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Delphi Complete Works of Tacitus (Illustrated) (Delphi Ancient Classics)

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One of the greatest Roman historians, Tacitus is celebrated for the brevity and compactness of his Latin prose, as well as for his penetrating insights into the psychology of politics. The Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Latin and Greek texts. This comprehensive eBook presents One of the greatest Roman historians, Tacitus is celebrated for the brevity and compactness of his Latin prose, as well as for his penetrating insights into the psychology of politics. The Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Latin and Greek texts. This comprehensive eBook presents the complete works of Tacitus for the first time in digital publishing history, with beautiful illustrations, dual Latin and English texts, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1) * Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Tacitus’ life and works * Features the complete works of Tacitus, in both English translation and the original Latin * Concise introductions to the historical texts and other works * Includes translations of Tacitus’ masterpieces the HISTORIES and the ANNALS that previously appeared in Loeb Classical Library edition * Excellent formatting of the texts * Easily locate the sections or works you want to read with individual contents tables * Includes a special dual text section, with paragraph by paragraph Latin and English texts of the complete works of Tacitus – ideal for Latin students, fully indexed, with book and chapter numbers * Features two bonus biographies - discover Tacitus’ ancient world * Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres CONTENTS: The Translations THE LIFE OF AGRICOLA GERMANIA DIALOGUE ON ORATORY THE HISTORIES THE ANNALS The Latin Texts LIST OF LATIN TEXTS Dual Texts DUAL LATIN AND ENGLISH TEXTS The Biographies LIFE OF TACITUS by W. S. Tyler INTRODUCTION TO TACITUS by W. Hamilton Fyfe


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One of the greatest Roman historians, Tacitus is celebrated for the brevity and compactness of his Latin prose, as well as for his penetrating insights into the psychology of politics. The Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Latin and Greek texts. This comprehensive eBook presents One of the greatest Roman historians, Tacitus is celebrated for the brevity and compactness of his Latin prose, as well as for his penetrating insights into the psychology of politics. The Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Latin and Greek texts. This comprehensive eBook presents the complete works of Tacitus for the first time in digital publishing history, with beautiful illustrations, dual Latin and English texts, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1) * Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Tacitus’ life and works * Features the complete works of Tacitus, in both English translation and the original Latin * Concise introductions to the historical texts and other works * Includes translations of Tacitus’ masterpieces the HISTORIES and the ANNALS that previously appeared in Loeb Classical Library edition * Excellent formatting of the texts * Easily locate the sections or works you want to read with individual contents tables * Includes a special dual text section, with paragraph by paragraph Latin and English texts of the complete works of Tacitus – ideal for Latin students, fully indexed, with book and chapter numbers * Features two bonus biographies - discover Tacitus’ ancient world * Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres CONTENTS: The Translations THE LIFE OF AGRICOLA GERMANIA DIALOGUE ON ORATORY THE HISTORIES THE ANNALS The Latin Texts LIST OF LATIN TEXTS Dual Texts DUAL LATIN AND ENGLISH TEXTS The Biographies LIFE OF TACITUS by W. S. Tyler INTRODUCTION TO TACITUS by W. Hamilton Fyfe

30 review for Delphi Complete Works of Tacitus (Illustrated) (Delphi Ancient Classics)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Clif Hostetler

