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January/February 2014, Volume 126, No. 1&2, #711 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Ed Valigursky CONTENT: Novella "In Her Eyes" by Seth Chambers Novelets "The New Cambrian" by Andy Stewart "The Man Who Hanged Three Times" by C. C. Finlay "The Via Panisperna Boys in ‘Operation Harmony’" by Claudio Chillemi and Paul Di Filippo "Out of the Deep" by Albert E. Cowdrey "The Museum o January/February 2014, Volume 126, No. 1&2, #711 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Ed Valigursky CONTENT: Novella "In Her Eyes" by Seth Chambers Novelets "The New Cambrian" by Andy Stewart "The Man Who Hanged Three Times" by C. C. Finlay "The Via Panisperna Boys in ‘Operation Harmony’" by Claudio Chillemi and Paul Di Filippo "Out of the Deep" by Albert E. Cowdrey "The Museum of Error" by Oliver Buckram Short Stories "The Story-Teller" by Bruce Jay Friedman "The Lion Wedding" by Moira Crone "For All of Us Down Here" by Alex Irvine "We Don't Mean To Be" by Robert Reed DEPARTMENTS "Plumage from Pegasus: The Very Last Miserabilist in Paradise" by Paul Di Filippo "Films: Virtual Gravity" by David J. Skal "Science: Rover the Superdog" by Paul Doherty & Pat Murphy


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January/February 2014, Volume 126, No. 1&2, #711 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Ed Valigursky CONTENT: Novella "In Her Eyes" by Seth Chambers Novelets "The New Cambrian" by Andy Stewart "The Man Who Hanged Three Times" by C. C. Finlay "The Via Panisperna Boys in ‘Operation Harmony’" by Claudio Chillemi and Paul Di Filippo "Out of the Deep" by Albert E. Cowdrey "The Museum o January/February 2014, Volume 126, No. 1&2, #711 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Ed Valigursky CONTENT: Novella "In Her Eyes" by Seth Chambers Novelets "The New Cambrian" by Andy Stewart "The Man Who Hanged Three Times" by C. C. Finlay "The Via Panisperna Boys in ‘Operation Harmony’" by Claudio Chillemi and Paul Di Filippo "Out of the Deep" by Albert E. Cowdrey "The Museum of Error" by Oliver Buckram Short Stories "The Story-Teller" by Bruce Jay Friedman "The Lion Wedding" by Moira Crone "For All of Us Down Here" by Alex Irvine "We Don't Mean To Be" by Robert Reed DEPARTMENTS "Plumage from Pegasus: The Very Last Miserabilist in Paradise" by Paul Di Filippo "Films: Virtual Gravity" by David J. Skal "Science: Rover the Superdog" by Paul Doherty & Pat Murphy

30 review for Fantasy & Science Fiction, January/February 2014 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #711)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Althea Ann

    Read the 'digest' version only. ** "For All of Us Down Here" by Alex Irvine It's always an interesting tack, when approaching a story, to take the point of view of someone the reader wouldn't expect, and therefore to show a new angle on events. However, there's such a thing as going too far outside the 'story,' and I felt like "For All of Us Down Here" did that. We meet a young boy who tells us he's an "Orphan of the Sing" - his parents, along with most of the planet, have opted to join the 'Singul Read the 'digest' version only. ** "For All of Us Down Here" by Alex Irvine It's always an interesting tack, when approaching a story, to take the point of view of someone the reader wouldn't expect, and therefore to show a new angle on events. However, there's such a thing as going too far outside the 'story,' and I felt like "For All of Us Down Here" did that. We meet a young boy who tells us he's an "Orphan of the Sing" - his parents, along with most of the planet, have opted to join the 'Singularity,' living presumably wonderful lives in virtual worlds. Meanwhile, those who've stayed behind, including this boy and his grandfather, are living in an increasingly decrepit world, as more and more knowledge is lost. Then one day, a Singular shows up, wanting to talk to his grandfather. And then what happens? Well, the boy never finds out, and neither does the reader. This might work as the opening chapter of a novel, rather than as a stand-alone. ** "Plumage from Pegasus: The Very Last Miserabilist in Paradise" by Paul Di Filippo Paul diFilippo really does like Paolo Bacigalupi, if we are to take his many published positive reviews and comments at face value. However, here he gives his colleague a good 'roasting,' in a humorous story about a former writer caught in a perfect utopia. It blatantly makes fun of Bacigalupi's dystopian outlook and 'Cassandra-like' warnings about our possible futures. Probably more entertaining to diFilippo and Bacigalupi than to a casual reader.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eamonn Murphy

