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Encompassing a broad range of subjects, styles and moods, English poetry of the late 18th and early 19th centuries is generally classified under the term "Romantic," suggesting an emphasis on imagination and individual experiance, as well as a preoccupation with such themes as nature, death and the supernatural. This volume contains a rich selection of poems by England's si Encompassing a broad range of subjects, styles and moods, English poetry of the late 18th and early 19th centuries is generally classified under the term "Romantic," suggesting an emphasis on imagination and individual experiance, as well as a preoccupation with such themes as nature, death and the supernatural. This volume contains a rich selection of poems by England's six greatest Romantic poets: William Blake (24 poems, including "The Tyger" and "Auguries of Innocence"), William Wordsworth (27 poems, including "Ode: Intimations of Immortality" and "I wandered lonely as a cloud"), Samuel Taylor Coleridge (10 poems, including "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" and "Kubla Khan"), Lord Byron (16 poems, including "The Prisoner of Chillon" and selections from Don Juan and Childe Harold's Pilgrimage), Percy Bysshe Shelley (24 poems, including "Ode to the West Wind" and "Adonais") and John Keats (22 poems, including all the great odes, "Isabelle" and "The Eve of St. Agnes"). For this edition, Stanley Appelbaum has provided a concise Introduction to the Romantic period and brief commentaries on the poets represented. The result is a carefully selected anthology that will be welcomed by lovers of poetry, students and teachers alike.


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Encompassing a broad range of subjects, styles and moods, English poetry of the late 18th and early 19th centuries is generally classified under the term "Romantic," suggesting an emphasis on imagination and individual experiance, as well as a preoccupation with such themes as nature, death and the supernatural. This volume contains a rich selection of poems by England's si Encompassing a broad range of subjects, styles and moods, English poetry of the late 18th and early 19th centuries is generally classified under the term "Romantic," suggesting an emphasis on imagination and individual experiance, as well as a preoccupation with such themes as nature, death and the supernatural. This volume contains a rich selection of poems by England's six greatest Romantic poets: William Blake (24 poems, including "The Tyger" and "Auguries of Innocence"), William Wordsworth (27 poems, including "Ode: Intimations of Immortality" and "I wandered lonely as a cloud"), Samuel Taylor Coleridge (10 poems, including "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" and "Kubla Khan"), Lord Byron (16 poems, including "The Prisoner of Chillon" and selections from Don Juan and Childe Harold's Pilgrimage), Percy Bysshe Shelley (24 poems, including "Ode to the West Wind" and "Adonais") and John Keats (22 poems, including all the great odes, "Isabelle" and "The Eve of St. Agnes"). For this edition, Stanley Appelbaum has provided a concise Introduction to the Romantic period and brief commentaries on the poets represented. The result is a carefully selected anthology that will be welcomed by lovers of poetry, students and teachers alike.

30 review for English Romantic Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Fasching-Gray

    Lord Byron is kind of cheesey though. He is like a hair metal band... the lyrics are sometimes strained, and he is a total horn-dog. Coleridge is a little better, more like a pretentious stoner band or progrock thing. Wordsworth is great but then he just keeps living and turns into some old man blowhard. I have been digging William Blake for a while now, and I really want to like Shelley but it hasn't really clicked for me yet. I think I would have some different Shelley poems in here if it was Lord Byron is kind of cheesey though. He is like a hair metal band... the lyrics are sometimes strained, and he is a total horn-dog. Coleridge is a little better, more like a pretentious stoner band or progrock thing. Wordsworth is great but then he just keeps living and turns into some old man blowhard. I have been digging William Blake for a while now, and I really want to like Shelley but it hasn't really clicked for me yet. I think I would have some different Shelley poems in here if it was up to me. Like, Revolt of Islam and Queen Mab and Mask of Anarchy... but I guess those were too long or something. Anyway, Shelley is a creep... the kind of guy who waits for his woman to fall asleep and then tiptoes over to give you a back rub. I bet he was a real Sensual Santa type. If the others are more metal, he's like R. Kelly. Keats is fantastic. I have been trying to read more poetry this year and I think I must be getting a real taste for it because I really liked Keats. Of all of them, he's the one you want to travel to the Mediterranean with and sit on the balcony watching the sun set on the waves while he coughs. He is not going to go all moony over some dark haired beauty on you or nod off or preach at you or something. It's just going to be like, man, those Greek ruins were something else, huh? Are you ready for another draught of vintage that hath been cool'd a long age in the deep-delved earth?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mister Jones

