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Compelling Accounts of Key People Who Have Formed Christian Belief through the Ages All Christians' beliefs are shaped by those who went before them. Now these giants of Christian history are presented chronologically and in a format that helps readers get to know them. In addition to a biographical sketch, readers will discover each person's primary contributions to the C Compelling Accounts of Key People Who Have Formed Christian Belief through the Ages All Christians' beliefs are shaped by those who went before them. Now these giants of Christian history are presented chronologically and in a format that helps readers get to know them. In addition to a biographical sketch, readers will discover each person's primary contributions to the Christian faith along with a brief quotation from their work. Students, history buffs, and curious readers will be fascinated as their faith is strengthened. Included are Polycarp, Justin Martyr, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Karl Barth, Carl F. H. Henry, and more.


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Compelling Accounts of Key People Who Have Formed Christian Belief through the Ages All Christians' beliefs are shaped by those who went before them. Now these giants of Christian history are presented chronologically and in a format that helps readers get to know them. In addition to a biographical sketch, readers will discover each person's primary contributions to the C Compelling Accounts of Key People Who Have Formed Christian Belief through the Ages All Christians' beliefs are shaped by those who went before them. Now these giants of Christian history are presented chronologically and in a format that helps readers get to know them. In addition to a biographical sketch, readers will discover each person's primary contributions to the Christian faith along with a brief quotation from their work. Students, history buffs, and curious readers will be fascinated as their faith is strengthened. Included are Polycarp, Justin Martyr, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Karl Barth, Carl F. H. Henry, and more.

30 review for The 40 Most Influential Christians . . . Who Shaped What We Believe Today

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jalynn Patterson

    About the Book: Compelling Accounts of Key People Who Have Formed Christian Belief through the Ages All Christians' beliefs are shaped by those who went before them. Now these giants of Christian history are presented chronologically and in a format that helps readers get to know them. In addition to a biographical sketch, readers will discover each person's primary contributions to the Christian faith along with a brief quotation from their work. Students, history buffs, and curious readers will About the Book: Compelling Accounts of Key People Who Have Formed Christian Belief through the Ages All Christians' beliefs are shaped by those who went before them. Now these giants of Christian history are presented chronologically and in a format that helps readers get to know them. In addition to a biographical sketch, readers will discover each person's primary contributions to the Christian faith along with a brief quotation from their work. Students, history buffs, and curious readers will be fascinated as their faith is strengthened. Included are Polycarp, Justin Martyr, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Karl Barth, Carl F. H. Henry, and more. My Review: Daryl Aaron has put together an awesome Theology resource whether you endeavor to be a Bible scholar, minister, or just someone who would like a more thorough understanding on the background of the Bible. The author has taken the top 40 most influential Christians that changed the face of Christianity as we know it today. With their thoughts, sermons or their publications, these individuals have come to be known as people that can completely change your thoughts on God. Whether its Dietrich Bonhoeffer and his stance against Nazism or Jurgen Moltmann with his latest approach on Theology from the perspective of eschatology. These brilliant minds gave us so much with their minds and with their Christian walk that we will never be able to repay. Their dramatic and innate works have driven me to research more about them. This book not only highlights the 40 most influential Christians but also the most brilliant. **Disclosure** This book was sent to me free of charge for my honest review from Bethany House.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Hill

