hits counter Murder at the Brightwell - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Murder at the Brightwell

Availability: Ready to download

Amory Ames is a wealthy young woman who regrets her marriage to her notoriously charming playboy husband, Milo. Looking for a change, she accepts a request for help from her former fiancé, Gil Trent, not knowing that she’ll soon become embroiled in a murder investigation that will test not only her friendship with Gil, but will upset the status quo with her husband. Amory a Amory Ames is a wealthy young woman who regrets her marriage to her notoriously charming playboy husband, Milo. Looking for a change, she accepts a request for help from her former fiancé, Gil Trent, not knowing that she’ll soon become embroiled in a murder investigation that will test not only her friendship with Gil, but will upset the status quo with her husband. Amory accompanies Gil to the Brightwell Hotel in an attempt to circumvent the marriage of his sister, Emmeline, to Rupert Howe, a disreputable ladies’ man. Amory sees in the situation a grim reflection of her own floundering marriage. There is more than her happiness at stake, however, when Rupert is murdered and Gil is arrested for the crime. Amory is determined to prove his innocence and find the real killer, despite attempted dissuasion from the disapproving police inspector on the case. Matters are further complicated by Milo’s unexpected arrival, and the two form an uneasy alliance as Amory enlists his reluctant aid in clearing Gil’s name. As the stakes grow higher and the line between friend and foe becomes less clear, Amory must decide where her heart lies and catch the killer before she, too, becomes a victim. Murder at the Brightwell is a delicious mystery in which murder invades polite society and romance springs in unexpected places. Weaver has penned a debut in the tradition of Jacqueline Winspear.


Compare

Amory Ames is a wealthy young woman who regrets her marriage to her notoriously charming playboy husband, Milo. Looking for a change, she accepts a request for help from her former fiancé, Gil Trent, not knowing that she’ll soon become embroiled in a murder investigation that will test not only her friendship with Gil, but will upset the status quo with her husband. Amory a Amory Ames is a wealthy young woman who regrets her marriage to her notoriously charming playboy husband, Milo. Looking for a change, she accepts a request for help from her former fiancé, Gil Trent, not knowing that she’ll soon become embroiled in a murder investigation that will test not only her friendship with Gil, but will upset the status quo with her husband. Amory accompanies Gil to the Brightwell Hotel in an attempt to circumvent the marriage of his sister, Emmeline, to Rupert Howe, a disreputable ladies’ man. Amory sees in the situation a grim reflection of her own floundering marriage. There is more than her happiness at stake, however, when Rupert is murdered and Gil is arrested for the crime. Amory is determined to prove his innocence and find the real killer, despite attempted dissuasion from the disapproving police inspector on the case. Matters are further complicated by Milo’s unexpected arrival, and the two form an uneasy alliance as Amory enlists his reluctant aid in clearing Gil’s name. As the stakes grow higher and the line between friend and foe becomes less clear, Amory must decide where her heart lies and catch the killer before she, too, becomes a victim. Murder at the Brightwell is a delicious mystery in which murder invades polite society and romance springs in unexpected places. Weaver has penned a debut in the tradition of Jacqueline Winspear.

30 review for Murder at the Brightwell

  1. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    I definitely chose this one for its cover and I was very lucky that the content was as good! Written in the style of an Agatha Christie novel, the book is set in an English hotel in an age when the wealthy indulged in afternoon teas, dressed formally for dinner and everyone smoked. Amory Ames is one of the wealthy, beautiful, intelligent and unhappy in her marriage. She is invited by her ex fiancé to join a party at the Brightwell Hotel and the story proceeds from there. I found the writing to be I definitely chose this one for its cover and I was very lucky that the content was as good! Written in the style of an Agatha Christie novel, the book is set in an English hotel in an age when the wealthy indulged in afternoon teas, dressed formally for dinner and everyone smoked. Amory Ames is one of the wealthy, beautiful, intelligent and unhappy in her marriage. She is invited by her ex fiancé to join a party at the Brightwell Hotel and the story proceeds from there. I found the writing to be good and the characters interesting. There were lots of them but that was necessary since quite a few of them died and there needed to be sufficient of them left to confuse us as to the identity of the murderer. There were plenty of red herrings too which kept things adequately mysterious. It was all very enjoyable and set the scene up for the books to follow in the series. I will certainly be looking out now for the second book. My thanks to Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

