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Sisters of the Earth is a stirring collection of women’s writing on nature: Nature as healer. Nature as delight. Nature as mother and sister. Nature as victim. Nature as companion and reminder of what is wild in us all. Here, among more than a hundred poets and prose writers, are Diane Ackerman on the opium of sunsets; Ursula K. Le Guin envisioning an alternative world in Sisters of the Earth is a stirring collection of women’s writing on nature: Nature as healer. Nature as delight. Nature as mother and sister. Nature as victim. Nature as companion and reminder of what is wild in us all. Here, among more than a hundred poets and prose writers, are Diane Ackerman on the opium of sunsets; Ursula K. Le Guin envisioning an alternative world in which human beings are not estranged from their planet; and Julia Butterfly Hill on weathering a fierce storm in the redwood tree where she lived for more than two years. Here, too, are poems, essays, stories, and journal entries by Emily Dickinson, Alice Walker, Terry Tempest Williams, Willa Cather, Gretel Erlich, Adrienne Rich, and others—each offering a vivid, eloquent response to the natural world. This second edition of Sisters of the Earth is fully revised and updated with a new preface and nearly fifty new pieces, including new contributions by Louise Erdrich, Pam Houston, Zora Neale Hurston, Starhawk, Joy Williams, Kathleen Norris, Rita Dove, and Barbara Kingsolver.


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Sisters of the Earth is a stirring collection of women’s writing on nature: Nature as healer. Nature as delight. Nature as mother and sister. Nature as victim. Nature as companion and reminder of what is wild in us all. Here, among more than a hundred poets and prose writers, are Diane Ackerman on the opium of sunsets; Ursula K. Le Guin envisioning an alternative world in Sisters of the Earth is a stirring collection of women’s writing on nature: Nature as healer. Nature as delight. Nature as mother and sister. Nature as victim. Nature as companion and reminder of what is wild in us all. Here, among more than a hundred poets and prose writers, are Diane Ackerman on the opium of sunsets; Ursula K. Le Guin envisioning an alternative world in which human beings are not estranged from their planet; and Julia Butterfly Hill on weathering a fierce storm in the redwood tree where she lived for more than two years. Here, too, are poems, essays, stories, and journal entries by Emily Dickinson, Alice Walker, Terry Tempest Williams, Willa Cather, Gretel Erlich, Adrienne Rich, and others—each offering a vivid, eloquent response to the natural world. This second edition of Sisters of the Earth is fully revised and updated with a new preface and nearly fifty new pieces, including new contributions by Louise Erdrich, Pam Houston, Zora Neale Hurston, Starhawk, Joy Williams, Kathleen Norris, Rita Dove, and Barbara Kingsolver.

30 review for Sisters of the Earth: Women's Prose and Poetry About Nature

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sierra

    Beautiful collection that introduced me to many to authors!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Easily a top contender for best book read in 2017. This anthology truly opened up a new world of writing to me. I absolutely loved this book, which is a collection of nature writing by American women, mostly from the 20th century. It includes many unique pieces of writing from a wide variety of backgrounds and experiences, all with the overarching theme of the intersection of feminism and ecology - or, women seeking and finding communion with the natural world. In a moment of serendipity, I chos Easily a top contender for best book read in 2017. This anthology truly opened up a new world of writing to me. I absolutely loved this book, which is a collection of nature writing by American women, mostly from the 20th century. It includes many unique pieces of writing from a wide variety of backgrounds and experiences, all with the overarching theme of the intersection of feminism and ecology - or, women seeking and finding communion with the natural world. In a moment of serendipity, I chose to read this collection while I was on a solo vacation in the Southwest, which made the experience even more special. There I was, a woman alone in nature, looking for the same exhilaration and peace that these women were seeking, finding, and writing about. This made for a truly enjoyable read. Most of the selections are short, so it was great for short spurts of reading as well as long marathons. I also found several new (to me) writers whose work I plan to explore in the future. I enjoyed this book by the fireside, under the shadow of mountains, at the shores of sapphire lake set in sandstone cliffs...I'd recommend to this anyone who wants a comprehensive look at obscure 20th century American women writers. I would like to note I read the first edition of this anthology, published in the early 90s. It was recently updated with 50+ new selections, so I'm not sure how the scope/context has changed in that time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tanya Sousa

