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As evil spreads across Gotham City, Batman's allies, including Red Robin, Batwing, Robin, Batgirl, the Birds of Prey, Nightwing and even Catwoman find themselves in a battle coming from all sides. The Court of Owls have shown their hand, and it's up to the collective effort of these heroes, some more unlikely than others, in this sprawling tale of corruption and violence. T As evil spreads across Gotham City, Batman's allies, including Red Robin, Batwing, Robin, Batgirl, the Birds of Prey, Nightwing and even Catwoman find themselves in a battle coming from all sides. The Court of Owls have shown their hand, and it's up to the collective effort of these heroes, some more unlikely than others, in this sprawling tale of corruption and violence. This epic springs from the pen of Scott Snyder, New York Times bestselling author of BATMAN: COURT OF OWLS, BATMAN: THE BLACK MIRROR and AMERICAN VAMPIRE, as well as creators Judd Winick, David Finch, Peter J. Tomasi, Pat Gleason, Tony Daniel, Scott Lobdell, Duane Swierczynski, JH Williams III, Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray! BATMAN: NIGHT OF THE OWLS collects ALL-STAR WESTERN #9, BATMAN #8-9, BATMAN ANNUAL #1, BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT #9, BATMAN: DETECTIVE COMICS #9, BATGIRL #9, BATWING #9, BIRDS OF PREY #9, NIGHTWING #8-9, BATMAN AND ROBIN #9, CATWOMAN #9 and RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS #9


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As evil spreads across Gotham City, Batman's allies, including Red Robin, Batwing, Robin, Batgirl, the Birds of Prey, Nightwing and even Catwoman find themselves in a battle coming from all sides. The Court of Owls have shown their hand, and it's up to the collective effort of these heroes, some more unlikely than others, in this sprawling tale of corruption and violence. T As evil spreads across Gotham City, Batman's allies, including Red Robin, Batwing, Robin, Batgirl, the Birds of Prey, Nightwing and even Catwoman find themselves in a battle coming from all sides. The Court of Owls have shown their hand, and it's up to the collective effort of these heroes, some more unlikely than others, in this sprawling tale of corruption and violence. This epic springs from the pen of Scott Snyder, New York Times bestselling author of BATMAN: COURT OF OWLS, BATMAN: THE BLACK MIRROR and AMERICAN VAMPIRE, as well as creators Judd Winick, David Finch, Peter J. Tomasi, Pat Gleason, Tony Daniel, Scott Lobdell, Duane Swierczynski, JH Williams III, Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray! BATMAN: NIGHT OF THE OWLS collects ALL-STAR WESTERN #9, BATMAN #8-9, BATMAN ANNUAL #1, BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT #9, BATMAN: DETECTIVE COMICS #9, BATGIRL #9, BATWING #9, BIRDS OF PREY #9, NIGHTWING #8-9, BATMAN AND ROBIN #9, CATWOMAN #9 and RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS #9

