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Andrew Draws

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When Andrew finds a crayon under the sofa, he puts it to use by scribbling on the floor. Mom is not happy, but Andrew's grandmother knows what to do. She gives him a pad of paper. From that day on, Andrew draws, and draws, and draws. He becomes so skilled that his work takes on a life of its own. Oh my, says Grandmother when the bird Andrew draws alights on her shoulder. H When Andrew finds a crayon under the sofa, he puts it to use by scribbling on the floor. Mom is not happy, but Andrew's grandmother knows what to do. She gives him a pad of paper. From that day on, Andrew draws, and draws, and draws. He becomes so skilled that his work takes on a life of its own. Oh my, says Grandmother when the bird Andrew draws alights on her shoulder. Hearing of Andrew's remarkable artwork, the president calls with a question. Could Andrew use his ability to help the whole world? Here is the story of a small boy who does the extraordinary, reminding readers of the power that both art and artist can wield.


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When Andrew finds a crayon under the sofa, he puts it to use by scribbling on the floor. Mom is not happy, but Andrew's grandmother knows what to do. She gives him a pad of paper. From that day on, Andrew draws, and draws, and draws. He becomes so skilled that his work takes on a life of its own. Oh my, says Grandmother when the bird Andrew draws alights on her shoulder. H When Andrew finds a crayon under the sofa, he puts it to use by scribbling on the floor. Mom is not happy, but Andrew's grandmother knows what to do. She gives him a pad of paper. From that day on, Andrew draws, and draws, and draws. He becomes so skilled that his work takes on a life of its own. Oh my, says Grandmother when the bird Andrew draws alights on her shoulder. Hearing of Andrew's remarkable artwork, the president calls with a question. Could Andrew use his ability to help the whole world? Here is the story of a small boy who does the extraordinary, reminding readers of the power that both art and artist can wield.

30 review for Andrew Draws

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    When Andrew draws the things of his imagination become manifest. Happily, Andrew uses his uncanny power for good until he runs out of paper. I particularly love the look of Andrew, who reminds me of Peggy Rathmann's work. Library copy When Andrew draws the things of his imagination become manifest. Happily, Andrew uses his uncanny power for good until he runs out of paper. I particularly love the look of Andrew, who reminds me of Peggy Rathmann's work. Library copy

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lorna

    I just didn't care for this. Who is the target age for this? With often sparse and simple text it would seem geared for younger kids, but then suddenly Andrew is solving huge world problems simple by illustrating solutions. Such a complex thing that many young readers won't get. I also found the illustration style to loose. While I'm sure it wasn't, it just felt rushed. I just didn't care for this. Who is the target age for this? With often sparse and simple text it would seem geared for younger kids, but then suddenly Andrew is solving huge world problems simple by illustrating solutions. Such a complex thing that many young readers won't get. I also found the illustration style to loose. While I'm sure it wasn't, it just felt rushed.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This is a great story about all of the magic that can be found with a crayon and a piece of paper. It is filled with imaginative possibilities, and also supports the concept of drawing, which helps build the skills and strength necessary to write.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sunah Chung

    Andrew finds a crayon under the sofa and starts to draw. First, it does not have a shape but a scribble, but later it has the power to be substantialized. That is when he draws a cat for his mother, it becomes a real cat. By the request of the President, he draws food trucks and supplement ships to send to those who need help. With the last piece of paper and a tip of the crayon, he draws something for himself. I thought this story would be a contemporary realistic fiction, but it turned out to Andrew finds a crayon under the sofa and starts to draw. First, it does not have a shape but a scribble, but later it has the power to be substantialized. That is when he draws a cat for his mother, it becomes a real cat. By the request of the President, he draws food trucks and supplement ships to send to those who need help. With the last piece of paper and a tip of the crayon, he draws something for himself. I thought this story would be a contemporary realistic fiction, but it turned out to be modern fantasy which encompasses magical powers. It must be a strong desire for most people to help others with sufficient foods and facilities for health and education. Andrew’s drawings have the power to solve the global issues. If Andrew drew a mighty wish such as conquering the world at the end of the story, this book would be for young adults or adults. However, Andrew drew a dog for himself which implies the child’s innocence. The illustrations are done by using pens and watercolors mostly. I love the atmosphere caused by the effects of water colors.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This is a quick read. Andrew loves to draw and soon discovers his drawings are special. The book moves along quickly and is a nice, light story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Seema Rao