    Lorraine Anderson did a wonderful job collecting nature-related writings by talented women authors. I savored each page and loved the diversity of choices as I enjoy the diversity in life itself. I loved it so much I looked her up and sent her a message - she said she's coming out with other collections soon. When she does, I'll be sure to read them! Lorraine Anderson did a wonderful job collecting nature-related writings by talented women authors. I savored each page and loved the diversity of choices as I enjoy the diversity in life itself. I loved it so much I looked her up and sent her a message - she said she's coming out with other collections soon. When she does, I'll be sure to read them!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Beth Britnell

    This is my all-time favorite non-fiction book ... I absolutely love it. "Christmas in Driftwood Valley" especially ... I think I've read it probably 2 dozen times. This is my all-time favorite non-fiction book ... I absolutely love it. "Christmas in Driftwood Valley" especially ... I think I've read it probably 2 dozen times.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    “The stiller she is, the more everything moves In the immense vocabulary of being.” Margaret Hasse “In this feverish and high-strung age we need desperately quiet and naturalness and sanity. And there is something in this contact with earthly things, whether it’s a passion for birds or gardening or camping, which is restoring and health-giving and wholesome…” Theodora Stanwell-Fletcher, 1951 I have to confess, for many years I have avoided women’s writing about nature, despite the most consequentia “The stiller she is, the more everything moves In the immense vocabulary of being.” Margaret Hasse “In this feverish and high-strung age we need desperately quiet and naturalness and sanity. And there is something in this contact with earthly things, whether it’s a passion for birds or gardening or camping, which is restoring and health-giving and wholesome…” Theodora Stanwell-Fletcher, 1951 I have to confess, for many years I have avoided women’s writing about nature, despite the most consequential book of my life being written by a woman, Annie Dillard’s Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. Ironically, both she and Mary Oliver declined to be collected in any single gender anthology, so they are not here. While I really do applaud women’s attempt to write of a goddess, to redeem from the patriarchy and domineering male viewpoint, I am not a fan of the imagery of the goddess and nature as feminine. I see it as part of myself, as deep connection, as visual poetry, as where we stand and walk and be on, as part of being. So I gave up but recently got really annoyed that many of my favorite words about nature are written by men and needed to return and explore and find more women’s voices to balance it out. This is a near perfect anthology of more than just worshipping the goddess, so hit a lot of high notes, or deep chords. Lots of indigenous and BIPOC voices, so I really appreciate that. “The writing in this book gives us a vocabulary and a way of seeing. But ultimately, with these words resonating in our consciousness, we must turn to the book of nature itself. It matters how we think about and touch this place during our brief and precious time in the world…it can come to reside in us as surely as we reside in it.” Lorraine Anderson I can’t possibly include all the gems found and adding quotes to an anthology looks like the editor wrote them so they are awkward; I will add by the author if possible, and place the anthology name in the quote so you should be able to search by that. I haven’t done a found poem in a while, so I will muse a little and then gift it to the world. The themes that always catch my attention are ones of awe, of feeling deeply one with the earth but also of breathlessness, where poetry is implied and capture, often unintentionally. Not too long ago, I spoke to a friend about forest bathing and sort of awkwardly laughed about actually hugging trees; I touch them, leaves, cones, flowers, but actually hugging seemed a little too far, and she said she did hug them because there is connection the skin feels and it is a way of showing reverence. I still haven’t done it, bust just may. Being with them is often enough, whether there is proof that ions and electrons and phytoncides that are beneficial or not, and I think this anthology captured my worldview so beautifully. There were some that didn’t’ speak to me, but I also think in a reread, they might. “There was a time in our culture, not long ago, when the essential role of men and women was to nurture and protect each other, to be caretakers of life and earth. At that time, when the sun