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Pro JavaScript Design Patterns

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As a web developer, you'll already know that JavaScript is a powerful language, allowing you to add an impressive array of dynamic functionality to otherwise static web sites. But there is more power waiting to be unlockedJavaScript is capable of full objectoriented capabilities, and by applyingobject-oriented principles, best practices, and design patterns to your code, y As a web developer, you'll already know that JavaScript is a powerful language, allowing you to add an impressive array of dynamic functionality to otherwise static web sites. But there is more power waiting to be unlockedJavaScript is capable of full objectoriented capabilities, and by applyingobject-oriented principles, best practices, and design patterns to your code, you can make it more powerful, more efficient, and easier to work with alone or as part of a team. With Pro JavaScript Design Patterns, you'll start with the basics of objectoriented programming in JavaScript applicable to design patterns, including making JavaScript more expressive, inheritance, encapsulation, information hiding, and more. With that covered, you can kickstart your JavaScript development in the second part of the book, where you'll find detail on how to implement and take advantage of several design patterns in JavaScript, including composites, decorators, facades, adapters, and many more. Each chapter is packed with realworld examples of how the design patterns are best used and expert advice on writing better code, as well as what to watch out for. Along the way you'll discover how to create your own libraries and APIs for even more efficient coding.Master the basics of objectoriented programming in JavaScript, as they apply to design patterns Apply design patterns to your kickstart your JavaScript development Work through several realworld examples What you'll learn How to apply objectoriented programming techniques in JavaScript How to take advantage of inheritance, interfaces, and encapsulation and information hiding to kickstart your JavaScript development How to implement several design patterns in your JavaScript projects, including factory, facade, bridge, composite, adapter, decorator, flyweight, proxy, command, observer, and chain of responsibility How to make your code easier to manage in a team environment, as well as on your own How to create your own libraries and APIs Who this book is for This book will be an invaluable learning tool for any experienced JavaScript developer. Table of Contents Expressive JavaScript Interfaces Encapsulation and Information Hiding Inheritance The Singleton Pattern Chaining The Factory Pattern The Bridge Pattern The Composite Pattern The Facade Pattern The Adapter Pattern The Decorator Pattern The Flyweight Pattern The Proxy Pattern The Observer Pattern The Command Pattern The Chain of Responsibility Pattern


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As a web developer, you'll already know that JavaScript is a powerful language, allowing you to add an impressive array of dynamic functionality to otherwise static web sites. But there is more power waiting to be unlockedJavaScript is capable of full objectoriented capabilities, and by applyingobject-oriented principles, best practices, and design patterns to your code, y As a web developer, you'll already know that JavaScript is a powerful language, allowing you to add an impressive array of dynamic functionality to otherwise static web sites. But there is more power waiting to be unlockedJavaScript is capable of full objectoriented capabilities, and by applyingobject-oriented principles, best practices, and design patterns to your code, you can make it more powerful, more efficient, and easier to work with alone or as part of a team. With Pro JavaScript Design Patterns, you'll start with the basics of objectoriented programming in JavaScript applicable to design patterns, including making JavaScript more expressive, inheritance, encapsulation, information hiding, and more. With that covered, you can kickstart your JavaScript development in the second part of the book, where you'll find detail on how to implement and take advantage of several design patterns in JavaScript, including composites, decorators, facades, adapters, and many more. Each chapter is packed with realworld examples of how the design patterns are best used and expert advice on writing better code, as well as what to watch out for. Along the way you'll discover how to create your own libraries and APIs for even more efficient coding.Master the basics of objectoriented programming in JavaScript, as they apply to design patterns Apply design patterns to your kickstart your JavaScript development Work through several realworld examples What you'll learn How to apply objectoriented programming techniques in JavaScript How to take advantage of inheritance, interfaces, and encapsulation and information hiding to kickstart your JavaScript development How to implement several design patterns in your JavaScript projects, including factory, facade, bridge, composite, adapter, decorator, flyweight, proxy, command, observer, and chain of responsibility How to make your code easier to manage in a team environment, as well as on your own How to create your own libraries and APIs Who this book is for This book will be an invaluable learning tool for any experienced JavaScript developer. Table of Contents Expressive JavaScript Interfaces Encapsulation and Information Hiding Inheritance The Singleton Pattern Chaining The Factory Pattern The Bridge Pattern The Composite Pattern The Facade Pattern The Adapter Pattern The Decorator Pattern The Flyweight Pattern The Proxy Pattern The Observer Pattern The Command Pattern The Chain of Responsibility Pattern

