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C.S. Lewis has long been recognized as a beloved author of children's literature and an apologist for Christian belief to a skeptical modern world. In this new volume, Gregory S. Cootsona shows us how Lewis can also serve as a guide to the ups and downs of the Christian journey. Like many of us, Lewis suffered from a variety of crises of faith and personal experience. Like C.S. Lewis has long been recognized as a beloved author of children's literature and an apologist for Christian belief to a skeptical modern world. In this new volume, Gregory S. Cootsona shows us how Lewis can also serve as a guide to the ups and downs of the Christian journey. Like many of us, Lewis suffered from a variety of crises of faith and personal experience. Like us, he came to faith in a world that no longer respects Christian commitment or offers much room for belief in God. Like us, he felt the absence of God when those closest to him died. Like us, he wrestled with doubt, wondering if God is real, or simply the projection of his own wishes onto the screen of the universe. Like us, he knew the kinds of temptations he described with such poignancy and humor in The Screwtape Letters. By examining these and the other crises of C.S. Lewis's life, Cootsona shows us how Lewis found God in each one, and how he shared those discoveries with us in his writing. All those wishing to deepen and enrich their own spiritual journey will find much guidance and wisdom in these pages.


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C.S. Lewis has long been recognized as a beloved author of children's literature and an apologist for Christian belief to a skeptical modern world. In this new volume, Gregory S. Cootsona shows us how Lewis can also serve as a guide to the ups and downs of the Christian journey. Like many of us, Lewis suffered from a variety of crises of faith and personal experience. Like C.S. Lewis has long been recognized as a beloved author of children's literature and an apologist for Christian belief to a skeptical modern world. In this new volume, Gregory S. Cootsona shows us how Lewis can also serve as a guide to the ups and downs of the Christian journey. Like many of us, Lewis suffered from a variety of crises of faith and personal experience. Like us, he came to faith in a world that no longer respects Christian commitment or offers much room for belief in God. Like us, he felt the absence of God when those closest to him died. Like us, he wrestled with doubt, wondering if God is real, or simply the projection of his own wishes onto the screen of the universe. Like us, he knew the kinds of temptations he described with such poignancy and humor in The Screwtape Letters. By examining these and the other crises of C.S. Lewis's life, Cootsona shows us how Lewis found God in each one, and how he shared those discoveries with us in his writing. All those wishing to deepen and enrich their own spiritual journey will find much guidance and wisdom in these pages.