30 review for Batman: Night of the Owls (The New 52) (Batman

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    A long and fast action-packed night! This is collected edition of 14 issues of several comic book titles related to "Batman" serving as "in-between" event right after "The Court of Owls". The rating of the edition is based on an overall average made from the individual ratings of each collected issue in this book. A LONG, BLOODY NIGHT The nursery rhyme of "The Court of Owls" resulted a lethal truth that almost costed the life of The Batman. Now, in an unexpected turn, The Court of Owls relea A long and fast action-packed night! This is collected edition of 14 issues of several comic book titles related to "Batman" serving as "in-between" event right after "The Court of Owls". The rating of the edition is based on an overall average made from the individual ratings of each collected issue in this book. A LONG, BLOODY NIGHT The nursery rhyme of "The Court of Owls" resulted a lethal truth that almost costed the life of The Batman. Now, in an unexpected turn, The Court of Owls released its entire army of resurrected Talons to exterminate all its enemies, in one single night. So, Alfred Pennyworth desperately calls for reinforcements... To all the allies of The Bat presently in Gotham. I send this with great urgency. Tonight, The Court of Owls has sent their assassins to kill nearly forty people across the city. The Court's targets are all Gotham leaders. People who shape the city. I have uploaded a list of their targets' names, here. The Court's assassins, the "Talons" are already en route to their targets. They are highly trained killers with extraordinary regenerative abilities. For many of their targets, I fear it may be too late to. I will keep the line to the Cave open as long as I can manage. Good luck to you... God help us all. But even without the knowledge of the Gotham's heroes, some of the Talons have chosen their targets from the list due very ancient and personal vendettas... --O-- Batgirl #9 - In the Line of Fire Rating: *** ( 3 stars ) Writer: Gail Simone // Illustrator: Ardian Syaf I think that we just lost Gotham. Batgirl aka Barbara Gordon faces a silent female Talon with an unexpected link to a dark moment during WWII, meanwhile James Gordon is played by The Court of Owls and suddenly, the hope of the city is broken at the sight of everybody in the night sky. --O-- Batwing #9 - You have been judged unworthy Rating: *** ( 3 stars ) Writer: Judd Winick // Illustrator: Marcus To If you see an end to the fight, do not think, take it. Batwing aka David Zavimbe, from "Batman, Inc.", representing the city of Tinasha, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, is making a visit to Gotham along with his ally, Matu Ba, when suddenly a Talon makes havok in the middle of a gala dinner of "Batman, Inc." threatening the life of Matthew Kalu, current Prime Minister of Congo. I have to say this. After watching Batwing's tactical decisions on the field. Honestly, I prefer to fight against The Batman than dealing against Batwing! --O-- Red Hood and the Outlaws #9 - Who are you? Hoo? Hoo? Rating: ** ( 2 stars ) Writer: Scott Lobdell // Illustrator: Kenneth Rocafort It isn't Gotham's fault Batman happens to live here. Red Hood aka Jason Todd, along with his teammates, Arsenal aka Roy Harper and Starfire aka Princess Koriand'r, take the call for help and they went to "protect" Mr. Freeze aka Dr. Victor Fries from the menace of a Talon. Jason Todd is a complicated person to say it mildly. If he hates so bad Batman, how is that he wears a red bat-symbol on the chest?! "Oooh, I hate you to guts but since I can't think of in any cool symbol of my own, so I will keep using yours!" Geez! --O-- Catwoman #9 - Mirrors come in all sizes Rating: ** ( 2 stars ) Writer: Judd Winick // Illustrator: Guillem March All us monsters deserve a little mercy. Catwoman aka Selina Kyle, along with some meta-dude called Spark, were planning to rob in The Penguin's safe when unexpectedly a Talon appears to kill The Penguin himself. So, Catwoman against her best senses decide to mess in the fight. --O-- Birds of Prey #9 - Gangland Style Rating: ** ( 2 stars ) Writer: Duane Swierczynski // Illustrator: Travel Foreman All he does is inflict pain. Black Canary aka Dinah Lance, along with her team: Katana aka Tatsu Yamashiro, Starling aka Ev Crawford and Poison Ivy aka Dr. Pamela Isley; got in the middle of the rampage of a schizoid Talon with problems to see clearly what it's happening in "his present". --O-- Batman and Robin #9 - Robin hears a Hoo Rating: ** ( 2 stars ) Writer: Peter J. Tomasi // Illustrator: Lee Garbett & Andy Clarke Why the hell should we be listening to a freakin' kid? Because this kid read Clausewitz and Jomini at the age of six while you were still trying to figure out the buttons on a Q-Box, you imbecile! Now all of you...follow my orders! Robin aka Damian Wayne, is assigned to protect the life of Major General Benjamin Burrows, the 52nd adjutant general of Gotham's National Guard. In the middle of night drill practices, a Talon is targeting General Burrows, and even while he is surrounded of an army (literally), still his best chance of survival falls into the skills of the new Boy Wonder. --O-- Nightwing #8 - Bloodlines & #9 - The Gray Son Rating: **** ( 4 stars ) Writer: Kyle Higgins and Illustrators: Eddy Barrows & Andres Guinaldo In a city divided, we are the middle. From the shadows, we keep order. Nightwing aka Dick Grayson, received the help's call and he rushes to protect Sebastian Hady, Mayor of Gotham City. Nightwing is the oldest student of The Batman, the best trained and the rest of the Bat-family looks up to him with respect. However, Nightwing will be tested in body and mind since the Talon that he will be facing is "too close" for comfort to his own roots. --O-- Batman #8 - Attack on Wayne Manor plus The Call & #9 - Night of the Owls plus The Fall of the House of Wayne Rating: **** ( 4 stars ) Writer: Scott Snyder & James Tynion IV and Illustrators: Greg Capullo & Rafael Albuquerque Get the hell out of my house. Bruce Wayne is still recovering from the physical and mental assault inflicted to him, under his Batman's cowl, by The Court of Owls. He has been already targeted too, by a Talon on his public persona; and now, in this Night of the Owls, Bruce Wayne is targeted yet again and The Court of Owls sends a whole squad of Talons to avoid any failure this time. The Batman, still heavily injured, will have to use anything at hand since Wayne Manor AND the Batcave will be turned into war zones!!! Also, a backstory featuring a dramatic letter written by Jarvis Pennyworth, Alfred's father, revealing very personal details about the past of the Wayne Family, but specially to some key facts about Martha Wayne that hide the truth behind how The Court of Owls are connected to the Wayne family and why the sudden massive attack to Gotham now. --O-- Batman Annual #1 - First Snow Rating: ***** ( 5 stars ) Writer: Scott Snyder & James Tynion IV and Illustrator: Jason Fabok It's time, Nora. Time for us to be together... After surviving the attack of a Talon, Mr. Freeze aka Dr. Victor Fries is "delivered" by Red Hood and the Outlaws to be taken to Arkham Asylum, but soon the cold villain escapes again to get his revenge on Bruce Wayne, the man who took from him, his dear Nora. Nightwing & Robin will have the first round against Mr. Freeze, and later The Batman will deal with the unexpected final round. This is easily the most solid story in the whole volume, oddly enough isn't really tied to the events happening during the Night of the Owls. It's the twisted tale of the unexpected origin of Mr. Freeze in this new timeline of New52. If you thought that it wasn't possible to think how to improve the tragic story of Dr. Victor Fries after the great work on Batman Animated... think again... --O-- Batman: The Dark Knight #9 - I can no longer be broken Rating: *** ( 3 stars ) Writer: Judd Winick // Illustrator: David Finch It is not a thing. It is a man. I can kill a man. The Batman has to fight against a very special Talon who was sent to kill Lincoln March, a candidate to the Mayor's Office of Gotham. Seems like unknown or forgotten by The Batman, this Talon has seen him before, and now the fear is fading. Now this Talon is understanding that that bat-creature is just a man with a suit. The Talon can kill a man in a suit. --O-- Detective Comics #9 - The Owls take Arkham Rating: *** ( 3 stars ) Writer and Illustrator: Tony S. Daniel Your powers prey on the wicked minded. Do I look weak to you?! The Batman runs to protect Jeremiah Arkham since he is a target too of The Court of Owls. Jeremiah Arkham isn't waiting that the Dark Knight would go to his help, so he does a devil's deal with one of the immates to use as a weapon against the Talon sent for him. --O-- All-Star Western #9 - Vengeance in the Big Easy Rating: ** ( 2 stars ) Writers: Jimmy Palmiotti & Justin Gray and Illustrator: Moritat Land is money, and it is particularly lucrative in big cities. In an unexpected story, back in the past, in the era of the old west, Jonah Hex fights alongside of Nighthawk and Cinammon against some creeps when suddenly a mysterious female assassin wearing a costume resembling an owl is mixed into the brawl.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    3.5 stars The story surrounding the Court of Owls is turning out to be more interesting than I originally thought. I wasn't in love with the first volume, but I enjoyed this one quite a bit more. The fact that it was a giant crossover comic? Meh. Some of the titles were good, and some were...less than good. For example, I got nothin' out of the beginning stuff with Jonah Hex. I don't know who any of the characters were, and the addition of the issue didn't to help me understand any part of the Cou 3.5 stars The story surrounding the Court of Owls is turning out to be more interesting than I originally thought. I wasn't in love with the first volume, but I enjoyed this one quite a bit more. The fact that it was a giant crossover comic? Meh. Some of the titles were good, and some were...less than good. For example, I got nothin' out of the beginning stuff with Jonah Hex. I don't know who any of the characters were, and the addition of the issue didn't to help me understand any part of the Court of Owls story line. And I guess I must have missed something because I had no idea that (view spoiler)[Bruce potentially has a long-lost brother running around out there somewhere. (hide spoiler)] Was this plot line a part of Detective Comics or something? Anyway... Didn't see the twisty reveal coming at the end with Mr Freeze, though. Nice. It's good. Read it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    An expansion on the Court of Owls tale but they recycle a lot of material so it's not as much fun to read. Absolutely gorgeous artwork. OVERALL GRADE: B minus to B. An expansion on the Court of Owls tale but they recycle a lot of material so it's not as much fun to read. Absolutely gorgeous artwork. OVERALL GRADE: B minus to B.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Worth it if you want an overarching look at the Night of Owls Bat family event. But do you really need to? The answer, unsurprisingly, is, "No, not really." Most, if not all, of the Gotham related series have an issue here, plus two from the core Batman book and Nightwing (the two books most tied to the event). Every other book is essentially side story, adding nothing really new or interesting to the overall event. There's no attempt to give a hand to readers who haven't been reading every sing Worth it if you want an overarching look at the Night of Owls Bat family event. But do you really need to? The answer, unsurprisingly, is, "No, not really." Most, if not all, of the Gotham related series have an issue here, plus two from the core Batman book and Nightwing (the two books most tied to the event). Every other book is essentially side story, adding nothing really new or interesting to the overall event. There's no attempt to give a hand to readers who haven't been reading every single issue of the New 52. Luckily, there doesn't seem to be much to confuse people being dropped in the middle of an ongoing series, though I can see where being up to date in these books would help. No, I don't know who Catwoman was talking to at the start of her issue, but I don't really care. It would have been nice to know who all those people in All-Star Western #9 were, though. The quality varies as wildly as you might expect, with no less than eleven writers on board. Batman and Nightwing were the best, of course, (they needed to be) and I also liked the Batgirl issue. The rest? Largely forgettable. This could be partly because it's basically the same story over and over again: A Talon shows up. The star of the book dispatches him. Repeat. It gets dull. And very, very few of the stories add anything at all to the event. I'm not sure why All-Star Western was in here. Since it's set more than a century before the other books, it can't possibly connect in any real way. It doesn't. So what was the point? Likewise, I'd advise skipping any issue in a series that you already know you don't like. This will not change your mind. And honestly, every single one of these issues will eventually be collected under their own titles. Wait for those, read Batman, Vol. 2: The City of Owls and Nightwing, Vol. 2: Night of the Owls (when it comes out) and skip this collection.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This was my first comic event anthology, and I really liked it! However, I was also baffled by it. Poor, long-suffering Matt had a hard time explaining the concept of an event to me, especially since this volume starts off with a terrible Jonah Hex story that I must have read about 8 or 9 times to attempt to figure it out. (Me: "I don't get it! What happens?" Matt: "Nothing happens. Stop rereading it. It's just a bad comic.") Luckily, the next story is BATWING, which was totally badass and redee This was my first comic event anthology, and I really liked it! However, I was also baffled by it. Poor, long-suffering Matt had a hard time explaining the concept of an event to me, especially since this volume starts off with a terrible Jonah Hex story that I must have read about 8 or 9 times to attempt to figure it out. (Me: "I don't get it! What happens?" Matt: "Nothing happens. Stop rereading it. It's just a bad comic.") Luckily, the next story is BATWING, which was totally badass and redeemed the Jonah Hex debacle. My favorite issue was Batgirl, mostly because I didn't know about Batgirl (I KNOW right) and because it features Fu-Go balloons. The whole issue was artistically stunning and featured the best panel in the collection, which was (view spoiler)[the balloons drifting over Gotham with the Bat Signal changed to an owl. Chilling (hide spoiler)] . Other thoughts: - Bruce Wayne is super hot in a a couple of these. I'd hit that. - Arkham Asylum is so insane. The mere presence of an asylum filled with super-powered criminals who routinely escape would make me move as far away from Gotham as possible. - The fight in Wayne Manor and (view spoiler)[Bruce punching Dick in the face (hide spoiler)] was pretty good. - The Red Hood and Gangland issues were pretty hard for me to keep up with, but I like women with weird powers. - The Mr. Freeze-centric issue near the end was surprisingly good. (I like issues that give me a lot of backstory, because I am comic illiterate.) - Is it really necessary to focus on Catwoman's cleavage when she's swinging around to kick someone in the face? (Everyone but me says "yes".) This anthology is oddly put together, because the last issue in the book spoils the entire mystery of the Court of the Owls. The storyline that follows Batman and takes you through the mystery chronologically is finished in Batman, Vol. 2: The City of Owls, but I'd argue that it's better to read the first 3/4 of the comic event before going to Vol. 2 (which repeats the Mr. Freeze storyline and the fight at Wayne Manor). It would be a shame to miss the Batgirl issue - it sets up several pieces of the plot.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo

    Read in the monthly floppies, the way they were originally published. Scott Snyder brings back the crossover to the Batman family of books and adds something new to the Bat-mythos. The Court of Owls has risen from the shadows to reclaim Gotham from its new protector. The Court is secret cabal as old as Gotham itself and they brought forth their army of assassins called Talons to impose their will on Gotham’s leadership. Snyder has taken advantage of new 52 relaunch of DC Comics titles. Despite the Read in the monthly floppies, the way they were originally published. Scott Snyder brings back the crossover to the Batman family of books and adds something new to the Bat-mythos. The Court of Owls has risen from the shadows to reclaim Gotham from its new protector. The Court is secret cabal as old as Gotham itself and they brought forth their army of assassins called Talons to impose their will on Gotham’s leadership. Snyder has taken advantage of new 52 relaunch of DC Comics titles. Despite the new numbering, the origin and history of Batman has basically retained its pre-52 roots primarily through the reader’s familiarity of the mythos. Snyder enriched it by retroactively reimagining familiar concepts in Batman’s backstory. Gotham, the Waynes and even Haly’s Circus. It is no coincidence that the strongest stories here are the Batman and Nightwing titles. Snyder is the architect of this story and Dick Grayson has his origin tweaked. It is a good enough crossover, not a great one. I would have preferred to have Snyder a firmer hand in orchestrating his story throughout the Batman line. But this is just the first of a promised trilogy by Snyder so I believe the best is still to come.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Frank Eldritch