54 review for Pro JavaScript Design Patterns

  1. 4 out of 5

    James Stewart

    Design patterns, and particularly their application in dynamic languages can be a controversial topic, and every now and again another round of blog posts bubbles up appalled at the way a new group of programmers have become infatuated with design patterns. Applied without care design patterns can quickly lead to over-engineered code that seems designed as much to draw on as many of the established patterns as possible as to solve the intended problem. But if applied with care, and with consider Design patterns, and particularly their application in dynamic languages can be a controversial topic, and every now and again another round of blog posts bubbles up appalled at the way a new group of programmers have become infatuated with design patterns. Applied without care design patterns can quickly lead to over-engineered code that seems designed as much to draw on as many of the established patterns as possible as to solve the intended problem. But if applied with care, and with consideration of how a pattern applies in the context of your chosen language they can be a helpful way to draw on the wisdom of the coders that came before you, and make your code easier to understand to those who may inherit it. Written by Dustin Diaz (of Google) and Ross Harmes (of Yahoo), Pro Javascript Design Patterns builds on experience of building complex, high profile javascript applications. That experience shows as each pattern is introduced with solid examples and sample code and then refined to provide looser-coupling, more flexibility and/or better performance. Early on in the book I was concerned that some of the solutions could become too heavy and the early introduction of interfaces hinted at something akin to the early approaches to pattern usage in PHP, which often looked more like an attempt to turn PHP into Java than a way to use PHP’s own features better. As the book goes on the usefulness of those interfaces, particularly for large development teams, becomes clear and most of those concerns are allayed, especially as the authors offer pros and cons for the use of each pattern and are clearly focussed on how these patterns can help produce more robust solutions. Most of the patterns will have a fairly immediate impact for developers new to them, and even for those who have used them in other contexts it is helpful to see how they have been applied in JavaScript. Most modern JavaScript libraries rely on several of these patterns to abstract out handling of different browser quirks or adding new event types, and even if you rely heavily on one or more of the major libraries this guide may well help you understand their internals better. I’ve sometimes been skeptical about books claiming to be targeted at an advanced target. Labels like “pro” are often handed out far too easily. But in this case it seems deserved. While the book does a good job of quickly introducing approaches to object-oriented programming in JavaScript, that’s based on an assumption of a solid knowledge of the language and of OO development in at least one language. If you’re a newcomer to JavaScript or just looking for a way to add a few fancy features to your web pages this isn’t be book for you. But if you have some serious JavaScript development experience and are needing a way to tighten up your code to make it more modular and more maintainable, this book is well worth your time. Disclaimer: I was sent a copy of this book for review by the publisher.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Costin Manda

    The book started really nice, at a beginner to medium level with which I could not feel neither embarrassed nor overwhelmed. The first chapter was about the expressiveness of Javascript and how different styles of programming could be employed to achieve the same goals. This part of it I would have liked to see expanded in a book of its own, with code examples and everything. The second chapter was also interesting, comparing the interface style of programming with the options available inside J The book started really nice, at a beginner to medium level with which I could not feel neither embarrassed nor overwhelmed. The first chapter was about the expressiveness of Javascript and how different styles of programming could be employed to achieve the same goals. This part of it I would have liked to see expanded in a book of its own, with code examples and everything. The second chapter was also interesting, comparing the interface style of programming with the options available inside Javascript as well as giving some real life solutions. Personally, I didn't think the solutions were valid, as writing the interface as comments and trying to enforce the interface inside methods and getters/setters feels cumbersome and "unJavascriptish" to me. The third chapter, Encapsulation and Information Hiding, described object creation, private, privileged (not protected!) and public members, while the fourth was dedicated to inheritance. All these are great reading for a Javascript programmer, as they might teach one or two new things. From then on, 13 chapters described various software patterns and their application in Javascript. Alas, since this was the explicit purpose of the book, I can't say I enjoyed that part of the book. It felt like any other rehashing of the original GoF book, only with the syntax changed. Well, maybe not quite so bad, but it lacked a consistency and a touch of the writer's personality that makes books easy to read and to remember. That being said, the technical part was top notch and the structure of each chapter made it easy to understand everything in them. The software patterns described were: Singleton, Chaining, Factory, Bridge, Composite, Facade, Adapter, Decorator, Flyweight, Proxy, Observer, Command and Chain of Responsibility. Overall, a nice book for reference, but not one that I would call memorable. An easy read and also an easy browse, since one can pass quickly through the book and still understand what it is all about.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Danial Kalbasi

