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Presentation designer and internationally acclaimed communications expert Garr Reynolds, creator of the most popular Web site on presentation design and delivery on the net — presentationzen.com — shares his experience in a provocative mix of illumination, inspiration, education, and guidance that will change the way you think about making presentations with PowerPoint or Presentation designer and internationally acclaimed communications expert Garr Reynolds, creator of the most popular Web site on presentation design and delivery on the net — presentationzen.com — shares his experience in a provocative mix of illumination, inspiration, education, and guidance that will change the way you think about making presentations with PowerPoint or Keynote. Presentation Zen challenges the conventional wisdom of making "slide presentations" in today’s world and encourages you to think differently and more creatively about the preparation, design, and delivery of your presentations. Garr shares lessons and perspectives that draw upon practical advice from the fields of communication and business. Combining solid principles of design with the tenets of Zen simplicity, this book will help you along the path to simpler, more effective presentations. --back cover


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Presentation designer and internationally acclaimed communications expert Garr Reynolds, creator of the most popular Web site on presentation design and delivery on the net — presentationzen.com — shares his experience in a provocative mix of illumination, inspiration, education, and guidance that will change the way you think about making presentations with PowerPoint or Presentation designer and internationally acclaimed communications expert Garr Reynolds, creator of the most popular Web site on presentation design and delivery on the net — presentationzen.com — shares his experience in a provocative mix of illumination, inspiration, education, and guidance that will change the way you think about making presentations with PowerPoint or Keynote. Presentation Zen challenges the conventional wisdom of making "slide presentations" in today’s world and encourages you to think differently and more creatively about the preparation, design, and delivery of your presentations. Garr shares lessons and perspectives that draw upon practical advice from the fields of communication and business. Combining solid principles of design with the tenets of Zen simplicity, this book will help you along the path to simpler, more effective presentations. --back cover

1 review for Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Fontana

    Preparation The six aptitudes are: Design (not only function) Story (not only argument - Mike Meyers type delivery) Symphony (not only focus) Empathy (not only logic) Play (not only seriousness) Meaning (not only accumulation) How to improve immediately: 1. Make slides that reinforce your work not repeat them. - NO MORE THAN SIX WORDS EVER! 2. Don't use cheesy images. Instead of four bullets on EPA pollution data just use a picture of dead birds and state the data 3. No dissolves, spins or o Preparation The six aptitudes are: Design (not only function) Story (not only argument - Mike Meyers type delivery) Symphony (not only focus) Empathy (not only logic) Play (not only seriousness) Meaning (not only accumulation) How to improve immediately: 1. Make slides that reinforce your work not repeat them. - NO MORE THAN SIX WORDS EVER! 2. Don't use cheesy images. Instead of four bullets on EPA pollution data just use a picture of dead birds and state the data 3. No dissolves, spins or other transitions. Keep it simple. 4. Create a written document. So they don't have to take notes. Don't handout printouts of slides - they don't work without you there. Pecha-kucha: 20 slides each shown for 20 seconds and automatically advancing. That gives you 6 minutes and 40 seconds to present your story. Then sit down and shut up. Next Planning: Instead of the regimented format of computer programs, use: Pen and paper, White boards, Post-its. Slow down your state of mind. Solitude: "In order to be open to creativity, one must have the capacity for constructive use of solitude. One must overcome the fear of being alone. - Rollo May Questions we should be asking: • How much time do I have? • What's the venue like? • What time of the day? • Who is the audience? • What's their background? • What do they expect of me (us)? • Why was I asked to speak? • What do I want them to do? • What visual medium is most appropriate for this particular situation and audience? • What is the fundamental purpose of my talk? • What's the story here? • WHAT IS MY ADSOLUTELY CENTRAL POINT? Always keep in mind two points - What is your point and Why does it matter? Take the elevator test: Can you pitch your presentation in 30 to 45 seconds? Presentations can have 3 parts: Slides, notes and handouts(documents). Create documents Not slideuments. Story: Make messages STICKY - the six principles are: • Simplicity - if everything is important than nothing is important - simplify • Unexpectedness - Surprise people. • Concreteness - Use natural speech and real examples, not abstracts. • Credibility - Put it in terms that people can visualize "Five hours of battery life." • Emotions - you must make them feel something. • Stories - Tell your message in a story. Step 1: Brainstorming Step 2: Grouping & Identifying the core. - key data Step 3: Story boarding off the computer. Step 4: Story boarding in slide/sorter. Design 1-7-7 Rule {in actuality use bullet point slides rarely!)• Have only one main idea per slide• Insert only seven lines of text maximum.• Use only seven words per line maximum.• The question is though: does this work?• Is this method really good advice?• Is this really an appropriate, effective "visual"?• This slide has just seven bullet pointsFor royalty free images go to www.iStockphoto.com or www.morguefile.com www.flickr.com/creativecommons www.imageafter.com www.sxc.hu www.everystockphoto.comRemember: Long quotes and quotes with images can be okay and use of a large amount of blank space is graphically pleasing.Use the rule of thirds for images - I.E. using a 9 box grid the center four intersections are the best place for images to be centered rather than directly center of the page.The BIG FOUR: Contrast, Repetition, Alignment, ProximityDelivery1. Carefully observe self, situation, others and environment2. Seize the initiative3. Consider fully, act decisively4. Keep to the middle Keep the lights on. You want the audience to see you as well as the slides.The Next Step flag 39 likes · Like  · see review View all 4 comments May 21, 2013 Lance Greenfield rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition Recommended to Lance by: tony greenfield There are over four thousand reviews of this book on Goodreads, so it is unlikely that I can say anything fresh about the content and style of this superb book, so I am not about to try. I'll just tell you a little story of how it helped me at a most opportune time.I have been presenting and instructing for well over three decades, and I am still learning something new every day. We should all be open to that and never believe that we have actually arrived at the perfect state. Strive for perfec There are over four thousand reviews of this book on Goodreads, so it is unlikely that I can say anything fresh about the content and style of this superb book, so I am not about to try. I'll just tell you a little story of how it helped me at a most opportune time.I have been presenting and instructing for well over three decades, and I am still learning something new every day. We should all be open to that and never believe that we have actually arrived at the perfect state. Strive for perfection.I got a lot out of this book. I read it on a plane from England to my company HQ in Florida. I was due to co-deliver a two-week induction class for new joiner technical staff from all over the world. As you can imagine, we had put a lot of effort into the planning and preparation for the ten days of intense instruction. Despite the experience of the new people, I have always felt that everyone could do with a few tips and hints on good