sparkled on the sea of our imagination as freshly as it sparkled on the sea itself, we thought of our world and each other in ways that were life-venerating and death-respecting. The porpoise school that weaves its history protectively around its common existence, the whales that tune body and mind in a continuous awareness of life, are not symbols of an alien mythology- they are evocative of what was once the core of human relationships.” Joan McIntyre I felt the span of lifetimes in some of the older selections from the late 1800s and early 1900’s. We always dream that life was so much simpler then without cell phones and facebook, but I think there is a busy or frantic gene in humans that make us consumers no matter what the consumed. These women wrote about walking, fresh air, weather, soul, spirit, strength and they stretch across time to teach us something we have lost; it is up to us to seek their words and try to listen and learn. This book could save the world, or the humans on the earth; the earth will endure without us. “Some of my pleasantest rambles have been over these hills. One is hardly content to walk over them. The pure, bracing air, the open sky, give to us such a sense of freedom and relief that we want to bound along, like merry, light-hearted children. And here I have seen and felt the glorious, wondrous ever-changing beauty of the clouds, watching them for hours, until I have been tempted to think them the grandest and most beautiful of all God’s grand and beautiful works.” Charlotte Forten Grimke, 1858, fifth generation descendant of an African slave, Glimpses of New England FOUND POEM by Cheryl The earth can bear man lightly if we learn its soul; if the dams are dynamited and free-flowing rivers restored, for example. When lumbermen cut an ancient forest, another like it will not grow in my lifetime, or my grandchildren’s. When the last member of a species dies in a zoo, it is gone forever. But a river has the power to forgive. To breach a dam is to admit mistakes, and so to release the power of the river to heal itself, to begin to heal the rift between human and nature. There are laws above our human laws, and ways above ours. We have no words for this in our language, or even our experience of being there. The prophecies have said that when the heart and The intellect come together and balance, the new age will begin. It has only been a couple hundred years since that coming together and we are all becoming natives here. Perhaps someday humans will find their humanity and give up their divinity. This is the prayer I sing, for we have forgotten this and so the earth is perishing. The best world is the body’s world And how I longed to live on this earth Walking her boundaries. You are soaked, submerged, immersed; full to the brim with beauty. For here the landscape is eloquent of the interplay of forces that have created it. Intermediaries between the sun and earth, they nurture the living and their strong roots promise resurrection transforming dirt into atmosphere, into us. Let nature’s breath breathe into your lungs the healing of her own. To be fully inside the looking moment is to be fully in your true self. I go out into the sunshine to sit receptively for what there is in the stillness calm. I am keenly aware that there is something. Just now it seemed to flow in a rhythm around me and then to enter me-something that comes in a hushed inflowing. Become a mere receptacle for heat, or become a color, and in the rapid, restless heart of the river, flowing swifter than the rest, there is a continuity of life that reached back into ancient times. Beyond the walls and solid roofs of houses is the outdoors. The sky, serene, or piled with white, slow-moving clouds, or full of wind and purple storm, is always overhead. But walls will assert themselves and domineer. They insist on the unique importance of the contents of walls and would have you believe the spaces above them, the slow processions of the seasons and the alternations of sunshine and rain, are accessories, pleasant or unpleasant, of walls. Wildness has no conditions, no sure routes, no peaks or goals, no source that is not instantly becoming more than itself, then letting go of that, always becoming. For what else might happiness be than to be porous, opened, rinsed through by the beings and things? When I came to myself, I was standing a-tiptoe gazing up after it, my breath coming in gasps, this full life my spirit asks! I’m convinced that there is something we once knew which has been lost to us in the evolutionary process. Sometimes we get glimpses of it. Being alone I could not be alone… My happiness ran through the centuries And linked itself to other happiness.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Garcia

