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Welcome to Noisy Village! Go crayfishing in the summer at Nocken, "dipping in the pot" at Christmastime with Lisa and Karl, and join Britta and Anna who know the best way to go about "nutting" for the New Year. In this gently humorous tale, master storyteller Astrid Lindgren takes us through a year in the lives and customs of six Swedish children living on a group of three Welcome to Noisy Village! Go crayfishing in the summer at Nocken, "dipping in the pot" at Christmastime with Lisa and Karl, and join Britta and Anna who know the best way to go about "nutting" for the New Year. In this gently humorous tale, master storyteller Astrid Lindgren takes us through a year in the lives and customs of six Swedish children living on a group of three farms in the countryside.


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Welcome to Noisy Village! Go crayfishing in the summer at Nocken, "dipping in the pot" at Christmastime with Lisa and Karl, and join Britta and Anna who know the best way to go about "nutting" for the New Year. In this gently humorous tale, master storyteller Astrid Lindgren takes us through a year in the lives and customs of six Swedish children living on a group of three Welcome to Noisy Village! Go crayfishing in the summer at Nocken, "dipping in the pot" at Christmastime with Lisa and Karl, and join Britta and Anna who know the best way to go about "nutting" for the New Year. In this gently humorous tale, master storyteller Astrid Lindgren takes us through a year in the lives and customs of six Swedish children living on a group of three farms in the countryside.