    Arguably the most successful of DC's New 52 titles since its relaunch, Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo's BATMAN series continues to rise to the challenge and explore new heights and dimensions for Gotham's Dark Knight and lone caped crusader. I was dully impressed with the first volume The Court of Owls which was gorgeously drawn and poetically narrated, turning Gotham into its own creature and serving Batman with the cold truth that the city does not belong to him at all nor does he know all its Arguably the most successful of DC's New 52 titles since its relaunch, Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo's BATMAN series continues to rise to the challenge and explore new heights and dimensions for Gotham's Dark Knight and lone caped crusader. I was dully impressed with the first volume The Court of Owls which was gorgeously drawn and poetically narrated, turning Gotham into its own creature and serving Batman with the cold truth that the city does not belong to him at all nor does he know all its dusty corners and deepest secrets which ultimately included the fabled Court of Owls. The second volume that follows its bold climax and conclusion was not without its flaws and lacks its predecessor's suspense and enigma but it was still a commendable follow-up. Capullo's illustrations on the action sequences are sheer poetry in themselves and had certainly created an air of excitement and intrigue. Synder's writing is at its finest as well even if the direction of the actual plot could have been refined some more. Nevertheless, The Night of the Owls was exemplary and a more definitive crossover event for me, with tie-ins that are more personal to characters than plot-driven. I could say the same for The Joker: Death of the Family which I reviewed extensively before, but I felt that this collected edition had more substantial meat and bones in them when it comes to the tie-ins. Like in the review of that previous crossover edition, I plan to briefly summarize each tie-in accordingly and decide whether it contributes to the Owls storyline and if you should even bothering picking it up. The thing about these tie-ins is that most of them are simply Owl-themed stories and are better appreciated by themselves since they don't exactly have any effect on Snyder's main arc. Still, there are some great ones worth reading. I would also like to point out that most of these tie-ins all happened during the course of one night and here is a breakdown by the hour, in case you want to read them that way. Right after the conclusion of The Court of Owls, each tie-in explores the events in different corners of Gotham City as the Talons try to assassinate a roster of prominent people. ALL-STAR WESTERN #9 If you don't know Jonah Hex at all then this story is not for you especially if you don't follow the actual line-up of this title. It's established that the Court of Owls has been around for centuries so this story focuses on that singular event when Hex crossed paths with a Talon assassin. That's really pretty much it. RECOMMENDED: NO BATWING #9 Easily my third favorite of the tie-ins, this is an issue with action panels that were finely illustrated and the target in question in no other than Lucius Fox whom I believe is the most important character that should be protected, given his role and contribution to the research and development facility for anything weapons-related that equip Batman and his followers. RECOMMENDED: YES BATGIRL #9 This had a solid narrative all throughout, making allusions to a previous war-ridden time and the Gotham City now. This is also when readers acquaint themselves with the subplot that these Talons used to be ordinary people before, ones who were captured and twisted into becoming self-sufficient killers. It's worth noting that each Talon that is confronted by a Bat-family member seems to echo the torment and inner demons of whoever one of Batman's surrogate children faces. In this case, Barbara Gordon meets a female Talon whose life has been destroyed by a tragedy that she can very much relate to on some level, given her struggle with spinal paralysis after suffering in the hands of the Joker (in Alan Moore's memorable The Killing Joke). I think this is the most interesting and heartfelt aspect of the tie-ins; the way the Talons are contrasted with the heroes themselves as if they're merely less desirable reflections of the miseries that plague even the best of us. My second favorite tie-in, hands-down. RECOMMENDED: YES BATMAN #8 and #9 The direction of the Owl saga sacking the Gotham City like that was irresponsible and reckless, considering they had operated in the background and subtly at that for decades so I don't really understand why they choose to come to the light after all that hard work. Because they feel Batman is a bigger threat? Perhaps. But the logistics just don't add up. Here is a powerful and historical figure that had been integrated into Gotham City's very foundations and they managed to survive this long because of anonymity. And yet they come out with a force in order to eliminate important people in the city which they could have done easily through the manipulations and control they took pride in. No need for bloodshed, that's what I believe. I think we should all be able to acknowledge how absurd the Owl saga became when Synder decided to play his hand too loosely, essentially undermining the Court's supposedly intimate influence in the process. It had certainly dulled the sharp edge of their intrigue as well. Still, I digress. Though the direction Snyder chose to do was for me not the most suitable of options, storytelling-wise, the action and suspense he did provide for these two issues were exhilarating. Deft, fast-paced and engrossing in all the right ways, issues 8 and 9 make a turn for the unthinkable and how Bruce Wayne himself must deal with the age-old repercussions. The collected edition sadly did not include issues 10 and 11 which are for me the climactic ones that were able to give readers a satisfying pay-off while still ominously promising that the worst has yet to come to light. I suggest you pick up said issues and witness for yourself just how ultimately amazing Synder left it open-ended, and how these deadly pieces had drastically changed the way Bruce Wayne views his city. RECOMMENDED: YES BATMAN AND ROBIN #9 I'm torn whether or not to commend this issue solely because I love, love, LOVE Damian Wayne as the current Robin. But this issue really didn't give any insightful/personal look unlike the other tie-ins did and it merely placed Damian Wayne in a position of authority and impressive combat skills as he tried to save an assassination target. The action panels were great to peruse through but this story really didn't do much. RECOMMENDED: NO NIGHTWING #9 and #10 My most favorite tie-in ever! I don't agree that making a chilling connection between Dick Grayson's origins and that of one of the Talons is an unnecessary complication. I believed it added dimension to his character and the entire plot itself, making the Court seemed more sinister in an intimate level for our heroes. This is such a tantalizing issue in scope, content and style. The art is exuberant and eye-catching all throughout, and the dialogue exchanges continue to make me feel uneasy and tense. I really enjoyed this story so much and you will too. RECOMMENDED: YES RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS #9 I feel that it must be said that every time Jason Todd is added in the mix of crossover events in the Batman universe (like with the Joker before), it leaves me very disappointed. Not the most likable of Robins, it's easy to dismiss Jason as the Red Hood to be some black sheep that is only brought in for extra muscle but I would like to believe he is still a significant member of the Bat-family. Frustratingly enough, this potential is never realized in his appearances in crossovers. His presence was taken too on-the-as well; even his interaction with a Talon that is supposed to be meaningful is diluted with the fact that he never truly takes a more active role other than to express his disdain over Batman. For someone who is at constant odds with his former surrogate father, he still keeps coming back to Gotham, forcing the notion that he is not able to cut ties with the city and his past at all. And that serves to weaken whatever character development he had undergone in the company of his outsider allies. There is also this grave error in detail pertaining to the Talon's only weakness which is subzero atmosphere. Despite their regenerative properties, the Talons can be stopped through cold. And yet no one in the Court felt the need to send as many assassins to eliminate Mr. Freeze, the one supervillain who can defeat them with his power. Meanwhile, they send tons of them to Wayne Manor when they have yet to uncover that he is Batman. It's not nitpicking to point this out. It's really an unsettling part of the story that needs to be criticized. RECOMMENDED: NO DETECTIVE COMICS #9 Batman takes a detour to save Jeremiah Arkham. Clayface and Black Mask make appearances. This was an acceptable story to take a break from but nothing of urgency. You may only read this to know what other messes Batman has to clean up. RECOMMENDED: NO BIRDS OF PREY #9 The women are confronted by a Talon and readers were offered a glimpse into the mind of said Talon which provided really interesting inner monologues across the panels. I really enjoyed the way the story was structured because it was neatly executed without going over-the-top in apprehending the Talon (like Batman and Robin #9) or completely being shoehorned in for the sake of action (Red Hood and the Outlaws #9). It's just another change in perspective in a corner of Gotham City that was brisk yet enjoyable. RECOMMENDED: YES BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT #9 I don't know why this was even included in the mix. I don't even feel like talking about it here. Quite a bit of a ret-con regarding the Talons so just skip this. RECOMMENDED: NO CATWOMAN #9 Just like with Damian Wayne, my affection for Catwoman makes it hard for me to dismiss this issue altogether. I certainly liked the heartfelt panels regarding Selina's sympathy for one of the Talons, Ephraim Newhouse, because she sees that he had been damaged in a way that she can understand, much like Barbara Gordon in Batgirl #9 with that female Talon. The story is simple enough; a Talon is sent to assassinate the Penguin who turned out to be hoarding bird-related artifacts and one of them was a blade that belonged to said Talon. A truly serendipitous moment, yes? Winick's work on Catwoman New 52 has generally made me uneasy but I would consider this issue to be one of his good ones. RECOMMENDED: YES because I think that next to Nightwing #9 and Batgirl #9, this story is also quite effective in making us feel something for a Talon. And Ephraim Newhouse is a rather sympathetic Talon for me and I'd like to see more of him. BONUS MATERIAL: Fall of the House Wayne and Batman Annual #1 I wouldn't like to give away too much about these stories but they were certainly intriguing to peruse tough especially the former. Told in the perspective of Alfred's father Jarvis Pennyworth as he writes his son a letter, this story has a horror vibe going on as we slowly unravel the truth about the early Court and its fixation on the Waynes. There are aspects about it that sort of ret-cons established details in the Batman mythos but I could overlook them. The latter story, on the other hand, was Mr. Freeze-centric which changes and revamps some of his origin story and is beautifully illustrated by Jason Fabok. A worthy read if you like said villain. OVERALL VERDICT: 7/10 I'd like to think that I was able to discuss fairly this collection's merits and flaws, both as a sum of its parts and in accordance to its individual tie-ins. There are irrelevant threads here and there, and some questionable narrative decisions, but it doesn't diminish the fact that Scott Snyder has done us a service on his take on Batman for DC's New 52 and I'm eager to see him refine his duller points when it comes to storytelling and execution. There are plenty of good things that are up for grabs in the horizon and I'm very excited to start reading Batman: Zero Year and Batman Eternal next! [DO READ MORE ABOUT MY BATMAN REVIEWS IN http://batman-comics-geek.blogspot.com/]

