hits counter Zen Haiku: Poems and Letters of Natsume Soseki - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

30 review for Zen Haiku: Poems and Letters of Natsume Soseki

  1. 4 out of 5

    Peycho Kanev

    Walking under the moon, Soseki has forgotten All about his wife. Moonlit night: Each silhouette Moving Just before me The Spirit's moving: Tip of my pen. Drizzling: A muddy cat asleep on The holy sutra. Passing year: Our cat squats Down in my lap. Early winter: The road to enlightenment, Its gate closed yet. Not knowing why, I feel attached to this world Where we come only to die. Walking under the moon, Soseki has forgotten All about his wife. Moonlit night: Each silhouette Moving Just before me The Spirit's moving: Tip of my pen. Drizzling: A muddy cat asleep on The holy sutra. Passing year: Our cat squats Down in my lap. Early winter: The road to enlightenment, Its gate closed yet. Not knowing why, I feel attached to this world Where we come only to die.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Capsguy

    I know it's retarded to read Japanese Haiku in other languages, but I'm never going to be reading it in Japanese so I should check it out as best I can in English. I know it's retarded to read Japanese Haiku in other languages, but I'm never going to be reading it in Japanese so I should check it out as best I can in English.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tanmay Jadhav

    Reading this book was like an poetic evolution for me. Initially I thought it was about trying to find a deeper meaning in the author’s words and that made the book open to a hundred interpretations. Then I realised that poetic form of a haiku is so elegantly created that it represents very particularly the feeling of the writer in that very moment. Most of the prose didn’t have a deeper meaning. They didn’t have symbolism. It was just Soseki telling me about his core sensations when he penned do Reading this book was like an poetic evolution for me. Initially I thought it was about trying to find a deeper meaning in the author’s words and that made the book open to a hundred interpretations. Then I realised that poetic form of a haiku is so elegantly created that it represents very particularly the feeling of the writer in that very moment. Most of the prose didn’t have a deeper meaning. They didn’t have symbolism. It was just Soseki telling me about his core sensations when he penned down those thoughts. This book isn’t meant to be read in one go. Though I did, I don’t think that I’ll never revisit it again. It lends you a lot of warm feelings when you try to picture yourself in place of Natsumi in his journey through zen and the seasons. This book is beautiful. I hope I’ll learn enough Japanese to read that original text some day.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kristyn

    These haiku feel both settled and fluid in turns.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Abhidev H M

    A dose of calmness

  6. 4 out of 5

    Florencia

  7. 4 out of 5

    Raquel Vázquez

  8. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jay

  10. 5 out of 5

    L.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Moran

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jthserra

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alan Summers

  15. 5 out of 5

    Negri

  16. 5 out of 5

    Zo

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tori

  19. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dean Duncan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Shlosberg

  22. 5 out of 5

    BenGilding

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chiatante Simon

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hani Iskadarwati

  25. 5 out of 5

    Diandra Ismiranti

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kyle D

  27. 5 out of 5

    Raven

  28. 4 out of 5

    LauSo

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eadweard

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro Saint-Barthélemy

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...