30 review for The Children of Noisy Village

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    I can say that I had a happy childhood. Not perfect, but happy. One of the reasons for this (a minor reason, but still) was that my parents bought me this book. The story is simple: once upon a time there was a tiny Swedish village called Bullerby (Noisy) consisting of three houses. In one house lived the heroine called Lisa with two brothers, in another house there lived two sisters, and in the last one there was a boy. From my understanding the difference between the oldest of the six kids and I can say that I had a happy childhood. Not perfect, but happy. One of the reasons for this (a minor reason, but still) was that my parents bought me this book. The story is simple: once upon a time there was a tiny Swedish village called Bullerby (Noisy) consisting of three houses. In one house lived the heroine called Lisa with two brothers, in another house there lived two sisters, and in the last one there was a boy. From my understanding the difference between the oldest of the six kids and the youngest was two years. The book is about these six kids. You cannot find any coming of age development in the book, no deep philosophical thoughts, no preaching, and no lessons. Just kids living together, having fun, working, going to school, and having a friendly (and 'friendly' is the keyword here) rivalry between boys and girls. Some of their adventures are just interesting, some very interesting, and some laugh-out-loud funny. I challenge anybody to read a chapter called "Our Way Home from School" and not to crack a smile at least once. I still laugh reading it. In other words, like practically everything Astrid Lindgren wrote, the book is good. Very good. Excellent even if you managed to read it in your childhood. Let me give you an idea. These pesky scientists came up with the term googol: it is a very large number equal to the 10 to power 100. In other words digit 1 followed by hundred zeroes. Everything is nice and great, but it turned out the number of elementary particles in the universe is lower (refer to Wikipedia if you do not believe me). So we have a number, but nothing to use it on. However I have a suggestion. This number is roughly the same as the number of times I read this book. It is this good. What is not good is the English translation (at least US one). I can understand Bullerby being translated into Noisy. What is bizarre is the need for translation of the names. I can somewhat understand Lizzie becoming Lisa. Bosse became Bill - at least the first letters are the same. Can somebody tell me what one need to smoke (or inhale, or inject - depending on one's preferences) to turn Lasse into Karl??? I am sure the stuff was very potent. So the book is great; 5 firm stars. The English translation is subpar; especially avoid the one done by Florence Lamborn. Obviously the best way to read it is in original language - for the lucky people that know Swedish. Russian translation is good enough as well. I have no idea about the other languages.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Astrid Lindgren had a penchant for married men and story-telling, and I would have pushed people out of my way to get closer to her at a dinner party. Ms. Lindgren's writing always pulls you in and tells you who's boss, even if it hides behind an illustrated cover and looks like it was meant for kids. And, let me tell you, if my kids had lost interest this week in this “kids' read” The Children of Noisy Village (they didn't), I would have continued reading it on my own. Absolutely. In fact, when my Astrid Lindgren had a penchant for married men and story-telling, and I would have pushed people out of my way to get closer to her at a dinner party. Ms. Lindgren's writing always pulls you in and tells you who's boss, even if it hides behind an illustrated cover and looks like it was meant for kids. And, let me tell you, if my kids had lost interest this week in this “kids' read” The Children of Noisy Village (they didn't), I would have continued reading it on my own. Absolutely. In fact, when my daughters and I got to chapter five of our read aloud, which is entitled How Olaf Got His Dog, they had the pleasure of watching their mother collapse in sobs when little Olaf finds a way to save a dog that was being beaten and neglected by Mr. Kind, the nasty village shoemaker. I was so invested in the story, I whispered, “You got what you deserved, you bastard,” as tears streamed down my face, while my nine-year-old looked on, confused, and said, “Mommy, I thought only Patricia Polacco and Charlotte's Web made you cry.” What, have we just forgotten all about Little House on the Prairie AND Anne of Green Gables?? Just add this one to the list, okay? So, yes, the story is beguiling (yes, I wrote beguiling), the black and white sketched illustrations are perfect for the text, and most children and adults will find themselves ready to move into this fictional Noisy Village, posthaste.