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    This is sort of a compilation in between the first two volumes of the Owls cycle. It is a fun ride with lots of superheroes Red Robin, Batwing, Robin, Batgirl, the Birds of Prey, Rightwing and Catwoman and yet avoids the overload I felt with, say, Injustice where there just were too many superheroes. It was fun to see how each hero addressed the dangers and worked both together and separately. Again, the artwork is excellent and the stories are invigorating.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rizwan

    Simply A-for AWESOME and B-for BADASS! What began very interestingly in Batman, Volume 1: The Court of Owls culminated in a perfect bombastic yet heart-touching end. Superbly written from start to finish including all the brilliant crossover stories (each a piece of the bigger picture) centering on other members of Bat-family. Thrilling, suspenseful, action-packed, emotional. Well-detailed characterizations with depth from all angles from our various heroes to the wonderfully unique voices and b Simply A-for AWESOME and B-for BADASS! What began very interestingly in Batman, Volume 1: The Court of Owls culminated in a perfect bombastic yet heart-touching end. Superbly written from start to finish including all the brilliant crossover stories (each a piece of the bigger picture) centering on other members of Bat-family. Thrilling, suspenseful, action-packed, emotional. Well-detailed characterizations with depth from all angles from our various heroes to the wonderfully unique voices and backstories for each different supposed evil Talon assassins. Truly epic in every sense of the word. In all, its almost 600 (!) pages (combining with Nightwing, Volume 1: Traps and Trapezes, which is a required-read before this big event), and its compulsively readable from the first page to the very last. Now I get why this is the most talk-about and famous Batman-event of the recent years. 10 out of 10 for the full crossover event.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    This graphic novel gives you your money's worth and then some. It takes the Court of the Owls/Talon storyline to the razor edge. You see how profound the war of the Owls is on those who oppose their agenda for Gotham. Batman and his family of crimefighters and their associates all find themselves in mortal danger and taking on these formidable and superhuman warriors that serve the the Court of Owls, the Talons. I liked how the story crosses generations in the telling. I finished reading all the This graphic novel gives you your money's worth and then some. It takes the Court of the Owls/Talon storyline to the razor edge. You see how profound the war of the Owls is on those who oppose their agenda for Gotham. Batman and his family of crimefighters and their associates all find themselves in mortal danger and taking on these formidable and superhuman warriors that serve the the Court of Owls, the Talons. I liked how the story crosses generations in the telling. I finished reading all the All Star Westerns my library has and I was pining for more, but I got a bit of that when the story goes back to Jonah Hex and his comrades dealing with the Talon. Also, we get to see how Dick Grayson's family became intertwined in the history of the Talon. There are some excellent cameos by Red Hood, Arsenal (Red Arrow), Starfire, Batwoman, Young Robin (Damien Wayne), Nightwing, Catwoman, and many others. We even see how Alfred's own father ran afoul of the Court of Owls. To me, this is a really excellent graphic novel collection. The artwork is beautiful and the storytelling is compelling. Batman is the king of awesome, but he's against a force that makes him the dark horse in this race (not something you see that often). This took me a while to read, but it's one that you want to spend a lot of time with, because the content is truly good stuff. Definitely recommend this to fans of Batman and his associates! Overall rating: 4.5/5.0 stars.

