hits counter The Model Bakery Cookbook: 75 Favorite Recipes from the Beloved Napa Valley Bakery - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Model Bakery Cookbook: 75 Favorite Recipes from the Beloved Napa Valley Bakery

Availability: Ready to download

This definitive baking guide is the much-anticipated cookbook from the Model Bakery, a mother-daughter-run baking destination with a huge local following that's been wowing the Wine Country for years. And this book of sensational artisan baked goods makes clear why there are lines out the door! Featuring 75 recipes and 60 photos, it's as luscious to look at as their most-r This definitive baking guide is the much-anticipated cookbook from the Model Bakery, a mother-daughter-run baking destination with a huge local following that's been wowing the Wine Country for years. And this book of sensational artisan baked goods makes clear why there are lines out the door! Featuring 75 recipes and 60 photos, it's as luscious to look at as their most-requested breads, classic desserts, and fresh pastries--all arrayed here--are to eat. Pain au Levain, Sticky Buns, Peach Streusel Pie, Ginger Molasses Cookies, and many more glorious recipes make this a mouthwatering read and a reference gem for lovers of bread and pastry, cakes and cookies, and, of course, the Model Bakery!


Compare

This definitive baking guide is the much-anticipated cookbook from the Model Bakery, a mother-daughter-run baking destination with a huge local following that's been wowing the Wine Country for years. And this book of sensational artisan baked goods makes clear why there are lines out the door! Featuring 75 recipes and 60 photos, it's as luscious to look at as their most-r This definitive baking guide is the much-anticipated cookbook from the Model Bakery, a mother-daughter-run baking destination with a huge local following that's been wowing the Wine Country for years. And this book of sensational artisan baked goods makes clear why there are lines out the door! Featuring 75 recipes and 60 photos, it's as luscious to look at as their most-requested breads, classic desserts, and fresh pastries--all arrayed here--are to eat. Pain au Levain, Sticky Buns, Peach Streusel Pie, Ginger Molasses Cookies, and many more glorious recipes make this a mouthwatering read and a reference gem for lovers of bread and pastry, cakes and cookies, and, of course, the Model Bakery!

30 review for The Model Bakery Cookbook: 75 Favorite Recipes from the Beloved Napa Valley Bakery

  1. 5 out of 5

    HBalikov

    “The Model Bakery” is a California wine country institution. My friends (including you, Jane) know my weakness for baked goods and I was interested to see how their cookbook held up under use. The answer: very well, indeed! The cookbook provides some context for the recipes and here is a typical one that had me salivating and assembling the ingredients: "It was Karen’s grandmother Stella who taught her how to make these flaky biscuits, which fly out of the bread basket. She said that her secret w “The Model Bakery” is a California wine country institution. My friends (including you, Jane) know my weakness for baked goods and I was interested to see how their cookbook held up under use. The answer: very well, indeed! The cookbook provides some context for the recipes and here is a typical one that had me salivating and assembling the ingredients: "It was Karen’s grandmother Stella who taught her how to make these flaky biscuits, which fly out of the bread basket. She said that her secret was a touch of sugar. That may be true, but handling the dough with a light hand is also essential, as is the combination of buttermilk as a tenderizer and half-and-half as an enrichment." Most of the recipes are not complicated. The one (below) for delicious scones is a good example: "MAKES 8 LARGE Apricot Pecan SCONES 3 cups/380 g unbleached all-purpose flour, plus more for the pan 1/3 cup/65 g sugar 21/2 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp baking soda 3/4 tsp fine sea salt 1 cup/225 g cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-in/12-mm cubes 2/3 cup/110 g diced dried apricots (1/2-in/12-mm dice) 1/2 cup/55 g coarsely chopped pecans, plus 2 Tbsp finely chopped pecans Grated zest of 1 orange 11/4 cups/300 ml cold buttermilk, plus more for brushing (optional) 2 Tbsp heavy cream 1. Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 400°F/200°C/gas 6. Flour the bottom of an 8-in/21-cm round cake pan. Line a half-sheet pan with parchment paper. 2. Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a large bowl. Add the butter and toss to coat with the flour mixture. Using a pastry blender or two knives, cut in the butter until the mixture is crumbly, with some pea-size pieces of butter. Add the apricots, coarsely chopped pecans, and orange zest and stir to coat. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and pour in the buttermilk. Stir to thoroughly moisten the dry ingredients, including any crumbly bits at the bottom of the bowl. Knead the dough in the bowl just a few times, until it comes together into a moist dough. 3. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface. The dough may look a little rough, but try to resist the temptation to knead it unless it is really shaggy. In that case, use just a few folds to smooth it out. Using floured hands, pat the dough into the prepared pan. Invert the dough onto a floured work surface. Using a sharp knife, cut the dough into eight equal wedges. Transfer the wedges, floured-side down, to the lined pan, spacing them 2 in/5 cm apart. Lightly brush each scone with the cream or additional buttermilk and sprinkle with the finely chopped pecans. 4. Bake until the scones are golden brown, about 25 minutes. Let cool for 5 minutes. Serve warm. (The scones can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 days.) NOTE: If you have a busy weekend coming up and it includes houseguests, freeze the unbaked scones. Place the wedges on a parchment paper–lined baking sheet, cover tightly with plastic wrap, and freeze for up to 2 weeks. When you’re ready to bake, transfer the frozen wedges to another parchment paper–lined baking sheet and bake in a preheated 425°F/220°C/gas 7 oven until golden brown, about 30 minutes." Interested?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cecelia