    A new year and a new issue of ‘The Magazine Of Fantasy & Science Fiction’ with which to celebrate it. Hurrah! The first thing I scanned was ‘The Via Panisperna Boys In “Operation Harmony”’, co-authored by Claudio Chillemi and Paul Di Filippo, two fellows clearly not frightened by quotation marks. Unless Germany invaded Czechoslovakia in 1934 and Marconi invented an iconoscope television that lets the watchers be watched, this is set in an alternative history. The lads of the title are a bunch of A new year and a new issue of ‘The Magazine Of Fantasy & Science Fiction’ with which to celebrate it. Hurrah! The first thing I scanned was ‘The Via Panisperna Boys In “Operation Harmony”’, co-authored by Claudio Chillemi and Paul Di Filippo, two fellows clearly not frightened by quotation marks. Unless Germany invaded Czechoslovakia in 1934 and Marconi invented an iconoscope television that lets the watchers be watched, this is set in an alternative history. The lads of the title are a bunch of Italian physicists who flee to the USA to develop a weapon to fight Hitler. Quite a nice weapon really. Enrico Fermi is their leader and they enjoy playing music together. The other band members are Ettore Majorana, Emilio Segrè and Bruno Pontecorvo, all of whom can be found in Internet encyclopaedias. One of those stories that are good fun to read and was probably even more fun to write. These historical fantasies are often entertaining, as is the case again with ‘The Man Who Hanged Three Times’ by C.C. Finlay. Consarn it, if this one ain’t set in the old west. Dagnabit, a fine tale of a drunk and no good citizen, who is accused of killing the Chinese woman with whom he lived in sin. He denies it but is found guilty and they try to hang him. The narrator of this one is interesting and it did not feature Hollywood made-up swearwords. That’s just me. ‘The New Cambrian’ by Andy Stewart is definitely my type of thing and might have been printed in one of those great SF magazines of the fifties such as ‘Astonishing’ (now ‘Analog’), ‘Galaxy’ or even ‘The Magazine Of Fantasy & Science Fiction’. It’s a good old-fashioned story of engineers and biologists working on Europa, one of Jupiter’s moons. Dr Schneider, a female biologist, has been lost in a tragic accident in the ice-covered ocean, the first death on the planet. It shakes everyone. Our first-person narrator is her former lover, Ty. Their affair ceased when his wife Ana came to join them at the base. Human feelings interact with the complexities of life in alien waters to make an interesting yarn that borders on horror. There’s more Science Fiction in ‘For All Of Us Down Here’ by Alex Irvine which extrapolates the continuing separation of society into the haves and have-nots. Perhaps I should say renewed separation. We got a bit more equal for a while. Anyway, in a not too distant future, the ‘haves’ can upload themselves to the Sing, which seems to be an orbiting computer complex. Their bodies are cared for but they soon lose the knack of using them properly. The story is about an encounter between a lad in Orono, Maine (that crossword puzzle favourite, as Stephen King once called it) and a Singular. It’s a neat family drama, but the context of the story is more interesting and I am sure there are other tales, probably a novel, to be extracted from this fascinating concept. Once the technology exists, I have no doubt there will be people delighted to upload themselves into their favourite computer game and spend eternity there, especially as the condition of planet Earth deteriorates. Moving from the Sing to Song, Seth Chambers gets the editorial mature content warning for his novella ‘In Her Eyes’ and, rightly so, as the language is crude and direct. That suits the character of the lady in it. The gentleman and first-person narrator is Alex, who works in a museum, and it’s there that he meets Song, a not very pretty woman. He likes her, despite her looks, they go out and then there are some surprises. To say more would be to ruin it for the reader but it is a raunchy yet emotional story based on an interesting Science Fictional concept. A strong contender for the best story this issue, if the magazines still ran polls. Paul Di Filippo has the regular ‘Plumage From Pegasus’ spot