communication, public speaking and, in particular, delivering powerful presentations and demonstrations to our customers. So I had two hours dedicated to these topics.I mostly knew what I was going to do with the two hours, but reading Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery inspired me to change my content and delivery.I was able to use the three main guiding principles of the book: restraint, simplicity and naturalness , to construct a session to illustrate the power of those three guiding principles to the participants on my course.I went analogue! I minimalised! I told my story!This book really helped me to do that.Was I rewarded?Yes, I was.At the end of the course, all of the participants were assessed on a presentation and demo which they had to prepare during the two weeks. My presentation on good communication came on day one, shortly followed by the assigning of course assignments.All of my students used the guiding principles of Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery to great effect. It was a joy to watch!Thank you very much Garr Reynolds. flag 17 likes · Like  · see review View 1 comment Mar 28, 2009 Josh Brown rated it really liked it Shelves: 2009 I learned more about presentations from this book than I ever thought possible.The audience is there to hear you speak, not to read your slides. You should be selling something to them - convincing them of something. If you're just giving them information, why didn't you just send them a document?Give presentations like Steve Jobs, not Bill Gates. Bill Gates is unremarkable.Keep the text on slides to a minimum - no more than six words on a slide.Rather than embedding a small image in the slide, I learned more about presentations from this book than I ever thought possible.The audience is there to hear you speak, not to read your slides. You should be selling something to them - convincing them of something. If you're just giving them information, why didn't you just send them a document?Give presentations like Steve Jobs, not Bill Gates. Bill Gates is unremarkable.Keep the text on slides to a minimum - no more than six words on a slide.Rather than embedding a small image in the slide, make the slide the image.No bullets. flag 8 likes · Like  · see review Oct 15, 2010 Trevor rated it liked it Shelves: writing, reference, education This was quite a good little book, if a bit over long. Which, in itself was quite amusing given that the main message is ‘keep it simple’. I think The Non-Designer's Presentation Book does a better job, but there were things in this one that really worked. His comparisons of cluttered and uncluttered slides on pages 123-125 ought to be enough to give people who spot this in a bookstore an idea of what needs fixing in their presentations.But overall there is too much guff about things that don’t This was quite a good little book, if a bit over long. Which, in itself was quite amusing given that the main message is ‘keep it simple’. I think The Non-Designer's Presentation Book does a better job, but there were things in this one that really worked. His comparisons of cluttered and uncluttered slides on pages 123-125 ought to be enough to give people who spot this in a bookstore an idea of what needs fixing in their presentations.But overall there is too much guff about things that don’t really matter. Can you spend too much time saying less is more?The best of this is the advice about the post-it notes – which is, use post-it notes to map out your slides. I really like this idea. It is also used I Slide-ology, but she also points out that you should use markers as if it is too fine detail to be said on a post-it with a marker then it is too fine detail to be said on PowerPoint. Not that there is too much need to read this book. Much of what he has to say can be read here:http://www.garrreynolds.com/Presentat...And this is an oft quoted and interesting call to action too:http://www.sethgodin.com/freeprize/re... flag 5 likes · Like  · see review May 14, 2013 Randy Ingermanson rated it it was amazing Shelves: business-productivity I was worried that this would be a breezy feel-good book without much content.No worries. The book turned out to be brilliant. The examples were the most useful part. It's one thing to tell me how to do it. It's another to show me. I've been doing presentations for a long time, and this book has lit a fire under me to do better. Looking forward to my next teaching gig to see how well it all works out for me. I was worried that this would be a breezy feel-good book without much content.No worries. The book turned out to be brilliant. The examples were the most useful part. It's one thing to tell me how to do it. It's another to show me. I've been doing presentations for a long time, and this book has lit a fire under me to do better. Looking forward to my next teaching gig to see how well it all works out for me. flag 3 likes · Like  · see review Nov 10, 2017 Cristiana rated it really liked it It was a re-read, had read most fragments from it some years ago, but it was still very good. Some things need refreshing and some I understood in a completely different way some years and many presentation later. I would recommend it with no hesitation to anybody working in communication, marketing or management. flag 2 likes · Like  · see review Aug 20, 2018 Eugene added it  ·  review of another edition Shelves: sales, 2018 Book dedicated to presentations and all things around them, from prototyping and story line to the selection of colors and backgrounds. Appreciate sample presentations included in the end of the book. Would love to find more about the process of writing / selecting stories but probably it is a subject for a separate book. flag 3 likes · Like  · see review Sep 17, 2020 Manuel Antão rated it liked it Shelves: 2020 If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Gnawing on My Own Wrist: "Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery" by Garr ReynoldsPowerPoint has always enabled people who are basically thick and dull to look clever.Of course it’s boring - would you hold up cue cards to an audience and then READ THE SAME CUE CARDS - no? So why does a digital projector and PowerPoint make it a good idea?But PowerPoint is worse than that - with PowerPoint you can put a buzzw If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Gnawing on My Own Wrist: "Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery" by Garr ReynoldsPowerPoint has always enabled people who are basically thick and dull to look clever.Of course it’s boring - would you hold up cue cards to an audience and then READ THE SAME CUE CARDS - no? So why does a digital projector and PowerPoint make it a good idea?But PowerPoint is worse than that - with PowerPoint you can put a buzzword next to a graph - next to a picture and with a swish fade effect and for some bizarre reason that makes the buzzword important.People say - 'don't read the words on the slide'Well, why HAVE the bloody slide then? flag 2 likes · Like  · see review Apr 04, 2008 Nat rated it liked it Recommends it for: pastors, speakers, designers, marketing, EXECUTIVES Less is more.Use full screen imagery to convey your point.Use pleasing color schemes.Use san-serif fonts.Those four sentences sum up what Presentation Zen is all about. I know some may say I don't get it. I do. I just don't think all the zen info helped. The author really didn't need to use them to prove his point. Just the comparison of slides was enough.However, this book did change the way I present my messages and talks to teens as a youth pastor. I believe it is true that people remember mo Less is more.Use full screen imagery to convey your point.Use pleasing color schemes.Use san-serif fonts.Those four sentences sum up what Presentation Zen is all about. I know some may say I don't get it. I do. I just don't think all the zen info helped. The author really didn't need to use them to prove his point. Just the comparison of slides was enough.However, this book did change the way I present my messages and talks to teens as a youth pastor. I believe it is true that people remember more when they have an image associated with the central points of a message or presentation.I had already put some of these practices to use before reading the book because I realized