    The premise for this book is indeed amazing, and I couldn't be happier. I took theology in Bible College, and I can remember many of the theologians at least by name. So I was happy to get to read about some of these great men in history that I knew by name only. I appreciate the conciseness of each chapter, and I enjoyed some of the stories the author told about the person. It was good to see what contributions they had made. My complaint is that this truly reads as a history textbook. While tha The premise for this book is indeed amazing, and I couldn't be happier. I took theology in Bible College, and I can remember many of the theologians at least by name. So I was happy to get to read about some of these great men in history that I knew by name only. I appreciate the conciseness of each chapter, and I enjoyed some of the stories the author told about the person. It was good to see what contributions they had made. My complaint is that this truly reads as a history textbook. While that may have been the author's purpose, I struggled through some of the technical nature of the book. I felt that is was assumed that the reader was familiar with various tenets of theology. I will admit that I often felt lost and overwhelmed. If more personal stories had been shared about the theologians, I believe I would have felt more connected with the book. In conclusion, if the author is only writing for the intellectuals of the Christian world, I would say that he accomplished his purpose. If, however, he wished to reach the more common Christian, this book would need to be much simpler and less comprehensive. I was sent a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I was not financially compensated, and all opinions are 100 percent mine.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Age Appropriate For: 12 and up Best for Ages: 12 and up Well, I’ve been working on a number of book-related projects and that’s when I realized I had never written a proper review for this book despite the fact that I said I would a couple of years ago. Well, better late than never. This book is not about the people you will agree with the most, as the title says, this is about 40 most influential Christians. I’m sure some of you, like me, will read some of the chapters and think the person did mor Age Appropriate For: 12 and up Best for Ages: 12 and up Well, I’ve been working on a number of book-related projects and that’s when I realized I had never written a proper review for this book despite the fact that I said I would a couple of years ago. Well, better late than never. This book is not about the people you will agree with the most, as the title says, this is about 40 most influential Christians. I’m sure some of you, like me, will read some of the chapters and think the person did more harm than good. I guess that is the point. Not everyone has a good influence. Daryl Aaron did a great job of walking us through the Christian faith and the men and women who have influenced. As a history buff and as someone who likes to know where things got started, this book was a win-win. I enjoyed getting to see where traditions and ideas got started. As I read, I understood my own faith and traditions better. Aaron did a great job of spending enough time on each person so you get a good picture of them, but not so long you get bored. I highly recommend this book for those who love history, want to explore their faith, and those who love history.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Blossom