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    Save this book in the Audible format until you’re sick, deathly sick. Especially if you’re separated from your mother — either by distance or death — so that she is not available to feed you homemade soup, tuck you into bed, and otherwise coddle you and read you a story. The Children of Noisy Village makes a nice substitute when you’re ailing. The six children of Noisy Village — 9-year-old Lisa; her mischievous older brothers, Karl and Bill; and neighbors Anna, Britta, and Olaf — don’t live in an Save this book in the Audible format until you’re sick, deathly sick. Especially if you’re separated from your mother — either by distance or death — so that she is not available to feed you homemade soup, tuck you into bed, and otherwise coddle you and read you a story. The Children of Noisy Village makes a nice substitute when you’re ailing. The six children of Noisy Village — 9-year-old Lisa; her mischievous older brothers, Karl and Bill; and neighbors Anna, Britta, and Olaf — don’t live in an actual village at all, but in a grouping of three farmhouses, as was the way in Sweden long ago, unlike in America where farms were spaced out. The three farmhouses got the affectionate nickname because of all of the ruckus an active pack of children can create. Set in a time before electricity or automobiles made their way to rural Sweden, The Children of Noisy Village is as healing as hot tea, chicken soup, or a cool hand on your fevered forehead. Lisa recounts the fun she and the other children have celebrating a favorite birthday, Christmas Eve and Christmas, Easter, and New Year’s Eve; spending the night on Lake Nocken to capture crayfish during the season, a misbegotten trip to the actual village to pick up a few staples, and hours and hours of imaginative pretending and creative games. Such ordinary pursuits should have been dull or cloying, right? But Astrid Lindgren, best known for Pippi Longstocking and its sequels, infuses Lisa’s tale with so much wit and imagination that I lapped up this short book — well, like my mother’s chicken soup. Highly recommended to readers of all ages.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Indeed and truly, the Noisy Village series (actually the German language translations of Astrid Lindgren's original Swedish text, and where the hamlet is known as Bullerbü) was one of my absolute favourites when I was a little girl (and I must have read all three books at least ten times, and that is at best a rather conservative estimate). And at that age (from about the age of seven to ten) I just felt and knew on a purely emotional and personal level that I absolutely adored the sweet and enc Indeed and truly, the Noisy Village series (actually the German language translations of Astrid Lindgren's original Swedish text, and where the hamlet is known as Bullerbü) was one of my absolute favourites when I was a little girl (and I must have read all three books at least ten times, and that is at best a rather conservative estimate). And at that age (from about the age of seven to ten) I just felt and knew on a purely emotional and personal level that I absolutely adored the sweet and enchanting episodical nuggets of a generally carefree childhood in a turn of the century Swedish village (actually, even less than a village, but really just three interconnected farms). But now, after recently rereading this here omnibus of all of the Bullerbü stories (and for the first time in decades), I can absolutely and totally appreciate and understand both emotionally and academically, stylistically, how simply wonderful the first-person narrative of seven year old Lisa really is, as Astrid Lindgren has so perfectly captured the innocent, but also astute voice of an imaginative and observant child (Lisa shines, and from her, emanates a magic that makes everything in Bullerbü sparkle with sweetness and light). However, although Die Kinder aus Bullerbü (and yes, in the English translations, Bullerbü is indeed known as Noisy Village) thus still remains and will always remain a total personal favourite, I am also by no means blind and deaf to the fact that there are also some need to be discussed issues and potential problems with Die Kinder aus Bullerbü, such as for example the rather unfortunate and salient fact that the children of Bullerbü, and especially the three boys, are constantly and joyfully playing Indian (a tendency of especially older adventure and nostalgia based children's literature which is often and with much justification regarded as profoundly anathema by many Native Americans and Canadians). And while even as a child, these episodes always did feel mildly uncomfortable, they also did not bother me all that much either, but they certainly do quite massively grate and chafe now. Now I do realise that these stories, that these anecdotal episodes were all written in the 1940s (and that the concept of playing Cowboys and Indians was a common and accepted trend and theme in European children's literature, and is actually still much more commonplace and accepted than in North America), but I do still cringe a bit and even feel a trifle guilty. And yes, if were in this day and age reading the Bullerbü series with or to children, I would most definitely be discussing this (to me important) scenario, especially with regard to that one scene in Die Kinder aus Bullerbü where the children are pretending that the family cows are an opposing Native American tribe (as that does really feel insulting to Native Americans and Canadians). However, and for me happily and appreciatively, at least in the German translations, these episodes have all been retained, to be discussed as necessary, unlike in the American "Noisy Village" translations, where they have seemingly been redacted altogether, understandable perhaps, but also both unfortunate and even rather unacceptable, as for one, these episodes are an integral part of the original plot and storyline and as already briefly pointed out, for two, also lead themselves very well to discussions and considerstions as to what constitutes so called political correctness (and whether inclusiveness and cultural understanding could even be achieved by simply removing, expurging words, scenes, themes now deemed possibly or probably offensive from older and more dated children's books, as really, removing such content could actually and easily be painting, showing an erroneous portrait of the past, of the world when the given book, in this case, the Bullerbü trilogy, was first published).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