  11. 5 out of 5

    nova ☼

    i like these collections on a whole because i have a crappy memory, but they’re also almost impossible to rate. some of the issues i really enjoyed and some i could live without.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Probably closer to 3.5 stars for an exciting, universe-wide event slightly marred by uneven stories. It is a very long collection, bringing together thirteen stories spanning one very long night. (And one from the past, because we need to get Jonah Hex in here somehow.) The big three, Batman, Nightwing, and Batgirl are well integrated, but some of the other runs aren't. For example, in Batman, Bats says he's going after Arkham first and then March. The story then skips straight to March's office Probably closer to 3.5 stars for an exciting, universe-wide event slightly marred by uneven stories. It is a very long collection, bringing together thirteen stories spanning one very long night. (And one from the past, because we need to get Jonah Hex in here somehow.) The big three, Batman, Nightwing, and Batgirl are well integrated, but some of the other runs aren't. For example, in Batman, Bats says he's going after Arkham first and then March. The story then skips straight to March's office. The next page, however, is Detective Comics, where Batman saves Arkham. Likewise, the annual #1 with Freeze didn't seem to fit into the timeline. ((view spoiler)[Jason rescues Freeze, turns him over to Batgirl. Babs apparently has time to drop him off at Arkham on her way to meet the Birds of Prey. Freeze is entered into the system, set to his usual cell, and meets with a counselor, seemingly while Batman rescues Dr. Arkham and fights Black Mask. Bats leaves to go see March and the staff get back to work. Freeze breaks out of prison and heads to Wayne Enterprises, only to be waylayed by Nightwing and Damien who were all the way across town five seconds ago. Freeze then goes up for a creepy as fuck revelation and a showdown with Batman. The same Batman who told us in Batman #9 that he was going to attack the Owls hideout. (hide spoiler)] Sooooo...he stopped for this? This is on a different night but inserted in the middle of the book? It really stalled the action.) The aforementioned Hex comic also seems pretty tacked on, since it's happened outside the confines of the Night of Owls. The other unfortunate thing is there's really no resolution. The sun rises and the night is over, but since this is a collection of #8 and #9's, Batman still has three more issues to keep fighting the Owls. The reveal at the end did whet my appetite, but Still, Red Hood and the Outlaws was a surprise treat. I've passed on the run before because Starfire does not appeal, but I liked Jason and his conflict regarding the city. His interaction with both the Talon and Batgirl felt like there was genuine emotion behind it. Catwoman and Birds of Prey were perfectly fine as well. In the end, I liked the collection enough to bump it up to four stars, and it was a great way to introduce characters whose stories I haven't been reading. But, despite collecting 14 books, I ended feeling that I'd missed something and I need to pick up the second Bats trade. If you're not deeply invested in the how the world as a whole weaves together, you could probably do the same.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    Nigh of the Owls is the first crossover of Batman titles during Snyder's spectacular run in the New 52 Batman. As Alfred calls for an almost distress signal, most of the members of the Bat family (hmmm, Batwoman is doing an equally awesome series that time so she was absent) responded. Night of the Owls is a collected mashup of Bat and Bird heroes against the the Talons of the Court of Owls. Unfortunately, they are really not at par with Snyder's obviously superior storytelling and Capullo's equa Nigh of the Owls is the first crossover of Batman titles during Snyder's spectacular run in the New 52 Batman. As Alfred calls for an almost distress signal, most of the members of the Bat family (hmmm, Batwoman is doing an equally awesome series that time so she was absent) responded. Night of the Owls is a collected mashup of Bat and Bird heroes against the the Talons of the Court of Owls. Unfortunately, they are really not at par with Snyder's obviously superior storytelling and Capullo's equally great artistry. Most of the titles are just action issues with little or no philosophical investment, save fore some like the Gray Son of Gotham. Robin has some shocking panels. The rest are just okay. Oh yeah, there's an armored Batman suit that literally belittles the many Talons that attacked the Wayne Manor. Crazy.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This was one of the better Batman and New 52 volumes that I have read. This was a huge crossover volume, and it was done very well. The titles were split up so that they were put in a cohesive order - super helpful for those of use that don't follow all of the other series! This was one of the better Batman and New 52 volumes that I have read. This was a huge crossover volume, and it was done very well. The titles were split up so that they were put in a cohesive order - super helpful for those of use that don't follow all of the other series!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    These theme books are scattered, and this book more so than others. It tries to tell the story of 'Night of the Owls' in chronological order, which means that issues from the same series often get separated. And even so, it doesn't work out (for example, one story starts at 8:15, jumps three hours ahead, and then a later issue fills in the missing hours), and there are gaps and missing pieces (and story threads that are left hanging from their respective series). That said, the stories are okay. These theme books are scattered, and this book more so than others. It tries to tell the story of 'Night of the Owls' in chronological order, which means that issues from the same series often get separated. And even so, it doesn't work out (for example, one story starts at 8:15, jumps three hours ahead, and then a later issue fills in the missing hours), and there are gaps and missing pieces (and story threads that are left hanging from their respective series). That said, the stories are okay. There's a lot of action, but they all play out pretty similarly. Several have back-stories for their respective Owls, which gives some semblance of diversity, but none of them are particularly gripping (Gail Simone's story being the exception, where the back story is more interesting than the actual battle). The court of Owls and the Talons were an impressive addition to the Batman canon, and Scott Snyder's issues here do some powerful work. But ultimately it suffers from too-similar stories.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    Very enjoyable. Typically, I see crossover issues as just filler. A way to sell more comic books (Dark Nights: Metal). I found almost every one of these individual issues enjoyable, and they actually added to the depth and magnitude of the Court (esp the Nightwing inserts). The "First Snow" issue alone makes this worth picking up. Very enjoyable. Typically, I see crossover issues as just filler. A way to sell more comic books (Dark Nights: Metal). I found almost every one of these individual issues enjoyable, and they actually added to the depth and magnitude of the Court (esp the Nightwing inserts). The "First Snow" issue alone makes this worth picking up.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    The Court Of Owls set their army of Talon assassins upon Gotham City with a list of targets to kill, causing Batman (or more specifically, Alfred) to call in the Bat-family for help. Although billed as a cross-over event, Night Of The Owls could be more accurately described as a large sample collection of most of the Bat-related titles in the New 52. Despite taking place during one night, there are inconsistencies throughout. Characters fix their costumes, recover from serious wounds and traverse The Court Of Owls set their army of Talon assassins upon Gotham City with a list of targets to kill, causing Batman (or more specifically, Alfred) to call in the Bat-family for help. Although billed as a cross-over event, Night Of The Owls could be more accurately described as a large sample collection of most of the Bat-related titles in the New 52. Despite taking place during one night, there are inconsistencies throughout. Characters fix their costumes, recover from serious wounds and traverse the city in impossible times. Even the weather changes with each chapter! For the most part, there's never any overall threat to Gotham and no real conclusion offered here. Of course, this is Batman's story to finish in The City Of Owls, but after reading a book of this length, the lack of a closing scene feels somewhat cheap. However, if you've not read some of the individual series included here, this is a good place to try something new. Most of the stories are enjoyable in their own right and form a good collection for fans of the Court Of Owls story arc. As for these individual issues, the quality predictably varies. Several writers and artists are included and it's a definite case of the good, the bad and the ugly. Batman and Nightwing are the best chapters here. This isn't too surprising, as they're the characters with the closest ties to the Court Of Owls. Batman #8 in particular is one of the best comic chapters i've read! Each page is gripping and will draw you in further with every panel. With Batman busy elsewhere, Robin goes solo and proves his worth in the brilliantly titled 'Robin Hears A Hoo'. Batwing gets a good showing for his character, in and out of his suit. The Court's power and manipulative tactics are used to their fullest in Batgirl, and the Batman Annual features the New 52 origin of Mr. Freeze. Both are well drawn and written. Having heard mostly criticism for Catwoman and also Red Hood & The Outlaws solo series, I was pleasantly surprised that their issues here were a fun read, including some meaningful moments. On the other hand, Birds Of Prey felt somewhat lacking, even with it's fearless Talon. Likewise, Detective Comics fell flat. Oddball Jeremiah Arkham and 'mind control' Black Mask just don't cut it and the chapter is poorly placed in the book, too. Similarly, All-Star Western is a poor choice of opener, offering little to the narrative other than a very brief appearance of a Talon. However, that leaves The Dark Knight to take the dubious honour of worst chapter in the book. Aside from the ugly artwork and misleading cover (Red Robin plays no part in this event), the plot does it's best to ruin parts of Scott Snyder's main Batman series and is best avoided altogether! It's also worth noting a unique feature for this collection. Due to the "undead" nature of the Talons, the "no kill" rule goes out the window. This means the Bat-family can cross the line when it comes to their attacks, although this comes more easily to some than others. In several chapters, each Talon is given a back story and a full character, ranging from sympathetic to psychotic and these are often a highlight. Ultimately, Night Of The Owls is a good collection of a less-than-stellar event, and is recommended for those who want to try out the various series included or to add more to their Court Of Owls collection.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    As with any crossover collection, this is very hit and miss. But what does work about it, maybe better than most crossovers I've read over the years, is how good of a job it does at incapsulating the sheer scope of the Night of the Owls and its affect on every single member of the Bat family (except Batwoman, I guess). The attack by the Talons (the Court of Owls' emissaries of doom) are relentless and innumerable, and seeing them play out across Gotham in this book really hits that point home. Th As with any crossover collection, this is very hit and miss. But what does work about it, maybe better than most crossovers I've read over the years, is how good of a job it does at incapsulating the sheer scope of the Night of the Owls and its affect on every single member of the Bat family (except Batwoman, I guess). The attack by the Talons (the Court of Owls' emissaries of doom) are relentless and innumerable, and seeing them play out across Gotham in this book really hits that point home. That said, I did start to find the stories a little wearying by the end. They're basically all slight riffs on the same concept: one of Batman's allies attempts to stop a Talon from murdering a high-ranking member of Gotham society. They fight, the Batperson wins at the last second, rinse and repeat. I guess that's the risk you run when your crossover is just about a bunch of similar-looking bad guys being dispatched across the same city to accomplish the same goal: it all looks the same. The Batman issues by Scott Snyder are the clear standouts here, depicting a real struggle for Batman to defeat the Talons and gain the upper hand. His stakes feel the most immediate and dire. However, you could get that same story without all the side dishes by reading Batman, Volume 2: The City of Owls, and I think it would be a smoother and more enjoyable experience. One of the biggest problems with a crossover of this nature is, nobody feels like they're really in danger. It's all just gently-interconnected chaos that we know is going to work out from the beginning, so no matter how great the action or dialogue is, it feels pre-settled. But, again, it's still cool to see all of this in one package, rather than reading the titles separately. It's piqued my interest in the whole Court of Owls collective even more, and I'm ready to finally know exactly what they're all about and how they've operated in the shadows for centuries. Which is about all you can ask for a crossover of this nature.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Taddow