    You know, this may be a modern American writing about about times gone by in the SW of England but nonetheless it is still a good book. The writing is excellent and it is a great detective story. I will certainly read more in this series. It is not an Agatha Christie, but believe me, it is not far short.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This delightful murder mystery is set in 1932. Amory Ames regrets her five year marriage to playboy Milo, who seems to spend his time holidaying without her and appearing in the gossip columns, when she is approached by her ex fiancé Gil Trent. Gil’s sister, Emmeline, is planning to marry Rupert Howe – a man who reminds Gil worryingly of Milo. Gil invites Amory to join a group of friends holidaying at the Brightwell Hotel, as Emmeline and Rupert will both be there, in the hope that she can warn This delightful murder mystery is set in 1932. Amory Ames regrets her five year marriage to playboy Milo, who seems to spend his time holidaying without her and appearing in the gossip columns, when she is approached by her ex fiancé Gil Trent. Gil’s sister, Emmeline, is planning to marry Rupert Howe – a man who reminds Gil worryingly of Milo. Gil invites Amory to join a group of friends holidaying at the Brightwell Hotel, as Emmeline and Rupert will both be there, in the hope that she can warn her of the consequences of marrying in haste. Amory is unsure of how she can help, but agrees to go, even though Milo has suddenly returned home. This is a classic Golden Age scenario. A great cast of characters are at the Brightwell when Amory arrives – including actor Lionel Blake, Nelson Hamilton and his soft spoken wife Larissa, solicitor Edward Rodgers and his platinum blonde wife Anne, the flashy Veronica Carter and Olive Henderson. There are lots of secrets, unrequited love and, before long, murder… When Gil is a suspect, Amory decides she must help clear his name. However, if she had conflicted feelings about Gil before, life is going to become even more complicated when Milo follows her to the Brightwell and becomes involved in her sleuthing. I thought this was a charming book, with a great central character in Amory, aided by the deliciously handsome Milo. This will appeal to readers who enjoy books by authors such as Carola Dunn and Nicola Upson. I hope very much that this becomes a long running series, as I can’t wait to read more adventures starring Amory Ames.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    I loved this!! I love it when I find a novel in which I enjoy the storyline, the characters, the scenery, and the writing. I simply can't wait to read the next one and I only hope there will be more after that one:) Deborah Crombie described this best by saying," An elegant Christie-esque 1930's romp." I loved this!! I love it when I find a novel in which I enjoy the storyline, the characters, the scenery, and the writing. I simply can't wait to read the next one and I only hope there will be more after that one:) Deborah Crombie described this best by saying," An elegant Christie-esque 1930's romp."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    When ex fiancé Gil Trent telephoned Amory Ames and asked that she accompany him for a week to the Brightwell Hotel, Amory was bemused. It seemed that Gil’s sister Emmeline was engaged to Rupert Howe, a ladies’ man that Gil didn’t trust. He knew Amory’s marriage of the past five years to Milo was shaky at best and he hoped Amory could persuade Emmeline to rethink her engagement, based on Amory and Milo’s marriage. Amory’s arrival at the Brightwell and the subsequent events, which included murder, When ex fiancé Gil Trent telephoned Amory Ames and asked that she accompany him for a week to the Brightwell Hotel, Amory was bemused. It seemed that Gil’s sister Emmeline was engaged to Rupert Howe, a ladies’ man that Gil didn’t trust. He knew Amory’s marriage of the past five years to Milo was shaky at best and he hoped Amory could persuade Emmeline to rethink her engagement, based on Amory and Milo’s marriage. Amory’s arrival at the Brightwell and the subsequent events, which included murder, an arrest, danger as Amory investigated, and the shock of seeing Milo arrive on the scene, all culminated in a conclusion which saw the remaining guests leaving the Brightwell, probably never to return… Murder at the Brightwell is the debut historical mystery/cozy novel by Ashley Weaver, and is also the 1st in the Amory Ames series. It was fun, lighthearted (even with murder at its core!) and highly entertaining. The days of polite society, women who – dressed to the nines – look down their noses at anyone deemed less important than they are, are fortunately not so prevalent these days. I thoroughly enjoyed this one, and look forward to searching out the second in the series. Highly recommended. With thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for my digital ARC to read in exchange for my honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Deena

    I persevered and finished! Yay me! Unfortunately, I have no idea why I bothered. The protagonist is a complete and utter moron who behaves as stupidly as possible at every opportunity. The police officer behaves in completely un-police-like ways. Socio-economic class issues, which might have given this some desperately needed depth, are briefly hinted at but then glossed over. The marital woes - apparently intended to provide that depth - are just as insipid as the protagonist. The mystery itsel I persevered and finished! Yay me! Unfortunately, I have no idea why I bothered. The protagonist is a complete and utter moron who behaves as stupidly as possible at every opportunity. The police officer behaves in completely un-police-like ways. Socio-economic class issues, which might have given this some desperately needed depth, are briefly hinted at but then glossed over. The marital woes - apparently intended to provide that depth - are just as insipid as the protagonist. The mystery itself wasn't dreadful, but it certainly gave readers nothing new. Comparisons to Dame Agatha are completely unfounded (at least the positive comparisons). There's a hint at the end that this could become a series; I would certainly not bother.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jaylia3

    Set at a luxury resort by the sea in 1930’s Britain, Murder at Brightwell has all the ingredients of a perfect diversion--well burnished prose, a captivating plot, witty dialog, elegant fashions, charming cads, upper class shenanigans, love gone wrong, secrets galore, an appealing main character, and murder. What could be more fun than that? I dashed through the story. Five years ago Amory Ames married Milo, her far too charismatic playboy husband, and then regretted that choice almost immediatel Set at a luxury resort by the sea in 1930’s Britain, Murder at Brightwell has all the ingredients of a perfect diversion--well burnished prose, a captivating plot, witty dialog, elegant fashions, charming cads, upper class shenanigans, love gone wrong, secrets galore, an appealing main character, and murder. What could be more fun than that? I dashed through the story. Five years ago Amory Ames married Milo, her far too charismatic playboy husband, and then regretted that choice almost immediately. Milo jaunts off to places like Monte Carlo to engage in gossip column worthy amusements far too often, leaving Amory all alone with the servants, so when her former fiancé knocks on the door one day Amory can’t help wondering what might have been. Amory has known Gil Trent since they were children and he’s everything Milo is not--steady, dependable, and trustworthy. After years of no contact he’s come to ask a favor that involves Amory accompanying him on a holiday by the sea, and Amory decides, why not? It’s a request and opportunity she can’t resist, but then someone is murdered and Gil is accused and Milo of all people shows up making everything all the more confusing. Amory investigates, of course, and a wonderful cast of characters make up the possible suspects. The romance and murder aspects of the story are finely balanced so that both threads kept me in suspense for most of the book. Murder at Brightwell is author Ashley Weaver’s debut novel, and I will be eagerly awaiting her second.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anne Boleyn's Ghost