30 review for C. S. Lewis and the Crisis of a Christian

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    This book does something different from most books about C. S. Lewis or his works. The purpose of this book is neither biography, nor an exposition or critique of part or all of the writing of Lewis. Rather, the writer seeks to introduce Lewis through the lens of the existential crises of life, as Lewis experienced them, as the author experienced them, and as we may experience them, either as atheists or Christians or in our common humanity. Cootsona summarizes the life of Lewis around crises he This book does something different from most books about C. S. Lewis or his works. The purpose of this book is neither biography, nor an exposition or critique of part or all of the writing of Lewis. Rather, the writer seeks to introduce Lewis through the lens of the existential crises of life, as Lewis experienced them, as the author experienced them, and as we may experience them, either as atheists or Christians or in our common humanity. Cootsona summarizes the life of Lewis around crises he experienced as an atheist, apologetic crises he grappled with as a Christian, and the existential crises of suffering, evil, and death that every human being must face and that Lewis faced in his own losses of mother and wife, as well as in his own final decline. But this is not simply biography. Around these three major types of crises, Cootsona introduces us to what Lewis said and wrote about these matters. Thus, this book could serve as an introduction to the relevance of Lewis's writing for a new generation of reader. First of all he concerns himself with "crises" of atheism. One of these is the self-contradictory and self-defeating nature of naturalism--if there is no design, if all is random, and if rationality is an epiphenomenon, then our certainty about these assertions, and this very sentence are up for grabs. Naturalism can offer no real sense of meaning, yet we act as if life is meaningful. Finally, even though we can posit no basis in naturalism for any transcendent moral law, we act as if it is so, that there are things that are really wrong. Then he moves on to crises peculiar to embracing Christian faith. One of these is the crisis of pluralism: how may we believe in the uniqueness of Christ when there are so many alternatives. Isn't this simply one myth among many? In this context, Coosona introduces us to Lewis's famous "liar-lunatic-Lord" trilemma. Secondly, he explores the question of authority and the nature of biblical authority. Here he "outs" Lewis as not among the inerrantists. Yet Lewis believed the Bible was authoritative because of Christ and the Church's witness, because, for its human faults, it carried the Word of God, at even sections Lewis might consider "mythical" (such as the creation accounts) were not fictional but true, and that the Bible forms the lives of those who read it, including Lewis. Lewis believed the miracles that were recorded as historical facts, including the miracle of the resurrection. Thus, Lewis challenges both fundamentalists and liberal skeptics in the way he reads and understands the scriptures. The final section explores existential questions. One is the question of emotivism. Ought I base my decisions simply upon feeling or are there moral standards that I might live by regardless of feelings? Second, how do we make sense of suffering? He explores not only the arguments in The Problem of Pain but also those in the more intensely personal A Grief Observed that explore both where purpose may be found in suffering and yet the fundamental mystery we face in much suffering. Finally we see how Lewis regarded death, including his own approaching death. Throughout, Cootsona weaves together his own experiences, Lewis's life and writing, as well as how this has proven helpful to others. Cootsona introduces us to some of his own archival research along the way where this illumines how Lewis might approach a question. Yet his priority focus is to demonstrate how the works of Lewis that are available to most readers address these crises of life. That begs the question: do we need this book if we have Lewis's books on our shelves? Strictly speaking, the answer is no. But for the skeptic or young believer who is not well-acquainted with Lewis, this book can serve as a helpful doorway into the works of Lewis. The book also serves as a basic apologetic for Christian faith for a person who is asking the questions or wrestling with the crises the book explores. I do think the book would be helped with recommended readings of Lewis at the end of each chapter relevant to the chapter discussion. There is a bibliography at the end that includes some material on where to start in reading Lewis and includes a lists of his works, biographies, and other scholarly work on Lewis. [This review is based on a complimentary e-galley version of this book provided by the publisher through Netgalley. I have not been in any other way compensated for the review of this book.]

  2. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    A well-written, scholarly work. The author has a lot of respect for Lewis, which shows in every sentence, and the detailed research he's done help make sense of Lewis' writings. Cootsona has expertly pulled together all Lewis' writings, published and unpublished, and used them to create a holistic view of Lewis' thought processes and understanding, thus allowing the reader to see the connections between Lewis' life, each book, and the crises discussed within. It is slow going. This isn't a book yo A well-written, scholarly work. The author has a lot of respect for Lewis, which shows in every sentence, and the detailed research he's done help make sense of Lewis' writings. Cootsona has expertly pulled together all Lewis' writings, published and unpublished, and used them to create a holistic view of Lewis' thought processes and understanding, thus allowing the reader to see the connections between Lewis' life, each book, and the crises discussed within. It is slow going. This isn't a book you can read in one or two sittings, but one to read, ponder and mark passages to come back to later. At times it seems a little repetitive, but this serves to drive him the most important influences on Lewis' life: the death of his mother, his experiences in the war, his friends, his wife. This book acts as an overview, not just of Lewis' work but also of Lewis himself. There's no doubt Lewis was an incredible man. His journey from tentative Christian to atheist to theist and then into an unapologetic Christian is definitely one to inspire. His ability to face those awkward questions ("Why does God allow suffering? What makes you so sure *your* religious myth is the real one?") head-on, to dissect the issues and eventually answer them to his own satisfaction was unprecedented, and Cootsona has carefully examined each one. Despite his high regard for Lewis, there are also critical aspects: his respect for Lewis does not preclude disagreement. Sometimes it's frustrating to follow as Lewis' talks and writings are thoughtfully analyzed and we only get glimpses of the whole, but it's inspired me to dust the books I have and finally finish them, rather than just dipping in here and there. The copious end notes will help guide further research, and there is indeed plenty to think about. I could barely read a page without underlining something of importance: a passage that spoke to me, or which suddenly made a concept clear. Even just the awareness the life context of Lewis' work was useful; like all people, his opinions and beliefs changed over time, so it's essential to understand where he was in his journey when certain books were written, and the target audience for each. It took me a long time to read and digest, but this is definitely a book I will return to, possibly many times (though I would prefer paperback to ebook). If you are at all interested in C.S. Lewis or his apologetics, this is highly recommended. Disclaimer: I received a free copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Robert D. Cornwall