that I remembered certain websites, books, and magazines used this style to present their information more than other design styles.I just wish that managers at previous jobs would have embraced this concept. Instead, it was one boring bullet after another.The book is presented well and follows the style of its message. It should be on the shelves of every person who speaks before people and needs them to remember information. flag 2 likes · Like  · see review Sep 14, 2010 Terry rated it it was ok I like the idea that slideware is a sufficiently developed form that there's an ecosystem of tools made to make one suck less at its usage. This book dips a toe in the water of improving ones tool usage but there are several things that get in the way.1) Walls of Text - Many of the words are wasted and several times I'd find that I'd skipped a paragraph, reread it and gain nothing.2) References to Asian Culture - Many of these asides simply got in the way. I got the constant feeling of "this is I like the idea that slideware is a sufficiently developed form that there's an ecosystem of tools made to make one suck less at its usage. This book dips a toe in the water of improving ones tool usage but there are several things that get in the way.1) Walls of Text - Many of the words are wasted and several times I'd find that I'd skipped a paragraph, reread it and gain nothing.2) References to Asian Culture - Many of these asides simply got in the way. I got the constant feeling of "this is for artists" when some cultural term was used instead of the translation making some things hard to follow.3) Poor Organization - I couldn't identify any information to the flow of the book.4) Internal contradiction - The author states that slides are nothing without the presentation then has an entire chapter dedicated to... slides.The book could have been reduced to two or three long blog entries or a pamphlet. flag 2 likes · Like  · see review Jul 25, 2012 Rex rated it liked it Shelves: presentation This book summarize the key elements of a presentation in a different way from the "craft of scientific presentation". However, many of the principles are overlapped. I find this book one of the must read for presentation along with "the craft of scientific presentation" and "slide:ology".Chapter 1 IntroductionPresentations in Today’s WorldDesign:Decoration, for better or worse, is noticeable -- sometimes enjoyable, sometimes irritating, but it is unmistakable there. However, the best designs ar This book summarize the key elements of a presentation in a different way from the "craft of scientific presentation". However, many of the principles are overlapped. I find this book one of the must read for presentation along with "the craft of scientific presentation" and "slide:ology".Chapter 1 IntroductionPresentations in Today’s WorldDesign:Decoration, for better or worse, is noticeable -- sometimes enjoyable, sometimes irritating, but it is unmistakable there. However, the best designs are so well done that “the design” is never even noticed consciously by the observer/user, such as the design of a book or signage in an airport.Story:We are born story tellers and story listeners. As kids we looked forward to show and tell, and we gathered with our friends at recess and at lunchtime and told stories about real things and real events that mattered, at least they mattered to us.Symphony:Focus, specialization, and analysis have been important in the “information age,” but in the “conceptual age”, synthesis and the ability to use seemingly unrelated pieces to form and articulate the big picture before us is crucial.Emphathy:Empathy is emotional. It’s about putting yourself in the position of others.Play :In the conceptual age, work is not just about seriousness but about play as well. Each presentation situation is different, but in many public speaking scenarios playfulness and humor can go a long way toward making a presentation palatable.Meaning:Making a presentation is an opportunity to make a small difference in the world.Chapter 2 Creativity, Limitations, and Constraints--Preparing, designing, and delivering a presentation is a creative art, and you are a creative being.--Creativity requires an open mind and a willingness to be wrong--Restrictions and limitations are not the enemy; they are a great ally.--As you prepare a presentation, exercise restraint and keep these three words in mind always: simplicity, clarity, brevity.Chapter 3 Planning Analog--Slow down your busy mind to see your problem and goals more clearly--Find time alone to see the big picture--For greater focus, try turning off the computer and going analog--Use paper and pens or whiteboard first to record and sketch out your ideas--Key questions: what’s your main point? Why does it matter?--If your audience remembers only one thing, what should it be?--Preparing a detailed handout keeps you from feeling compelled to cram everything into your visuals.Chapter 4 Crafting the storyWhat makes messages stick?SUCCESs.Simplicity, unexpectedness, concreteness, credibility, emotions, storiesA CED presenation--He knew his material inside and out, and he knew what he wanted to say--He stood front and center and spoke in a real, down-to-earth language that was conversational yet passionate.--He did not let technical glitches get in his way. When they occurred, he moved forward without missing a beat, never losing his engagement with the audience.--And he used real, sometimes humorous, anecdotes to illustrate his points, and all his stories were supremely poignant and relevant, supporting his core message.Summary--Make your ideas sticky by keeping things simple, using examples and stories, looking for the unexpected, and tapping into people’s emotions.--A presentation is never just about the facts.--Brainstorm your topic aways from the computer, chunk the most important bits. Identify the underlying theme and be true to that theme throughout the creation of the presentation.--Make a storyboard of your ideas on paper -- and then use software to lay out a solid structure that you can see--Show restraint at all times and bring everything back to the core message.Chapter 5 Simplicity: Why it matters?Summary--Simplicity is powerful and leads to greater clarity, yet it is neither simple nor easy to achieve--Simplicity can be obtained through the careful reduction of the nonessential.--As you design slides, keep the following concepts in mind: subtlety, grace, and understated elegance.--Good designs have plenty of empty space. Think “subtract” not “add”.--While simplicity is the goal, it is possible to be “too simple.” Your job is to find the balance most appropriate to your situation.--learn from the art of comicsThe fish story:When Vijay opened his store, he put up a sign that said:” We Sell Fresh Fish Here. “ His father stopped by and said that the word “We” suggests an emphasis on the seller rather than the customer, and is really not needed. So the sign was changed to “Fresh Fish Sold Here.”His brother came by and suggested that the world “here” could be done away with -- it was superfluous. Vijay agreed and changed the sign to “Fresh Fish Sold”Next, his sister came along and said the sign should just say “Fresh Fish”. Clearly, it is being sold; what else could you be doing?Later his neighbor stopped by to congratulate him. Then he mentioned that all passers-by could easily tell that the fish was really fresh. Mentioning the word fresh actually made it sound defensive as though there was room for doubt about the freshness. Now the sign just read: “FISH”.As Vijay was walking back to his shop after a break he noticed that one could identify the fish from its smell from very far, at a distance from which one could barely read the sign. He knew there was no need for the word “FISH”.Chapter 6 Presentation Design: Principles and TechniquesSignal vs Noise ratio--When it comes to the display of data (charts, tables, graphs, etc), I strongly favor display designs that include the highest SNR possible without any adornment.--Orientation images can be added if there is an emotion involved instead of purely rational or technical information.( e.g., save the planet)--Use 2-D instead of 3-D for data.