    4.5 stars. I kind of loved this. Scratch that. I definitely loved this. Clever, utterly charming, and thoroughly entertaining. Curling up with a cup of tea and a Masterpiece Mystery has long given me the warm fuzzies. I think that this series will have a similar effect. But let's not examine WHY murder mysteries make me feel so cozy and content... Set in 1930s England, Murder at the Brightwell follows Amory Ames' unlikely trajectory from wealthy socialite to amateur sleuth. She attempts to solve t 4.5 stars. I kind of loved this. Scratch that. I definitely loved this. Clever, utterly charming, and thoroughly entertaining. Curling up with a cup of tea and a Masterpiece Mystery has long given me the warm fuzzies. I think that this series will have a similar effect. But let's not examine WHY murder mysteries make me feel so cozy and content... Set in 1930s England, Murder at the Brightwell follows Amory Ames' unlikely trajectory from wealthy socialite to amateur sleuth. She attempts to solve the murder of a notorious ladies' man while juggling the reappearance of another ladies' man - her estranged husband, Milo. I can't help but suspect that Milo is not the careless playboy that he appears to be, and I'm looking forward to finding out. Many thanks, Critterbee*, for the intel that gave me a much-needed push. I don't regret moving forward for a second. On the contrary, it's been some time since I felt so excited about a series!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kate Baxter

    3.5 / 5.0 stars This first book in series was a delicious introduction to the Amory Ames mystery series by talented author, Ashley Weaver. There is depth to her very human characters, each one a bit flawed in their own special way. The interplay among characters is quite believable, as emotions run high throughout the story. One gets a strong sense of time, place, and the glitz and glamour of the Bristish aristocracy on holiday at the seaside. It doesn't take long for a corpse to appear on scene. 3.5 / 5.0 stars This first book in series was a delicious introduction to the Amory Ames mystery series by talented author, Ashley Weaver. There is depth to her very human characters, each one a bit flawed in their own special way. The interplay among characters is quite believable, as emotions run high throughout the story. One gets a strong sense of time, place, and the glitz and glamour of the Bristish aristocracy on holiday at the seaside. It doesn't take long for a corpse to appear on scene. Then it's off to the races to figure out who had it in for the poor soul. England, Summer of 1932 Amory Ames, is a delightful young aristocrat whose errant husband of five years, Milo Ames, has caused pure embarrassment to her and brought shame to their marriage. In her frustration and sorrow, she is at a crossroad in her life. She tires of hearing the tawdry gossip concerning Milo and his playboy exploits all over the continent. Shortly after he returns home to Kent, Amory is visited by Gilmore Trent, the fiancé she jilted when swept up into the vortex of Milo's exhilarating and thrilling existence. Gil seeks out Amory on the pretense that he needs her assistance in shepherding his sister, Emmeline, away from a disastrous engagement to Rupert Howe. Would she please consider joining them at the seaside and advise Emmeline away from a marriage which would probably become too much like her own. Sure, why not get away and head for the seaside? What's good for the gander is surely good for the goose. And off they go, leaving Milo behind, or did they? That first night at the Brightwell, dinner was awkward and a bit stiff with all the posh friends of Gil's and Emmeline's. It didn't take Amory long to size up the members of the group and determine who was friend and who should be avoided at all costs. By the next morning, it appeared that one of their party had taken a spill over the hotel balcony and wouldn't be joining them for breakfast or any subsequent meals. As it was Amory who spotted the body, she decides to take on the sleuthing work to figure out who really is friend and who is foe. Then enter stage right, Milo Ames, just to stir things up and provide fodder for the gossip rags. This was a fun story with a bit more depth than most cozy mysteries. This seems to be the way of most historically set mysteries. With six books already out in this series, it would appear that this reader has some catching up to do and they're looking forward to it. I am grateful to author Ashley Weaver and her publsiher, Thomas Minotaur Books for having provided a free uncorrected digital galley of this book through NetGalley. Their generosity, however, has not influenced this review - the words of which are mine alone.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    Bright, young thing Amory Ames is in her fifth year of an unsatisfactory marriage to the devilishly handsome and charming (but philandering) Milo when her former beau Gil Trent shows up with a request for a favor: Will Amory accompany him to the seaside for a weeklong holiday to talk his little sister Emmeline out of entering into a similar marriage? It doesn’t take Amory long to see that Emmeline’s fiancé, Rupert Howe, is cut from the exactly same cloth as Milo Ames: good-looking, wealthy, excit Bright, young thing Amory Ames is in her fifth year of an unsatisfactory marriage to the devilishly handsome and charming (but philandering) Milo when her former beau Gil Trent shows up with a request for a favor: Will Amory accompany him to the seaside for a weeklong holiday to talk his little sister Emmeline out of entering into a similar marriage? It doesn’t take Amory long to see that Emmeline’s fiancé, Rupert Howe, is cut from the exactly same cloth as Milo Ames: good-looking, wealthy, exciting, and polished, but conceited and selfish. Amory’s nuanced talk appears to succeed where Gil’s heavy-handed entreaties of Emmeline and threats against Rupert have not. But we’ll never know for certain, as Rupert is killed — and poor Gil is arrested! Amory, convinced of Gil’s innocence, takes it upon herself to prove his innocence. While the premise may sound cliché, author Ashley Weaver has penned a cozy mystery that’s plausible, charming, and intriguing. Set in 1932, Murder at the Brightwell feels as if it were set a decade earlier, with the gaiety and recklessness of 1920s. And Amory Ames is such a delightful heroine — generous, clever, and witty — that I cannot wait to begin the sequel, Death Wears a Mask, so as to get another dose of her. For those listening to the Audible edition of Murder at the Brightwell, narrator Billie Fulford-Brown does a respectable job with the women’s voices, although the male ones are barely differentiated. Still, I enjoyed listening to the book overall.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Everyman