    Gregory Cootsona is an evangelical-leaning Presbyterian pastor serving as Associate Pastor of Adult Discipleship and College Ministries at Bidwell Presbyterian Church in Chico, California. Chico is ensconced in Northern California near Redding and home to Chico State University. He writes this book about Lewis from the perspective of one who has found Lewis to be a constant companion in the life of faith, helping him resolve doubts and navigate challenges to his faith. He honors Lewis while als Gregory Cootsona is an evangelical-leaning Presbyterian pastor serving as Associate Pastor of Adult Discipleship and College Ministries at Bidwell Presbyterian Church in Chico, California. Chico is ensconced in Northern California near Redding and home to Chico State University. He writes this book about Lewis from the perspective of one who has found Lewis to be a constant companion in the life of faith, helping him resolve doubts and navigate challenges to his faith. He honors Lewis while also recognizing that Lewis was not a saint, though he refers to him somewhat ironically as St. Clive. This is not a biography or a critique. According to the author the books is one person’s attempt to ascertain why Lewis continues to be popular fifty years after his death, selling more books now than then. He also seeks to explain why Lewis continues to speak to him. His answer is this: "Lewis’s voice still resonates because his crises and their resolutions in his work reflect our own crises and guide us toward resolution." (p. 2). The book, therefore, is an exploration of the way in which Lewis dealt with the crises that face Christians through his own writings. Cootsona does delve into Lewis’ life, but only as it touches on the subject at hand. The keys to the story is Lewis’s movement out of atheism as a young man and his need to deal with questions of pain and grief – losing a mother at age nine, fighting in the trenches of World War I, and the loss of his wife Joy Davidman from cancer near the end of his own life. Mixed into all of this is Lewis’s academic interest in ancient and medieval literature, along with the study of mythology. Lewis became a leading “apologist” for the faith because he dealt with issues that are common to humans – questions about suffering and meaning in life. He did so in a way that made sense. He offered rational, reasonable answers. We might not assent to all of them, but one can understand why they speak to so many even today. Complete review to be found at my blog -- http://www.bobcornwall.com/2014/10/cs...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeanie

    I just finished a journey. A journey of one man in the crisis of life has brought many with his words and stories along the same journey. Having only read a few of his books, I am a fan; however, my children are bigger fans. They were excited when the Chronicles of Narnia became a Disney movie and I excitedly took them to see. They are great memories of great conversations of faith. The goodness of God and the true condition of man are prevalent in CS Lewis writings. He was a man that knew somet I just finished a journey. A journey of one man in the crisis of life has brought many with his words and stories along the same journey. Having only read a few of his books, I am a fan; however, my children are bigger fans. They were excited when the Chronicles of Narnia became a Disney movie and I excitedly took them to see. They are great memories of great conversations of faith. The goodness of God and the true condition of man are prevalent in CS Lewis writings. He was a man that knew something was not right and there was something better. There was an ache of his heart. The crises that he endured are the same that you and I may go thru; however, with his gift of words, he is able to communicate to generations this void in our hearts. We are introduced to CS Lewis and the crisis of faith that was at work in his life. I have listed the contents and a description of each. The Crises of Atheism-CS Lewis was an atheist. “I maintained that God did not exist. I was also very angry with God for not existing. The Crisis of Materialism-We seek something that this world cannot satisfy, which points to a God beyond this world. The Crisis of Meaninglessness-We were created with desires and those desires are satisfied in the purpose of God. “Good forms us morally. Truth forms our minds. And beauty lures us. It is what we desire. It is what makes truth and goodness desirable and interesting (kindle loc 622) this leads to joy which leads to glory. The Crisis of Anomie-CS Lewis desired joy in the moral design of the universe. This was brilliantly expressed in Narnia. “He wanted to show as well as tell. In his language, he wanted us to enjoy as well as contemplate. (loc 790) Lewis was convinced that moral formation is central to human life and happiness. The Crises of Christian Faith Jesus and the Crisis of other Myths-The crisis of answering the question-Who is Jesus? This question demands a response. Jesus according to the gospels claims he was witness to the truth. He is the truth. That truth leads us to turn from our wickedness. The Crisis of the Bible-Lewis believed the bible had authority; however, he was not a fundamentalist. He was intent in grasping the meaning of the scriptures. He was careful not to create a “new Jesus”. The Crisis of Human Life-It is when we acknowledge the mundane things in life. The everyday things. The Crisis of Feelings-our feelings are secondary because they change and do not reflect truth. We are in a culture where we are obsessed with feelings. It is our obedience that shows the world how to love God. The Crisis of Suffering-To find the joy in life, we have to come to terms of the suffering. True freedom comes from doing the right thing. For God to love us implies that God wants to change us. If we trust that God is good that should be our desire and the changing of our will can be most painful. The Crisis of Death-With life there is hope and with death there is faith on the promises of God. CS Lewis was on a journey and Gregory Cootsona included his readers on one as well. A special thank you to Westminster John Knox Press, and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Christmas

    I was already a big C.S. Lewis fan. I've read several of his books, always being blown away by his thoughts on Christianity. Although I don't agree with 100% of what he says, I still find him fascinating in both his theology and his life. Reading this well-researched overview of Lewis' struggles in his life and how his writings show how God has helped him overcome them was a wonderful push for me to read and look at more of his essays and books. Although Cootsona writes more like he is speaking, I was already a big C.S. Lewis fan. I've read several of his books, always being blown away by his thoughts on Christianity. Although I don't agree with 100% of what he says, I still find him fascinating in both his theology and his life. Reading this well-researched overview of Lewis' struggles in his life and how his writings show how God has helped him overcome them was a wonderful push for me to read and look at more of his essays and books. Although Cootsona writes more like he is speaking, or with a voice of a high school essay, his points are made well. He has definitely done thorough research on this subject - research that involves looking at timelines and dozens of Lewis' works together and very in-depth. I enjoyed this book very much, and would highly recommend it to anyone who is either questioning Christianity, or going through the journey themselves.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dan Curnutt