as well as the aforementioned collaboration and gives us ‘The Very Last Miserabilist In Paradise’. Science has solved all mankind’s problems and there is boundless energy, food for all and no work unless you want to, and all the benefits once dreamed of by SF writers. But one SF writer is not happy. Good fun as usual. Albert E. Cowdrey is a welcome regular in these pages, often with comedy, but ‘Out Of The Deep’ presents him in serious mode. After an incisive description of fifties America, the protagonist, Pete, tells us how he met Alistair McCallistair, a rich kid, whilst on holiday on the Gulf coast. Time passes and Pete is a Viet-Nam vet and a bit messed up. McCallistair has avoided the war, as rich kids did, and now hires his old friend as a bodyguard because one of the bad guys is out to kill him. The fantastical element comes from McCallistair’s cook and concubine, a lady from the Caribbean with that ol’ black magic. It’s a great story with interesting characters, not least, the messed up ‘hero’. Cowdrey is a good old-fashioned storyteller who gives you a definite beginning, middle and cathartic end. You know exactly what’s happened and there’s none of that woolly vagueness that sometimes plagues the genre. He deserves to be on the bestseller lists and many of his yarns, because they are so strong as stories, would make good films, including this one. He could easily write straight thrillers, I think, and achieve mainstream success but clearly, he has a fondness for fantasy. We are lucky to have him. ‘The Museum Of Error’ is a longer entertainment from Oliver Buckram, who has contributed hilarious short stories in the past. Herbert Linden is the Assistant Curator for military history in the museum and is called upon to investigate when the petrified cat goes missing. The cat was turned to stone by the gorgon gun of mad inventor Theophrastus Morhof who accidentally petrified himself, too, and is also an exhibit. Evil rivals at the Science Institute may be responsible for the theft. Buckram’s inventiveness in dreaming up the exhibits for the Museum of Error is almost unbelievable and there’s a good gag in nearly every paragraph. It also works pretty well as a detective story. Thoroughly enjoyable. ‘We Don’t Mean To Be Kind’ by Robert Reed is set in a distant future when the universe is winding down and some creatures catch up with the Creator. The conflict is told from both points of view. An interesting concept at the far reaches of the fantastical and I’m not sure if I liked it or not. I’m pretty sure it’s good and that my hesitancy is based on residual Catholic guilt and the fear that He might be watching me read and judging. Moira Crone gets away with ‘The Lion Wedding’ one of those fantasies set in the ‘real’ world that are generally written by and appeal to sensitive ladies. Well-crafted and some will like it but not really my type of thing. Likewise ‘The Story Teller’ by Bruce Jay Friedman in which a professor of literature finds himself in an afterlife where a story is demanded from him. It was okay but writers writing about writing should probably be confined to non-fiction. The stories by Cowdrey, Buckram and Chambers more than compensate for the cover price of the magazine by themselves and the additional worthy material is a bonus. I should also mention the non-fiction articles but my electronic preview does not include the current ones and by the time I get a hard copy the review is done. Generally, they are excellent. The intelligent book reports of Charles De Lint and Elizabeth Hand give me good lists of books I don’t have time to read and so are frustrating. Readers with fewer tomes to be done will find them useful. On the other hand, a movie takes up less lifespan and the film reviews, by various contributors, highlight DVDs to look out for, often ones that have not been commercially successful but are well worth a watch. Also, they are not snobbish and will allow that a half-decent Hollywood action movie of the sci-fi sort can be entertaining, too. So, ‘The Magazine Of Fantasy & Science-Fiction’ is keeping alive several worthy traditions. For the Creator’s sake buy it and keep them going! Eamonn Murphy This review first appeared at https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/

