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Benoit: Wrestling with the Horror that Destroyed a Family and Crippled a Sport

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The life and alarming death of acclaimed professional wrestler Chris Benoit are explored in this timely and exhaustive biography. In June 2007 Benoit committed suicide after killing his wife and son, and the media coverage surrounding this event—as well as the facts of the case and its effects on professional wrestling—are all extensively addressed. Benoit’s life prior to The life and alarming death of acclaimed professional wrestler Chris Benoit are explored in this timely and exhaustive biography. In June 2007 Benoit committed suicide after killing his wife and son, and the media coverage surrounding this event—as well as the facts of the case and its effects on professional wrestling—are all extensively addressed. Benoit’s life prior to and during his pro wrestling career is examined, as is his significant impact on the wrestling world and widespread popularity. This close-up look at one of pro wrestling’s greatest and most lamented figures also presents the place of his tragedy in the darker side of wrestling’s history.


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The life and alarming death of acclaimed professional wrestler Chris Benoit are explored in this timely and exhaustive biography. In June 2007 Benoit committed suicide after killing his wife and son, and the media coverage surrounding this event—as well as the facts of the case and its effects on professional wrestling—are all extensively addressed. Benoit’s life prior to The life and alarming death of acclaimed professional wrestler Chris Benoit are explored in this timely and exhaustive biography. In June 2007 Benoit committed suicide after killing his wife and son, and the media coverage surrounding this event—as well as the facts of the case and its effects on professional wrestling—are all extensively addressed. Benoit’s life prior to and during his pro wrestling career is examined, as is his significant impact on the wrestling world and widespread popularity. This close-up look at one of pro wrestling’s greatest and most lamented figures also presents the place of his tragedy in the darker side of wrestling’s history.

30 review for Benoit: Wrestling with the Horror that Destroyed a Family and Crippled a Sport

  1. 5 out of 5

    Wendy green

    First 30 to 50 pages where good. The rest was about the media and its use of the situation for ratings

  2. 4 out of 5

    coreen anderson

    Very good read Very good read slot of really interesting insight. I would definitely recommend this book to any wrestling fan new or old.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Daigen

    This collection of essays on the Benoit Tragedy - where beloved former WWE Champion Chris Benoit murdered his wife, Nancy, and 7-year-old son Daniel before taking his own life - is one that might have struck more of a chord with me when it first came out in 2008/2007, not so long after the double-murder-suicide. There was a lot of emotion at the time - inclination towards both demonization and defense - of the wrestling business, of Chris Benoit himself ... and these were written in the embers o This collection of essays on the Benoit Tragedy - where beloved former WWE Champion Chris Benoit murdered his wife, Nancy, and 7-year-old son Daniel before taking his own life - is one that might have struck more of a chord with me when it first came out in 2008/2007, not so long after the double-murder-suicide. There was a lot of emotion at the time - inclination towards both demonization and defense - of the wrestling business, of Chris Benoit himself ... and these were written in the embers of that smouldering cauldron. Having said that, considering the circumstances under which these essays were written and compiled, I am impressed with the professionalism and cool-headedness behind them. I question some perceptions - Nancy Grace is portrayed as an inquiring voice of reason who did her homework and made only minor factual errors in her reporting by one essay, while Chris Jericho is portrayed as pandering to the WWE, 'working from under to get a job', where I found him (especially considering his closeness to Benoit) to be a reasoned and intelligent voice amidst the hubbub. While I might disagree with a few perceptions of that nature, these essays do a great job of combining insider knowledge of the wrestling industry, with 'how things looked to the outside', and creating a well-thought-out and fairly accurate picture of the Benoits, of the crime, and of the media coverage of it. But there are times where the raw emotion comes through - the reality of being a wrestling fan, whether one inclined to defend the business, or one feeling bitterly betrayed by it - and while only in a minor sense considering the time, it's sort of jarring now, seven and a half years later, where it feels like a horrible and pivotal but ever-more-distant piece of dark wrestling history. And while that in fact is probably a good thing - this horrible event was - or at least should have been - a watershed moment, and the outrage it inspired should never be forgotten in an industry far too resistant to introspection and change. But within a book that is by-and-large a very even-handed and well-considered reflection on this horrifying crime, those feelings still jangle - both in the writers, and in this reader.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Oliver Bateman