    Excellent! When the book first was available to me for review, I was somewhat hesitant to select it because to say "the 40 most" is quite specific. The concern I had was that the author, who I've not read any of his works before, would be biased and only include who he thought was beneficial. I will admit that I, after the fact, would like to have more information on the tertiary Christians that he barely mentions, such as Arius when talking about Athanasius, or Chrysostom when talking about The Excellent! When the book first was available to me for review, I was somewhat hesitant to select it because to say "the 40 most" is quite specific. The concern I had was that the author, who I've not read any of his works before, would be biased and only include who he thought was beneficial. I will admit that I, after the fact, would like to have more information on the tertiary Christians that he barely mentions, such as Arius when talking about Athanasius, or Chrysostom when talking about Theodore of Mopsuestia. But I gather the reason Aaron only mentions these others are because their contributions were the result of faction, or they were deemed heretical, both of those in regards to Arius, or such as Chyrsostom, the work they contributed was expounded on more fully by later Christians. Even so, these also helped solidify beliefs of Christians. Aaron's words on the title of the book: "Regarding the title of this book...Please understand that I am not under the illusion that I have nailed the definitive top 40 list of theologians...I thought a more accurate title would be 40 of the Most Influential Christians Who Shaped What We Believe Today, in the Humble Opinion of One Particular Writer, but that seemed a little unwieldy to the publisher. Good arguments can be made that some of these should not have made it while others should have. (pg 13)" My thought is that the title would have been perfect if it were written hundreds of years ago! But really I think it would be better without "The". Each of the individuals in the book have indeed had quite a bit of influence on Christian belief; they were most influential, but not the most influential. The writing style is very easy to follow, even for someone who has very little exposure to 'theology' and/or has a very basic knowledge of theology and church history {that'd be me}. I've read George Hodges' Saints and Heroes to the End of the Middle Ages and his Saints and Heroes Since the Middle Ages, which acquainted me with some of the names in Aaron's book. This book, The 40 Most Influential Christians, actually has forty-two Christians who shaped Christian beliefs. Each chapter starts with a historical setting to give context -we can see where the individual was coming from in life, where they went and who they came into contact with, through their personal life and/or writings and ideas of the time. Next it talks about contributions that were made by the individual. Finally, the author includes a conclusion- this pretty much is how the person's contributions had affected beliefs to that point. Aaron says: "Regarding format, each chapter will be divided into three main sections with two subparts: context (theological and biographical), contribution (theological and bibliographical), and conclusion (theological and personal)...What is most important in what follows is not getting to know these great Christian thinkers better, nor is it understanding theology better (in and of itself); rather, what is most important is getting to know God better. After all, our Savior, Jesus Christ, commanded us to "Love the Lord your God with all your heart and all your soul and all your mind" (Matthew 22:37). There are the stories of Christians who were trying to do that and trying to help others as well. (pg 14, 15)" I learned quite a bit of where a belief of today stemmed from and who spread it, and found it was generally because of their position, but not always. Also, there is a section titled "Brief Interlude: Meanwhile in Rome (or at least in Trent)" where we are enlightened with some beliefs of the Roman Catholic Church, which to this point personally I had been fairly unaware. Going back to the writing style: for the most part the information is presented in a no-nonsense fashion. The facts are given, the works are offered, a conclusion is made. However, occasionally Aaron inputs his own personal beliefs into this {would you really expect anything different?}, but more often he imbues the information with a little humor. Not much but it is there and I like it. I'll give you an example of both (with my own emphasis added): "As a Protestant and evangelical, I would share these concerns; however, I also appreciate and applaud the intent of Christian mystics overall--to draw closer to God in experiential relationship. (pg 147, "Julian of Norwich, Monastic Mystic") Scholastic theology at this time focused on the integration of theology (revelation) and philosophy (reason), so it stands to reason (no pun intended) that the thought of Aristotle would attract attention. (pg 135, "Thomas Aquinas, Angelic Doctor")" At the back of the book are two things that I appreciate: Creeds (The Creed of Nicea & The Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed) & Resources, which includes both primary and secondary sources that I gather Aaron used to write this book. I love being able to read other books or articles on the subject presented in a book I am reading. He does include many footnotes throughout the book as well, which I also like. I would definitely recommend this book for anyone interested in history of the church and Christianity. I don't imagine those who are partial to the beliefs that were considered heretical (such as Arianism) would find this to be too terribly beneficial, I still think for the sake of knowledge it would be good. I would definitely recommend it to those looking to strengthen their beliefs- whether they agree with the "Christian" beliefs of today or not. I think that going through the book sheds light on why the belief sprang up -we get a glimpse of the brilliance -or lack of- of thought that brought it about. All glory goes to God that allows Christians to be enlightened by his word, the Bible. One thing I would love to have seen in this book is more. More of the words of the bibliographical contributions of these Christians. More of the "why" they believed the way they did. We are only presented with enough to give us a basic foundation to move onto the next Christian who shaped the beliefs. I do think that in order to do that, though, the author would have to devote much more time and space to each person, as well as include more people. Perhaps that is just asking too much for this sort of introductory work, as I think of it. Or perhaps a book like I mention already exists and another of its kind is not necessary. Perhaps as stated in the introduction to the book, the focus would change too much by including more. Overall, it is a satisfying and good book. ***Disclaimer: I received the book for free from Bethany House publishing for the purpose of an honest review. All opinions stated are my own.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Keith Beasley-Topliffe

    a good survey of theology This really is a survey of 40+ theologians from the Church Fathers to Carl FH Henry with brief bio, a look at key teachings that would shape future thought, and an evalation of their contribution. There two women, Julian of Norwich and Rosemary Radford Ruether. The evaluations seem to be in part how well each anticipated Henry's evangelical theology. I read one a day as part of my morning devotions and suspect that trying to rush through faster would not be helpful.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dan Pan