    I loved this account of day to day Swedish life. Asrid Lindgren captures perfectly the relationship between friends and the rivalry between brother and sister. We loved the details of games played, dens built and festivals celebrated. We really didn't like Tony Ross's illustrations, their modern style just didn't suit the traditional nature of the stories. We love Bullerby, we would happily move there tomorrow and if that wasn't possible would happily read this book again and imagine!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

    The Noisy Village series (well actually, the German language translation of Astrid Lindgren's original Swedish text, and where the hamlet is known as Bullerbü) was one of my absolute favourites when I was a little girl (I must have read all three books at least ten times, and that is a conservative estimate). At that age (from about age six to age nine or ten) I just felt and knew on a purely emotional and personal level that I absolutely adored the sweet and enchanting episodical nuggets of car The Noisy Village series (well actually, the German language translation of Astrid Lindgren's original Swedish text, and where the hamlet is known as Bullerbü) was one of my absolute favourites when I was a little girl (I must have read all three books at least ten times, and that is a conservative estimate). At that age (from about age six to age nine or ten) I just felt and knew on a purely emotional and personal level that I absolutely adored the sweet and enchanting episodical nuggets of carefree childhood in a turn of the century Swedish village (actually, even less than that, but really just three interconnected farms). Now, after recently rereading (and again in German) for the first time in decades, I can truly appreciate and understand both emotionally and academically, stylistically, how simply wonderful the first-person narrative of seven year old Lisa really is. Astrid Lindgren has so perfectly captured the innocent, but also astute voice of an imaginative and observant child (Lisa shines, and from her, emanates a magic that makes everything in Bullerbü sparkle with sweetness and light). With such a glowing preamble, why then only two stars for this English language translation, for The Children of Noisy Village? It has NOTHING to do with the story, with the general themes presented, and EVERYTHING to do with Florence Lamborn's woefully inadequate translation, or rather what has been changed and is missing in said translation. Not only are the episodes themselves arranged rather haphazardly, there are anecdotes in the first book (in this book, in this translation) that in the German editions I read (and likely also in the Swedish originals, but that is speculation on my part) appear in books two and three. But even MORE of an issue is the fact that there are numerous chapters which do not appear at all, which have seemingly been entirely omitted (expunged) by the translator. And that, at least for me, is not only flabbergasting but also totally unacceptable, and for me, a massive insult to both Astrid Lindgren and her legacy as an author. And thus, I firmly believe that it is high time for a new English language translation of the Noisy Village series, namely one that keeps to the original, and does not arbitrarily omit entire chapters!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cindi

    Sheer delight. Seriously. I'm not sure when I've read a children's book that was so delightful. I found this book in "A Landscape with Dragons." The author called it the Little House on the Prairie of Sweden. I had to keep stopping to read sections to whoever in my family would listen to me. See for yourself: Mommy says she can't understand why it takes more than twice as long to walk home as it does to walk to school. I don't understand it either. But it just can't be helped. As we were walking al Sheer delight. Seriously. I'm not sure when I've read a children's book that was so delightful. I found this book in "A Landscape with Dragons." The author called it the Little House on the Prairie of Sweden. I had to keep stopping to read sections to whoever in my family would listen to me. See for yourself: Mommy says she can't understand why it takes more than twice as long to walk home as it does to walk to school. I don't understand it either. But it just can't be helped. As we were walking along, Britta took her book out of her schoolbag and smelled it. She let all of us smell it. New books smell so good that you can tell how much fun it's going to be to read them. The day after we baked the ginger snaps was fun too, for then we went to the forest to cut the Christmas trees. All the fathers go along when we cut the Christmas trees--and all the children too, of course. the mothers have to stay at home and cook, poor things! Then there was nothing to do but WAIT. Karl said that times like those hours in the afternoon of Christmas Eve, when you don't do anything but wait and wait, are the kind of things people get gray hairs from. We waited and waited and waited, and from time to time I went to the mirror to see if I had any gray hairs yet. I feel sorry for all people who have never rowed out on a lake at four in the morning and picked up crayfish traps.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lucie Novak

    My favourite children book series of all those books I ever read, if I have grand children, I must get it for them. Lives of 6 children in a tiny hamlet in Sweden, in Czech with beautiful illustrations of a Czech artist Zmatlikova, I read those books again and again.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I had never read this book before, in fact: I'd never heard of it until a few months ago. It's a sweet little book, about the lives of a group of children who live on three neighboring farms. It's written in a very simple style, ostensibly by one of the children, Lisa, who describes different traditions and aspects of their life. This would be a great first chapter book. It's 123 pages, with illustrations in each short chapter.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jaimie Franchi

    My six year old and I are having fun with this one so far. Update: As a read-aloud, it's probably three stars, but I think for an eight year old reading it to herself, it would be a four. From a parent's perspective, it's full of wholesome fun and adventures. I did enjoy reading about the Swedish holiday traditions.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katy Noyes