  3. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Is it the absence of John Joseph Adams from F&SF that has made this magazine seemingly less stellar compared to how I remember it being in the past? This particular issue is likely an aberration in my usual enjoyment of the magazine, but it does start to make me worried. "In Her Eyes" by Seth Chambers is a very well done story, taking a SF plot of shape shifting into profound and unexpected directions. "The Man Who Hanged Three Times" by C. C. Finlay stood out as a less 'deep' but thoroughly enjo Is it the absence of John Joseph Adams from F&SF that has made this magazine seemingly less stellar compared to how I remember it being in the past? This particular issue is likely an aberration in my usual enjoyment of the magazine, but it does start to make me worried. "In Her Eyes" by Seth Chambers is a very well done story, taking a SF plot of shape shifting into profound and unexpected directions. "The Man Who Hanged Three Times" by C. C. Finlay stood out as a less 'deep' but thoroughly enjoyable tale. For the short stories "For All of Us Down Here" is the most significant, Alex Irvine continuing to write engaging social commentary in fiction. Aside from these, however, the remainder of the issue I found forgettable or best-forgettable.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeridel Banks

    Half the stars for half the stories. I liked a few stories from this magazine issue, but it's definitely not worth the subscription price. Also, this is another magazine that caters to white males. My only recommendations are "In Her Eyes" by Seth Chambers and "The Man Hanged Three Times" by C.C. Finlay.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    I enjoyed this issue a lot, it made for some great reading and would recommend giving if a look if you haven't subscribed to it yet.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Clever, well-written novella. Good characters, interesting sliver of a universe. I never saw where it was going for a single moment. I've not read Seth Chambers before, but this was a nice introduction.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lance Schonberg

    Sometime in the near-ish future, there are a small fraction of human beings called polymorphs, who can alter their appearance. Some of them, not many, are really, really good at controlling it and can manipulate their bodies to suit. It’s a messy, painful process they have to go through once per week. Hold up a mirror to our society and substitute in any particular subset (or all of them) of the LGBT community, and you’ll get the reaction you’d expect from certain elements in our society. Just t Sometime in the near-ish future, there are a small fraction of human beings called polymorphs, who can alter their appearance. Some of them, not many, are really, really good at controlling it and can manipulate their bodies to suit. It’s a messy, painful process they have to go through once per week. Hold up a mirror to our society and substitute in any particular subset (or all of them) of the LGBT community, and you’ll get the reaction you’d expect from certain elements in our society. Just their existence frightens some people. In Her Eyes is a romance story, with some sex mixed in, showing us what happens when a normal falls in love with one of that select group of polymorphs who can manipulate their bodies completely. He doesn’t know why he goes out with her to begin with, doesn’t know why he’s attracted to her in a form she’s deliberately made unpleasant, even convinces himself he isn't, but he doesn’t just walk away and enjoys getting to know her instead, leaving the door open for a relationship to begin. We watch through his eyes as that relationship grows, as they keep the secret that he isn’t with a different woman every week, as she slowly opens up to him. She quizzes him about women they see in public and what he finds attractive about them, filing that information away for future changes, changing her form to please him because she can be completely herself—crude, fun-loving, living in the moment but with a great love for things that never change on a human scale—with him. All the while, we also get to see just how far her ability goes. There’s a shadowy government agency, and a hidden personality inside her head she thought was just a part of her, manipulated by her father when she was a child into becoming a boy because that was culturally desirable. The outcome is tragic and disturbing, but he adapts. Only she adapts more, to the point of modifying the structure of her own brain. I don’t normally like my fiction to end on a down tick, but this is a wonderful story and may have put the author on my watch list.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jaffa Kintigh