    Interesting book. I learned a lot about the various theological movements (Orthodox, Catholic, Protestant, Mainline, Evangelical, Fundamental) and the people that shaped them. My gripe with this book is it’s title. Plenty of the people mentioned were probably not Christian. For example, number 39 is Rosemary Radford Reuther, a feminist theologian who believes the primary source of Biblical interpretation should be woman’s experience and refers to (her) God as “Goddess.” Needless to say, she is m Interesting book. I learned a lot about the various theological movements (Orthodox, Catholic, Protestant, Mainline, Evangelical, Fundamental) and the people that shaped them. My gripe with this book is it’s title. Plenty of the people mentioned were probably not Christian. For example, number 39 is Rosemary Radford Reuther, a feminist theologian who believes the primary source of Biblical interpretation should be woman’s experience and refers to (her) God as “Goddess.” Needless to say, she is mostly likely not a Christian and has definitely not shaped what I, or anyone I know, believe today. This is the most extreme example, but a couple of other wacky theologians are included in the book. A better title would have been, “The 40 People that Exerted the Most Influence on Christianity.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn Pettigrove

    This really was an interesting book. It was easy to read although it was about theologians from the early church to modern day. There were quite a number I was unfamiliar with, but when they were presented with their biological sketch and their contribution it became a learning experience. I was unaware of the tug between conservative and liberal theology and the ties to philosophy. I was also unaware of how the theologians picked at tenets of the faith that I’ve learned and accepted as long as I This really was an interesting book. It was easy to read although it was about theologians from the early church to modern day. There were quite a number I was unfamiliar with, but when they were presented with their biological sketch and their contribution it became a learning experience. I was unaware of the tug between conservative and liberal theology and the ties to philosophy. I was also unaware of how the theologians picked at tenets of the faith that I’ve learned and accepted as long as I can remember which almost got thrown out. For some odd reason I thought those were a modern day problem. As I read it, it made me wonder at times how the church evolved at all. It was touch and go at times.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Grace

    I'm not normally a fan of history. I think it is just the way that this book presents it, that makes it more interesting. In three easy sections per individual - Context, Contribution and Conclusion - several paragraphs, concisely accurate and descriptive allow the reader to capture the essence of the person and their place in history, along with the development of our current understanding of the Christian faith. It makes a great companion to daily Bible reading for any student of the word of G I'm not normally a fan of history. I think it is just the way that this book presents it, that makes it more interesting. In three easy sections per individual - Context, Contribution and Conclusion - several paragraphs, concisely accurate and descriptive allow the reader to capture the essence of the person and their place in history, along with the development of our current understanding of the Christian faith. It makes a great companion to daily Bible reading for any student of the word of God.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eli Randolph

    A good survey of 40 influential Christians, and impressive if only because of the diversity of cultures, time periods, and theologies examined. However, the author's bias frequently comes out in what he defines as orthodoxy, especially regarding atonement and biblical inspiration. In addition, the final chapter (Carl F. H. Henry) was more of an apology for evangelicalism than a critical evaluation of Henry's contributions.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jared Huber

    Relatively useful book that gives short bios of some of the most impactful minds in Christianity, including their contributions to and thoughts on the faith. It offered some insightful information on many different theological elements and the people that developed them. It wasn't the most riveting read but definitely very useful--especially to those looking to become influential Christians themselves.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael Locklear