    This is the kind of book I'm always currently reading, and one I never get tired of; yes, you can find these poems in beaucoups of textbook anthologies, but I like how this one edition focuses on, what I believe to be, the single most influential and greatest period of poetry. Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, and Keats are all there, and presented in such a way, that you don't feel like you're looking for an express way exit when you're three lanes away during the 4 o'clock rush hour. This This is the kind of book I'm always currently reading, and one I never get tired of; yes, you can find these poems in beaucoups of textbook anthologies, but I like how this one edition focuses on, what I believe to be, the single most influential and greatest period of poetry. Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, and Keats are all there, and presented in such a way, that you don't feel like you're looking for an express way exit when you're three lanes away during the 4 o'clock rush hour. This is a good edition, and the poems are certainly accessible, and the book doesn't weigh heavier than the chasis on a 57 Chevy. God, I love "Tintern Abbey" !

  3. 4 out of 5

    robin friedman

    Priceless Poetry At A Budget Price I have had this inexpensive Dover Thrift Edition anthology of English romantic poetry for many years. I keep it on a readily accessible shelf in my office and browse in it for inspiration. It is always a pleasure during a harried and wearying day simply to hold this little volume in my hands. The book consists of a generous selection of 123 poems from six English romantic poets: William Blake (1757 - 1827); William Wordsworth (1770 -1850); Samuel Taylor Coleridge Priceless Poetry At A Budget Price I have had this inexpensive Dover Thrift Edition anthology of English romantic poetry for many years. I keep it on a readily accessible shelf in my office and browse in it for inspiration. It is always a pleasure during a harried and wearying day simply to hold this little volume in my hands. The book consists of a generous selection of 123 poems from six English romantic poets: William Blake (1757 - 1827); William Wordsworth (1770 -1850); Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 - 1834); Lord Byron (1778-1824); Percy Shelly (1792 - 1822); and John Keats (1795 - 1821). The book also includes a short introduction by editor Stanley Appelbaum, who has edited several books in the Dover series, together with a brief sketch of each poet. For each poet, the selections include both short and long poems. The selections are extensive enough that they go beyond the familiar and will introduce most readers to works that are likely unfamiliar to them. The Blake selections include short poems from both "Songs of Innocence and "Songs of Experience" and other short lyrics. They also include longer works such as the "Proverbs of Hell" from "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell." Blake remains my favorite poet, and it is always good to be reminded of him. For example, here is Blake's short poem, "Mock on, mock on, Voltaire, Rousseau", (p. 10) for my own edification and, I hope, to whet the reader's interest. "Mock on, Mock on Voltaire Rousseau Mock on Mock on! tis all in vain! You throw the sand against the wind And the wind blows it back again And every sand becomes a Gem Reflected in the beams divine Blown back they blind the mocking Eye But still in Israels paths they shine The Atoms of Democritus And Newtons Particles of light Are sands upon the Red sea shore Where Israels tents do shine so bright." The Wordsworth selections include a collection of sonnets, the famous "Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey", and selections from "The Prelude". Coleridge's inexhaustible "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" is given in full together with "Kubla Khan" and other works. The Byron selections include several short love lyrics, including "She walks in beauty" together with selections from "Don Juan" and "Childe Harold". The Shelley selections include the great sonnet "Ozymandias" and the "Hymn to Intellectual Beauty", "The Cloud" and "Adonais: an Elegy written on the Death of John Keats." Keats himself is represented by his four great odes and by sonnets such as "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer" and "Bright Star." As other reviewers have observed, this book includes little in the way of background, commentary, or analysis. The volume would not be suitable for scholarly purposes or, probably, for introducing high school or college students to this great poetry. But the Thrift Editions are not designed for these purposes. For readers who want an inexpensive, easy to handle and reasonably large selection of poetry from the English romantics to read from time to time and to refresh their hearts, this volume is ideal. Robin Friedman

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dayna Smith

    A selection of English romantic poems by such fantastic poets as William Blake, John Keats, William Wordsworth, Lord Byron, Samuel Coleridge, and Percy Bysshe Shelley. A must read for all poetry lovers.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Aysar Ibrahim

    I love poetry , i was so amused by colrladge part and all his poemes' Blake's part didnt have that luch of his great poemes . It was nice

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gavin D.