    I am a bit conflicted with how much I liked this anthology. Let me start out by saying the art is great, most of the stories are good (some are awesome, some are okay) and the I really like the concept of the Court of Owls- this powerful society of unknown power elites that have been in place since the beginning of Gotham City with a small army of elite super assassins called Talons to enact their will. *SPOILER* But here's my conflict. With the exception of some awesome battles where Batman take I am a bit conflicted with how much I liked this anthology. Let me start out by saying the art is great, most of the stories are good (some are awesome, some are okay) and the I really like the concept of the Court of Owls- this powerful society of unknown power elites that have been in place since the beginning of Gotham City with a small army of elite super assassins called Talons to enact their will. *SPOILER* But here's my conflict. With the exception of some awesome battles where Batman takes on several Talons at once, or when several superheroes take on a single Talon, the majority of the fights between the Talons and the various other heroes (Batwing and Robin to name just a couple) were disappointing. Maybe this is just my cry for some heroic blood (which is why I probably could never write a series of books based on the same main characters where they are never defeated or killed by the enemy, despite the set-up that the enemy is so powerful). Example: There are these highly-trained assassins with accelerated healing. They have no problem assassinating their normal non-superhero targets and their normal guards but can't do much against a superhero. Perhaps the fighting techniques and equipment of the Talons are outdated (as much as bladed implements and punching and kicking could become ineffective) and so they can't compete with the superheroes. This kind of makes me agree with what the Joker says later in the series when he pokes fun at Batman for beating the Court of Owls. The Talons are depicted as great for killing the normal masses, but the argument could be made "why need a super-powered elite assassin when a trained "normal" assassin could probably do the same work?" Of course there are some Talons that shine (the one that fights Nightwing for example- at least that was a back and forth battle of note) and perhaps if the story depicted more Talons like this (and if a Talon could not kill because I understand the need to continue a comic series, but maybe at least seriously injure some superheroes) the deadly potential of this enemy could have been highlighted.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    Night of the Owls consists of Batfamily tie-ins to the greater Court of Owls storyline being weaved in the main Batman comic line run by Scott Snyder, which has been fantastic. This volume’s purpose is mainly to show just how widespread Talon activity is during the Night of Owls and pretty effectively draws this rebooted Batfamily back together again, explaining and redefining relationships among the resuited Dick Grayson who has returned as Nightwing in the New 52 universe, Tim Drake (now known Night of the Owls consists of Batfamily tie-ins to the greater Court of Owls storyline being weaved in the main Batman comic line run by Scott Snyder, which has been fantastic. This volume’s purpose is mainly to show just how widespread Talon activity is during the Night of Owls and pretty effectively draws this rebooted Batfamily back together again, explaining and redefining relationships among the resuited Dick Grayson who has returned as Nightwing in the New 52 universe, Tim Drake (now known as Red Robin after striking it out on his own), Damian Wayne (the new Robin), Catwoman, Barbara Gordon (returning as Batgirl after a miraculous recovery from the damage Joker did to her spine), and the Red Hood (former Robin Jason Todd). It’s all a bit odd to be honest. Old bits of storyline have been kept in this continuity rather than just retconned or avoided entirely and it makes it kind of difficult for people who were following the Bat storyline sequentially to get their bearings, but if you can just quiet that nagging voice in your mind demanding order and rationality, it’s enjoyable enough. Ultimately, this volume doesn’t really do that much to heighten the intensity of the Owls storyline. It’s individual issues are hit and miss in terms of quality and usually end up rather repetitive. A Talon is introduced and we see their historical roots, they stalk a member of the family and the family succeeds in putting them down and gaining a “legitimate” (at least in the eyes of the reader, and in some cases the disapproving eyes of Bruce) place in the new pantheon of Bat heroes. The only one of value were the Nightwing stories as his character is intimately tied to the Owls, but even that is explained in the main title sequence. If you’re just looking for the core story of the Owls, which is pretty good for the most part, stick to Snyder’s main narration in the main Batman title. The tie-ins aren’t necessary and you’ll get references to the significant events of this collection in the main story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    Now THAT was a badass Batman book. An enemy that's nearly invulnerable, that knows Bruce Wayne inside and out and across time. One that can strike at anyone, anytime. This brings together the whole Bat Family, and is a great way to see many of them in action in one place, but all with their own stories. The strongest story is Bruce and Alfred in the Mansion, but a very close 2nd is the Nightwing story all about Dick and his actual origins. Look for appearances of Damian, Batgirl, Batwing, Birds Now THAT was a badass Batman book. An enemy that's nearly invulnerable, that knows Bruce Wayne inside and out and across time. One that can strike at anyone, anytime. This brings together the whole Bat Family, and is a great way to see many of them in action in one place, but all with their own stories. The strongest story is Bruce and Alfred in the Mansion, but a very close 2nd is the Nightwing story all about Dick and his actual origins. Look for appearances of Damian, Batgirl, Batwing, Birds of Prey, Jonah Hex, and Red Hood & the Outlaws (I LOVE this version of Jason Todd). The artwork is top notch, making Bruce Wayne look great, and Batman looks like he is one step away from the edge at some points. There's way more brutality in this one, so it's a change of pace. I also love how Snyder ties in with Old Gotham, something he started way back in one of his first titles: Gates of Gotham, and has again laid a fantastic tapestry of the history of Gotham which has controlled and ruled until even now under all the Wayne's noses. This is the kind of enemy that has great long term potential. If Snyder keeps up with this pace, he'll soon be Grant Morrison level on his Batman run. Fantastic. MUST READ!!!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael (Mai)

