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From Warren Ellis, the creative dynamo behind such acclaimed titles as Transmetropolitan and The Authority, comes volume one in a stunning new Titan graphic novel series! Global Frequency is a latticework of 1001 scientists, soldiers and specialists in every field imaginable, woven into a net to stop every terrorist with a nuke, government weapons programme gone rogue or a From Warren Ellis, the creative dynamo behind such acclaimed titles as Transmetropolitan and The Authority, comes volume one in a stunning new Titan graphic novel series! Global Frequency is a latticework of 1001 scientists, soldiers and specialists in every field imaginable, woven into a net to stop every terrorist with a nuke, government weapons programme gone rogue or alien computer virus, Seeing, hearing, touching and battling all evil, it is Mankind's collective consciousness and immune system. Drawn by a dream team of amazing artists, Global Frequency is the all-knowing, all-powerful blanket to smother our darkest fears and worst nightmares! Collecting: Global Frequency 7-12


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From Warren Ellis, the creative dynamo behind such acclaimed titles as Transmetropolitan and The Authority, comes volume one in a stunning new Titan graphic novel series! Global Frequency is a latticework of 1001 scientists, soldiers and specialists in every field imaginable, woven into a net to stop every terrorist with a nuke, government weapons programme gone rogue or a From Warren Ellis, the creative dynamo behind such acclaimed titles as Transmetropolitan and The Authority, comes volume one in a stunning new Titan graphic novel series! Global Frequency is a latticework of 1001 scientists, soldiers and specialists in every field imaginable, woven into a net to stop every terrorist with a nuke, government weapons programme gone rogue or alien computer virus, Seeing, hearing, touching and battling all evil, it is Mankind's collective consciousness and immune system. Drawn by a dream team of amazing artists, Global Frequency is the all-knowing, all-powerful blanket to smother our darkest fears and worst nightmares! Collecting: Global Frequency 7-12

30 review for Global Frequency, Vol. 2: Detonation Radio

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ben Comeau

    Global Frequency: Detonation Radio is the second comic of the Global Frequency series. The comics consist of multiple short stories of how the Global Frequency agents solve potentially world ending problems. One includes stopping a nuclear bomb from taking out a country and another includes a carbon spear that is being shot out of the sky to potentially destroy the whole planet. The art style is very graphic and almost gory in the comic. (It is heavily action based). I don’t think this comic was Global Frequency: Detonation Radio is the second comic of the Global Frequency series. The comics consist of multiple short stories of how the Global Frequency agents solve potentially world ending problems. One includes stopping a nuclear bomb from taking out a country and another includes a carbon spear that is being shot out of the sky to potentially destroy the whole planet. The art style is very graphic and almost gory in the comic. (It is heavily action based). I don’t think this comic was as good as the first one I read but it was definitely still interesting. Most of the agents in the story tend to be very likable because they have strong morals and want the best for the planet. The characters don’t have much room to grow because they already know all of the agent protocols but they are definitely changed after each mission. This is because they are usually traumatizing and very risky. If your into action comics or high adrenaline stories this is a good thing to read. However some parts can be very violent/graphic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ma'Belle

    These short stories emphasize the science in science fiction. I read Warren Ellis' Orbiter the day before reading Global Frequency, and I feel it lent some understanding of Ellis' passion for non-militarized, manned space flight. Both volumes combined developed in me a sense of appreciation and intrigue in the repeat characters, as well as a respect for Ellis' plotlines. This series didn't thrill me or challenge me nearly as much as Transmetropolitan, but reminded me why I enjoyed watching the ma These short stories emphasize the science in science fiction. I read Warren Ellis' Orbiter the day before reading Global Frequency, and I feel it lent some understanding of Ellis' passion for non-militarized, manned space flight. Both volumes combined developed in me a sense of appreciation and intrigue in the repeat characters, as well as a respect for Ellis' plotlines. This series didn't thrill me or challenge me nearly as much as Transmetropolitan, but reminded me why I enjoyed watching the made-for-television episodes of The Ghost in the Shell years ago.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    Overall I probably liked this second volume better. In the first volume the stories felt very separate, and while they're still separate here, there was more of a feeling of connection. This is probably because two of the stories involve threats to Miranda Zero and Aleph, so the organization feels more a part of the world. One of the agents even returns for a second story in this book, though in a minor way. The only story I didn't care for in this volume was "Superviolence". It was pretty much Overall I probably liked this second volume better. In the first volume the stories felt very separate, and while they're still separate here, there was more of a feeling of connection. This is probably because two of the stories involve threats to Miranda Zero and Aleph, so the organization feels more a part of the world. One of the agents even returns for a second story in this book, though in a minor way. The only story I didn't care for in this volume was "Superviolence". It was pretty much just two pain-resistant guys beating the crap out of each other.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lewis Manalo