    Gregory Cootsona gives us a glimpse at the life of C.S. Lewis and the profound writing that he brought to our world. He also gives us his story, his journey through crisis and how reading the works of C.S. Lewis he was able to navigate a path through the wilderness of evil, doubt and meaningless to find the true path of righteousness, mercy, grace, salvation and the way to God and a meaningful life. Throughout the book Cootsona will refer to the many writings of C.S. Lewis to explain the issues o Gregory Cootsona gives us a glimpse at the life of C.S. Lewis and the profound writing that he brought to our world. He also gives us his story, his journey through crisis and how reading the works of C.S. Lewis he was able to navigate a path through the wilderness of evil, doubt and meaningless to find the true path of righteousness, mercy, grace, salvation and the way to God and a meaningful life. Throughout the book Cootsona will refer to the many writings of C.S. Lewis to explain the issues of our day and why so many people can't seem to get a handle on things and find that they need a guide. For Cootsona and many of the rest of us that guide is C.S. Lewis. Lewis brings us a proper view of Good vs. Evil, Morality vs. Immorality and the answer to 'Why or how can a loving God allow suffering and evil in the world that He created.' Probably one of the best quotes form the works of C.S. Lewis sums up the purpose of Cootsona's book. In Surprised by Joy, C.S. Lewis writes, "A young man who wishes to remain a sound Atheist cannot be too careful of his reading . . . God is, If I may say it, very unscrupulous." In my own words I might paraphrase this to say, "If you are an Atheist you better watch out what you read because God cannot be hidden in the words of ill informed, He cannot be buried in the verbose words of the moralist, He cannot be dismissed in the tomes of science. God will get you in whatever you read with an open mind, because God has informed it all and it all points to Him." C.S. Lewis started out his life as an Atheist, he then progressed to becoming an Agnostic and finally had not option but to turn his life over to Jesus Christ and accept Him as Lord and Savior. Even though Lewis saw the horrors of mankind in the trenches of WWI, he still came to realize that man has a moral code that guides him, some of evil, but most for good. It is this moral code that Lewis determines is woven into the very fabric of every human by God Himself. There is no denying this moral code and thus in the long run there is no denying God. Cootsona will take you on a journey through the writings of C.S. Lewis that you will thoroughly enjoy. If you are a fan of C.S. Lewis you will find this a comfortable book that reminds you of the truth you found in the writings of Lewis. If you are not a fan of C.S. Lewis and have never read his works then you will find yourself thinking, I really need to put this book down and start reading C.S. Lewis himself. Bravo, that would be a wise choice. Then you can come back to this book and smile, nod your head and find yourself agreeing with everything that Cootsona has to say about Lewis. So, where to start? Maybe with Mere Christianity, the most profound apologetic book of the 20th Century. Or maybe a fun read such as the Chronicles of Narnia where you will find the epic battle of good and evil and a God who loves His creation enough to provide a plan of salvation. Or maybe you might want to read the science fiction trilogy that many people forget C.S. Lewis wrote. Out of the silent planet, Prelandria and That Hideous Strength. Maybe my favorite though is "Surprised by Joy," in which C.S. Lewis gives his exclamation of what he discovered through all his searching. Whatever you do just know that this work by Gregory Cootsona will give you a good glimpse into the life and writings of C.S. Lewis and apologetics master who has given us classic volumes of work to help us find our way in a world of corruption and evil. Enjoy!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Readnponder

    “Do we really need another book about C. S. Lewis?” I can hear some readers say. Well, that depends . . . . such as whether the author has some new fact or insight. While Gregory Cootsona is not adding anything new to what is known about Lewis, he is applying Lewis’s extant writings in a novel manner. Observing that many people (the author included) have turned to Lewis when facing various crises, Cootsona endeavors to identify common trouble spots and see how C. S. Lewis worked his way through “Do we really need another book about C. S. Lewis?” I can hear some readers say. Well, that depends . . . . such as whether the author has some new fact or insight. While Gregory Cootsona is not adding anything new to what is known about Lewis, he is applying Lewis’s extant writings in a novel manner. Observing that many people (the author included) have turned to Lewis when facing various crises, Cootsona endeavors to identify common trouble spots and see how C. S. Lewis worked his way through them. He groups them into three categories: crises of atheism (such as materialism or the meaninglessness of life), crises of the Christian faith (such as what sets apart Jesus from other myths or what makes the Bible uniquely authoritative), and finally crises of human life (such as the reliability of feelings or the question of suffering and death). Woven in with Lewis’s wrestling on each topic is the story of someone who resolved a similar personal crisis using C. S. Lewis as a guide: Francis Collins, Charles Colson, Sheldon Vanauken, to name a few. The author includes his own struggle with atheism as an undergrad at Berkley and later with counseling hurting parishioners as a minister. This treatment maintains a human face on what might all too easily slip into dry apologetics. The book’s strength is its thorough, but not exhaustive, overview of Lewis’s discussion on the various crisis topics. Those who wish to drill down deeper will need to go to works dealing exclusively with that particular issue. And while this book is no substitute for reading Lewis himself, it will help you decide where you want to start. Long-time fans of C. S. Lewis may treat of this as topical anthology of sorts. (Remember those charts in some Gideon Bibles that listed scripture passages to read if you were angry or grieving or fearful etc.? This book serves as a similar handy reference.) For those new to Lewis, this work will serve well as an introduction to the man’s life and thought. It is well paced and not too technical, theologically or philosophically. In addition to his seminary training, the author has a background in comparative literature and admits to being shaped by both mainline and evangelical denominations. In fact, his book would be consistent with Lewis’s notion of “mere Christianity.”