    Some good points of this book: 1. It explains most important design patterns in JS and it comes with comprehensive examples in ES5. 2. The author has a good mindset to solve the issues and the mindset itself is inspiring. 3. If you are not too familiar with vanilla JS (ES5), this is a great book to get a good overview of it. Some stuff that is not valid anymore: 1. We are in an age of TypeScript and Flow and lots of great frameworks use them along with ES6. Some examples such as implementing the in Some good points of this book: 1. It explains most important design patterns in JS and it comes with comprehensive examples in ES5. 2. The author has a good mindset to solve the issues and the mindset itself is inspiring. 3. If you are not too familiar with vanilla JS (ES5), this is a great book to get a good overview of it. Some stuff that is not valid anymore: 1. We are in an age of TypeScript and Flow and lots of great frameworks use them along with ES6. Some examples such as implementing the interface manually or using a huge amount of inheritance in the code is not a valid practice anymore. 2. We got other benefits in existing JS frameworks and libraries which are good to mention like A higher-order component technique that React is using. Elaborating on new technique is a big part I believe a modern JS book must have, otherwise it may not be practical anymore.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Craig Cecil

    Let me just say this up front—this book contains some advanced JavaScript techniques and code, and is not for the beginning or even intermediate JavaScript programmer. Even advanced practitioners may want to go back through for a second reading to ensure that all the concepts within are fully understood, especially when and how to use these patterns, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each in context of the JavaScript implementations. Here we have two advanced authors, one from Googl Let me just say this up front—this book contains some advanced JavaScript techniques and code, and is not for the beginning or even intermediate JavaScript programmer. Even advanced practitioners may want to go back through for a second reading to ensure that all the concepts within are fully understood, especially when and how to use these patterns, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each in context of the JavaScript implementations. Here we have two advanced authors, one from Google (Dustin Diaz), the other from Yahoo! (Ross Harmes), who have extensive experience building large-scale JavaScript-based API systems. They present 12 design pattern implementations in JavaScript, with examples of how each could be used, as well as the important core concepts of interfaces, encapsulation, information hiding, inheritance and chaining. Even if you only come away from the book learning and implementing one of the patterns or concepts in your code, it will help make the code you write more scalable, extensible, and longer lasting.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Balhau

    Very good book on core javascript and oop paradigm. It goes a step further than the "Object Oriented Javascript" of Stoyan Stefanov. In this approach these two developers give an implementation overview of the main tools and patterns that you use in your everyday when developing with languages as java or other full oop language. Since Javascript is not a oop language by design but instead a multi paradigm language you must emulate the main features of oop on top of the core concepts of these lan Very good book on core javascript and oop paradigm. It goes a step further than the "Object Oriented Javascript" of Stoyan Stefanov. In this approach these two developers give an implementation overview of the main tools and patterns that you use in your everyday when developing with languages as java or other full oop language. Since Javascript is not a oop language by design but instead a multi paradigm language you must emulate the main features of oop on top of the core concepts of these language. This is where all the magic happens. The language is so versatile that you can, with relatively verbosity, emulate oop on top of those core concepts. If you have read the book of Stoyan Stefanov this is just stretching the rope on the same concepts. If you have not read Stoyan book i trully recomend as a good complementary/prerequisite of this one. On a overall analysis i must say that this is an excelent book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    David

    Overall I found this book worth the read despite it being a little old. Design Patterns are one of those things where I think you need to see them from several perspectives. If this is an area you are interested in, definitely check it out. On the downside, I found some of the examples a little too complicated and could have been made simpler to get the point across. Also, you may find yourself just staring at the code samples for a few minutes because some can be kind of long. On the upside, I Overall I found this book worth the read despite it being a little old. Design Patterns are one of those things where I think you need to see them from several perspectives. If this is an area you are interested in, definitely check it out. On the downside, I found some of the examples a little too complicated and could have been made simpler to get the point across. Also, you may find yourself just staring at the code samples for a few minutes because some can be kind of long. On the upside, I did like how each pattern had a practical example, as opposed to using silly examples with cars. If you do get this book, also check out Addy Osmani's design pattern book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rakesh Gopal

    HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Must read for any Javascript developer. After reading this book, you'll never see Javasript the same way again. If you are like me, you'll get an intense urge to rewrite all the Javascript code in your current project and curse yourself for not reading this book long back. We all admire how elegant the JQuery library is. This book takes examples of functions and classes in JQuery, Dojo and YUI and show through examples of how much simpler our life would have been, if all our J HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Must read for any Javascript developer. After reading this book, you'll never see Javasript the same way again. If you are like me, you'll get an intense urge to rewrite all the Javascript code in your current project and curse yourself for not reading this book long back. We all admire how elegant the JQuery library is. This book takes examples of functions and classes in JQuery, Dojo and YUI and show through examples of how much simpler our life would have been, if all our JS code was written similar to JQuery or Dojo. Or better still, using JQuery or Dojo.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ernesto

    This book has tons of great JS practices, presented in practical examples and for the most part is extremely easy to follow. If you have *any* interest in using OOP in JS, I highly recommend this book. Heck, if you use JavaScript at all, even if you think you don't need to use "all that Object Oriented stuff" you'll get a lot out of reading this book. This book has tons of great JS practices, presented in practical examples and for the most part is extremely easy to follow. If you have *any* interest in using OOP in JS, I highly recommend this book. Heck, if you use JavaScript at all, even if you think you don't need to use "all that Object Oriented stuff" you'll get a lot out of reading this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ivo Stoykov

    Close attention is brought to interfaces in conjunction of the known patterns which in Javascript is left to the developers' goodwill. Though there is no doubt that interfaces have own place in software development in the case of JavaScipt applications where many independent developers work interfaces could easily become a nightmare. Close attention is brought to interfaces in conjunction of the known patterns which in Javascript is left to the developers' goodwill. Though there is no doubt that interfaces have own place in software development in the case of JavaScipt applications where many independent developers work interfaces could easily become a nightmare.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rick Toews

    Bridge Pattern. A principle of object-oriented design is loose coupling of objects (Harmes & Diaz, p. 107). This is where the bridge pattern becomes particularly useful. According to the Gang of Four, the bridge pattern "should decouple an abstraction from its implementation so that the two can vary independently." (Harmes & Diaz, p. 109). Bridge Pattern. A principle of object-oriented design is loose coupling of objects (Harmes & Diaz, p. 107). This is where the bridge pattern becomes particularly useful. According to the Gang of Four, the bridge pattern "should decouple an abstraction from its implementation so that the two can vary independently." (Harmes & Diaz, p. 109).

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rezaul Karim Sajib

    One of the finest books for developers who work extensively with javascript. Sometimes, it becomes messy if anyone works in a large project an try to ensure maximum code re usability, I think, this books is perfect for them.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amr Draz

    This book peeked my interest in JavaScript and unlocked my potential as a front-end developer. I has taught me that JavaScript is more then just another language and opened my eyes to a new ways of modeling my programs.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    It is about time someone wrote this book. Very well researched. A book that really helped me on some big JS projects.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Noventa

    So many patterns. Nicely covered. Good reference.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Illia Olenchenko

    A good one to drive in patterns and only. Authors describe a lot of patterns and their usage in js. A lot of code and words. Like and recommend.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ant

    Interesting read, something to get your teeth into.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kjirou

    深刻なまでに英語

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hazem Saleh

    Nice book. Very useful for knowing how to implement the different patterns in JavaScript.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ankti

    good

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nick Carter

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tazio

  22. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  23. 5 out of 5

    Prashant Singh

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pablo Avilés

  25. 5 out of 5

    Viktor Mazetti

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tim Walker

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nick Lowman

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lennart Paasse

  29. 4 out of 5

    Earl Moss

  30. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  32. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

  33. 5 out of 5

    notv

  34. 4 out of 5

    Arif

  35. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Welker

  36. 5 out of 5

    Dustin Diaz

  37. 5 out of 5

    Flavio

  38. 4 out of 5

    Jaggu

  39. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  40. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

  41. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  42. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  43. 4 out of 5

    Carlo

  44. 4 out of 5

    Yves514

  45. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  46. 5 out of 5

    JJ Halans

  47. 4 out of 5

    Jesslyn Teo

  48. 4 out of 5

    Mostafa S. Amin

  49. 5 out of 5

    Danny Hotea

  50. 5 out of 5

    Wesen

  51. 5 out of 5

    Steven1972

  52. 5 out of 5

    Giulio

  53. 5 out of 5

    Zhen Xie

  54. 5 out of 5

    Dante Cassanego

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