--Dont put logo on every slidesPicture superiority effect--Picture is more memorable--Ask yourself this: what information are you presenting with the written word on a slide that you could replace with a photograph (or other appropriate image or graphic?)--Dont make slides which do not make sense without narration.--Different font sizes can be used in a single sentence to emphasize important points.Where can you get good images?Low cost placeswww.istockphoto.comwww.dreamstime.comhttp://us.fotolia.com/http://www.shutterstock.com/Freehttp://morguefile.com/http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/http://sxc.hu/http://www.everystockphoto.com/--Use asymmetric design to create more dynamic presentation.--Use the rule of thirds. Divide the presentation in nine boxes, the text should center one point in the middle and the picture should center the opposite point.The big four: contrast, repetition, alignment, proximity--Contrast simply means difference. Make some part of the image stand out or use different fonts to emphasize things.--Repetition: Repeat some of the elements in your slides, so that it looks like one deck.--Alignment: you slides should not look random--Proximity:moving things closer or farther apart to achieve a more organized look. Similar things should group together.--e.g. when using pictures to orient assertion or numbers, avoid giving a frame for the picture, the picture should have the same background as the slides. Make the assertion or charts as a part of the entire picture.Chapter 7 Sample slides: Images & TextPdf scans are in the computer directory./rex/life/toastmasters/books/presentation_zenChapter 8 The Art of Being Completely Present--Like a conversation, presentation requires your full presence at that time and place.--Like a master swordsman, you must be completely in the moment without thoughts of the past or the future, or of “winning” and “losing”.--Mistakes may happen, but do not dwell on past mistakes or worry about future ones. Be only in this moment, sharing and conversing with the audience in front of you.--You will make it look easy and natural by preparing and practicing like mad. The more you rehearse, the more confident you’ll become, and the easier it will seem to the audience.--Though you must plan well, being fully in the moment also means that you remain flexible, totally aware, and open to the possibilities as they arise.Chapter 9 Connecting with an Audience--You need solid content and logical structure, but you also have to make a connection with the audience. You must appeal to both the logical and the emotional--If your content is worth talking about, then bring energy and passion to your delivery. Every situation is different, but there is never an excuse for being dull.--Don’t hold back. If you have a passion about your topic, then let people know it.--Remember hara hachi bu. It is better to leave your audience stuffed and feeling that they have had more than enough.--Keep the lights on; the audience must always be able to see you.--Remove any barriers between you and the audience. Avoid podiums, if possible. And use a wireless mic and remote control for advancing slides so that you can move around freely and naturally.Chapter 10 The Journey BeginsMany people look for the short road and the quick fix to achieve presentation excellence. But it doesn’t exist: there are no panaceas or off-the-shelf fixes. Learning to become and exceptional presenter in today’s world is a journey.I have worked with professionals--young and old--who believed that they were not particularly creative, charismatic, or dynamic, and yet with a little help they were able to transform themselves into extremely creative, highly articulate, engaging presenters once they realized that that person--that remarkable presenter--was in them already.How to improve?--Read and study”--Just do it--Exercise your right brain: play music, draw art--Get out: nothing great will ever happen to you if you stay in your comfort zone.Lessons are all around you--We usually ignore or take for granted so much of the design in an urban setting, but just walking down the street you’ll find that the examples from which to learn are all around you. The lessons are everywhere.It’s within you already--Dont let anyone dictates you.--The secret is in increased awareness and being able to see the world and all the lessons around you. flag 1 like · Like  · see review Apr 05, 2019 Lori Palen rated it really liked it Shelves: work The Preparation and Design sections were great; the Delivery section felt generic and flat. The Zen angle was often soothing or interesting but sometimes felt froo-froo. flag 1 like · Like  · see review Jun 17, 2020 Joe rated it really liked it Not the most current but the underlying fundamentals are strong and still apply. Present better and for god’s sake don’t read your slides at me. flag 1 like · Like  · see review Sep 01, 2010 Megan rated it it was amazing Recommended to Megan by: Shirley Shelves: work, adult, 2010, how-to, nonfiction, favorites, ajpl This Friday I'm heading a workshop for 11 librarians in the county, on how to use social media. I am a little bit nervous about this, not because of going up in front of a group of people (I have little fear of this, which is really surprising), but because I'm afraid I won't be able to get my point across, speak loudly enough, or be clear enough for people unfamiliar with new technology. I had written up a standard PowerPoint with bullet points, clipart, and gradient backgrounds, and it all fel This Friday I'm heading a workshop for 11 librarians in the county, on how to use social media. I am a little bit nervous about this, not because of going up in front of a group of people (I have little fear of this, which is really surprising), but because I'm afraid I won't be able to get my point across, speak loudly enough, or be clear enough for people unfamiliar with new technology. I had written up a standard PowerPoint with bullet points, clipart, and gradient backgrounds, and it all felt so clunky.The person who is helping me out with the presentation told me to read two books, this one and Presentation Zen Design. I flipped through this one a couple weeks ago and was immediately inspired. I mean, immediately. Without actually reading a word of the book I sat down and did a "Zen" version of my PowerPoint. It no longer has more than six words per slide. It has no bullets. It has large, bold images and unique text. It has fewer slides than before, because I'll be talking, not reading what's on each slide.I was super happy with it. Over the Labor Day weekend I settled down to actually read both books, and Garr Reynold's words have inspired me even more. He's really able to explain concepts of design in a familiar and accessible way. There are a ton of visuals, and it's so easy to get the point, especially with before and after slides. You really don't have to read it all the way through; you'll get the idea. flag 1 like · Like  · see review Jul 09, 2011 Ken rated it it was amazing Shelves: finished-in-2011, nonfiction For its purpose, this book can't get much better than it is. Garr Reyolds uses plenty of gorgeous photos and example slides to show you how to make a better slide show presentation. But it's more than that. There are touches of self-help -- bits of advice that have as much to do with making yourself a better person as they do with making yourself a better presenter. There are touches of how-to -- tracts that show you where you've gone wrong in the past and why you are on the "Most Wanted List" i For its purpose, this book can't get much better than it is. Garr Reyolds uses plenty of gorgeous photos and example slides to show you how to make a better slide show presentation. But it's more than that. There are touches of self-help -- bits of advice that have as much to do with making yourself a better person as they do with making yourself a better presenter. There are touches of how-to -- tracts that show you where you've gone wrong in the past and why you are on the "Most Wanted List" in the FBI's bulging file called "Death by Power Point."Also there are touches of zen and philosophy. Many of the pictures fit this theme, and Reynolds, an expat living in Japan, constantly weaves in the similarities of Zen simplicity with design and presentation strategy. Keep it simple and visually exciting. Be creative. Invite your inner child