    This mystery, selected by a book group here on Goodreads, which is how I happened to read it, is the debut mystery by a young writer who gets a “nice try, but.” Ashley Weaver builds her adequate but no more than that story around a goodly helping of mystery cliches. This first person mystery starts with the classic country house (in this case a seaside hotel, but same difference) where a group of friends gathers for a few days, offering the traditional limited group of potential victims and murd This mystery, selected by a book group here on Goodreads, which is how I happened to read it, is the debut mystery by a young writer who gets a “nice try, but.” Ashley Weaver builds her adequate but no more than that story around a goodly helping of mystery cliches. This first person mystery starts with the classic country house (in this case a seaside hotel, but same difference) where a group of friends gathers for a few days, offering the traditional limited group of potential victims and murderers. Her protagonist, Amory Ames, is a semi-outsider to the group, having been invited by one of the group (a former fiancé who was rejected when a more alluring prospect came along but who still carries a flame for her) to use the occasion to wrest his sister from the embraces of a perceived cad who has become engaged to her. I say semi-outsider because most of the other guests, friends of each other, are previously unknown to her. So in another mystery cliche we get to meet the potential victims and subjects through their gradual introductions to her as they appear at tea or dinner. Amory Ames is, of course, a feisty, independent, intelligent young woman. That’s de rigueur. Naturally her husband, who she wavers between loving and hating, who has spent the past five years in Monte Carlo paying no attention to her, shows up without warning or notice a few hours before her departure for the hotel, adding a complication to the situation which tests the credulity of the reader. Mrs. Ames, again of course, is the one who finds the body. The murdered man is, no surprise, the cad, and her friend, of course, is suspected and arrested. She, of course, is convinced of his innocence (she KNOWS him, he could NEVER murder anybody), and so, also as expected, decides for no discernibly adequate reason to distrust the police and go about playing amateur detective. And in yet another reliably invoked cliche, the detective inspector who comes to investigate strikes up a highly unprofessional friendship with Mrs. Ames, sharing confidences with her and disregarding her potential as a murderer helping her friend rescue his sister from the clutches of the cad. Cliche piles on cliche. The detective, seeing that the victim who tumbled down a cliff to his death has a bruise on his head, concludes that he was struck by a blunt instrument, and jumps to the unprofessional conclusion that it was murder, completely disregarding the possibilities that it was accident or manslaughter, but this is a murder mystery, so murder it must be. Once the item with which he was struck is revealed it’s obvious that it could never have made an injury that could reasonably be described as being from a blunt instrument, but the cliche requires a blunt instrument, and so it becomes one. We have, of course, the traditional demand that the members of the party must remain on site until the police are ready to let them depart, adding to the internal stresses and making sure that all prospective suspects remain available to interact with and be suspected and questioned by our amateur detective. Meanwhile, we need to toss some unrelated complications in to the protagonist’s life. So ... the friend comes to her room to consult on the murder, gets drunk and spends the night (innocently, as it turns out, but the appearance is sufficient). The husband shows up at the hotel, again unexpectedly, and finds out about the incident, with the expected result. In order to complicate things, and for no apparent other reason, the husband lies and behaves otherwise in a manner which makes his wife suspect him of being the killer. She dithers and wavers between the husband and the friend as to whether she regretted her decision to switch horses those several years ago and who she really loves, and so we have this completely unrelated tangle, the warp to the weft of the mystery, including an incident where the couple, having broken into guest rooms in search of clues, in another reliable cliche, when the guest shows up unexpectedly wind up hiding together in a closet while a second victim is being murdered a few feet away. Eventually, of course, our protagonist breaks into yet another guest’s room in a search for clues (not only is she trespassing, but the police could not have made this search without a warrant, but of course our protagonist is above the law), is found there, discovers who the murderer and the motive are, is threatened at gunpoint, manages to turn the tables and subdue the killer, during which the gun discharges without hitting anybody, when, no cliche being left unturned, the friend and detective burst into the room to find her standing over the now revealed murderer. If there are any murder mystery cliches I have forgotten to mention, be assured that they are nonetheless present and accounted for. The characterizations are adequate but not memorable, the setting adequately but not well developed, the motive barely sufficient to justify murder, and in general, the book, as I said at the beginning, a nice try, but.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This delightful murder mystery is set in 1932. Amory Ames regrets her five year marriage to playboy Milo, who seems to spend his time holidaying without her and appearing in the gossip columns, when she is approached by her ex fiancé Gil Trent. Gil’s sister, Emmeline, is planning to marry Rupert Howe – a man who reminds Gil worryingly of Milo. Gil invites Amory to join a group of friends holidaying at the Brightwell Hotel, as Emmeline and Rupert will both be there, in the hope that she can warn This delightful murder mystery is set in 1932. Amory Ames regrets her five year marriage to playboy Milo, who seems to spend his time holidaying without her and appearing in the gossip columns, when she is approached by her ex fiancé Gil Trent. Gil’s sister, Emmeline, is planning to marry Rupert Howe – a man who reminds Gil worryingly of Milo. Gil invites Amory to join a group of friends holidaying at the Brightwell Hotel, as Emmeline and Rupert will both be there, in the hope that she can warn her of the consequences of marrying in haste. Amory is unsure of how she can help, but agrees to go, even though Milo has suddenly returned home. This is a classic Golden Age scenario. A great cast of characters are assembled at the Brightwell when Amory arrives – including actor Lionel Blake, Nelson Hamilton and his soft spoken wife Larissa, solicitor Edward Rodgers and his platinum blonde wife Anne, the flashy Veronica Carter and banker’s daughter Olive Henderson. There are lots of secrets, unrequited love and, before long, murder… When Gil is a suspect, Amory decides she must help clear his name. However, if she had conflicted feelings about Gil before, life is going to become even more complicated when Milo follows her to the Brightwell and becomes involved with her sleuthing. I thought this was a charming book, with a great central character in Amory, aided by the deliciously handsome Milo. Set at a fashionable British seaside resort, the author has skilfully recreated the period between the wars. The depression is hinted at, but both Amory and Milo obviously come from backgrounds of both wealth and privilege. This will appeal to readers who enjoy books by authors such as Carola Dunn and Nicola Upson and I hope very much that this becomes a long running series, as I can’t wait to read more adventures starring Amory Ames.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    I found this a wonderful historical mystery that surprised me several times. I love it when I don't guess the murderer, not from lack of clues but from not seeing how they all fit together until the end. It lets my mind stay busy with suspecting everyone, and I don't feel cheated when I'm surprised by the pieces of the puzzle clicking together. I also very much enjoyed the drama of Amory's marriage troubles, which gave it more emotional depth than is often present in these types of mysteries. Th I found this a wonderful historical mystery that surprised me several times. I love it when I don't guess the murderer, not from lack of clues but from not seeing how they all fit together until the end. It lets my mind stay busy with suspecting everyone, and I don't feel cheated when I'm surprised by the pieces of the puzzle clicking together. I also very much enjoyed the drama of Amory's marriage troubles, which gave it more emotional depth than is often present in these types of mysteries. Those who prefer their mysteries without any romantic distractions may not enjoy it so much, but I tend to prefer mine with a good dose of character development outside of the mystery itself. Another positive for me is that although there was romance, it was not about people just meeting and falling in love. Instead it dealt with the much more complex issues of an established relationship on shaky ground. I found Amory's state of mind to be realistic in the circumstances and was completely engrossed in her struggles to find the truth of her own heart. I want to know what happens to her next, and that's what will drive me to pick up the next book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    From the onset, Amory Ames was beset with a troubled marriage. As it happened, her husband’s return from the Riviera coincided with her ex-fiancee at their door. She hadn’t seen Gilmore Trent since their break-up more than five years ago. But Amory was miffed at Milo’s two-month sojourn so she accepted Gil’s plea for help. I wasn’t sure what to think of Milo and Amory Ames. Their story took place in England in 1932. The Great Depression had spread across the globe but the Ames, with all their we From the onset, Amory Ames was beset with a troubled marriage. As it happened, her husband’s return from the Riviera coincided with her ex-fiancee at their door. She hadn’t seen Gilmore Trent since their break-up more than five years ago. But Amory was miffed at Milo’s two-month sojourn so she accepted Gil’s plea for help. I wasn’t sure what to think of Milo and Amory Ames. Their story took place in England in 1932. The Great Depression had spread across the globe but the Ames, with all their wealth, appeared immune. With airs of The Thin Man, the mystery had some pleasant twists. Though the main characters were not always endearing, they were painted with master strokes. I found I wanted to learn more about this unsettled couple’s past. There were layers to be unwrapped while reading. I can’t remember when I wasn’t particularly fond of either MC but I enjoyed the descriptive narrative of the mystery. 3.5 stars for a decent introduction to the series and hoping the Ames work through their personal turmoils.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Jayyn