    A boy loves to draw wherever he is. It is one of those books that is okay, but not amazing.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    Award Winning Book: In this story Andrew finds a small crayon and begins to draw everywhere. When his grandmother gives him a pad of paper though, he begins drawing all the time anywhere that he can. One day his drawing of a bird flew off of his paper and was real. Seeing that his pictures could come to life he starts drawing images that could help others all over the world. He drew trucks with food and sent that to places where people were hungry and drew hospitals for places where those were n Award Winning Book: In this story Andrew finds a small crayon and begins to draw everywhere. When his grandmother gives him a pad of paper though, he begins drawing all the time anywhere that he can. One day his drawing of a bird flew off of his paper and was real. Seeing that his pictures could come to life he starts drawing images that could help others all over the world. He drew trucks with food and sent that to places where people were hungry and drew hospitals for places where those were needed. Andrew uses his drawing ability to help others and then with the remnants of his crayon he draws a puppy for himself. This book shows that power of creativity and imagination. In a sweet way it addresses real world issues and gives children an idea of what is needed all over the world. I liked the message that even one person can make a difference if they try and help others. The fact that Andrew thought of others and even as a little boy he did what he could with his talents to help that in need is a topic that kids should be hearing. I would use this book to start discussion on social issues or how we could help others around us. Even while Andrew's pictures were not always great, he did what he could and thought of others. This book is very simple though and does not contain much detail or imagery. I had to pull this overall meaning out of the text but if just read at face value it would just be a cute, short story. The illustrations look like watercolors and are appealing to look at. They help show this imaginative storyline about how his pictures come to life. The pictures work well with the text to share this story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emmaline MacBeath

    Andrew finds a crayon under the couch. At first he scribbles on the floor until his mom catches him and Grandma gives him a drawing pad. He practices and practices wherever he goes until his drawings begin to jump off the page--literally. He draws items for his family. The president hears of Andrews amazing gift and asks him to use it for the good of the world. Andrew draws trucks of food for the hungry and a boatload of supplies to make houses. One day his crayon it down to the final stub so he Andrew finds a crayon under the couch. At first he scribbles on the floor until his mom catches him and Grandma gives him a drawing pad. He practices and practices wherever he goes until his drawings begin to jump off the page--literally. He draws items for his family. The president hears of Andrews amazing gift and asks him to use it for the good of the world. Andrew draws trucks of food for the hungry and a boatload of supplies to make houses. One day his crayon it down to the final stub so he draws something for himself. I love the character of Andrew and his wild hair. I don't enjoy the illustrations of this book as much as some of McPhail's others. The illustrations are a little sketchy and feel incomplete. But I enjoy the simplicity of the story and how Andrew keeps drawing until he becomes very good. This is a cute story for budding artists. I recommend this book for ages 3-7.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    “Andrew Draws,” is derivative of “Harold and the Purple Crayon.” Like Harold, what Andrew draws comes to life. But where Harold is able to draw anything he would like for himself, here McPhail shows Andrew learning to draw, making mistakes and gradually mastering drawing. And, unlike Harold, Andrew uses his gift to altruistically create pictures for the benefit of others before drawing a last, final picture for himself. Using Andrew’s altruism as an example, one tie-in classroom activity is to e “Andrew Draws,” is derivative of “Harold and the Purple Crayon.” Like Harold, what Andrew draws comes to life. But where Harold is able to draw anything he would like for himself, here McPhail shows Andrew learning to draw, making mistakes and gradually mastering drawing. And, unlike Harold, Andrew uses his gift to altruistically create pictures for the benefit of others before drawing a last, final picture for himself. Using Andrew’s altruism as an example, one tie-in classroom activity is to encourage children to think about how they can help make people’s lives better. What picture would they draw to change the world? The deceptively simple story of “Andrew Draws” underlines the importance art lends to vision and the impact an artist can have on the world.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brian Smith