back. Ignore the voice of regret and failure. AND LOSE THE BULLETS!It works, and the words work seamlessly whether he's talking about presentations or life. A worthwhile book and a beautiful one, too. Pass on the Kindle savings in this case. The glossy, real-life color is worth an extra five bucks. flag 1 like · Like  · see review Jan 11, 2012 John Mangan rated it really liked it After reading this book you'll realize why 99% of presentations you have ever seen have been done all wrong, and it all makes perfect sense. You'll also realize how applications such as "PowerPoint" are misunderstood and misused in most business environments today.Finally, in retrospect you can easily compare the tips for success in this book with very famous and high impact presentations such as those given by Steve Jobs and other industry leaders. After reading this book you'll realize why 99% of presentations you have ever seen have been done all wrong, and it all makes perfect sense. You'll also realize how applications such as "PowerPoint" are misunderstood and misused in most business environments today.Finally, in retrospect you can easily compare the tips for success in this book with very famous and high impact presentations such as those given by Steve Jobs and other industry leaders. flag 1 like · Like  · see review Apr 11, 2011 Andrew Neuendorf rated it it was amazing I want to throw everything else away and shave my head and follow the teachings of this book and tattoo my favorite PowerPoint slide on my face, which would be a single brush stroke on a white background, arcing like a swan's neck. (My body is the white background...I am white) I want to throw everything else away and shave my head and follow the teachings of this book and tattoo my favorite PowerPoint slide on my face, which would be a single brush stroke on a white background, arcing like a swan's neck. (My body is the white background...I am white) flag 1 like · Like  · see review View all 3 comments Apr 18, 2011 Anton marked it as to-read Loved the book - I still don't always do as he says (I still use the cursed bullet points too much :-)), but it affected how I present and speak. Loved the book - I still don't always do as he says (I still use the cursed bullet points too much :-)), but it affected how I present and speak. flag 1 like · Like  · see review View all 3 comments Mar 17, 2019 Azzaz rated it it was amazing Shelves: read-2018 Some notes to make you better Presenter and public speaker(facing the audience is establishing good eye contact)... flag 1 like · Like  · see review Jul 21, 2019 Patrice Blanchard rated it it was amazing Very interesting approach of presentation comparing the good the bad and the ugly realisations of Presentations. Very useful.Interesting comparison with jazz. flag 1 like · Like  · see review Jun 02, 2020 Jamey Badger rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition Great suggestions for improving presentations. More applicable to business than education. flag 1 like · Like  · see review Jan 01, 2014 Omar Halabieh rated it really liked it Below are key excerpts from the book that I found particularly insightful:1- "If we desire to communicate with more clarity, integrity, beauty, and intelligence, then we must move beyond what is considered to be "normal" to something different and far more effective. The principles I am most mindful of through every step of the presentation process are restraint, simplicity, and naturalness: Restraint in preparation. Simplicity in design. Naturalness in delivery. All of which, in the end, lead t Below are key excerpts from the book that I found particularly insightful:1- "If we desire to communicate with more clarity, integrity, beauty, and intelligence, then we must move beyond what is considered to be "normal" to something different and far more effective. The principles I am most mindful of through every step of the presentation process are restraint, simplicity, and naturalness: Restraint in preparation. Simplicity in design. Naturalness in delivery. All of which, in the end, lead to greater clarity for us and for our audience."2- "Not all presentation situations are appropriate for using multimedia. For example, if you have a small audience and data-intensive materials to discuss, a handout of the materials with a give-and-take discussion is usually more appropriate. There are many situations when a whiteboard or flipcharts or a paper with detailed figures make for better support. Each case is different. The discussions in this book, however, center among those presentations when multimedia is a good fit with your unique situation."3- "Design. Story. Symphony. Empathy. Play. Meaning. Dan Pink's A Whole New Mind gives us the context of the new world we're living in and why "high touch" talents—and that includes exceptional presentation skills—are so important today. Professionals today around the globe need to understand how and why the so-called right-brain aptitudes of design, story, symphony, empathy, play. and meaning are more important than ever. The best presentations of our generation will be created by professionals—engineers as well as CEOs and "creatives"—who have strong "whole mind" aptitudes and talents. These are not the only aptitudes needed by the modern presenter, but mastering these talents along with other important abilities such as strong analytical skills will take you far as a communicator in the "conceptual age.""4- "You can wreck a communication process with lousy logic or unsupported facts, but you can't complete it without emotion. Logic is not enough. Communication is the transfer of emotion."5- "Once you realize that the preparation of a presentation is an act requiring creativity, not merely the assembling of facts and data in a linear fashion, you'll see that preparing a presentation is a "whole-minded" activity that requires as much right-brain thinking as it does left-brain thinking. In fact, while your research and background work may have required much logical analysis, calculation, and careful evidence gathering or so-called left-brain thinking, the transformation of your content into presentation form will require that you exercise much more of your so-called right brain."6- "Life is about living with limitations and constraints of one type or another but constraints are not necessarily bad, in fact they are helpful, even inspiring as they challenge us to think differently and more creatively about a particular problem. While problems such as a sudden request to give a 20-minute sales pitch or a 45-minute overview of our research findings have built-in limitations—such as time, tools, and budget—we can increase our effectiveness by stepping back, thinking long and hard, and determining ways we can set our own parameters and constraints as we set out to prepare and design our next presentation with greater clarity, focus, balance, and purpose."7- "One of the most important things you can do in the initial stage of preparing for your presentation is to get away from your computer. A fundamental mistake people make is spending almost the entire time thinking about their talk and preparing their content while sitting in front of a computer screen. Before you design vour presentation, you need to see the big picture and Identify your core messages-or the single core message. This can be difficult unless you create a stillness of mind for yourself, something which is hard to do while puttering around in slideware."8- "Questions We Should Be Asking...