    A very good read about some who shaped our Christian theology. I appreciated the author's critic of those whose views were weak or questionable. As a Classical Arminian, I was curious how he would treat Jacob Arminius. The author's description of Arminius was very fair and accurate.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Interesting but only understood about 2/3 of it. Glad I read it but won't reread.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Everything we teach in church today comes from our church's forefathers who have carved that path before us. And all Christians' beliefs are shaped, in one way or the other, by those who went before them. Here many of these giants of Christian history are presented chronologically & in a format that helps readers get to know them. In addition to a biographical sketch, we discover each person's primary contributions to the Christian faith (good or bad) along with a brief quotation from their work Everything we teach in church today comes from our church's forefathers who have carved that path before us. And all Christians' beliefs are shaped, in one way or the other, by those who went before them. Here many of these giants of Christian history are presented chronologically & in a format that helps readers get to know them. In addition to a biographical sketch, we discover each person's primary contributions to the Christian faith (good or bad) along with a brief quotation from their work. Now the author Dr. Aaron says that the list consists of who in his opinion are the 40 most influential Christians. He does point out that he is not necessarily a fan of the theologies of all those included, but is only noting that each is influential. He admits that a more accurate title for this book would be "40 of the Most Influential Christians Who Shaped What We Believe Today, in the Humble Opinion of One Particular Writer." So you won’t read about Charles Hodge or Benjamin Warfield, neither Abraham Kuyper, Herman Bavinck or Herman Dooyeweerd. No Francis Schaeffer, George Whitefield or Thomas Chalmers. Most will be surprised that you won’t be reading about Charles Spurgeon, Cornelius Van Til or Gordon Clark. However the book is a good read, informative & helpful, especially for those who know very little about church history (which would be most American Christians). Each chapter (one per theologian) is divided into three parts: the biographical and theological context in which the theologian was working, his or her contribution, and a conclusion, which is Aaron's personal assessment of the theologian's life and influence. Great book for Sunday School.

  14. 5 out of 5

    G. Jorge Medina

    Learning through easy reading… Book Review: The 40 Most Influential Christians Who Shaped What We Believe Today by Daryl Aaron Aaron is a good writer and does a great job at distilling the kinds of things that make a person important in the grand scheme of church history. Of course, the task of choosing only 40 such representatives is in itself a burden, I’m sure. Plus, one cannot avoid the influence of one’s own theological presuppositions along with a triumphalistic dependence on what some have Learning through easy reading… Book Review: The 40 Most Influential Christians Who Shaped What We Believe Today by Daryl Aaron Aaron is a good writer and does a great job at distilling the kinds of things that make a person important in the grand scheme of church history. Of course, the task of choosing only 40 such representatives is in itself a burden, I’m sure. Plus, one cannot avoid the influence of one’s own theological presuppositions along with a triumphalistic dependence on what some have termed, “The Historic Christian Church.” The author, of course, does not share many of my theological foundations and, therefore, makes no mention of some Christians without which my own “church history” (Pentecostal) would be different. No doubt other non-Evangelicals will share a similar feeling. In the end, the book is an interesting and informative read. Does Aaron always succeed? No, but no one can fault him for trying to distill a lifetime into a four-page chapter. If you have five minutes to spare and would like to learn who Bonhoeffer or Arminius were, that’s all it will take to get a good introduction to these men. Disclosure: The book was received for free from Bethany House book review program. The program does not require a positive review, only an honest one.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mark Murray