    This novella is a powerful blend of crass, funny, sweet, sad and poignant. Alex, a curator at Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History, narrates most of this tale through the arc of him meeting and falling for the engimatic and crass Sing Song. Alex soon discovers that Song is a Polymorph--a human able to alter her appearance and physicality at will. The rare genetic ability is much reviled, so Alex must keep Song's secret and adapt to being with a "different" person every week, most everything This novella is a powerful blend of crass, funny, sweet, sad and poignant. Alex, a curator at Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History, narrates most of this tale through the arc of him meeting and falling for the engimatic and crass Sing Song. Alex soon discovers that Song is a Polymorph--a human able to alter her appearance and physicality at will. The rare genetic ability is much reviled, so Alex must keep Song's secret and adapt to being with a "different" person every week, most everything changes except for her eyes and voice. This part of the tale almost hits an erotic/romantic tone. But a darker tale emerges in Alex's search for the true Song. She knows more than most what it means to be judged on appearance. Her ability to alter her look to meet Alex's or society's or her family's expectations only obscures her true self. The turn toward the serious and sad startles with its raising of new issues: dysmorphia and gender dysphoria among others. The novella is highly recommended. The use of true Chicago as the setting, was mere icing for this Chicago transplant. In Her Eyes appears in The Year's Best Science Fiction & Fantasy Novellas: 2015 edited by Paula Guran and published by Prime Books. It first appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, January/February 2014.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Guillermo Galvan

    Four out of the ten stories in this issue straight sucked. Totally disappointing. Fortunately, this issue was saved by some stand out stories. "In Her Eyes" by Seth Chambers does something new with the overdone subject of shape shifters. Sex plays a big role yet it doesn't resort to cheap writing. It's a twisted love story with a sci-fi edge. This one kept me glued. "All Of Us Down Here" by Alex Irvine is a Marxist-cyber punk story about a lonely boy in the future. This story is rich in social and Four out of the ten stories in this issue straight sucked. Totally disappointing. Fortunately, this issue was saved by some stand out stories. "In Her Eyes" by Seth Chambers does something new with the overdone subject of shape shifters. Sex plays a big role yet it doesn't resort to cheap writing. It's a twisted love story with a sci-fi edge. This one kept me glued. "All Of Us Down Here" by Alex Irvine is a Marxist-cyber punk story about a lonely boy in the future. This story is rich in social and interpersonal dynamics. People who have the means can upload themselves into a virtual utopia. Everyone else is forced to exist in a technology starved United States. This one could have definitely been extended into a novella. "The Man Who Hanged Three Times" by C.C. Finlay is supernatural country western written in the style of classic pulps. Murder in a small town has led to an innocent man being condemned to death. Yet something keeps saving him from execution. The chilling truth is disturbing. This story might qualify as dark humor. The rest of the stories are hardly worth mentioning. The editors are letting some really lacking stories through.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Durr

    One the best shape-shifter, romance novellas I've ever read. Wait...no, scratch that, the third best. No but seriously, fantastic. Not to sound like a misogynist, but I've always said there is a strong connection between psychotic and erotic and the story's love interest, Song, is the very embodiment of that. Her foul mouth and fun-loving nature is in perfect balance with the story's bland protagonist, Alex. Together, their differences make their rocky relationship glow neon in the reader's mind One the best shape-shifter, romance novellas I've ever read. Wait...no, scratch that, the third best. No but seriously, fantastic. Not to sound like a misogynist, but I've always said there is a strong connection between psychotic and erotic and the story's love interest, Song, is the very embodiment of that. Her foul mouth and fun-loving nature is in perfect balance with the story's bland protagonist, Alex. Together, their differences make their rocky relationship glow neon in the reader's mind. Not to mention, the author expertly reveals the world of the polymorph (shape-shifter) one page at a time, hooking us in the gills. Can't recommend this story enough.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Lubell