    the back cover reads in part, "A stirring collection of women's writing on nature: Nature as healer. Nature as delight. Nature as mother & sister. Nature as victim. Nature as companion & reminder of what is wild in us all." this book is all that and more. it's a collection of pieces from more than 100 women poets, prose writers and authors who provide poems, essays, stories, & journal entries which span centuries. A wonderful addition to anyone's library with writers such as Emily Dickenson, Ali the back cover reads in part, "A stirring collection of women's writing on nature: Nature as healer. Nature as delight. Nature as mother & sister. Nature as victim. Nature as companion & reminder of what is wild in us all." this book is all that and more. it's a collection of pieces from more than 100 women poets, prose writers and authors who provide poems, essays, stories, & journal entries which span centuries. A wonderful addition to anyone's library with writers such as Emily Dickenson, Alice Walker, Terry Tempest Williams, Willa Cather, Gretel Ehrlich, Adrienne Rich, Louise Erdrich, Zora Neale Hurston, Kathleen Norris, Rita Dove, Julia Butterfly Hill, Barbara Kingsolver, Sue Hubbell, Starhawk and Rachel Carson. Magnificently edited by Lorraine Anderson, with fascinating & intelligent introductions of each new voice prior to their selected piece. I was so moved by this long, beautiful song in women's voices, flowing powerfully from their soft, more nurturing but incredibly strong souls. an outpouring on thought, experiences and love for nature. I was profoundly struck by a continuous refrain concerning the healing power of nature and a call for us to reciprocate. Perhaps Women's Review of Books says it best, "Not only is Sisters of the Earth a pleasure; it is relevant and urgent--politically, aestheticaly and spiritually." a read to relish and return to often.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Florence

    Every author in this anthology has experienced a closeness to the natural world. The entries that speak most profoundly to me offer an experience of wildness in the midst of the ordinary, everyday world. Mary Donahue follows "a V of honkers" to the northland. I have often tried to imagine the world as it looks to flying geese. I wonder where they are going, what it would be like to fly with them. Judith Minty writes of "those cats of mine"; the enigma of living with a creature who is one moment Every author in this anthology has experienced a closeness to the natural world. The entries that speak most profoundly to me offer an experience of wildness in the midst of the ordinary, everyday world. Mary Donahue follows "a V of honkers" to the northland. I have often tried to imagine the world as it looks to flying geese. I wonder where they are going, what it would be like to fly with them. Judith Minty writes of "those cats of mine"; the enigma of living with a creature who is one moment lazing in the sun and a few hours later is stalking prey. A cat will convert a backyard into jungle wilderness. What better way is there to embrace the natural world than to have a cat, the most graceful, exquisite creature in existence, in one's own daily life. In 1962 in her prescient book, "Silent Spring" Rachel Carson warned that the indiscriminant use of pesticides would have deleterious effects throughout the food chain up to and including our own species. She was labelled a "hysterical woman". I salute her and the scientists who are today sounding the alarm on global warming.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    So far, I am LOVING this book! A lovely collection of essays and poetry...perfect for when I can only read for 15-20 minutes. I will be exploring Helen Hoover's writing after finding her in these pages! So far, I am LOVING this book! A lovely collection of essays and poetry...perfect for when I can only read for 15-20 minutes. I will be exploring Helen Hoover's writing after finding her in these pages!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kendra

    A lovely book with a mix of women's personal poetry and stories regarding earth and how women perceive her. Deep and moving, and without the aggressive writing like men tend to view the relationship with earth. A lovely book with a mix of women's personal poetry and stories regarding earth and how women perceive her. Deep and moving, and without the aggressive writing like men tend to view the relationship with earth.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Deb Weina

    Wonderful book of women's prose & poetry about the earth and wilderness. A woman's love for earth and her bookshelf should have this book!!! I refer to this jewel often. Wonderful book of women's prose & poetry about the earth and wilderness. A woman's love for earth and her bookshelf should have this book!!! I refer to this jewel often.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Camellia