• How much time do I have? • What's the venue like? • ^hat time of the day? • Who is the audience? • What's their background? What do they expect of me (us) Why was I asked to speak? What do I want them to do? What visual medium is most appropriate for this particular situation and audience? What is the fundamental purpose of my talk? What's the story here? • And this is the most fundamental question of all. Stripped down to its essential core: What is my absolutely central point? Or put it this way: If the audience could remember only one thing (and you'll be lucky if they do), what do you want it to be?"9- "Two Questions: What's Your Point? Why Does It Matter?"10- "If you remember that there are three components to your presentation—the slides, your notes, and the handout—then you will not feel the need to place so much information (text, data, etc.) in your slides. Instead, you can place that information in your notes (for the purpose of rehearsing or as a backup "just in case") or in the handout."11- "Here's a quick summary of the six principles from Made to Stick that you should keep in mind when crystallizing your ideas and crafting your messages for speeches, presentations, or any other form of communication.1) Simplicity. If everything is important, then nothing is important. If everything is a priority, then nothing is a priority. You must be ruthless in your efforts to simplify—not dumb down—your message to its absolute core...2) Unexpectedness. You can get people's interest by violating their expectations. Surprise people. Surprise will get their interest. But to sustain their interest, you have to stimulate their curiosity. The best way to do that is to pose questions or open holes in people's knowledge and then fill those holes...3) Concreteness. Use natural speech and give real examples with real tilings, not abstractions. Speak of concrete images, not of vague notions. Proverbs are good, say the Heath brothers, at reducing abstract concepts to concrete, simple, but powerful (and memorable) language...4) Credibility. If you are famous in your field, you may have built-in credibility (but even that does not go as far as it used to). Most of us, however, do not have that kind of credibility, so we reach for numbers and cold hard data to support our claims as market leaders and so on...5) Emotions. People are emotional beings. It is not enough to take people a laundry list of talking points and information on your slides—you must make them feel something...6) Stories. We tell stories ail day long. It's how humans have always communicated. We tell stories with our words and even with our art and music. We express ourselves through the stories we share. We teach, we learn, and we grow through stories..."12- "What made this CEO's presentation so compelling and memorable was that it was, above all, authentic. His stories were from his heart and from his gut. not from a memorized script. We do not tell a story from memory alone; we do not need to memorize a story that has meaning to us. If it is real, then it is in us. Based on our I research, knowledge, and experience, we can' tell it from our gut. Internalize your story, but do I not memorize it line by line. You can't fake it. I you do not, no amount of hyped-up, superficial enthusiasm or conviction will ever make your time with an audience meaningful. If you do not believe it, do not know it to be true, how can you J connect and convince others with your words in story form? Your words will be just hollow words."13- "Below is the four-step approach I usually take...Step 1 Brainstorming. Step back, go analog, get away from the computer, tap into the right brain and brainstorm ideas. do not edit ideas much here: the aim is to just let it flow. I explore. It may be messy. That's OK. What I'm tying to do—whether I am working alone or leading a group—is to see the issue from all sides. But to do that, you have to take a step back and see the big picture...Step 2 Grouping & identifying the core. In this step, I look to identify the one key idea that is central (and memorable) from the point of view of the audience. What is the "it" that I want them to get? I use "chunking" to group similar ideas while looking for a unifying theme. The presentation may be organized into three parts, so first I look for the central theme that will be the thread running through the presentation. There is no rule that says your presentation should have three sections or three "acts" from the world of drama. However, three is a good number to aim for because it is a manageable constraint and generally provides a memorable structure...Step 3 Storyboarding off the computer. 1 take the ideas sketched out on paper in Step 2 and lay them out with Post-it notes. The advantage of this method (compared to the Slide Sorter view in PowerPoint or the Light Table view in Keynote) is that i can easily add content by writing on an additional Post-it and sticking it under the appropriate section without ever losing sight of the structure and flow...Step 4 storyboarding in Slide Sorter/Light Table view. If you have a clear sense of your structure, you can skip Step 3 and start building the flow of your presentation directly in slideware."14- "When I use the word simple (or simplicity), 1 am referring to the term as being essentially synonymous with clarity, directness, subtlety, essentialness and minimalism. Designers, such as interaction designers, for example, are constantly looking for the simplest solution to complex problems. The simple solutions are not necessarily easiest for them, but the results may end up being the "easiest" to use for the end user. The best visuals are often ones designed with an eye toward simplicity. Yet, this says nothing about the specifics of a visual presentation. That will depend on the content and context."15- "General Design Principles:1) The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is a principle borrowed from more technical fields such as radio communications and electronic communication in general, but the principle itself is applicable to design and communication problems in virtually any field. For our purposes, the SNR is the ratio of relevant to irrelevant elements or information in a slide or other display. The goal is to have the highest signal-to-noise ratio possible in your slides...2) The picture superiority effect says that pictures are remembered better than words, especially when people are casually exposed to the information and the exposure is for a very limited time...3) Empty space (also called negative space or white space) is a concept that is supremely simple, yet the most difficult for people to apply. Whether people are designing a document or a slide, the urge to fill empty areas with more elements is just too great. One of the biggest mistakes that typical business people make with presentation slides (and documents as well) is going out of their way to seemingly use every centimeter of space on a page, filling it up nth text, boxes, clip art, charts, footers, and the ubiquitous company logo. Empty space implies elegance and clarity. This is true with graphic design. but you can see the importance of space (both visual and physical) in the context of, say, interior design as well. High-end brand shops are always designed to create as much open space as possible. Empty space can convey a feeling of high quality, sophistication, and importance...4) Contrast simply means difference. And for whatever reason—perhaps our brains think they are still back in the savannah scanning for wild predators—we are all wired to notice differences. We are not conscious of it, but we are scanning and looking for similarities and differences all the time. Contrast is what we notice, and it's what gives a design its energy. So you should make elements that are not the same clearly different, not just slightly different...5) The principle of repetition simply means the reusing of the same or similar elements throughout your design. Repetition of certain design elements in a slide or among a deck of slides will bring a clear sense of unity, consistency, and cohesiveness. Where contrast is about showing differences, repetition is about subtly using elements to make sure the design is viewed as being part of a larger whole.6) The whole point of the alignment principle is that nothing in your slide design should look as if it were placed there randomly. Every element is connected visually via an invisible line. Where repetition is more concerned with elements cross a deck of slides, alignment is about obtaining unity among elements of a single slide.7) The principle of proximity is about moving things closer or farther apart to achieve a more organized look. The principle says that related items should be grouped together so that they will be viewed as a group, rather than as several unrelated elements. Audiences will assume that items that are not near each other in a design are not closely related. Audiences will naturally tend to group similar items that are near to each other into a single unit."16) "Technical training is important, but