    100 pages of nostalgia from the author of Pippi Lockstocking. The children of Noisy Village are six children living on three adjacent farms in a hamlet in Sweden. One of them narrates these short tales from their year - from making maps and caves in the hayloft in the summer to struggling through miles of snow to get home at Christmas. The boys and girls are fairly typical - they like adventures and playing pretend, picking strawberries, dressing up, sometimes they prefer to play apart, but they 100 pages of nostalgia from the author of Pippi Lockstocking. The children of Noisy Village are six children living on three adjacent farms in a hamlet in Sweden. One of them narrates these short tales from their year - from making maps and caves in the hayloft in the summer to struggling through miles of snow to get home at Christmas. The boys and girls are fairly typical - they like adventures and playing pretend, picking strawberries, dressing up, sometimes they prefer to play apart, but they are also good friends. As an editor notes at the end, the episode involving stealing eggs from nests and blowing them woudl these days be both illegal and considered in a very different light to back in the 1940s, but I'm glad it was left in - it's good to be able to share such acts and explain how times have changed. For an adult, though I have never even visited Sweden, this has a lovely wistful feel to it, of childhoods past and village life in a time before technology, of innocence and children making their own fun. Chapters are very short, and it would be perfect for bedtime reading with a 5-7 year old, so parents can talk about the differences between now and then, the children's lives and their own. A couple of issues would raise questions - the egg blowing for one, and also the chapter involving an abused dog. Times may change, but children don't, and this is a lovely collection of short adventures to show today's children what their grandparents young lives (or those of their contemporaries) may have been like.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    When I first brought this book home from the library (based entirely on GR reviews), my 6-year-old son said it looked "lame." However...after I persisted in reading the first few chapters, he was completely won over. This is the charming story of a year in Noisy Village (really just a cluster of three small farms), in long ago Sweden. 1920s? They travel by foot or occasionally horse-drawn sled, but I think there might be mention of a truck. The Children of the title are three girls and three boy When I first brought this book home from the library (based entirely on GR reviews), my 6-year-old son said it looked "lame." However...after I persisted in reading the first few chapters, he was completely won over. This is the charming story of a year in Noisy Village (really just a cluster of three small farms), in long ago Sweden. 1920s? They travel by foot or occasionally horse-drawn sled, but I think there might be mention of a truck. The Children of the title are three girls and three boys, ranging in age from 9 to 11: the narrator, Lisa, her two older brothers, a set of sisters who live on one side and a boy (who has a toddler sister) on the other side. It's all very wholesome and Swedish, with Lisa narrating events with a contagious wide-eyed enthusiasm. There's no real plot, although each chapter has a theme and tells a little story. The book just rambles on, much like childhood. Although it's a lovely little nostalgic taste of yesteryear (whenever that was), it did make me grateful for a lot of modern conveniences. The poor mothers never get to do any of the fun activities, like cutting down the Christmas tree or camping out at the lake to catch crayfish. They're too darn busy cooking, cleaning, etc., even though they have hired help.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dita

    Bullerbyn kids series were the books I really fond of when I was a little kido. And the memories never fade away. I read this thousand times and will remember the laughters. All of the kids are cheerful, smart, witty, caring, adventurous and humble at once.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This is as lovely as I remember it being. A cute, light-hearted bunch of stories about kids growing up in Sweden. My mom used to read the Polish version to me when I was a kid. Definitely something I could see myself reading to my future children.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Issac