    🍸🍸🍸🍸 (four stars as rated in class-ass martinis, darling) I was given an advanced reader copy of this book by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Ashley Weaver, you evil genius. Giving out free “ARC’s” of the first book in your deliciously bingeable series to get us all hooked? Brilliant! Murder at the Brightwell was so much fun! I love “locked door” style period mysteries and this one was ab-so-lutely delightful. Not to mention, classy af. 🎩 The story is perfect for fans 🍸🍸🍸🍸 (four stars as rated in class-ass martinis, darling) I was given an advanced reader copy of this book by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Ashley Weaver, you evil genius. Giving out free “ARC’s” of the first book in your deliciously bingeable series to get us all hooked? Brilliant! Murder at the Brightwell was so much fun! I love “locked door” style period mysteries and this one was ab-so-lutely delightful. Not to mention, classy af. 🎩 The story is perfect for fans of Agatha Christie or Jaqueline Winspear and, as a fan of both, I just adored it. Ashley Weaver’s writing is gorgeous. And I found the mystery to be fantastic. It accomplished everything I seek from this genre without getting overly convoluted. The conclusion came as a surprise to me (a big win) and I really didn’t know who to believe until all was revealed at the end. As for the love triangle.... siiiiigh. I did not want Amory to end up with (view spoiler)[Gil (hide spoiler)] . But nor did I feel that her relationship arc with (view spoiler)[ Milo (hide spoiler)] was satisfying enough for her to (view spoiler)[be enthusiastically making out with him at the end!! (hide spoiler)] I needed more discussion about what happened between them prior to this story in order to give their love a legitimate second shot. That being said, I am genuinely looking forward to book 2. I am hoping for the MAJOR redemption story of (view spoiler)[ Milo (hide spoiler)] in the second book because without that I am going to be MAD! I mean, he has a lot to make up for... A LOT. Content Warnings for this book: murder and attempted murder, infidelity, attempted suicide, drowning, dysfunctional relationship, toxic relationship, emotional abuse, bullying, manipulation

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jan C

    This was probably really 2 1/2 ☆. For much of the book it was hovering around 1-2☆ but I thought it perked up a bit at the end. The author spent far too much time describing what her main character, Amory Ames, was wearing. Is Amory a common name? Or perhaps it was supposed to be a family name. It wasn't just that she changed into a gray suit but she had to describe all the facets about it. I gave some allowance to the author as it was her first book. But where was her editor? Not a house party bu This was probably really 2 1/2 ☆. For much of the book it was hovering around 1-2☆ but I thought it perked up a bit at the end. The author spent far too much time describing what her main character, Amory Ames, was wearing. Is Amory a common name? Or perhaps it was supposed to be a family name. It wasn't just that she changed into a gray suit but she had to describe all the facets about it. I gave some allowance to the author as it was her first book. But where was her editor? Not a house party but an engagement party at a hotel at the seashore. Then the bodies start falling. A little too much about Amory being torn between her husband Milo and former boyfriend Gil. How did a normal name like Gil get mixed up with all these other strange names? I have been known to turn down books simply because characters have strange first names.