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    What is the power of Clive Staples Lewis, author of “The Chronicles of Narnia” and “The Screwtape Letters,” to lead contemporary readers to an understanding of Christianity, to deepen the faith of believers, and to be a faithful companion for those facing some of life’s biggest decisions? The Oxford scholar died in 1963, and yet his popularity is undiminished. Why? Greg Cootsona, Pastor of Adult Discipleship at Chico’s Bidwell Presbyterian Church, and an academic in his own right, says of his own What is the power of Clive Staples Lewis, author of “The Chronicles of Narnia” and “The Screwtape Letters,” to lead contemporary readers to an understanding of Christianity, to deepen the faith of believers, and to be a faithful companion for those facing some of life’s biggest decisions? The Oxford scholar died in 1963, and yet his popularity is undiminished. Why? Greg Cootsona, Pastor of Adult Discipleship at Chico’s Bidwell Presbyterian Church, and an academic in his own right, says of his own journey that “Lewis taught me that Christian faith could withstand serious intellectual engagement.” As a student at UC Berkeley, he writes, “My crisis of doubt found an answer in the gospel, and I can attribute a fair measure of this to Lewis.” In “C.S. Lewis And The Crisis Of A Christian," Cootsona weaves Lewis’ own life story around its central decision-points, the crises that shaped his writing. As a young atheist, Lewis wrestled with the crises of materialism, meaninglessness, and anomie (no source of moral guidance). Eventually, describing himself as a “reluctant convert,” Lewis the Christian had to face the question of the uniqueness of Jesus Christ and the nature of the Bible. And as a human being, he dealt head on with the crises of suffering and death, and with feelings. If God feels close one day, why does he feel absent the next? Through rereading Lewis’ works and research in Lewis archives in the US and UK, Cootsona finds renewed guidance for his own life and ministry. Lewis experienced a lifelong sense of “poignant longing. He described it as a search for joy (which Lewis frequently capitalizes because he uses it as a technical term). The taste of joy—and the desire it evokes—began early in his life and gradually expanded, like a time-release capsule that drove him to God.” This book gives another taste of that Joy. Copyright Chico Enterprise-Record; used by permission.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    A View the Crises that Shaped C. S. Lewis' Writing During his early life, C. S. Lewis was a confirmed atheist. While at Oxford he struggled with the problems of materialism, meaninglessness and anomie. Eventually, after much soul searching he became in his words a reluctant convert to Christianity. From this beginning, and probably because of it, he became one of the foremost apologists in the twentieth century, one who uses rational argument to defend Christianity. His works such as Mere Christi A View the Crises that Shaped C. S. Lewis' Writing During his early life, C. S. Lewis was a confirmed atheist. While at Oxford he struggled with the problems of materialism, meaninglessness and anomie. Eventually, after much soul searching he became in his words a reluctant convert to Christianity. From this beginning, and probably because of it, he became one of the foremost apologists in the twentieth century, one who uses rational argument to defend Christianity. His works such as Mere Christianity, and Surprised by Joy still bring many readers to the Christian faith, the author being one of them. He attributes his embrace of the Christianity, eventually becoming a pastor to reading C. S. Lewis while he was a student at UC Berkley. Lewis' scholarly works are not the only ones that bring people to Christianity. Cootsona points out that Lewis turned to writing fiction, primarily the Chronicles of Narnia, because he believed that other scholars were more capable of making academic arguments. Engaging the imagination was another way to continue the apologetic task. From the number of people who love the Chronicles of Narnia, he seems to have been correct. This is an excellent overview of Lewis' life and writing. The first chapters are the most philosophical and somewhat difficult to follow, but Cootsona intersperses Lewis' philosophical writings with his own reactions. This makes the book very readable and gives the reader insight into how Lewis' arguments affected the author's embrace of Christianity. If you're unfamiliar with Lewis' writing, this is a good place to start. If you've already read him extensively, this overview will help to put the whole body of his work into perspective. I enjoyed the book and highly recommend it. I reviewed this book for Net Galley.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Karen Klein