technical training is something acquired and will always have the feel of artificiality unless one has the proper state of mind. "Unless the mind which avails itself of the technical skill somehow attunes itself to a state of the utmost fluidity or mobility," says Suzuki, "anything acquired or superimposed lacks spontaneity of natural growth." In this sense, I think instructors and books can help us become better at presenting well, but ultimately, like many other performance arts, it must grow within us."17) "These precepts offer good advice for delivering effective presentations: (1) Carefully observe oneself and one's situation, carefully observe others, and carefully observe one's environment. (2) Seize the initiative in whatever you undertake. (3) Consider fully, act decisively. (4) Know when to stop. (5) Keep to the middle. These are wise words indeed, but these are not "effective presentation principles" at all, they are Jigoro Kano's Five Principles of Judo as outlined by John Stevens in Budo Secrets (Shambhala; New Ed edition)."18) "Professional entertainers know that you want to end on a high note and leave the audience yearning for just a bit more from you. We want to leave our audiences satisfied (motivated, inspired, more knowledgeable, etc.), but not feeling that they could have done with just a little less. We can apply this spirit to the length and amount of material we put into a presentation as well. Give them high quality—the highest you can—but do not give them so much quantity that you leave them with their heads spinning and guts aching."19) "The first step down the road to becoming a great presenter is simply seeing—really seeing- that that which passes for normal and ordinary and good enough is off-kilter with how we learn, understand, remember, and engage. No matter what your starting point is today, you can become much better. In fact, you can become extraordinary. I know this is true because I have seen it many times before. I have worked with professionals—young and old—who believed that they were not particularly creative, charismatic, or dynamic, and yet with a little help they were able to transform themselves into extremely creative, highly articulate, engaging presenters once they realized that that person—that remarkable presenter—was in them already. Once they opened their eyes and made the commitment to learn and leave the past behind, it was just a matter of time before great progress was visible. Interestingly, as their confidence grew and they became more effective presenters, their newly found confidence and perspective had a remarkable impact on other aspects of their personal and professional lives." flag Like  · see review Aug 28, 2016 Adrian Luben rated it it was amazing very good place to start in order to perfect your presentation skills.. flag 1 like · Like  · see review Jan 14, 2020 Sang Tran rated it it was amazing This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 1. Some people think that they aren't not creative. But just thinking like a beginner's mind or a child's mind. 2. Your expert's mind will say: "It can't be done" or "It shouldn't be done". Your beginner's mind will say: "I wonder if it can be done?"3. One of the most important thing in the initial stage of preparing for your presentation is to get away from your computer. Just using paper and sketch out rough ideas.4. Many of us spend too much time worrying about bullets or images on slides ins 1. Some people think that they aren't not creative. But just thinking like a beginner's mind or a child's mind. 2. Your expert's mind will say: "It can't be done" or "It shouldn't be done". Your beginner's mind will say: "I wonder if it can be done?"3. One of the most important thing in the initial stage of preparing for your presentation is to get away from your computer. Just using paper and sketch out rough ideas.4. Many of us spend too much time worrying about bullets or images on slides instead of thinking about how to craft the story that is the most effective, memorable and appropriate for our audience.5. Elevator test. Can you describe your ideas in 30-45 seconds?6. Never, ever hand out copies of your slides, and certainly before your presentation, because it is useless for your audience. Handouts can set you free.7. Three part of a presentation: - Slides the audience will see- Notes only you will see- Handout to be taken away8. Using story principles in presentations:- Identity the problem- Identity causes of the problem- Show how and why you solved the problem9. Tell your real stories, not line by line.10. Five-step approach:- Step 1: Brainstorming- Step 2: Grouping and identifying the core- Step 3: Storyboarding off the computer- Step 4: Sketch your visuals- Step 5: Storyboarding on the computer11. Avoid nonessencial text, lines, symbols, photos12. Use 2D graphs13. Not insert your logo every slide. Get that stuff off the screen. Clean it up and get it off if you want people to understand better.14. Don't use show 2 slides of bulleted list, one after another. Change the second one with caution (use images or something)15. Pictures are remembered better than words. Use them together.16 People are not reading, they can actually listen to you. People cannot listen and read at the same time.17. Using images is an efficient way to compare contrast changes.18. Using quotes from famous people to say our opinions.19. If you need to use 2 languages on slides, make the main language larger than the other20. Using EMPTY SPACE21. Using images of faces, even nonhuman faces, to get viewers' attention. Try to use eye gaze to help guide the viewer's eye22. Symmetrical design is not very interesting. Asymmetrical design is creating a simpler and more powerful visual23. Grids and the rule of thirds or Golden ratio. Place element or word on four cross points24. The big 4:- CONTRAST: strong contract, not weak contrast- REPETITION- ALIGNMENT- PROXIMITY: group elements. Don't make people think25. There are 3 things to consider when evaluating your ability to project yourself to an audience aside from the content of the talk:- The way you look- The way you move- The way you sound26. Remove barriers: lectern, computer screen and ream of notes.27. Use a wireless mic and remote control for advancing slides so you can move around freely and naturally28. You must believe in your content or you cannot sell it flag Like  · see review Apr 04, 2019 Bruce Genaro rated it really liked it PresentationZen Design by Garr Reynolds is a graphic design book for non-designers who want to create more effective multi-media presentations. As Reynolds states, “We know what we like when we see it, but we lack the visual literacy to articulate our thoughts…” So he provides a nomenclature and a way to organize your thoughts when communicating with words and images. In addition to a crash course on the principles of good design, he helps you clarify your content and make it more meaningful.Rey PresentationZen Design by Garr Reynolds is a graphic design book for non-designers who want to create more effective multi-media presentations. As Reynolds states, “We know what we like when we see it, but we lack the visual literacy to articulate our thoughts…” So he provides a nomenclature and a way to organize your thoughts when communicating with words and images. In addition to a crash course on the principles of good design, he helps you clarify your content and make it more meaningful.Reynolds uses the basics of Zen - simplicity, harmony and balance - as the basis of good design. He balances these big picture ideas with the more practical details of typography (fonts, spacing, placement), images (JPEG, TIFF, cropping), and photography (don’t use Auto Mode). He employs numerous images to visually drive home his message, and in clear concise text, demonstrates how to maximize your presentation’s impact by employing unifying themes, visual clues, depth (created by using large foreground elements) and decluttering (less is more).While you know that you live in a visual world, how often do you stop and think why one thing is more appealing than another? Although Presentationzen Design focuses on presentations, I found it to have a much broader application. Want to attract more people to your website, have more followers on Twitter, make an impression