    Why did I not read this sooner? As a person who grew up before the huge cross-title "events" became the mainstay of comic books, I really appreciate the stories that are contained in one issue, let alone a title you can start reading smack in the middle of the series. Scary, science-y ideas and ultraviolence aside (though they are awesome) these fast-paced stories are simply well-written and fun. Anyone who reads comics should check them out. Why did I not read this sooner? As a person who grew up before the huge cross-title "events" became the mainstay of comic books, I really appreciate the stories that are contained in one issue, let alone a title you can start reading smack in the middle of the series. Scary, science-y ideas and ultraviolence aside (though they are awesome) these fast-paced stories are simply well-written and fun. Anyone who reads comics should check them out.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ramon

    Why oh why didn't this series continue? I could've easily consumed 5 more years of this book. Even though this is a re-read session, having repurchased books I know I already own, they don't feel dated except for the fact that the Frequency phone is a huge brick of a not-smartphone and they still called drones UAVs. Moar! Why oh why didn't this series continue? I could've easily consumed 5 more years of this book. Even though this is a re-read session, having repurchased books I know I already own, they don't feel dated except for the fact that the Frequency phone is a huge brick of a not-smartphone and they still called drones UAVs. Moar!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dale

    Maybe too much gore in some stories, but a really creative approach to the "smart people save the world" sci-fi thriller graphic novel genre (is that a real thing?). I pretty much read both Vol 1 and 2 on a long day of plane rides and enjoyed the ideas, the characters, and the art. As long as you can stand (or overlook) the gore, this is a fun read. Maybe too much gore in some stories, but a really creative approach to the "smart people save the world" sci-fi thriller graphic novel genre (is that a real thing?). I pretty much read both Vol 1 and 2 on a long day of plane rides and enjoyed the ideas, the characters, and the art. As long as you can stand (or overlook) the gore, this is a fun read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ninja