    Very nice classic looking cover. I liked The Man Who Hanged Three Times, a western ghost story about a man who God won't let be executed. The Museum of Error, a very funny story about a museum of mistakes that is both a light mystery and romance (of the Connie Willis variety). I also liked Alex Irvine's For All of Us Down Here, a story about what it is like to be left behind on Earth when everyone else (almost) goes into cyberspace. In Her Eyes, about a shapechanger was very well written, just n Very nice classic looking cover. I liked The Man Who Hanged Three Times, a western ghost story about a man who God won't let be executed. The Museum of Error, a very funny story about a museum of mistakes that is both a light mystery and romance (of the Connie Willis variety). I also liked Alex Irvine's For All of Us Down Here, a story about what it is like to be left behind on Earth when everyone else (almost) goes into cyberspace. In Her Eyes, about a shapechanger was very well written, just not my cup of tea.

  12. 5 out of 5

    G33z3r

    A few highlights: I thought "The Museum of Errors" was humorous enough to make me laugh a few times. And "For All of Us Down Here" was an interesting Singularity story. A depressingly significant number of stories left me thinking, "huh?" at the end. "In Her Eyes" was an example of a decent, well-written story that drew my interest but then took a odd turn at the end it just left me hanging. I guess I'm just too old to appreciate stories without easily comprehensible endings.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Klaus Kronenberg

    Beautiful edition of the historic magazine of fantasy and science fiction. The most beautiful stories: "In Her Eyes" by Seth Chambers (masterpiece); "The Via Panisperna Boys in" Operation Harmony "" by Claudio and Paul Di Filippo Chillemi (Very Good); "For All of Us Down Here" by Alex Irvine (Good). Excellent cover.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    A difficult story for me to review. I do not usually like stories with an overload of sex and foul language but here their use seemed both right and balanced. A very sad and poignant story on what it means to be "you".

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Eh, this issue didn't do much for me. I really only enjoyed The Museum of Error by Oliver Buckram (as usual). For my full review, click here. Eh, this issue didn't do much for me. I really only enjoyed The Museum of Error by Oliver Buckram (as usual). For my full review, click here.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Zardoz

    My favorites were as follows. Novellas: In Her Eyes Novelettes: The Man Who Hanged Three Times Also Out Of The Deep. Nothing else really stood out except for For All Of Us Down Here, but it seemed like a chapter from a novel published as a short story.

  17. 4 out of 5

    George Heintzelman

    Some really good stories -- I especially liked the novella, "In Her Eyes", by Seth Chambers, and the humorous "The Museum of Error", by Oliver Buckram.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marc Siegel

    Overall it was a good book, interesting and captivating. It was beutiful in a way that made you sad. Read it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rob Port

    "The Man Who Hung Three Times" was delightful.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Enrico Accenti

    I loved this issue!! My full review on http://eerieworlds.blogspot.com/2014/... I loved this issue!! My full review on http://eerieworlds.blogspot.com/2014/...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Favs. * “In Her Eyes,” Seth Chambers

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alyn Lunt

    This was an excellent issue.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Derrick

    some good stories in this magazine.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Sipila