    This is a pretty cool anathology. It’s really good to read once you’ve finished both The Court of the Owls and The City of Owls. It’s the different tales of all of Batman’s allies that Alfred has contacted. Why I really liked it is because I got some insight into the background of Nightwing and a few of the talons before they were made into assassins. It also showed my favorite outlaw: Red Hood along with Starfire and her crazy-ass self. Be prepared for a bunch of different fantastic artists and This is a pretty cool anathology. It’s really good to read once you’ve finished both The Court of the Owls and The City of Owls. It’s the different tales of all of Batman’s allies that Alfred has contacted. Why I really liked it is because I got some insight into the background of Nightwing and a few of the talons before they were made into assassins. It also showed my favorite outlaw: Red Hood along with Starfire and her crazy-ass self. Be prepared for a bunch of different fantastic artists and reading about different histories and what is happening in different parts of Gotham on the night the Owls tried to take over. The only problem was there were a few repeats from The City of Owls. Other than that it was too good to complain about!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eldon Farrell

    As this collection contained mostly the crossover issues outside the Batman title I found it slow going. Unfortunately as seems often to be the case most of these stories add nothing of value to the overall story arc. It's all right but necessary. As this collection contained mostly the crossover issues outside the Batman title I found it slow going. Unfortunately as seems often to be the case most of these stories add nothing of value to the overall story arc. It's all right but necessary.

  24. 5 out of 5

    JB

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really enjoyed this Bat-event! The Court of Owls is a very interesting adversary. The Talon's especially are formidable foes. I loved the way the Court of Owls was embedded in Gotham's history and in the personal history of Bruce Wayne, Dick Grayson, Alfred Pennyworth etc. Every Bat-title brought something to the event. If you're reading Scott Snyder's Batman I recommend you to get this to see what the Night of the Owls brought with it in every Bat-title. I really enjoyed this Bat-event! The Court of Owls is a very interesting adversary. The Talon's especially are formidable foes. I loved the way the Court of Owls was embedded in Gotham's history and in the personal history of Bruce Wayne, Dick Grayson, Alfred Pennyworth etc. Every Bat-title brought something to the event. If you're reading Scott Snyder's Batman I recommend you to get this to see what the Night of the Owls brought with it in every Bat-title.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Koen

    Owls vs. bats, robins, canaries,... Well, it was quite the ride and I loved the historical aspects in here a lot.. Showing us the owls, how they were, who they are.. But I'm sorry, there were some lame tie-ins in this one (Jonah Hex?? :S ) Still, Redhood and Nightwing always know how to get stuff done and give me a smile on my face.. So, not really a must read, but it was fun.. Won't be a part of my memorables.. Owls vs. bats, robins, canaries,... Well, it was quite the ride and I loved the historical aspects in here a lot.. Showing us the owls, how they were, who they are.. But I'm sorry, there were some lame tie-ins in this one (Jonah Hex?? :S ) Still, Redhood and Nightwing always know how to get stuff done and give me a smile on my face.. So, not really a must read, but it was fun.. Won't be a part of my memorables..

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Harbour

    This is a good addition to the Court of Owls story arc of Snyder's Batman, with tie-ins for all the other major Batman spinoffs: The Dark Knight, Detective, B&R, Nightwing, Batgirl, etc. A very good value and definitely a must-read if you don't buy those other books separately. This is a good addition to the Court of Owls story arc of Snyder's Batman, with tie-ins for all the other major Batman spinoffs: The Dark Knight, Detective, B&R, Nightwing, Batgirl, etc. A very good value and definitely a must-read if you don't buy those other books separately.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    A crossover that works?! Check out the full review here! A crossover that works?! Check out the full review here!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julio Bonilla

    It's like "Batman Begins" from another point of view! It's like "Batman Begins" from another point of view!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kole

    A fun enough read, most of the stories were good, the Scott Snyder stories being the highlights. The rest were good, the only complete flop for me was the All Star Western which didn't make much sense taken out of context of it's series as I have no idea who the characters are and it didn't really add anything to the story, a bad start to this compilation. Overall while some of the crossover issues were over fairly quickly they still made for fine stories if a bit rushed. This volume isn't entir A fun enough read, most of the stories were good, the Scott Snyder stories being the highlights. The rest were good, the only complete flop for me was the All Star Western which didn't make much sense taken out of context of it's series as I have no idea who the characters are and it didn't really add anything to the story, a bad start to this compilation. Overall while some of the crossover issues were over fairly quickly they still made for fine stories if a bit rushed. This volume isn't entirely necessary but it's fun overall and nice to see this event expanded. In the end you have a fine experience with only 1 or 2 duds and only a few great issues which tend to be the Scott Snyder stuff that I think is collected in other volumes because I'm fairly certain that I've read them before. If you want more Batman and his friends, you could do a lot worse. Reccomended 3.5/5

  30. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    Like most collections like this, this is a mixed bag of some good and some bad. I am a fan of the overall event and story though. It is a cool idea from Scott Snyder and DC

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