  17. 4 out of 5

    ˜”*°•.˜”*°• Sheri •°*”˜.•°*”˜

    Amory Ames is a wealthy young woman who regrets her marriage to her notoriously charming playboy husband, Milo. Looking for a change, she accepts a request for help from her former fiancé, Gil Trent, not knowing that she’ll soon become embroiled in a murder investigation that will test not only her friendship with Gil, but will upset the status quo with her husband. First let me say that I really like the cover. I know, nothing to do with the writing, but nice to look at. At the beginning I though Amory Ames is a wealthy young woman who regrets her marriage to her notoriously charming playboy husband, Milo. Looking for a change, she accepts a request for help from her former fiancé, Gil Trent, not knowing that she’ll soon become embroiled in a murder investigation that will test not only her friendship with Gil, but will upset the status quo with her husband. First let me say that I really like the cover. I know, nothing to do with the writing, but nice to look at. At the beginning I thought "oh no" but I found the main character appealing and enjoyed this light read. This would be a good beach or vacation book. Think about this quote for a while and you'll have the gist of the company you will be keeping as you read this cozy novel. “The letter wasn't at all in Milo's style. He would have issued a much more elegant threat on vastly superior stationery.”

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Reads Books

    Just finished Murder at the Brightwell today and I couldn't be more thrilled to find another wonderful mystery series to add to my collection of favorites. The characters are well written and charming, with the main character, Amory Ames and her husband, Milo, being the best of the bunch. The setting of post-war England makes this a unique read, as well. The tone of the novel stayed true to the time frame, which I appreciated. The mystery plot kept me guessing to the very end, which I admit does Just finished Murder at the Brightwell today and I couldn't be more thrilled to find another wonderful mystery series to add to my collection of favorites. The characters are well written and charming, with the main character, Amory Ames and her husband, Milo, being the best of the bunch. The setting of post-war England makes this a unique read, as well. The tone of the novel stayed true to the time frame, which I appreciated. The mystery plot kept me guessing to the very end, which I admit doesn't happen very often. I really thought I had it figured out until the murderer was announced and I was completely wrong. I am looking forward to checking out the next installment to see what adventures Amory and Milo get up to next. A huge thanks to Minotaur Books Publishing and NetGalley for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Maxwell