    An excellent book I highly recommend

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jo Skeffington-Debski

    Wonderful collection of poems and stories by American Female Authors centered around the theme of Nature. From her Preface: “I do think there is a feminine way of being in relationship to nature. This way is caring rather than controlling; it seeks harmony rather than arrogance, by appreciation rather than acquisitiveness. It’s available to both men and women, but it hasn’t been exercised much in the history of Western civilization.” I came away with several authors that I now want to research a Wonderful collection of poems and stories by American Female Authors centered around the theme of Nature. From her Preface: “I do think there is a feminine way of being in relationship to nature. This way is caring rather than controlling; it seeks harmony rather than arrogance, by appreciation rather than acquisitiveness. It’s available to both men and women, but it hasn’t been exercised much in the history of Western civilization.” I came away with several authors that I now want to research and read. And for me it sealed my longing to move somewhere to be in the midst of nature (trees, mountains, ocean, animals).... Thank you!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    This was a quite different book from the kinds I usually read. Given to me by a good friend, it consists of short stories and poems about nature. The entries are written exclusively by women and give intimate reflections on everything from the smallest insects to large trees, small intimate spaces to vast vistas. It was not the kind of book I could sit down and be so absorbed in that I couldn't put it down, but it was a book of images of beauty and sometimes overwhelming power. I would recommend This was a quite different book from the kinds I usually read. Given to me by a good friend, it consists of short stories and poems about nature. The entries are written exclusively by women and give intimate reflections on everything from the smallest insects to large trees, small intimate spaces to vast vistas. It was not the kind of book I could sit down and be so absorbed in that I couldn't put it down, but it was a book of images of beauty and sometimes overwhelming power. I would recommend it to anyone who loves the outdoors and all its creatures.

  14. 5 out of 5

    MG

    Favorites include: -Valerie Andrews "Beginning with a place" (p4) from A PASSION FOR THIS EARTH -Opal Whiteley "The joy song of nature" (p7) from THE SINGING CREEK WHERE THE WILLOWS GROW -Zora Neale Hurston "Blossoming pear tree" excerpt from THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD (p12) -May Swenson "I will lie down" (p52) -Celia Laighton Thaxter "Childhood on White Island" from AMONG THE ISLES OF SHOALS (p84) -Barbara Meyn "Changing" (p294) Favorites include: -Valerie Andrews "Beginning with a place" (p4) from A PASSION FOR THIS EARTH -Opal Whiteley "The joy song of nature" (p7) from THE SINGING CREEK WHERE THE WILLOWS GROW -Zora Neale Hurston "Blossoming pear tree" excerpt from THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD (p12) -May Swenson "I will lie down" (p52) -Celia Laighton Thaxter "Childhood on White Island" from AMONG THE ISLES OF SHOALS (p84) -Barbara Meyn "Changing" (p294)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I am certainly adding this to my favorites list. I was delighted to see so many works from times long gone. I for some reason was under the assumption this was modern work only (I never read the description prior to picking it up). What a wonderful collection of writings. And Starhawk! I love her so.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Talarico

    This book had been sitting on my shelf for years before I picked it up and decided to read it. What a gem! The readings were rich in women's connection to nature and a discovery of female writers long unknown to me. The bibliography is a gift in itself and a great jumping off point to delve deeper into these writings. This book had been sitting on my shelf for years before I picked it up and decided to read it. What a gem! The readings were rich in women's connection to nature and a discovery of female writers long unknown to me. The bibliography is a gift in itself and a great jumping off point to delve deeper into these writings.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Blake

    I had to read this for a class I was taking in college. I enjoyed a lot of the different poems and authors yet this seemed like such an abridged greatest hits of what could be so much better. I did find a ton of fantastic poems though.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Penney Peirce

    An amazing compendium; to be treasured.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is a beautiful collection.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mary Banken

    A nice bedside compendium... tidbits to read as one settles in for the night. Interesting intro to authors. Perhaps a little overwhelming though with 100+ pieces in the book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Irene

    I loved reading how women write about their relationship with nature.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    [read for school] *3.5

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This is one of my favorite collections. I revisit it often.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mariah