    Note: A copy of this arc was given to me through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I enjoyed reading this and have added to my wishlist of much wanted books. It will definitely be a great addition to my bookshelves! I have attempted to read C.S. Lewis' books several times, but have always either put them down because I had a hard time understanding the material or finished it but walked away still slightly confused. After reading Pastor Cootsona's book, I think that I can finally go back Note: A copy of this arc was given to me through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I enjoyed reading this and have added to my wishlist of much wanted books. It will definitely be a great addition to my bookshelves! I have attempted to read C.S. Lewis' books several times, but have always either put them down because I had a hard time understanding the material or finished it but walked away still slightly confused. After reading Pastor Cootsona's book, I think that I can finally go back to Lewis' books and understand. In this book, the author attempts to analyze and take apart Lewis' theories on atheism and also explore his crises of faith. The author believes that many of the things that Lewis went through as he struggled with his faith in God most people go through as well and that as C.S. Lewis was able to resolve his crises with his writings, so too will we be able to answer many of our questions after reading C.S. Lewis's works. There is a small amount of biographical information, which was helpful for me since I don't really know much about the man himself (I just tried to read his books). This book provided me with some much needed wisdom!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Taffy

    This is an interesting book looking into the life and writings of C.S. Lewis as he journeys through his spiritual life. The author has done extensive reading and research into C.S. Lewis, trying to figure out why his words resound so strongly with him. It is a spiritual journey for Mr. Cootsona as well that eventually led him to becoming a pastor. If you love C.S. Lewis, you will love this book and the look into his life with stories and quotes backing up such chapters as The Crisis of Materialis This is an interesting book looking into the life and writings of C.S. Lewis as he journeys through his spiritual life. The author has done extensive reading and research into C.S. Lewis, trying to figure out why his words resound so strongly with him. It is a spiritual journey for Mr. Cootsona as well that eventually led him to becoming a pastor. If you love C.S. Lewis, you will love this book and the look into his life with stories and quotes backing up such chapters as The Crisis of Materialism or The Crisis of Suffering. As reader, you can't help finding a little peace and understanding in your own spiritual journey. thanks to netgalley for the read!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mary Foxe