    Stronger than the first with a lot of great stories including backstory on Aleph / Global Frequency, and a biosecurity situation. A couple of write-offs like the Frenchman ("Superviolence"), but otherwise great, though for some reason the fact that it's a collection of short stories was pushing me to nudge this back down to a 4... Stronger than the first with a lot of great stories including backstory on Aleph / Global Frequency, and a biosecurity situation. A couple of write-offs like the Frenchman ("Superviolence"), but otherwise great, though for some reason the fact that it's a collection of short stories was pushing me to nudge this back down to a 4...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Although I'm personally in love with pretty much everything Warren Ellis has ever written; from his critically acclaimed novel "Crooked Little Vein" to his many forays into original graphic novel material - I really think that his two Global Frequency books are some of his best stuff ever. And that's saying something. Books one and two are essentially the same, format-wise. the Global Frequency is a group of 1,001 agents - worldwide - that each have a very special set of skills. The point of thi Although I'm personally in love with pretty much everything Warren Ellis has ever written; from his critically acclaimed novel "Crooked Little Vein" to his many forays into original graphic novel material - I really think that his two Global Frequency books are some of his best stuff ever. And that's saying something. Books one and two are essentially the same, format-wise. the Global Frequency is a group of 1,001 agents - worldwide - that each have a very special set of skills. The point of this 'agency', headed by a woman named Miranda Zero, is to save the fucking world. The best part about these books is that each TPB (trade paperback - graphic novel - whatever) gives you at least a half-dozen really quick snapshot stories and they are all amazing. A satellite meant for wiping out the world's human population to a more manageable size goes haywire and needs to taken out before it completes it's task? Global Frequency calls on the exact agents it needs in order to do what is needed. An alien contagion threatens to spread throughout the globe unless someone can quickly research and discover a way to stop it? Miranda Zero is already on her vid-phone calling the people necessary. Many times it's interesting just who these 'agents' are and why. While some of them are up to the task and ready to jump into whatever the situation is, there are also times where these agents are reluctant, unwilling, sometimes even angry that they are being called on. However when it comes to saving lives, they take the job for fear of having bodies on their conscience. The agents are anyone from the typical covert operatives and military-trained killers to the surprisingly ordinary roles of detectives, mathematicians, and doctors. You'll never know type of skill-sets the next task that the Global Frequency takes on requires, so Miranda has an amazing array of people on her contact list. The stories themselves are also so, so so excellently written. I've never been on the edge of my seat more when reading a TPB. I love each and every character because they are all so well written. I'm blown away by each situation that comes up. HOW does Ellis come up with all of these great scenarios in which to stick all of these great characters?! Even the dialog is great, and you wouldn't think it would/could be written by an old fuddy-dud from the UK. Ellis is my hero. And I'm ridiculously upset that 1) there are only 2 Global Frequency books, and 2) no one is paying this man to write more of them. If no one else, Mr Ellis please look me up because I will personally fund the next one.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. More of what was in the first book, which is to say that it was fast paced and enjoyable, though it often strained credibility. There is more tendency in these stories to examine the characters than in the previous volume I felt. In particular two stories focus on Miranda Zero and Aleph the only recurring characters. Detonation: a terrorist attempts to trigger war between Germany and the UK, but agents hunt down him and his cronies. His philosophy that war leads to development is flawed but sadly More of what was in the first book, which is to say that it was fast paced and enjoyable, though it often strained credibility. There is more tendency in these stories to examine the characters than in the previous volume I felt. In particular two stories focus on Miranda Zero and Aleph the only recurring characters. Detonation: a terrorist attempts to trigger war between Germany and the UK, but agents hunt down him and his cronies. His philosophy that war leads to development is flawed but sadly common; war is, weirdly, an opiate of sorts that brings a sort of pleasure in purpose and hate, but which stifles progress. (Untitled?): Miranda Zero is kidnapped by a white power group that objects to her work and Global Frequency has one hour to find and save her. Nice and fast with lots of hyper-competent people, the trademark of this series. (Untitled 2?): an agent who wants to be retired and whose only skills are surviving and staying sane is sent into a cutting-edge biotech hospital and finds the doctors are insane from a chemical leak and have made horrible melds of patients; an airstrike is called in. Superviolence: the title says it all; pretty much just a brutal, knock-down, limb-mangling fight between a Global Frequency agent, the Frenchman, and an assassin named Lionel Wellfare, both masters of self enhancement through bio-feedback. Enjoyably brutal. Aleph: a brief scene shows Aleph's recruitment by Miranda Zero. In the present when a team tries to break in to Global Frequency's central command she takes them out. Harpoon: a computer glitch activates a satellite weapon which will destroy Chicago, part of a whole shadowy doctrine which could be used to destroy 88% of humanity. There are lots of neat details here, but the premise is kind of dumb; killing 88% of humanity would probably very quickly lead to a 99% reduction of humanity, if not outright extinction. The manufacturing basis of our technological society is way too globally interconnected. The people who would want to do this would not have the connection to implement it, and the people who would implement it would be working entirely against their own interests.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sparrow

    Issue 7 - Dang, I keep forgetting how graphic Ellis's work can get. The violence is a bit unsettling. But still a good story. The sacrifices some of these characters make are so inspiring. Issue 8 - Loved it. Glad to see the stakes raised with Zero. Issue 9 - Wow. Just, wow. Takashi was such an amazing character. Loved the new type of beginning...and the sad ending... Issue 10 - Don't think I much liked this one. Wasn't too interesting with just one bloody fight. Couldn't tell the two guys apart an Issue 7 - Dang, I keep forgetting how graphic Ellis's work can get. The violence is a bit unsettling. But still a good story. The sacrifices some of these characters make are so inspiring. Issue 8 - Loved it. Glad to see the stakes raised with Zero. Issue 9 - Wow. Just, wow. Takashi was such an amazing character. Loved the new type of beginning...and the sad ending... Issue 10 - Don't think I much liked this one. Wasn't too interesting with just one bloody fight. Couldn't tell the two guys apart and so I wasn't sure who to root for. And at first, I thought the whole fight scene was a flashback to show us how ruthless the Frenchman was, but I guess it wasn't. And I also don't know why the Frenchman hated Wellfare. Ah well, one bad one in twelve is okay. Issue 11 - Liked this one. Nice to see where Aleph came from and nice to see Central compromised. I wonder what's possibly left for the finale. Issue 12 - Of course, the finale would have a terrorist(?) threat for the entire earth. Large enough story, but didn't have a very large effect on me. I think it's because the comic was too short - I couldn't let the heaviness of the idea sink in deep enough, whereas one comic for one or two characters did the trick. Still very good and still sad that it's all done. Overall - An excellent idea excellently written. It's only too bad that the series is so short. It could have gone in many different directions. I also sort of enjoyed seeing all of the different artwork, even though I wasn't fond of all of the artists.