    eh it was alright

  16. 5 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    Cleanliness Children's Bad Words Mild Obscenities & Substitutions - 1 Incident: d*rned Name Calling - 7 Incidents: draggletail, impossible brats, stupid, brat, tattletale, stupid Religious Profanity - 2 Incidents: My goodness, thank goodness Religious & Supernatural - None Violence - None Romance Related - 1 Incident: Siblings tease, chanting, "Boyfriend and girlfriend." (no one is dating) Attitudes/Disobedience - 2 Incidents: When her brothers don't want her playing with them, the older brother will ho Cleanliness Children's Bad Words Mild Obscenities & Substitutions - 1 Incident: d*rned Name Calling - 7 Incidents: draggletail, impossible brats, stupid, brat, tattletale, stupid Religious Profanity - 2 Incidents: My goodness, thank goodness Religious & Supernatural - None Violence - None Romance Related - 1 Incident: Siblings tease, chanting, "Boyfriend and girlfriend." (no one is dating) Attitudes/Disobedience - 2 Incidents: When her brothers don't want her playing with them, the older brother will hold is sister and then run away quickly so she can't follow. "Boys are such a nuisance." At school, "When the boys have nothing else to do they fight, and during class they get into all kinds of mischief." Conversation Topics - 5 Incidents: Mentions that the children tell each other ghost stories (a few times throughout). Mentions Santa Claus a few times (the children no longer believe in him). Mentions a prince who was possibly bewitched. Children pretend the maid is a witch and run from her. Children reference goblins. Parent Takeaway The children that live in the village all get along (there are a couple of incidents where they don't, but they make up). It's a fun story of the children's adventures on the farm, at school, their holiday celebrations and time spent with their grandfather whom they love dearly. **Like my reviews? Then you should follow me! Because I have hundreds more just like this one. With each review, I provide a Cleanliness Report, mentioning any objectionable content I come across so that parents and/or conscientious readers (like me) can determine beforehand whether they want to read a book or not. Content surprises are super annoying, especially when you’re 100+ pages in, so here’s my attempt to help you avoid that! So Follow or Friend me here on GoodReads! You’ll see my updates as I’m reading and know which books I’m liking and what I’m not finishing and why. You’ll also be able to utilize my library for looking up titles to see whether the book you’re thinking about reading next has any objectionable content or not. From swear words, to romance, to bad attitudes (in children’s books), I cover it all!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    This book was excellent and confirms what I thought after I read Ronia the Robber's Daughter...which is that Astrid Lindgren is a wonderful author. The language in this book is totally different than in that book, because this book is told in the voice of the little girl, Lisa, who is the main character. The words are simple, but meaningful and capture her experiences just right! In Ronia, the story is told in the 3rd person and uses a different, more adult style of writing that worked beautiful This book was excellent and confirms what I thought after I read Ronia the Robber's Daughter...which is that Astrid Lindgren is a wonderful author. The language in this book is totally different than in that book, because this book is told in the voice of the little girl, Lisa, who is the main character. The words are simple, but meaningful and capture her experiences just right! In Ronia, the story is told in the 3rd person and uses a different, more adult style of writing that worked beautifully. I can't wait for my youngests to read this when our very own copy comes in the mail. (I borrowed it from the library, but since my kids are tough on books, we're safer having our own copy, I think!) I may even branch out of my usual hatred for reading chapter books out loud, and give this one an out-loud reading try! I think the language in this book might work perfectly for a group read. I really, really loved it. Best quote of the book, and it's just exactly like my daughter, A, (and myself), "As we were walking along, Britta took her book out of her schoolbag and smelled it. She let all of us smell it. New books smell so good you can tell how much fun it's going to be to read them." <3 Read #2 2018 Interesting song reference: "Now It Is Winter" page 61

  18. 5 out of 5

    Colette

    As a child, this book was a favorite after discovering it in 3rd grade. I discovered it again, years later, in the English language section of a bookshop in Stuttgart, Germany. Now, I'm pleased to find it again in yet another phase of life. When rereading childhood favorites, I'm always a bit nervous that they won't hold up. I was not disappointed. The Children of Noisy Village is just as delightful and happily nostalgic as it always was. I'm happy to have found it again at the library (the shod As a child, this book was a favorite after discovering it in 3rd grade. I discovered it again, years later, in the English language section of a bookshop in Stuttgart, Germany. Now, I'm pleased to find it again in yet another phase of life. When rereading childhood favorites, I'm always a bit nervous that they won't hold up. I was not disappointed. The Children of Noisy Village is just as delightful and happily nostalgic as it always was. I'm happy to have found it again at the library (the shoddy shape it was in only indicates that it is well loved here as well!) and will likely be purchasing yet another copy in the near future.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kerstin