    A breezy read, and certainly not worth the ridiculous ECW Press cover price ($15!--message me for the .pdf). The Muchnick essay is interesting but so overwritten as to be almost incomprehensible (though scattered amongst the bizarre syntax are some choice insights), the McCoy piece is a serviceable account of Benoit's Stampede days, and Johnson's analysis of the "media feeding frenzy" in the wake of the Benoit incident is actually quite good (it should've been increased to book length and fleshe A breezy read, and certainly not worth the ridiculous ECW Press cover price ($15!--message me for the .pdf). The Muchnick essay is interesting but so overwritten as to be almost incomprehensible (though scattered amongst the bizarre syntax are some choice insights), the McCoy piece is a serviceable account of Benoit's Stampede days, and Johnson's analysis of the "media feeding frenzy" in the wake of the Benoit incident is actually quite good (it should've been increased to book length and fleshed out--Johnson, a UVa journalism PhD, is the more intellectual of the Oliver/Johnson "Hall of Fame" books pairing, as evidenced by how much better their collaborations are than Oliver's solo "The Hall of Fame: The Canadians"). As for Oliver's essay...well, it's an okay rehash of material available elsewhere, but my god, the price point here is unbelievable. Seriously, they could've called me and I would've given them 50-60 extra pages for 0 dollars (which would be a challenge, given that I didn't really like Benoit even before all this went down--he was a total zero on the mic, and a Dynamite Kid knockoff inside it).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    A pretty decent series of essays about the Chris Benoit murder/suicide. I enjoyed almost all of the included essays, with the exception of the Muchnick one at the end. It's so overwritten it's almost incomprehensible (though scattered amongst the bizarre syntax are some choice insights). An insightful, quick read for anyone interested in this bizarre case. A pretty decent series of essays about the Chris Benoit murder/suicide. I enjoyed almost all of the included essays, with the exception of the Muchnick one at the end. It's so overwritten it's almost incomprehensible (though scattered amongst the bizarre syntax are some choice insights). An insightful, quick read for anyone interested in this bizarre case.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    This was sort of cathartic for me I guess, as I eventually had to come to terms with the fact that someone I admired murdered his wife and son. It's really four very separate essays thrown into a book. Some are better than others. This was sort of cathartic for me I guess, as I eventually had to come to terms with the fact that someone I admired murdered his wife and son. It's really four very separate essays thrown into a book. Some are better than others.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    A series of essays on the trial and tribulations of the Chris Benoit case. They tell of his career, his humble beginning to the height of his career winning the world title at Wrestlemania to his fall and the aftermath of the murder suicide.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Evan Kirby

    A revealing set of essays about Benoit. A story that will forever fascinate and sad me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Denis

    An uncomfortable examination of a man who murdered his wife and child, and the response from his sport and the media.

  10. 4 out of 5

    George

    Not a straightforward narrative of the Benoit murder/suicide tragedy but rather a series of essays. Still good but not exactly what I wanted.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Good book. A set of essays covering different topics related to the Benoit murder/suicide. Some essays were better than others. The essay on the media reaction was especially good.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Werner

    insightful. more about the media implications and coverage than the tragedy itself. however it's made me want to do some further reading on the subject. insightful. more about the media implications and coverage than the tragedy itself. however it's made me want to do some further reading on the subject.

  13. 5 out of 5

    james decker

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laura Smith

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  16. 5 out of 5

    J Villen

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  18. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Munday

  19. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nelson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Eloy Villanueva

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

  24. 5 out of 5

    Half-blood Reads

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cassidy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brhm

  28. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daniel O'reilly

  30. 4 out of 5

    PJ Davis

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