    In the story, Andrew Draws by David MacPhail, the main character finds a crayon under a chair in his living room. He begins drawing on the floor and that is quickly remedied by a gift of a drawing pad from his grandmother. He begins drawing all kinds of things as much as he can. Soon, the things he draws begin to come to life right off the page. Eventually, he uses his special gift to help those in need around the world. In the end he rewards himself for his good deeds by using the last remainin In the story, Andrew Draws by David MacPhail, the main character finds a crayon under a chair in his living room. He begins drawing on the floor and that is quickly remedied by a gift of a drawing pad from his grandmother. He begins drawing all kinds of things as much as he can. Soon, the things he draws begin to come to life right off the page. Eventually, he uses his special gift to help those in need around the world. In the end he rewards himself for his good deeds by using the last remaining bit of crayon to draw himself a puppy. I though this book was ok and so were the illustrations. It is obviously inspired by "Harold and the Purple Crayon" but had enough of it's own storyline to be its own. I felt like it could have been a bit longer. It seemed to wrap up in a hurry.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Ann

    A story about a boy and a magic crayon. At first Andrew's drawings cannot by understood. His mom says "what a pretty flower" when it's really a drawing of a dog! As Andrew's drawings improve, something magical happens. The parrot he draws for his grandmother flies onto her shoulder. He draws a chair for his dad - his dad finds it very comfortable. One day the president gives him a call. Maybe Andrew can help fix some of the world's problems. He helps by drawing trucks filled with food for the hung A story about a boy and a magic crayon. At first Andrew's drawings cannot by understood. His mom says "what a pretty flower" when it's really a drawing of a dog! As Andrew's drawings improve, something magical happens. The parrot he draws for his grandmother flies onto her shoulder. He draws a chair for his dad - his dad finds it very comfortable. One day the president gives him a call. Maybe Andrew can help fix some of the world's problems. He helps by drawing trucks filled with food for the hungry.... But what happens when that crayon runs out!? This book reminds me of Weezer Changes the World.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Bateman

    David McPhail's classic style is visible in the flowing lines of the watercolor illustrations that accompany this simple story. Young Andrew finds a crayon and begins to draw, and draw, and draw. His skills improve to the point where what he draws comes to life. He uses his skill to provide his family with things, and eventually to help the world. At last, with the stub of the crayon, he draws something just for him. With shades of "Harold's Purple Crayon" and "Liang and the Magic Paintbrush," t David McPhail's classic style is visible in the flowing lines of the watercolor illustrations that accompany this simple story. Young Andrew finds a crayon and begins to draw, and draw, and draw. His skills improve to the point where what he draws comes to life. He uses his skill to provide his family with things, and eventually to help the world. At last, with the stub of the crayon, he draws something just for him. With shades of "Harold's Purple Crayon" and "Liang and the Magic Paintbrush," this is a gentle tale about the power of art.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Henry Martin

    I'm a fan of David McPhail, but this story left me somewhat cold. It has the potential to be greater than what it is. With a little twist on the Harold and the Purple Crayon tale, the author here establishes Andrew as someone who practices his drawing to the point that not only he becomes great at it, but his drawings leap from the page and become real. When the president calls and asks Andrew to help to fix some real issues in the world, Andrew helps with food, supplies, schools . . . The endin I'm a fan of David McPhail, but this story left me somewhat cold. It has the potential to be greater than what it is. With a little twist on the Harold and the Purple Crayon tale, the author here establishes Andrew as someone who practices his drawing to the point that not only he becomes great at it, but his drawings leap from the page and become real. When the president calls and asks Andrew to help to fix some real issues in the world, Andrew helps with food, supplies, schools . . . The ending, however, comes rather abrupt and sells the book short.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda K

    Read this with the resident 5 y.o. two or three times. Simple story about a boy who loved to draw, and how one day he finds a crayon under the sofa that helps his drawings come to life from the page. The drawings are colorful, expressive and simple enough to move the story forward to the next idea. Fun ending had us wondering what he would draw for a final picture once his crayon became too stubby to draw anymore.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Abby Kenski