    A beautiful collection of works that made me laugh, cry, and generally marvel at the world around me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Sisters of the Earth: Women's Prose and Poetry About Nature is a veritable treasure trove of women's writing on nature. Lorraine Anderson did an outstanding job collecting a diverse group of writers who contributed poetry, prose, short stories and essays to the book. Her thoughtful and illuminating biographies that precede each work demonstrates her palpable attentiveness to each woman's voice. Sisters of the Earth contains this chorus of voices that include well-known writers to lesser known; I Sisters of the Earth: Women's Prose and Poetry About Nature is a veritable treasure trove of women's writing on nature. Lorraine Anderson did an outstanding job collecting a diverse group of writers who contributed poetry, prose, short stories and essays to the book. Her thoughtful and illuminating biographies that precede each work demonstrates her palpable attentiveness to each woman's voice. Sisters of the Earth contains this chorus of voices that include well-known writers to lesser known; I was amazed at the diversity of women found on each page - they include civil/natural rights activists, writers, environmentalists, biologists, poets, and teachers. It's an indicator of the times that many of the women who contributed to this anthology are not readily recognized for their work. For that reason, I consider this wonderful book an indispensable contribution to the (mostly male) canon of nature writing. And despite the inevitable label of "women's writing," this is a deeply humane book. Simply put, I love this book. It's perfect to pick up and read a snippet here and there, or settle in a comfy chair and devour the whole thing. Bravo, Ms. Anderson. Five stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tom Mueller

    For a beautiful review, see: http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GA... In the book's acknowledgments, I read of a course offered by Stanford; "Women and Ecology", which gives me yet another inducement to pursue some 'non-degree seeking' course work. Some of my favorite classical authors such as Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Rachael Carson and Willa Cather are among the more than 100 authors represented in Lorraine Anderson's compilation. Contempory authors include such stand-bys as Terry Tempest Willia For a beautiful review, see: http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GA... In the book's acknowledgments, I read of a course offered by Stanford; "Women and Ecology", which gives me yet another inducement to pursue some 'non-degree seeking' course work. Some of my favorite classical authors such as Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Rachael Carson and Willa Cather are among the more than 100 authors represented in Lorraine Anderson's compilation. Contempory authors include such stand-bys as Terry Tempest Williams and Ursula Le Guin. Of Sisters of the Earth: Women's Prose and Poetry About Nature, it runs the gamut from essays and poems, to journal entries, to short stories and other works of fiction. Sisters . . . "offer[s] a vivid, eloquent response to the natural world" (back cover). This work adds "the world as perceived by women" (p. xvi) in addition to the (also valid) male point of view. A "must read" for all Folk who care.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tina Cipolla

    Absolutely excellent! I picked up this book in the Yosemite bookstore. One could not ask for a better read on a weeklong journey through Yosemite. I found so many writers in here that I want to read more of, some I'm familiar with, some not, but I cannot think of a better trove of new material to read. Be prepared for the full gamut of emotions from joy, and sighs of delight straight on down to despair and rage and everything in between. This book is an emotional roller coaster but well worth th Absolutely excellent! I picked up this book in the Yosemite bookstore. One could not ask for a better read on a weeklong journey through Yosemite. I found so many writers in here that I want to read more of, some I'm familiar with, some not, but I cannot think of a better trove of new material to read. Be prepared for the full gamut of emotions from joy, and sighs of delight straight on down to despair and rage and everything in between. This book is an emotional roller coaster but well worth the time if you love women writers and care about the natural world.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gary Brooks

    First and foremost I love poetry and I even write a little myself. What i really enjoyed about this work was that it covers almost the complete diaspora of nature writing. From historical perspectives, animal welfare, activism to even the space age and our stewardship of our planet. The description almost to microscopic detail of almost all natural biomes eg the Pacific northwest, Prairie and the Canadian wilderness.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    This is a treasure of deep ecology from the perspective of women writes from the early 1900's to today. This book is more pose than poetry but well worth exploring the authors that have observed nature, protested against its destruction and found nature as a means to heal. This is a treasure of deep ecology from the perspective of women writes from the early 1900's to today. This book is more pose than poetry but well worth exploring the authors that have observed nature, protested against its destruction and found nature as a means to heal.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Lynn Thomas

    Reading for my Ecofeminist Literature class. Some good stuff, but a lot of it is just pulled from wherever, and there are many incomplete pieces. I prefer anthologies with complete essays/short stories, personally, so this didn't quite do it for me. Reading for my Ecofeminist Literature class. Some good stuff, but a lot of it is just pulled from wherever, and there are many incomplete pieces. I prefer anthologies with complete essays/short stories, personally, so this didn't quite do it for me.

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