  11. 5 out of 5

    47Time

    This volume is even more grim than the last. We get to see some kinks in the organization's security (their central base is attacked and their leader is captured), the immense amount of stress that the Global Frequency operatives go through (one of them calls it quits after an mission involving suicidal children went bust, but still answers the call) and their complete dedication to the task (operatives sacrificing their lives for the mission). The same atmosphere is kept throughout the 12-issue This volume is even more grim than the last. We get to see some kinks in the organization's security (their central base is attacked and their leader is captured), the immense amount of stress that the Global Frequency operatives go through (one of them calls it quits after an mission involving suicidal children went bust, but still answers the call) and their complete dedication to the task (operatives sacrificing their lives for the mission). The same atmosphere is kept throughout the 12-issue run, so it's consistent from that point of view. If you like the first issue, you will like the whole comic and, really, it can reasily be read in one day. The artwork is of high quality even considering that each issue has a different artist. Again there is no overall story, just separate missions involving usually only a handful of operatives. It would have been worth it to have a longer series that delves into the history of the organization, its leader, how the organization is allowed to exist and how it gained its worldwide status. I expect they would have had similarly powerful organizations opposing them and trying to hunt down their operatives. Unfortunately, this never came to pass and this is really the only downside to the 12-issue run - the fact that it's only a 12-issue run.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    It's clear from this second volume that the same thing that makes the series a success is also the thing that I personally think holds it back from being great. The individual stories are fun, but ultimately unsatisfying because there are no stakes. The 1001 people on the frequency are so good that they ALWAYS get the job done and any kind of investigation of morals and ethics are frequently dismissed by Miranda Zero as par for the course in order to protect innocent people. I think there's real It's clear from this second volume that the same thing that makes the series a success is also the thing that I personally think holds it back from being great. The individual stories are fun, but ultimately unsatisfying because there are no stakes. The 1001 people on the frequency are so good that they ALWAYS get the job done and any kind of investigation of morals and ethics are frequently dismissed by Miranda Zero as par for the course in order to protect innocent people. I think there's real potential to do a larger story, create some recurring villains and bring back some of the more memorable agents so we can learn more about them. Two volumes in, however, it's clear that the series is only interested in one-off stories. That means that my issues with the first volume - that the quality and interest ranges per individual story and artist - is just as applicable here as it was then.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

    Fantastic follow up to the first volume. This volume is just as strong, if not a bit stronger than the previous one. Any book that spawns the battle cry "Deaht to the purple headed womb-broom!" is ok with me. You just CAN'T go wrong with Warren Ellis. So basically the Global Frequency is a private organization that rescues the world from extreme disasters (usually involving fringe/extreme areas of science or fringe extremist groups) or defending itself against attacks from evil establishment bast Fantastic follow up to the first volume. This volume is just as strong, if not a bit stronger than the previous one. Any book that spawns the battle cry "Deaht to the purple headed womb-broom!" is ok with me. You just CAN'T go wrong with Warren Ellis. So basically the Global Frequency is a private organization that rescues the world from extreme disasters (usually involving fringe/extreme areas of science or fringe extremist groups) or defending itself against attacks from evil establishment bastards! Check this out if you like Warren Ellis and science/techno thrillers with a slight cyber-punk feel to it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mikael Kuoppala

    I didn’t really get the first volume of “Global Frequency.” I thought it was too chaotic and aimless, and was too keen on being “cool” in the expense of content. I respect Warren Ellis so much though that I decided to give his creation another chance. “Detonation Radio” is an improvement. The characters get more attention, as well as the actual concept of the future this series depicts. Still, I felt like I was reading something that is somewhat entertaining but a bit pointless. But maybe it cou I didn’t really get the first volume of “Global Frequency.” I thought it was too chaotic and aimless, and was too keen on being “cool” in the expense of content. I respect Warren Ellis so much though that I decided to give his creation another chance. “Detonation Radio” is an improvement. The characters get more attention, as well as the actual concept of the future this series depicts. Still, I felt like I was reading something that is somewhat entertaining but a bit pointless. But maybe it could still get good…

  15. 5 out of 5

    Neville Ridley-smith

    Global Frequency promises so much and just doesn't deliver. Really the major disappointment are the stories - they go nowhere. It's like Ellis has all these ideas and starts writing a story until suddenly he's at the issue page limit and tries to quickly wrap things up and stops dead. In order, 1: ugly art, average story 2: good art, decent story 3: incredible art, ok story 4: an interesting exercise but just messy and confusing - 20 pages of fisticuffs with no decent payoff 5: decent 6: great art, pro Global Frequency promises so much and just doesn't deliver. Really the major disappointment are the stories - they go nowhere. It's like Ellis has all these ideas and starts writing a story until suddenly he's at the issue page limit and tries to quickly wrap things up and stops dead. In order, 1: ugly art, average story 2: good art, decent story 3: incredible art, ok story 4: an interesting exercise but just messy and confusing - 20 pages of fisticuffs with no decent payoff 5: decent 6: great art, promising story but fizzles at the end and ultimately doesn't make any sense