    I think Christians is a bit of a misnomer it really should be Theologians. Additionally it really is the 42 as he sneaks in a pair of Gregory's in with Basil the Great. They were corporately known as the Cappadocians. So what does that make Charles Wesley and George Whitfield, maybe even Francis Asbury? If it really is Christians then at least for me the first big missing names are William and Catherine Booth. Also missing are some other important people like Ignatius of Loyola the founder of th I think Christians is a bit of a misnomer it really should be Theologians. Additionally it really is the 42 as he sneaks in a pair of Gregory's in with Basil the Great. They were corporately known as the Cappadocians. So what does that make Charles Wesley and George Whitfield, maybe even Francis Asbury? If it really is Christians then at least for me the first big missing names are William and Catherine Booth. Also missing are some other important people like Ignatius of Loyola the founder of the Jesuits. The mystics with the exception of Julian of Norwich are missing like Saint Teresa of Ávila and her most important disciple Saint John of the Cross. The great pioneering missionaries of the 19th century are all missing. For that matter Brother Andrew and Loren Cunningham also. With almost a quarter of all confessing Christians identifying at some level with roots to Azusa Street there was no mention of William J. Seymour or Charles Parham. Dennis Bennett is missing, as is Demos Shakarian. No matter what you think about him Oral Roberts deserves to be in the list. All-in-all the book is very good and earns the 5 Stars, hey did I mention it was free!!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This is far from a dusty annual on long dead historical figures! "The 40 Most Influential Christians" often reads like a short story, showing the heroic and the human side of these heroes of the Christian faith. Each entry is introduced with a just the facts biography followed by the author's research and thoughts. I enjoy reading Christian history so I was pleased that the information seemed fresh to me when reading about people I thought I already knew like Martin Luther and Dietrich Bonhoeffe This is far from a dusty annual on long dead historical figures! "The 40 Most Influential Christians" often reads like a short story, showing the heroic and the human side of these heroes of the Christian faith. Each entry is introduced with a just the facts biography followed by the author's research and thoughts. I enjoy reading Christian history so I was pleased that the information seemed fresh to me when reading about people I thought I already knew like Martin Luther and Dietrich Bonhoeffer. I also met many amazing men for the first time. My only complaint is that of the 40 people profiled, only one woman is included. This seemed a token entry and personally I would prefer that they just made it a book simply about men rather than throw in one woman at the end. This book is an easy way for both Christians and people of other faiths to see how a life can be change after encountering Christ. I received an ebook copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shauna

    This book takes you on a brief journey through the lives and influence of 40 people important to the history of the christian faith. A chapter is devoted to each person, and that is broken down to the context (the time the lived, a little about their life, etc), their contribution and a brief conclusion summing things up. I found this book to be quite dry. I guess I expected it to be more biographical than theological. I would have liked to know more about their lives, as well as what they believ This book takes you on a brief journey through the lives and influence of 40 people important to the history of the christian faith. A chapter is devoted to each person, and that is broken down to the context (the time the lived, a little about their life, etc), their contribution and a brief conclusion summing things up. I found this book to be quite dry. I guess I expected it to be more biographical than theological. I would have liked to know more about their lives, as well as what they believed. There really wasn't enough information about the different individuals and too much of the author's opinion on what they believed and/or preached. I can see this being a good resource for Bible School students but it didn't hold my interest. This book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc. Available at your favourite bookseller from Bethany House, a division of Baker Publishing Group.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    Loved this book! It gave lots of insight into how some of our Christian thinking was shaped. If you are looking for in-depth detail, this is not the book for you. This is a high level look at ~40 men thru the past ~2000 years. I liked that the author included a lot of different thinking. Not all the thinking was Christian in my opinion but that was okay. I think the intent of the author was to give not only Christian viewpoints but some viewpoints that are also on the fringe of Christianity. I a Loved this book! It gave lots of insight into how some of our Christian thinking was shaped. If you are looking for in-depth detail, this is not the book for you. This is a high level look at ~40 men thru the past ~2000 years. I liked that the author included a lot of different thinking. Not all the thinking was Christian in my opinion but that was okay. I think the intent of the author was to give not only Christian viewpoints but some viewpoints that are also on the fringe of Christianity. I also liked that the format of each chapter was able to provide some background about the times to help understand each of the thinking. Overall, this was a book well organized and worth reading. It also provided a multitude of resources to go into more detail.

