he basically founded existential psychotherapy, and also was the first person to effectively use the group model in any productive way. (he uses the process group method, dbt uses a more classroom style approach.) "the fat lady" is maybe the most famous story from here - what i love about yalom is you know he's the biggest pompous asshole, but at the same time, he's tota this is a series of essays, based on yalom's private practice. yalom is a freakin' massive genius is the world of psychology - he basically founded existential psychotherapy, and also was the first person to effectively use the group model in any productive way. (he uses the process group method, dbt uses a more classroom style approach.) "the fat lady" is maybe the most famous story from here - what i love about yalom is you know he's the biggest pompous asshole, but at the same time, he's totally willing to admit he can be repulsed by patients, that he loses his temper, that he has faults. he also isn't afraid to express these faults to his patients, which i love, being a person who doesn't like the blank slate model of therapy. it's all around entertaining, and enjoyable, perhaps more so because the stories are true and the people are true, and because yalom never condescends to his patients - he treats them as regular human beings who are smart - and he treats his readers the same way.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    I read this book for a second time sometime last week and have been too busy to write anything about it. Currently I really need to be asleep and am not, so this will be slightly confused, short, and likely unnecessary, deal. The first time that I read this book I appreciated the fact that Yalom's therapy is relationship based. It is really about the people and caring about those people. Instead of diagnosis and being crazy. Not to say that this can't be completely misinterpreted as I saw in my I read this book for a second time sometime last week and have been too busy to write anything about it. Currently I really need to be asleep and am not, so this will be slightly confused, short, and likely unnecessary, deal. The first time that I read this book I appreciated the fact that Yalom's therapy is relationship based. It is really about the people and caring about those people. Instead of diagnosis and being crazy. Not to say that this can't be completely misinterpreted as I saw in my class that discussed this book. What struck me when I read it this time was the fact that Yalom is one of the most fucked up people I have ever heard of. He thinks of women as his mother or sex objects. He wants to shove fat people's faces in their food. He is constantly bored and has hubris like you wouldn't believe. Perhaps I only notice these things because the idea of being a therapist terrifies me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marta :}

    “Some day soon, perhaps in forty years, there will be no one alive who has ever known me. That's when I will be truly dead - when I exist in no one's memory. I thought a lot about how someone very old is the last living individual to have known some person or cluster of people. When that person dies, the whole cluster dies,too, vanishes from the living memory. I wonder who that person will be for me. Whose death will make me truly dead?” I loved it, gave me insight of how the therapist-patient r “Some day soon, perhaps in forty years, there will be no one alive who has ever known me. That's when I will be truly dead - when I exist in no one's memory. I thought a lot about how someone very old is the last living individual to have known some person or cluster of people. When that person dies, the whole cluster dies,too, vanishes from the living memory. I wonder who that person will be for me. Whose death will make me truly dead?” I loved it, gave me insight of how the therapist-patient relationships go, made me more understanding of how people perceive the idea of death, especially when they feel it's coming. I really liked it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    somecandytalking

    This idiot has no empathy for his patients, how could he possibly be a good therapist? Yalom's therapeutic "insights" were boring and obvious and with every page, I lost more and more respect for him due to his self-centered and arrogant manner. My sympathies to the patients that had to endure this misogynist for months during treatment. This idiot has no empathy for his patients, how could he possibly be a good therapist? Yalom's therapeutic "insights" were boring and obvious and with every page, I lost more and more respect for him due to his self-centered and arrogant manner. My sympathies to the patients that had to endure this misogynist for months during treatment.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katharine Holden

    A truly foul book. I pity the patients who end up in the "care" of this hateful man. A truly foul book. I pity the patients who end up in the "care" of this hateful man.

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