    Central Idea: Didn’t really have any central idea. It was a big compilation of English poetry and nothing else so I’m going to pick one poem in the book and tell that poems central idea. The central idea of the poem Ode to Duty is that duty is a guide and empowering force. It says duty gives power to men and talks about how duty can bring direction and strength to those feeling weak and lost. The poem has lots of simile in it and I like it I wish the whole book had a subject matter though. Figurat Central Idea: Didn’t really have any central idea. It was a big compilation of English poetry and nothing else so I’m going to pick one poem in the book and tell that poems central idea. The central idea of the poem Ode to Duty is that duty is a guide and empowering force. It says duty gives power to men and talks about how duty can bring direction and strength to those feeling weak and lost. The poem has lots of simile in it and I like it I wish the whole book had a subject matter though. Figurative language: The figurative language is everywhere in the book although it’s more of a compilation of poems. But one I saw in almost every poem has alliteration and rhyme in every poem it has a rhyme pattern. Another I saw was metaphor it wasn’t in every poem but in the longer poems there was heavy metaphor which seemed strange due to language shifts but if you are able to understand them they convey a lot of meaning and allow you a frame of reference for the poem. A simile is yet another figurative device similes like metaphors can be misunderstood due to language shifts. The book has many more figurative devices but I could go on and on about them so I’ll just say that these three are the most common figurative devices found throughout the book. I really love using alliteration and rhyme in my poems so this book helped give me ideas when writing my own poems. Opinion: The book has some really good poetry although most are of a more serious matter. The poems are laid in a long poem several short poems long poem pattern in the book and the long poems can be a few pages along. There’s a lot of alliteration and tons of figurative devices. The poetry is hard to understand but this isn’t the actual writing’s fault the time the poems are from use different language which creates these misunderstandings but other than this the poetry in the book is very well crafted. I wouldn’t read the book again that’s more of a personal bias I have a hard time reading poetry at all but this books poetry is good the layout of the book is my favorite thing with the book is the short poems giving you a break on long ones to show another side of English poetry

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Diaz

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. English romantic poetry from the romanticism era was great. I now have a deeper appreciation for this era of poetry. I loved how the artists incorporated nature, death, and supernatural elements. I enjoyed how intertwined the poems were with how they felt or how others felt and feel today. This is an excerpt of one of the wonderful incorporation, forms found in this book: "Success is counted sweetest by those who ne'er succeed." from the poem "Success is counted sweetest" by Emily Dickinson. Thi English romantic poetry from the romanticism era was great. I now have a deeper appreciation for this era of poetry. I loved how the artists incorporated nature, death, and supernatural elements. I enjoyed how intertwined the poems were with how they felt or how others felt and feel today. This is an excerpt of one of the wonderful incorporation, forms found in this book: "Success is counted sweetest by those who ne'er succeed." from the poem "Success is counted sweetest" by Emily Dickinson. This book is one book I would recommend to a friend. I give this book a four out of five stars.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    The perfect book to start reading poetry. I told my close friend who reads that I wanted to dive in to poetry and she suggested me this as a starter. This book has exposed me to various English poets and it helps me to decide what style that I like and not. I paused for while for a couple of time to highlight the ones that I love and there were plenty. A lovely book, in general.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kennedy

    I love Romantic poetry, so I was delighted when I came across this book. I enjoy some authors more than others and I wish that there were more authors. However, I don't think it takes away too much as the main figures of Romanticism are highly covered. This is a really nice introduction to Romanticism that I would recommend to anyone curious!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    "Rough wind, that moanest loud Grief too sad for song; Wild wind, when sullen cloud Knells all the night long; Sad storm whose tears are vain, Bare woods, whose branches strain, Deep caves and dreary main,-- Wail, for the world’s wrong!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Luke Schroeder