    I found this 1930s period mystery to be absolutely charming, with a style that reminded me of both Mary Stewart and Agatha Christie. The story kept me guessing on several fronts because everyone had something to hide and I never guessed who dunnit until the culprit was revealed. Amory Ames is an intelligent, very British sleuth and I can't wait to see what she gets up to next! I found this 1930s period mystery to be absolutely charming, with a style that reminded me of both Mary Stewart and Agatha Christie. The story kept me guessing on several fronts because everyone had something to hide and I never guessed who dunnit until the culprit was revealed. Amory Ames is an intelligent, very British sleuth and I can't wait to see what she gets up to next!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    I really enjoyed the read. Its a mystery set in the 1930's. The heroine is a socialite that stumbles into a murder investigation. It was lighthearted, fun at times, not too heavy, with some romance thrown in. It reminded me a bit of the old Thin Man movie series, but with much less alcohol. :)) I really enjoyed the time period it was staged in, and the author seemed to stay true to the speech and mannerisms of the time. I also liked that it was a fairly clean book, no vulgar language or graphic s I really enjoyed the read. Its a mystery set in the 1930's. The heroine is a socialite that stumbles into a murder investigation. It was lighthearted, fun at times, not too heavy, with some romance thrown in. It reminded me a bit of the old Thin Man movie series, but with much less alcohol. :)) I really enjoyed the time period it was staged in, and the author seemed to stay true to the speech and mannerisms of the time. I also liked that it was a fairly clean book, no vulgar language or graphic scenes to take away from the plot. I also the thought the mystery was good, it had me guessing until the end. Its the first in a series it seems, but I enjoyed it enough to read the other books. I appreciate a good clean mystery that's set in the Golden Age.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    'Amory Ames is a wealthy young woman who regrets her marriage to her notoriously charming playboy husband, Milo. Looking for a change, she accepts a request for help from her former fiancé, Gil Trent, not knowing that she’ll soon become embroiled in a murder investigation that will test not only her friendship with Gil, but will upset the status quo with her husband. Amory accompanies Gil to the Brightwell Hotel in an attempt to circumvent the marriage of his sister, Emmeline, to Rupert Howe, a d 'Amory Ames is a wealthy young woman who regrets her marriage to her notoriously charming playboy husband, Milo. Looking for a change, she accepts a request for help from her former fiancé, Gil Trent, not knowing that she’ll soon become embroiled in a murder investigation that will test not only her friendship with Gil, but will upset the status quo with her husband. Amory accompanies Gil to the Brightwell Hotel in an attempt to circumvent the marriage of his sister, Emmeline, to Rupert Howe, a disreputable ladies’ man. Amory sees in the situation a grim reflection of her own floundering marriage. There is more than her happiness at stake, however, when Rupert is murdered and Gil is arrested for the crime. Amory is determined to prove his innocence and find the real killer, despite attempted dissuasion from the disapproving police inspector on the case. Matters are further complicated by Milo’s unexpected arrival, and the two form an uneasy alliance as Amory enlists his reluctant aid in clearing Gil’s name. As the stakes grow higher and the line between friend and foe becomes less clear, Amory must decide where her heart lies and catch the killer before she, too, becomes a victim.' ______________________________ Murder at the Brightwell is the first book in Ashley Weaver's debut series, The Amory Ames Mystery Series, and is a historical mystery set in the 1930s. I have had the first four books in this series sitting on my bookshelf for over a year now. When I saw them at the bookstore, I knew they were something that I would enjoy, so I snatched them up. Without meaning to though, I kept pushing them down onmy TBR list because I knew I would want to ready them back to back and didn't want to take a break from my other books for that long. But with the senventh in the series about to be released, I decided it was the right time. Now that I finally started reading them, it turns out that I was right to buy them because just with this first book, I'm fully on board. I really love the way the author unfolded the mystery and wove in the red herrings. Some seemed to be trying to distract from the real villain whereas others seemed to muddy the waters and expand the number of possible suspects in a way that made it more difficult to decide who the guilty party was. I found it really well-done and I enjoyed the book quite a lot. I love that Amory showed some backbone and was willing to step out of her comfort zone to take this trip in order to reevaluate her marriage. But unfortunately she has quite the weakness where her husband is concerned and so he gets away with quite a lot unfortunately. I'm very suspicious of Milo, both with his ease in hiding his thoughts and feelings and the hidden nature of his movements. I had such a feeling that he must secretly be a spy and was surprised when that wasn't a reveal in the book. Perhaps I'm wrong and he's just shifty or maybe it'll come about in a later book? Either way I'm looking forward to reading the next book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    Murder at the Brightwell was a positively delightful start to a new mystery series. The opulent setting and the inquisitive heroine made this a pleasure to read and I will absolutely be tuning in for book two. Amory Ames has been invited to the seaside resort, Brightwell, by her former fiance, Gil. Amory had broken off her engagement to Gil five years ago when she met and married her husband, Milo. The past five years have not gone smoothly, leaving Amory with the feeling that she may have made t Murder at the Brightwell was a positively delightful start to a new mystery series. The opulent setting and the inquisitive heroine made this a pleasure to read and I will absolutely be tuning in for book two. Amory Ames has been invited to the seaside resort, Brightwell, by her former fiance, Gil. Amory had broken off her engagement to Gil five years ago when she met and married her husband, Milo. The past five years have not gone smoothly, leaving Amory with the feeling that she may have made the wrong choice in selecting a husband. Gil has not invited Amory to start an affair, instead he's hoping that Amory will be able to dissuade his sister, Evangeline from making the same mistake Amory made. But it seems Amory's assistance is not needed in that capacity as the day after she arrives, Evangeline's fiance is murdered and Gil is the prime suspect. Feeling that she has contributed to the inspector's confidence that Gil is the murderer, Amory starts her own investigation, only to be interrupted by her estranged husband. Milo's sudden appearance only serves to confuse her and her opinion on the state of their marriage, a murder investigation is just what she needs to take her mind off their confusing relationship. I loved Murder at the Brightwell. This is exactly the kind of mystery that I like. It's light and character driven, and has the bonus of being set in 1932 England. The setting was the very first thing that I noticed about this one, it really stood out in the descriptions of the English seaside. The author also created a fabulous sense of opulence that will be sure to appeal to Downton Abbey fans with the description of the ritzy hotel and the lifestyle of the characters. Readers were always treated to the style of dress of it's well dressed heroine, Amory, and she was always dressed to the nines as evidenced by her first night dining at the Brightwell: I wore a fitted gown of mauve silk with sheer flutter sleeves and flowing tulle panels inset into the skirt, the cut quite flattering to my thin, tallish frame, if I may say so myself (p. 34). Normally, I would say that I don't like an over abundance of description regarding characters clothes, but here I really felt that it went a long way to set the scene. Amory was rich and her wardrobe showed it. Her interest in her clothing was simply a part of her character and I thought it worked to advantage in the novel. That's not say that Amory was a shallow character only interested in her dress. In fact, Amory was an extremely loyal character willing to go to great lengths to help her friend. I also really liked that Amory's marriage played such a large part of the novel. Amory was obviously deeply unhappy and lonely in her marriage. Her husband is aloof and not often serious, and most of the time he's not even present being away on the continent getting up to no good. Personally, I'm convinced that Milo is a spy because, folks, that traveling and his seeming devotion to Amory do not add up. Something is not what it seems and I am convinced that Milo is engaged in espionage (I hope I'm right!). I'm interested to find out more about Milo in subsequent books because the Ames marriage is not on secure ground at the end of Murder at the Brightwell. The marriage has been patched, but Amory's issues with her husband have not been resolved. Ultimately, it is the characters that I adored in this book. On the surface Amory Ames appears a shallow and superficial character, but she's clearly anything but once you get into her narration. Throw in her complicated marriage to a man of much mystery, and I am sufficiently intrigued. I'm officially anxiously awaiting book two, Death Wears a Mask. Review originally published at The Book Adventures.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This is basically the book that would have resulted if Noël Coward and Mary Stewart had teamed up to co-write an Agatha Christie mystery - and it is DELICIOUSLY fun! It really saved me on a tired and frustrated day - I just sank into it and loved every minute. Before I'd even finished this first book in the Amory Ames series, I'd already run back to the library to grab Books 2 and 3 - and honestly, now that I'm 40 pages into Book 2, I am wishing that I'd taken the chance to grab Books 4 and 5 at This is basically the book that would have resulted if Noël Coward and Mary Stewart had teamed up to co-write an Agatha Christie mystery - and it is DELICIOUSLY fun! It really saved me on a tired and frustrated day - I just sank into it and loved every minute. Before I'd even finished this first book in the Amory Ames series, I'd already run back to the library to grab Books 2 and 3 - and honestly, now that I'm 40 pages into Book 2, I am wishing that I'd taken the chance to grab Books 4 and 5 at the same time! This is SUCH an addictive and fun mystery series - and perfectly made for binge-reading. I'm loving the series so far - and I loved this book so much that I plan to buy a copy to keep for re-reading on future bad days.