    This review is only about The Annals, not the complete works of Tacitus included in this publication. The Annals is both fascinating and tedious. Fascinating because of its antiquity and reminder that wars and political fights and scandals have always been a feature of the human community. Tedious because of the incredible detail of page after page of these conflicts which made me thankful that not all of the original content of The Annals has survived. I read this because it was selected as This review is only about The Annals, not the complete works of Tacitus included in this publication. The Annals is both fascinating and tedious. Fascinating because of its antiquity and reminder that wars and political fights and scandals have always been a feature of the human community. Tedious because of the incredible detail of page after page of these conflicts which made me thankful that not all of the original content of The Annals has survived. I read this because it was selected as the January book for Great Books KC. Otherwise, I would never spend the time required to get through it. The Annals by Roman historian and senator Tacitus(c.56AD–c.120AD) is a history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Tiberius to that of Nero, the years 14AD–68AD. It is believed that Annals originally consisted of 16 volumes, but books 7–10 and parts of books 5, 6, 11 and 16 are missing. Probably the most interesting part of The Annals for the modern reader is the mention of Christians in Rome, which Tacitus does in connection with Nero's persecution of the Christians. It is the first non-Christian writing that indicates the Jesus was crucified by Pontius Pilate.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    This really does contain all the extant writings of Tacitus. The bulk of this volume consists of the Annals and the Histories. It also has the Agricola and the Germanica plus one or two sundry writings. The Annals covers the period from the death of Augustus up to about two years before Nero's demise. There are gaps because some of the books of the Annals have been lost. What is not here is the reign of Caligula, the first few years of Claudius's reign and the last two of Nero's. What there is co This really does contain all the extant writings of Tacitus. The bulk of this volume consists of the Annals and the Histories. It also has the Agricola and the Germanica plus one or two sundry writings. The Annals covers the period from the death of Augustus up to about two years before Nero's demise. There are gaps because some of the books of the Annals have been lost. What is not here is the reign of Caligula, the first few years of Claudius's reign and the last two of Nero's. What there is consists of plots and counterplots amongst the Roman elite at perhaps the most dangerous moment in history to have belonged to such an elite. Paranoia was rife. Tacitus tells it all in a matter-of-fact way without becoming preachy or judgmental. The History contains an account of the period from early 69 AD to late 70 AD, during which period there were four emperors, and what an extremely interesting time it was as brought to life by Tacitus. The Agricola is a mini-autobiography of the man of the same name, the Germanica is an account of Germany and its tribes. Germany at the time was a good deal larger than it is today by the Roman account, extending east to Finland and Lithuania and including what is now Belgium and Holland.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    History can be a rather divisive subject in my mind. I always look to how it's written, to tone, direction, style, and so-forth. Often, the historian encompasses many of these as I please - but not to all. Tacitus, on the other hand, does and perfectly so. Thus far, Tacitus is the best of all historians I've encountered thus far. His style is remarkable and his ability of history is masterful. He takes the keen of Thucydides, the story telling ability of Herodotus, the moralizing of Sallust, and History can be a rather divisive subject in my mind. I always look to how it's written, to tone, direction, style, and so-forth. Often, the historian encompasses many of these as I please - but not to all. Tacitus, on the other hand, does and perfectly so. Thus far, Tacitus is the best of all historians I've encountered thus far. His style is remarkable and his ability of history is masterful. He takes the keen of Thucydides, the story telling ability of Herodotus, the moralizing of Sallust, and the succinctness of Eutropius and Florus all into one. It is, in the end, the crown jewel of ancient history-writing. And quite frankly, it's a first-level tragedy we don't possess his two major histories in a complete form. I think if ever the choice came, by some magical means, to have a lost author's work retaken into our times, I'd likely choose Tacitus'. Though, Livy comes close.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Les Wilson

    Enjoyable. Another book I hadn’t read since school days. One forgets how good they were.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alexis Mijatovic

    Love having it all in one edition and Tacitus’ vast panorama never fails to inspire wonder or tickle a funny bone. One big flaw in the translation was that I felt a famous quote out of the History, usually translated: “they leave a desolation and call it peace” is here translated as “solitude”- that seemed a major fumble but perhaps they were trying to be closer to the Latin. Over all though appreciate the experience reading the whole volume brought me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    M.A.

    Worthy of the time spent.

  7. 4 out of 5

    James Davis

    Good author bad design. No TOC There's no table of contents to find each books chapter. So this is no bargain. Get Delphi classics version. That's it Good author bad design. No TOC There's no table of contents to find each books chapter. So this is no bargain. Get Delphi classics version. That's it

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Read in parts, and reviewed below accordingly. Overall: The text is quite readable and the history contained therein is often fascinating and sometimes mundane, perhaps a reversal of history as it actually occurs but certainly a favorable way to relay it as a text. Tacitus steps out from behind the writing at times, and the way he understands his role as an historian is important to understanding what he conveys, and how. As a text, this edition lacks maps and could use a directory. Since Tacitu Read in parts, and reviewed below accordingly. Overall: The text is quite readable and the history contained therein is often fascinating and sometimes mundane, perhaps a reversal of history as it actually occurs but certainly a favorable way to relay it as a text. Tacitus steps out from behind the writing at times, and the way he understands his role as an historian is important to understanding what he conveys, and how. As a text, this edition lacks maps and could use a directory. Since Tacitus jumps around the several fronts of the Roman Empire, some kind of historical atlas would have been helpful. The Annals: The Annals detail the years of the Roman Empire from the death of Augustus, through Tiberius, Gaius, Claudius, and nearly to the end of the reign of Nero. While I cannot speak to the accuracy or spirit of the text as taken from the Latin, I found this translation to be highly accessible and immensely interesting. I admittedly have no basis for comparison from other volumes of Tacitus, so we will leave it at that I thoroughly enjoyed the examination of how a historian's portrayal influences the history about which he writes. Tacitus, for example, lived through the reign of Nero, and has a particularly unfavorable opinion of him--this is clearly conveyed in The Annals, and has likely influenced the extraordinarily negative legacy still carried by that emperor almost 2 millennia later. Historiae: The Historiae detail the Roman empire after the death of Nero, through an intense period of 4 different emperors in A.D. 69 (Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian). The works are supposed to have covered A.D. 69-96, but only parts remain. The histories of Tacitus meld artful storytelling with historical fact, and as Moses Haades shared in the introduction, being a historian was at once an art and a science when this was written, circa 100-110 A.D.. These books (1-4, and a small part of 5) detail a spectacularly tumultuous time of civil war, with constant betrayal, chaos, mutiny, and battles between regions and ethnicities within the Roman empire. Unlike the sometimes plodding chronicling of The Annals, the account of the Year of Four Emperors contains so much action, it's often difficult to follow who is fighting whom, and on what side. The books cover many battles and other events in quick succession. The Life of Cnaeus Julius Agricola: A quite flattering eulogistic account of the life and accolades of Agricola, Tacitus's father-in-law. Germany And Its Tribes: Another mostly flattering account of the culture Germanic tribes from the account of this Roman historian. Dialog on Oratory: This recount of a lively (and seemingly timeless!) debate about whether the best orators are in the past or the "present" is also a good-natured and amusing trade of witty banter among rhetorical combatants.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Valjean