    Keats was the angst poet before that was cool. Also I’m pretty sure that I would not be friends with Byron if I met him. Kind of gives off the d-bag vibe. Overall it was a good read if not a little slow.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Gosh, I love Keats.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Hollander

    Great primer into the major figures of the Romantic poetic tradition, and inspiring for further reading.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    An okay beginner's look at English Romantic poetry, but if you're not completely invested in reading only the "Big Six" (Wordsworth, Blake, Keats, Shelley, Byron, Coleridge), skip this book for now and look at the recommendations listed in the Introduction. I can imagine most would be thinking, "240 pages with only six poets, and they're all Romantics? Kill me now." Honestly, it is tiresome. But if you're genuinely interested in poetry, it is a relatively good way to branch out of contemporary a An okay beginner's look at English Romantic poetry, but if you're not completely invested in reading only the "Big Six" (Wordsworth, Blake, Keats, Shelley, Byron, Coleridge), skip this book for now and look at the recommendations listed in the Introduction. I can imagine most would be thinking, "240 pages with only six poets, and they're all Romantics? Kill me now." Honestly, it is tiresome. But if you're genuinely interested in poetry, it is a relatively good way to branch out of contemporary and modern work and to feel your way around recent poetic history.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Garlen

    The Dover anthology of Romantic poetry is a useful and inexpensive collection, although it lacks the footnotes and biographical material that many beginners might need to appreciate the poems. The poems themselves are brilliant, of course. I used this book for a course, so I was able to provide the missing information my students needed, but individual readers might want to weigh their need for contextual material with their desire for a cheap edition.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Whilst me doth like and feel a kinship with ye Romantic poets, especially Wordsworth (whose poesy a young seeker of Beauty and Truth wouldst no doubt find sublime if he wouldst but read it), their antiquated English doth at times vex and perplex me, and cause me to frown and grimace and e’en at times swoon. Nevertheless, thou canst not be a true lover of poesy if thou chooseth to read not the Romantics. So hasten thither!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Following up the Age of Wonder...I figured I should read more on the poets of the time. Byron is my favorite and most readable ("Darkness" -- 200 years before The Terminator -- is one of the best descriptions of the Apocalypse), followed by Blake, Shelley, Keats, Coleridge and Wordsworth. I wish I'd read them as a teenager/20-something: the exclamation points are a bit annoying.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mikaela Keithley

    This book was a mandatory school assignment. We only read a select few poems of which I only enjoyed some. I wouldn't recommend this to my friends, but it wasn't horrible. My favorite poet was probable Coleridge. Unfortunately, some of the poems we read were very depressing which is not my choice of reading.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I tend to either love Romantic poems or hate them...there are some of both in this anthology, but it's worth reading at least once for every poet. We can't know where we're going if we don't know where we've been.

  20. 4 out of 5

    John Porter

    The review is, obviously, for the edition. The poems are, well, classic. The selections and editorial choices here are very, bvery good...you save yourself some pretty serious $$ by buying this instead of a bigger collection.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Micaela Semien

    I had to read this book for one of my classes. It was ok, I didnt read the whole book, just some of the poems. They poems were actually pretty good. We discussed them in class and I got a better understanding of what they mean.

  22. 4 out of 5

    John Reinhart

    This is an excellent intro to Romantic Poetry, touching on the six English. Other collections, like Duncan Wu's, do more justice to the secondary figures in this movement, and address the role of women (substantial) that is ignored in this collection and many others.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Ehrlich

    I believe the poets featured in this text had similar ideas about their writing because of the focus on natural imagery or on individuals. The only post I was not really fond of was William Blake. I'm more fond of romantic prose than romantic poetry.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Reader2007

    I just had to read a large portion of this for my GB 4 class. It's so great! I love poetry!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christina knox

    Someone needs to pick up where this guy left off.

  26. 5 out of 5

    kate

    No annotations, sadly - but a comprehensive overview for the very affordable price of $2.50.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Doolan

    Read selections from Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge and Keats. Doesn't really float my boat. Is this stuff supposed to be subjective?

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    just some poems, nothing real special. read for a class, read mostly Blake and Wordsworth.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Myles

    Like the Ancient Mariner, I walk away a bit sadder and a bit wiser.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    For a class/reading group. Did not read all content.

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