  24. 4 out of 5

    G.

    2.5/5 Murder at the Brightwell is a 1930s murder mystery set in England. Imagine a bunch of people wearing fashionable clothing while conversing in very clipped English accents and pretending to have a merry getaway at a posh hotel. But then, murder. I found the mystery of the novel to be twofold: one, the identity of the murderer, and two, the very pressing conundrum of the heroine continuing to put up with her husband. The trouble with Murder at the Brightwell is that I guessed the first quite 2.5/5 Murder at the Brightwell is a 1930s murder mystery set in England. Imagine a bunch of people wearing fashionable clothing while conversing in very clipped English accents and pretending to have a merry getaway at a posh hotel. But then, murder. I found the mystery of the novel to be twofold: one, the identity of the murderer, and two, the very pressing conundrum of the heroine continuing to put up with her husband. The trouble with Murder at the Brightwell is that I guessed the first quite early, but couldn't figure out the second for the life of me. Anyway, it's an okay read, if not a particularly satisfying one.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    This is charming. The writing is overly deliberate, especially in the beginning, but its stiffness wears off, and the more casual formality that's left is perfectly fitting the setting and characters. This is very much a setup novel - Amory's marriage is too broadly sketched (though oddly, her relationship with Gil is well done) - but it's excellent setup: I cannot wait to see how she and Milo work things out. (I will be very annoyed if Milo becomes your standard tortured hero cliche.) This is charming. The writing is overly deliberate, especially in the beginning, but its stiffness wears off, and the more casual formality that's left is perfectly fitting the setting and characters. This is very much a setup novel - Amory's marriage is too broadly sketched (though oddly, her relationship with Gil is well done) - but it's excellent setup: I cannot wait to see how she and Milo work things out. (I will be very annoyed if Milo becomes your standard tortured hero cliche.)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lady Wesley

    I would like to read this part romance, part cozy mystery, part period piece, which was recommended by Old Latin Teacher on Amazon. And yet -- maybe I'm just too cheap -- but I am not inclined to fork over $9.99 for an unknown author's debut novel. I would like to read this part romance, part cozy mystery, part period piece, which was recommended by Old Latin Teacher on Amazon. And yet -- maybe I'm just too cheap -- but I am not inclined to fork over $9.99 for an unknown author's debut novel.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Barb Moore

    Was looking forward to "Thin Man" style of elegance and humor, instead got a Harlequin romance with murder. Meh. Was looking forward to "Thin Man" style of elegance and humor, instead got a Harlequin romance with murder. Meh.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Stacie Haden

    First line: "It is an impossible great trial to be married to a man one loves and hates in equal proportions." Good starting novel to a series. England 1932 First line: "It is an impossible great trial to be married to a man one loves and hates in equal proportions." Good starting novel to a series. England 1932

  29. 5 out of 5

    N.N. Light

    Murder at the Brightwell is a smart, sophisticated mystery and I loved every minute of it. When I discovered the Amory Ames Mystery series last year, I started with book four and worked my way back to the beginning. Reminiscent of Nick and Nora Charles, Amory and Milo have a different sort of marriage, not like the ones we have today. It worked for me as it was all too common in the 1930's. The mystery itself took a backseat to the relationship issues of the Ameses but I think I know what Ashley Murder at the Brightwell is a smart, sophisticated mystery and I loved every minute of it. When I discovered the Amory Ames Mystery series last year, I started with book four and worked my way back to the beginning. Reminiscent of Nick and Nora Charles, Amory and Milo have a different sort of marriage, not like the ones we have today. It worked for me as it was all too common in the 1930's. The mystery itself took a backseat to the relationship issues of the Ameses but I think I know what Ashley Weaver's plan for this story. As a debut to a series, certain things need to be established. The continuity from book four to this one impressed me. If you love historical mysteries with a little humour, pick this up today. Disclaimer: I received a copy from the publisher via Netgalley in the hopes I'd review it. My Rating: 4 stars Reviewed by: Mrs. N

  30. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    I often enjoy historical mysteries, and this was an easy light read, but there was just too much romance for me (and that's something I never thought I'd say!) I did enjoy some of the humour and the characters. The main story, about an unpopular playboy who is killed at a seaside hotel, also kept me guessing. However, I didn't think the romance plot, about a young socialite torn between her husband and her ex-fiance, was very convincing. Looking forward to discussing this with the Reading the De I often enjoy historical mysteries, and this was an easy light read, but there was just too much romance for me (and that's something I never thought I'd say!) I did enjoy some of the humour and the characters. The main story, about an unpopular playboy who is killed at a seaside hotel, also kept me guessing. However, I didn't think the romance plot, about a young socialite torn between her husband and her ex-fiance, was very convincing. Looking forward to discussing this with the Reading the Detectives group, even though it wasn't really my cup of poison.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.