    Absolutely delightful!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Davina

    Reading wholesome Astrid Lindgren books together with my two young boys feels like a major parenting win. This esteemed author holds a special place in my heart because of her Pippi Longstocking books and Mio, My Son which were childhood favorites of mine. I was delighted to discover The Children of Noisy Village and the sequel, Happy Times in Noisy Village and am happy to say that they did not disappoint. Lately, on road trips with my two and six year old, they're just as happy to have me read Reading wholesome Astrid Lindgren books together with my two young boys feels like a major parenting win. This esteemed author holds a special place in my heart because of her Pippi Longstocking books and Mio, My Son which were childhood favorites of mine. I was delighted to discover The Children of Noisy Village and the sequel, Happy Times in Noisy Village and am happy to say that they did not disappoint. Lately, on road trips with my two and six year old, they're just as happy to have me read them a chapter in one of these books as they are to watch a movie and that feels like something to celebrate!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Daniel and Rebekah Eikum

    I read this with Gwen (6yo) and it was pure fun! It's about a girl, Lisa, who lives in a little farm town in Sweden. She has many adventures with her friends. I liked learning about the Swedish holiday celebrations. Seeing them through Lisa's eyes was sweet and Gwen could totally relate. I laughed so hard at the chapter about "helping people."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melissa McAlvey

    I am probably rating this one more for me than Norah. I have always adored Pippi Longstocking, but hadn't read this one before. not as many pictures as Captain Underpants, but it still held her interest enough to be a good read aloud while she colored or ate lunch, etc. It helped that two characters are named Anna and Olaf. ;) I thought it was a sweet read that reminded me of the Little House books

  23. 5 out of 5

    A Severs

    Amusing short stories providing an insight into the life of children in rural Sweden at some point in the past. Lots of launchpads for further exploration into Swedish traditions. Great for year 3 children - I'll be recommending it to my 7 year old!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emma M.

    This was such a cute, fun read aloud. I love that each chapter is essentially a short story with the same characters and setting. I think that helped the kids enjoy it that much more.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Toby Chapman

    Great /good 👍

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Sweet, short read aloud with my girls.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Guilherme Semionato

    Very soothing, so much lovelier (and, bless this, quieter) than the exhausting PIPPI series. I read the 2014 Oxford University Press edition, apparently the translation is faithful to the original.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Eric Hinkle

    Such a charming book. I wish I had grown up in Noisy Village instead of the boring suburbs. I would've been a different person, I do believe! A true classic.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lena

    I first read this book when I was 9, maybe 10. I adored it a lot and I was sad I lost my copy over the years. I got a copy (in English this time) recently and as I re-read the book, it was just as magical as the first time. Definite childhood favourite!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Brothers

    I think most Americans meet Lindgren through Pippi Longstocking. I met her through Volvo. My dad was a Volvo mechanic for decades. He got to travel to Sweden several times because he won a prestigious award from the company many times. We called it the Volvo Olympics. He toured the factory, drove the latest cars, ate dinner at the same place where they give out the Nobel Peace prizes. You know, shop stuff. He brought me lovely souvenirs over the years. The red folk art horse, exotic t-shirts, th I think most Americans meet Lindgren through Pippi Longstocking. I met her through Volvo. My dad was a Volvo mechanic for decades. He got to travel to Sweden several times because he won a prestigious award from the company many times. We called it the Volvo Olympics. He toured the factory, drove the latest cars, ate dinner at the same place where they give out the Nobel Peace prizes. You know, shop stuff. He brought me lovely souvenirs over the years. The red folk art horse, exotic t-shirts, thrillingly expensive, perfectly clear art glass. But one of the first things was this woman's books. Namely, Lotta and this one. These stories are like the swedish Laura Ingals Wilder. Sweet stories about trekking through hip deep snow and making gingerbread and getting into trouble. It's a peaceful read and the pictures are just magical. I love the scruffy hair and pixie faces of the kids.

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