  25. 5 out of 5

    Adriene

  26. 5 out of 5

    John Loyd

    5 • The New Cambrian • 26 pages by Andy Stewart Fair/good. Ty is a member of a science team on Europa. The story starts with the death of Dr. Schneider; Ty was having an affair with her. 45 • The Story-Teller • 11 pages by Bruce Jay Friedman Fair. A retired english teacher is given 24 hours to put together a story. He's not a writer so he goes through the plots of a dozen different famous novels dismissing one after the other. 56 • The Man Who Hanged Three Times • 20 pages by C. C. Finlay Very Goo 5 • The New Cambrian • 26 pages by Andy Stewart Fair/good. Ty is a member of a science team on Europa. The story starts with the death of Dr. Schneider; Ty was having an affair with her. 45 • The Story-Teller • 11 pages by Bruce Jay Friedman Fair. A retired english teacher is given 24 hours to put together a story. He's not a writer so he goes through the plots of a dozen different famous novels dismissing one after the other. 56 • The Man Who Hanged Three Times • 20 pages by C. C. Finlay Very Good. A prospector is found over his wife's dead body and is sentenced to hang. The gallows malfunctions and he's taken back to jail. A lynch mob comes to get him and attempts for a second time to hang him. All the while the narrator is there but staying out of the action. 76 • In Her Eyes • 50 pages by Seth Chambers Excellent. I saved the novella/best for last. Alex meets Song and is instantly taken by her but not in lustful way. Yet. Song turns out to be a polymorph, and a different appearence every week. Lots of lust after that, but there can be no relationship the world has a resentment for polymorphs. To his coworkers it just looks like Alex has become a super stud with a different babe every week. 131 • The Lion Wedding • 9 pages by Moira Crone Good/vg. A woman falls in love with a lion, convinces him to marry her... 140 • For All Us Down Here • 16 pages by Alex Irvine Very Good. Most of humanity has uploaded themselves to the Sing. Good story, but left a lot of questions about Gramps unanswered. 156 • The Via Panisperna Boys in "Operation Harmony" • 23 pages by Claudio Chillemi, Paul Difilipo Good. Pre WWII, and some scientists are working on weapons that turn the target peaceful. Some references to musical instrument. 185 • We Don't Mean to Be • 4 pages by Robert Reed Crap. Existensial crap. 190 • Out of the Deep • 28 pages by Albert E. Cowdrey Very Good/Good. Pete grew up in southern Mississippi. After he got back from 'Nam a boyhood pal got him to come back as a bodyguard. 229 • The Museum of Error • 28 pages by Oliver Buckram Excellent/VG. Really Good humor filled story. One of the museum peices goes missing and a geeky curator is assigned the task of finding it. Merged review: 5 • The New Cambrian • 26 pages by Andy Stewart Fair/good. Ty is a member of a science team on Europa. The story starts with the death of Dr. Schneider; Ty was having an affair with her. 45 • The Story-Teller • 11 pages by Bruce Jay Friedman Fair. A retired english teacher is given 24 hours to put together a story. He's not a writer so he goes through the plots of a dozen different famous novels dismissing one after the other. 56 • The Man Who Hanged Three Times • 20 pages by C. C. Finlay Very Good. A prospector is found over his wife's dead body and is sentenced to hang. The gallows malfunctions and he's taken back to jail. A lynch mob comes to get him and attempts for a second time to hang him. All the while the narrator is there but staying out of the action. 76 • In Her Eyes • 50 pages by Seth Chambers Excellent. I saved the novella/best for last. Alex meets Song and is instantly taken by her but not in lustful way. Yet. Song turns out to be a polymorph, and a different appearence every week. Lots of lust after that, but there can be no relationship the world has a resentment for polymorphs. To his coworkers it just looks like Alex has become a super stud with a different babe every week. 131 • The Lion Wedding • 9 pages by Moira Crone Good/vg. A woman falls in love with a lion, convinces him to marry her... 140 • For All Us Down Here • 16 pages by Alex Irvine Very Good. Most of humanity has uploaded themselves to the Sing. Good story, but left a lot of questions about Gramps unanswered. 156 • The Via Panisperna Boys in "Operation Harmony" • 23 pages by Claudio Chillemi, Paul Difilipo Good. Pre WWII, and some scientists are working on weapons that turn the target peaceful. Some references to musical instrument. 185 • We Don't Mean to Be • 4 pages by Robert Reed Crap. Existensial crap. 190 • Out of the Deep • 28 pages by Albert E. Cowdrey Very Good/Good. Pete grew up in southern Mississippi. After he got back from 'Nam a boyhood pal got him to come back as a bodyguard. 229 • The Museum of Error • 28 pages by Oliver Buckram Excellent/VG. Really Good humor filled story. One of the museum peices goes missing and a geeky curator is assigned the task of finding it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Frankie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ashby Albright

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rex Hughes

  30. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Clardy

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