  16. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    A network of 1,000 secret consultants and specialists work together to keep the world safe from terrorists, mad scientists and technology gone wrong. One of my favorite things written by Warren Ellis, as he creates a framework that lets him tell all kinds of stories using a wide variety of characters. Some are straight forward adventure, some make you think and some are just slightly disturbing. Shame the TV show never got past the pilot stage.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    Absolutely wonderful. I think Ellis hit some more personal beats here that weren't quite as clearly present in the first volume, the story about the kinetic harpoons and Aleph, especially. Only reason I knocked it down a star was for the saves and rescues always coming at the last *micro* second. Sometimes, yeah, things come down to the wire. But for the sake of realism, can we get some saves that come an hour before time is up? Absolutely wonderful. I think Ellis hit some more personal beats here that weren't quite as clearly present in the first volume, the story about the kinetic harpoons and Aleph, especially. Only reason I knocked it down a star was for the saves and rescues always coming at the last *micro* second. Sometimes, yeah, things come down to the wire. But for the sake of realism, can we get some saves that come an hour before time is up?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tuulikki

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Especially enjoyed Harpoon, probably for Gene Ha's artwork, but the computer-y, science-y-ness was a little extreme the whole way through. The stories got me through a long waiting room stint, but they all rely on super competent individuals using perfectly applicable technology just in the nick of time. Especially enjoyed Harpoon, probably for Gene Ha's artwork, but the computer-y, science-y-ness was a little extreme the whole way through. The stories got me through a long waiting room stint, but they all rely on super competent individuals using perfectly applicable technology just in the nick of time.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    A little less strong than the first Global Frequency collection (I'd give this three-and-a-half if I could - some of these feel like retreads of ideas from the first volume, and the writing can be even more obnoxious), but still exciting and fun. The big standouts for me are the two untitled issues in the middle. A little less strong than the first Global Frequency collection (I'd give this three-and-a-half if I could - some of these feel like retreads of ideas from the first volume, and the writing can be even more obnoxious), but still exciting and fun. The big standouts for me are the two untitled issues in the middle.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Noah Soudrette

    I hesitated to pick this up since I was rather disappointed with volume one. I'm glad I bit the bullet. This is a vast improvement in terms of writing and art. If it wasn't for one story that's a bit of a clunker ("Superviolence"), this would be a five star book. Highly recommended. I hesitated to pick this up since I was rather disappointed with volume one. I'm glad I bit the bullet. This is a vast improvement in terms of writing and art. If it wasn't for one story that's a bit of a clunker ("Superviolence"), this would be a five star book. Highly recommended.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    Not quite as strong as the first Global Frequency, but still fascinating; this one has a couple very cerebral issues as well as two all-out action issues. A great balance, and as always it leaves me wishing we'd gotten more of the Global Frequency. Not quite as strong as the first Global Frequency, but still fascinating; this one has a couple very cerebral issues as well as two all-out action issues. A great balance, and as always it leaves me wishing we'd gotten more of the Global Frequency.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Short, short series, but utterly motivating. I'm hoping for a follow-up someday... Short, short series, but utterly motivating. I'm hoping for a follow-up someday...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Small Creek

    Of note: Global Frequency #9 for the amazing art of Lee Bermejo coupled with David Baron's orgasmic colouring. Of note: Global Frequency #9 for the amazing art of Lee Bermejo coupled with David Baron's orgasmic colouring.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kimberlee

    Words cannot describe how much I love this author. Global Frequency is fast-paced, episodic, and only two volumes long, proving that great authors can still leave you wanting more!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pieter

    Amazing! Much better than volume one. The stories just seemed to flow much better and I liked the artwork much better than the first volume.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Wilkins

    I hated the art. Jesus Christ, it was awful.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    This was MUCH more fucked up than the first volume. Perfect.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    The art was good, but the stories were hit and miss. Some where really interesting, while others lacked in plot. It was nice to see some reoccuring agents though.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Will Boncher

    Even better than the first one, maybe edgier's the word? Even better than the first one, maybe edgier's the word?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ketan Shah

    Some smart ideas,and stunning art ,especially from Lee Bermejo.One story was just a very long fight scene,but the others made up for it.

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