with your business card? It all comes down to aesthetics. And if you understand that the color red implies assertiveness and urgency, and that green connotes dignity, loyalty and professionalism, then you have an advantage in the marketplace. flag Like  · see review Aug 31, 2018 Stephanie Scotti rated it it was amazing Do you find most presentations mind-numbingly dull? … Do you want to break free from the status quo? … Do you wonder how you can leverage PowerPoint for maximum impact?If your hand is waving excitedly at one or all of these ideas, grab a copy of presentationzen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery by Garr Reynolds.Once my copy arrived, I couldn’t put it down. I carried it with me wherever I went so that I could read a few pages in spare moments. It’s that good and that fast a read.A Do you find most presentations mind-numbingly dull? … Do you want to break free from the status quo? … Do you wonder how you can leverage PowerPoint for maximum impact?If your hand is waving excitedly at one or all of these ideas, grab a copy of presentationzen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery by Garr Reynolds.Once my copy arrived, I couldn’t put it down. I carried it with me wherever I went so that I could read a few pages in spare moments. It’s that good and that fast a read.Actionable ideas by the truckloadAccording to Reynolds, live talks today must tell a story enhanced by imagery and other forms of appropriate multimedia to make an impact. Here are some additional thoughts from presentationzen that resonated for me:• Take time to discover your core message (the one thing, and only one, that you want your audience to remember, stated in one simple sentence)• Relish the opportunity to differentiate yourself, your organization or your cause. Why be a clone when you can be your true unique self?• Use detailed handouts to keep you from feeling compelled to cram everything into a slide.• Less is more! Remove from slides any element that doesn’t add to your core message.• Images are more powerful than words.• Keep the lights on; the audience must always be able to see youBut wait, there’s more . . . (as the saying goes)presentationzen is packed with visual examples of great (and not so great) presentations, allowing you to see the difference. Key take-a-ways are summarized at the end of each chapter, and guests – from marketing guru Seth Godin and slide:ology author Nancy Duarte to Entrepreneur columnist Guy Kawasaki – also share their thoughts and experiences.Are you ready to get Zen?If you’re looking for few quick tips on how to do a PowerPoint presentation, don’t look here. The author’s analogies to the Zen philosophy and concepts can get annoying pretty quickly (I just skimmed over them).However, if you bear with him, you will learn more than how to break free from the “death by PowerPoint” mold. Get ready to express yourself in a new way, be challenged to see the big picture from your customers’ perspective, and be inspired to be bold, different, and enthused while preparing for your next presentation.Becoming a Zen master may not be easy, but it can pay big dividends when you reset the “presentation bar” for yourself and your organization. flag Like  · see review Jun 24, 2017 Krishna Kumar rated it really liked it Reynolds wants to write about good PowerPoint presentation, and he does a very good job at it. He explains the poor ways in which business people (including Bill Gates) currently use PowerPoint, and how much better it can be, citing the example of Steve Jobs, among others. He shows us some very good examples of PowerPoint presentations that he and other people (independently) have prepared. The book also contains examples of poor slides and how they can be improved. Reynolds draws upon the knowl Reynolds wants to write about good PowerPoint presentation, and he does a very good job at it. He explains the poor ways in which business people (including Bill Gates) currently use PowerPoint, and how much better it can be, citing the example of Steve Jobs, among others. He shows us some very good examples of PowerPoint presentations that he and other people (independently) have prepared. The book also contains examples of poor slides and how they can be improved. Reynolds draws upon the knowledge of experts such as Edward Tufte to illustrate how graphics should be presented. The place where the book stumbled was in its use of Zen theme: it did not do a good enough job of blending them into the main content of the book. It almost seemed like "Presentation" was separate and "Zen" was separate. Nevertheless, good book and must-read. flag Like  · see review Jan 23, 2018 Mindaugas Mozūras rated it liked it "Restraint in preparation. Simplicity in design. Naturalness in delivery."I liked Prezentation Zen. I won't rate it higher because I've read most of the advice given here in other places (speaking.io, Confessions of a Public Speaker, The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs and The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking). I still found some new specific tricks/ideas. For example, the author goes into detail about lecterns and the idea that by blocking the speaker, they decrease engagement. It also "Restraint in preparation. Simplicity in design. Naturalness in delivery."I liked Prezentation Zen. I won't rate it higher because I've read most of the advice given here in other places (speaking.io, Confessions of a Public Speaker, The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs and The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking). I still found some new specific tricks/ideas. For example, the author goes into detail about lecterns and the idea that by blocking the speaker, they decrease engagement. It also served as good reminder for me on other ideas.In addition to other resources I've listed, Presentation Zen is definitely worth considering if you want to learn how to give better presentations and looking for a place to start. flag Like  · see review Apr 02, 2018 Vita rated it really liked it About 60% of the material in the book was familiar to me, and by now, should be a common sense. No, you shouldn't put an insanely huge amount of text on your slides and make people read it while you talk about something else. No, popular art and generic images are not fun. And so on... What I really enjoyed reading this book is the Japanese/Zen component. The author explains several Japanese concepts that relate to visual design (ikebana, etc.) and shows how they can be applied to PowerPoint pre About 60% of the material in the book was familiar to me, and by now, should be a common sense. No, you shouldn't put an insanely huge amount of text on your slides and make people read it while you talk about something else. No, popular art and generic images are not fun. And so on... What I really enjoyed reading this book is the Japanese/Zen component. The author explains several Japanese concepts that relate to visual design (ikebana, etc.) and shows how they can be applied to PowerPoint presentations. I also liked explanation of the more technical details, such font, color theme and such. Many photographs and examples of well-done presentations. flag Like  · see review Sep 08, 2020 Jack rated it liked it Entertaining conversations on design and aesthetics but lacking in practical application. I felt rather unimpressed after reading many positive reviews and recently finishing the excellent Storytelling with Data: A Data Visualization Guide for Business Professionals.In short, I'd recommend this book to beginners on design, aesthetics, and presentation. To readers with some background experience, you are unlikely to find radically new ideas here. Entertaining conversations on design and aesthetics but lacking in practical application. I felt rather unimpressed after reading many positive reviews and recently finishing the excellent Storytelling with Data: A Data Visualization Guide for Business Professionals.In short, I'd recommend this book to beginners on design, aesthetics, and presentation. To readers with some background experience, you are unlikely to find radically new ideas here. flag Like  · see review « previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 … next »

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