    Note: I received this from Net Galley for free. I have been an ardent lover of Narnia since elementary school and watched the movies with glee. I have read a multitude of Lewis' other works both fiction and nonfiction. One of my professors wrote her dissertation on C.S. Lewis' Four Loves while another taught a class on Lewis and Tolkien (which was one of my favorites of my entire academic career). Professor Lewis is part of the reason I am a Christian, a lover of fantasy, and a student of literat Note: I received this from Net Galley for free. I have been an ardent lover of Narnia since elementary school and watched the movies with glee. I have read a multitude of Lewis' other works both fiction and nonfiction. One of my professors wrote her dissertation on C.S. Lewis' Four Loves while another taught a class on Lewis and Tolkien (which was one of my favorites of my entire academic career). Professor Lewis is part of the reason I am a Christian, a lover of fantasy, and a student of literature. All of this to say, I am quite pleased with this book. Gregory S. Cootsona talks about different crises of faith Lewis had as an atheist, as a new Christian, and from the struggles all people go through. Cootsona is obviously a fan of Lewis while at the same time is critical of Lewis' logic and disagrees with him personally at times. I could tell by the style of the book without being told that it was a dissertation, but that does not take away the readability of this book. Cootsona wanted to follow C.S. Lewis' example of speaking to the ordinary person, and I think he has done that fairly well for someone who reads books such as Lewis' Miracles (one of Lewis' denser works). I would recommend this to my friends who are Lewis fans if they would like a refresher on how C.S. Lewis presented and defended his faith in both fiction and nonfiction.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. This was a very slow book for me to read, but only because it shifted my normal reading mind from flying through a book packed with action, romance, suspense, etc etc, to slowly reading through this book to truly understand one of my favorite children’s fiction authors, CS Lewis. No, I have not read any of this other works, though I am eyeing The Screwtape Letters. I have read the Narnia Chronicles as a child and as I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. This was a very slow book for me to read, but only because it shifted my normal reading mind from flying through a book packed with action, romance, suspense, etc etc, to slowly reading through this book to truly understand one of my favorite children’s fiction authors, CS Lewis. No, I have not read any of this other works, though I am eyeing The Screwtape Letters. I have read the Narnia Chronicles as a child and as an adult, and I believe I actually enjoy them more as an adult. Perhaps this coming year I will delve into his non-fiction apologetic works. The author does a good job of showing us Lewis’ work through the lens of Lewis’ life and the reasons behind the writing of each. As the author put it, when Lewis found himself in a crisis, he would sit down and write through it. This book caused me to read a paragraph, then go back and re-read it, and then go back and re-read it a third time to truly understand the thought process behind Lewis’ apologetic works. For a scientist like myself, it is not easy at times to follow the process of subjects that are so amorphous at times. Over all, though, it was a good book, and one that introduced me to a part of Lewis’ life that I avoided.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    C. S. Lewis will always be one of my favorite writers of Christian books. The first book I ever read by him was Mere Christianity. Since then, I have immersed myself in his fantasy stories and studied his nonfiction books. I often read the books two or more times because there is so much to gained from them that I often don't always notice important details the first time. When I saw that Gregory Cootsona had written a book about the crises that Lewis had gone through, I couldn't wait to read it C. S. Lewis will always be one of my favorite writers of Christian books. The first book I ever read by him was Mere Christianity. Since then, I have immersed myself in his fantasy stories and studied his nonfiction books. I often read the books two or more times because there is so much to gained from them that I often don't always notice important details the first time. When I saw that Gregory Cootsona had written a book about the crises that Lewis had gone through, I couldn't wait to read it. I am glad that I did, because I have been so blessed by this book! The author pulls together information from the many writings by C S Lewis on a variety of subjects. he also shares some of his own history which deepened my appreciation. In this world we have trouble. I highly recommend this book to help you in the way. I will be reading it over and over again and buying copies to give away. I think you should too.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Bromley

    I received an uncorrected proof of this book via NetGalley. This book was very interesting, as I didn't know much about CS Lewis. I enjoyed learning about how his life and his faith interwove with his work. However, it was hard for me to stay involved. It was a bit tedious for being such a short book. It was hard for me to pick it back up when it was time to read again. But the information provided and research done was exceptional. I received an uncorrected proof of this book via NetGalley. This book was very interesting, as I didn't know much about CS Lewis. I enjoyed learning about how his life and his faith interwove with his work. However, it was hard for me to stay involved. It was a bit tedious for being such a short book. It was hard for me to pick it back up when it was time to read again. But the information provided and research done was exceptional.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Wilcox

    This probably deserves 3.5 stars. I really enjoyed the framework of Lewis's life and literature in terms of human and Christian crises. The themes are incredibly well-organized, and I got enough of the author's voice for it to not feel like a textbook. I recommend it. Read my full review at Austin CNM. This probably deserves 3.5 stars. I really enjoyed the framework of Lewis's life and literature in terms of human and Christian crises. The themes are incredibly well-organized, and I got enough of the author's voice for it to not feel like a textbook. I recommend it. Read my full review at Austin CNM.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Diana

  18. 4 out of 5

    "('・c_,・` )" lewis"('・c_,・` )"

  19. 4 out of 5

    amatul sobia

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alfredo Deambrosi

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Paul

  22. 5 out of 5

    Donald Frush

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ganevar M.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sara Sara

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

  26. 4 out of 5

    Greg Cootsona

  27. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Ng

  28. 5 out of 5

    Boni Manalili

  29. 5 out of 5

    John T.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gary

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