    By simply looking at the cover of the book, I wasn't sure if I was going to like this book. However, this story had an underlying meaning to it. Andrew kept drawing and practicing until he was able to perfect it and make an impact on the world. After reading this, I think a child can definitely get some inspiration from this book. I also thought that the illustrations were very child friendly and cute. I got a kick out Andrews hair and how he drew just about everywhere he went. By simply looking at the cover of the book, I wasn't sure if I was going to like this book. However, this story had an underlying meaning to it. Andrew kept drawing and practicing until he was able to perfect it and make an impact on the world. After reading this, I think a child can definitely get some inspiration from this book. I also thought that the illustrations were very child friendly and cute. I got a kick out Andrews hair and how he drew just about everywhere he went.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Reminiscent of Harold and the Purple Crayon, this is a story about a boy who's art comes to life, which he uses to help the world. It's a sweet story, and a good length for reading in storytime. I wonder though, if this is one the caregivers would "ooo and ahh" over, but the kids would be pretty neutral. Reminiscent of Harold and the Purple Crayon, this is a story about a boy who's art comes to life, which he uses to help the world. It's a sweet story, and a good length for reading in storytime. I wonder though, if this is one the caregivers would "ooo and ahh" over, but the kids would be pretty neutral.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Afriendlylibrarian

    Delightful book with a great message. Imaginative play at its best. Andrew draws typical things like animals at the zoo and fish at the aquarium, but he also draws a picture of some trucks filled with food for hungry people. He draws pictures of schools and hospitals and sends them where they are needed. Andrew also draws a little something for himself at the end of the book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Andrew Draws is a quiet little book with big ideas. I wish I had a crayon that could save the world from so much of it's worries. I would use this book as a story starter or to do a writing exercise with my student's. What would you draw for yourself? What would you draw for the people you love? How about your country? The World? Andrew Draws is a quiet little book with big ideas. I wish I had a crayon that could save the world from so much of it's worries. I would use this book as a story starter or to do a writing exercise with my student's. What would you draw for yourself? What would you draw for the people you love? How about your country? The World?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    What starts off as a sweet book about a boy who loves to draw suddenly turns into a boy who can make his drawings come to life and so he uses that ability to solve the world peace problem with some rather simplistic solutions. In that regard, the book felt rather patronizing.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I loved it! When Andrew's pictures start coming to life, he draws trucks of food for hungry people, and schools and hospitals for places that need them. It tugged at my do-gooder heartstrings. The soft color palette underscores the sweet, gentle nature of the story. I loved it! When Andrew's pictures start coming to life, he draws trucks of food for hungry people, and schools and hospitals for places that need them. It tugged at my do-gooder heartstrings. The soft color palette underscores the sweet, gentle nature of the story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    I like that Andrews drawings come to life. The book supports drawing which is important for kids to do as a prerequisite for writing. I'm not a huge fan of the illustrations, though. Could be a tad long for anyone 3 and under. I like that Andrews drawings come to life. The book supports drawing which is important for kids to do as a prerequisite for writing. I'm not a huge fan of the illustrations, though. Could be a tad long for anyone 3 and under.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    The big issues that emerge suddenly in the middle of the story throw off the flow of a gentle lovely book. Interesting, yet it seems geared more towards parents that would read to their kids as opposed to one that kids would request themselves.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Souza

    Love this story and the messages. Also the illustrations are beautiful.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    Andrew uses his magical drawings selflessly, and he has very cool hair.

  25. 4 out of 5

    pati

    Thoughtful text and fabulous art - Andrew is a masterpiece maker!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    You can help change the world, and hopefully this book will teach kids that they can make people's lives better. cute and short. You can help change the world, and hopefully this book will teach kids that they can make people's lives better. cute and short.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    I like Andrew's altruism and spirit. Similar story in some ways to Pig Pig And The Magic Photo Album. I like Andrew's altruism and spirit. Similar story in some ways to Pig Pig And The Magic Photo Album.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    This book celebrates the magic and wonder of drawing.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Becky Loader

    Nicely illustrated tale of a little boy whose drawings become real. He helps out the world, but saves the last drawing for himself. Very nice.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bethe

    As Andrew's skill with the crayon develop, something magical and heartfelt results. Love what he draws for himself with the very last piece of paper. Andrew also has some wild hair! As Andrew's skill with the crayon develop, something magical and heartfelt results. Love what he draws for himself with the very last piece of paper. Andrew also has some wild hair!

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