  19. 5 out of 5

    IrenesBookReviews

    This book was not very interesting and it took me awhile to get through it. I gave the book 4/5 stars for a few reasons. I would say this book is more of a textbook then a sit down and read for the enjoyment book. I also thought some of the people chosen were not as influential as others. There are so many great Christians to choose from that I was surprised at some that were chosen and written about. If you are looking for a book about Christians and are willing to skim over some boring parts, This book was not very interesting and it took me awhile to get through it. I gave the book 4/5 stars for a few reasons. I would say this book is more of a textbook then a sit down and read for the enjoyment book. I also thought some of the people chosen were not as influential as others. There are so many great Christians to choose from that I was surprised at some that were chosen and written about. If you are looking for a book about Christians and are willing to skim over some boring parts, you might enjoy the book more than I did. I would like to thank the publisher for the copy of this book I enjoyed reading. I gave an honest review based on my opinion of what I read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Louisa Black

    Whether you believe these are THE most influential Christians is always debatable but I really enjoy hearing different peoples point of view and learning new things. It's not a thing I personally sit and think about, what is the tp 40 etc, but I do feel encouraged when I read Christian testimony. This is one of the best I've read so far. I particularly like the format and way in which each person was approached, for example, the author aims to give you the background with good content but brief Whether you believe these are THE most influential Christians is always debatable but I really enjoy hearing different peoples point of view and learning new things. It's not a thing I personally sit and think about, what is the tp 40 etc, but I do feel encouraged when I read Christian testimony. This is one of the best I've read so far. I particularly like the format and way in which each person was approached, for example, the author aims to give you the background with good content but brief and an understanding of the era and why their actions are still remembered today. I found all the information interesting and useful and a book that I will refer back to now and again.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Judith Noameshie

    Very informative This was written in such a clear and concise way, I am sure this book is part of the curriculum in Bible schools. I really like that the author had different paragraphs on the thinker life, contribution, and conclusion about his work. The book also answered personal questions about the way we think as Christians and the different Christians denominations out there.

  22. 5 out of 5

    John

    The title of this may put some people off, as it did me, for a while. But this is a helpful book that serves as a sort of whirlwind tour of church history. The book starts with the church fathers, covers the medieval scholastics, the reformers, Puritans, liberal theologians, fundamentalism, and ends with Carl Henry and the rise of evangelicalism. This is a helpful book, and I recommend it to all within the church.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    This was generally an interesting summary of the lives of the people discussed. My only complaint is that the author's bias towards Reformed theology and against a Wesleyan Holiness tradition is very apparent. I do not think the author intended for it to be apparent, but it came across quite clearly in some of the criticisms listed for a few of the people reviewed. It would have been a better book if the author had been more neutral.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fernando Navarro

    I liked this book because I felt like I was in a theological trip. It does not have a lot of details, as far as their lives, of these Christian theologians thinkers. The author's aim was reviewing the concepts and the contributions to the Christian theology by these people. One of my favorites was the theology of liberation by Gustavo Gutiérrez. I feel more inclined to this one because is a more realistic way to behave as a christian.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Michael Gallen

    Good Christian History Book This novel focuses on forty influences in the Christian religion, simultaneously serving as an overall history of the church, and is for the most part a great resource. There are some things omitted such as Martin Luther's anti-Semitism, but the book is otherwise highly recommended/

  26. 5 out of 5

    Phil Barnes

    A Quick Trip Through Historical Theology This book is an easy-to-read guide through historical theology. If you are interested in getting such an overview, I would recommend this book. The chapters are relatively short, and the author organizes each chapter the same - context, contribution, and conclusion for each historical figure.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jim Shaffer

    Fascinating Book Daryl Aaron has written a wonderful history of the Christian church through the eyes of some of the most influential Christians. I appreciated the authors fairness in including diverse individuals who held differing opinions.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Hillary

    Interesting yet boring I enjoyed reading about notable Christians of the past, some I am familiar with and others not. I did, however, find my mind wandering as I was still reading the words. I wouldn't say I would recall very well what I read for the most part.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carol Dickey

    An overview of Christian Theology This book is a good overview of Christian theology. The writing is plain enough for laypeople and is well-balanced. The book encompasses the great theological movements of Christianity. The concluding summary is particularly good.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Hensley

    I think every Christian should read this. The author does a good job sticking with his tag line of who shaped, not necessarily who are the best or even what the author believes is his doctrinal belief, the Christian faith. This book is a concise historical overview and an interesting read.

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