    Bad form to start with a disclaimer -- but I only finished the Annals of Tacitus., rather than his entire works. That out of the way, the Annals are a reminder of the importance of old books and what they tell us about the relatively unchanging nature of humans when given power over others. The technology and the names for oppressive political systems may change, but the principle features of those who are corrupted by power do not -- unlimited cruelty in those who have power, base servility to Bad form to start with a disclaimer -- but I only finished the Annals of Tacitus., rather than his entire works. That out of the way, the Annals are a reminder of the importance of old books and what they tell us about the relatively unchanging nature of humans when given power over others. The technology and the names for oppressive political systems may change, but the principle features of those who are corrupted by power do not -- unlimited cruelty in those who have power, base servility to those supporting the despot. Rather than paraphrase or summarize, I will let this insightful historian speak for himself, and remind us of what we should be looking for in our own time: “Meanwhile at Rome people plunged into slavery—consuls, senators, knights. The higher a man’s rank, the more eager his hypocrisy… For Tiberious would inaugurate everything with consuls, as though the ancient constitution remained and he hesitated about being emperor.” I.7 “…now bills were passed, not only for national objects but for individual cases, and laws were most numerous when the commonwealth was most corrupt.” III.27 “So now, after a revolution, when Rome is nothing but the realm of a single despot, there must be good in carefully noting and recording this period.” iv.33 “The force of terror had utterly extinguished the sense of human fellowship, and, with the growth of cruelty, pity was thrust aside.” vi.19 “Never did a more filthy rabble add a worse licentiousness to our long corrupted morals. Even with virtuous training, purity is not easily upheld; far less amid rivalries in vice could modesty or propriety or any trace of good manners preserved.” xiv.15 (referring to Nero and his companions’ behavior) “Nero after having butchered so many illustrious men, at last aspired to extirpate virtue itself by murdering Thrasea Paetus and Barea Soranus.” xvi.21

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bernard Norcott-mahany

    The "Annales" are quite fascinating to read, and very dramatic -- they read more like historical fiction than history. The "Historiae" has a few good moments, but a lot is taken up with troop movements and battles -- a bit tedious. The "Germania" is interesting. The "Agricola" is an excellent panegyric of Tacitus' father-in-law. The "Dialogus de Oratoribus" is a rather peculiar work. Church and Broadribb's translation is the translation to have! The "Annales" are quite fascinating to read, and very dramatic -- they read more like historical fiction than history. The "Historiae" has a few good moments, but a lot is taken up with troop movements and battles -- a bit tedious. The "Germania" is interesting. The "Agricola" is an excellent panegyric of Tacitus' father-in-law. The "Dialogus de Oratoribus" is a rather peculiar work. Church and Broadribb's translation is the translation to have!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sonya

    I just read the Germany section - a short but very interesting view of the "barbarians" from a Roman point of view. He shows respect for the Germanic people and writes it in a easily read style. Much easier to read than Caesar's writings on the Gauls. He mentions many aspects of their lives - family, politics, religion, women, etc. I am disappointed that this view of the Germanic people is not incorporated into school history classes! I just read the Germany section - a short but very interesting view of the "barbarians" from a Roman point of view. He shows respect for the Germanic people and writes it in a easily read style. Much easier to read than Caesar's writings on the Gauls. He mentions many aspects of their lives - family, politics, religion, women, etc. I am disappointed that this view of the Germanic people is not incorporated into school history classes!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dwight

    Took me a year and a half, but I made it through. This would be made much better if it were given the Landmark treatment. I spent many pages simply overwhelmed by the number of people and places which were too much for me to comprehend. There are some great bits though. My favorite was book 5 of the history.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steve Gordon

    "To spoil, to butcher, and to commit every kind of violence, they style by a lying name, Government; and when they have spread a general desolation, they call it Peace." Two thousand years later... not much has changed. "To spoil, to butcher, and to commit every kind of violence, they style by a lying name, Government; and when they have spread a general desolation, they call it Peace." Two thousand years later... not much has changed.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bybliotech

    .

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    They created a desert and called it peace

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    the histories, the annals, and a few essays. not uniformly engaging, but really glad to have read it all.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Art Mitchell

    Tacitus was truly an epic historian in the same vein as Herodotus.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Olle

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mario

  20. 5 out of 5

    Noel

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    history and well developed

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gardner

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matt Sautman

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  25. 5 out of 5

    giorgio

  26. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mr.B

  28. 4 out of 5

    Paul Edwards

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lou Robertella

  30. 4 out of 5

    Edward Weiner

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