    I won a Facebook contest for a dozen English Muffins. I know this sounds completely batty, and in a way, it is. Chronicle Books is a savvy company, and they know that if they put a photo of delicious food in their feed and tell you that you can win it by entering the contest… someone will enter. I am that someone, and also lucky. One dozen English Muffins from the Model Bakery showed up on my doorstep this Monday, and a copy of The Model Bakery Cookbook by Karen Mitchell, Sarah Mitchell Hansen a I won a Facebook contest for a dozen English Muffins. I know this sounds completely batty, and in a way, it is. Chronicle Books is a savvy company, and they know that if they put a photo of delicious food in their feed and tell you that you can win it by entering the contest… someone will enter. I am that someone, and also lucky. One dozen English Muffins from the Model Bakery showed up on my doorstep this Monday, and a copy of The Model Bakery Cookbook by Karen Mitchell, Sarah Mitchell Hansen and Rick Rodgers followed yesterday. I didn’t realize the cookbook was coming too, but I’m glad it did. I am not the sort of person who turns down cookbooks. Especially ones that focus on baking. The Model Bakery Cookbook begins with the story of how Karen Mitchell took over the bakery in St. Helena in the middle of California Wine Country, and with her daughter transformed it into what it is today – a two-location baking supplier for the local area, including businesses and restaurants in addition to their retail locations. The photos by Frankie Frankeny are mouth-wateringly beautiful, and the mix of history and baking guide make this cookbook a must-see for the serious home baker. The book is divided into several sections, according to what the bakery produces (recipes reduced to home baking proportions, of course). There are several recipes listed under each section: breads, yeasted sweets, breakfast favorites, cakes, pies and tarts, and cookies. The recipes are a mix of traditional American favorites and European-influenced imports, but all should be familiar to an American audience – they’re the kind of thing you find in your local bakery. I, for instance, made the recipe for Irish Soda Bread to test the recipe, and I can report that it’s a solid, no frills approach to the seasonal favorite. The best things about the cookbook are the great ingredient & equipment advice (I’ll be taking notes when pie-season arrives… basically, in a week or two!), an array of delicious recipes ranging from simple to difficult-to-replicate-at-home, lovely photos – some offering step-by-step visuals for the items requiring assembly, local and historical anecdotes of both the Hansens’ story and the location in St. Helena, and classic recipes done to perfection. I had few quibbles with the cookbook, and they are minor. The first is the small type used for instructions portion of each page. I have good eyes, but if I didn’t it would require bending very close to the page, which is not necessarily something you want to be doing with floured hands. The tips on the ingredients and tools also make it clear that this is not a cookbook for the frugal baker. While I agree with the writers that the best food comes from the best ingredients, it isn’t an inexpensive proposition, especially if you count some of the specialty flour and chocolate mentioned. Finally, you won’t find any truly unique items (so don’t go in expecting them!). This baking book is about the classics, and they done very well. In all, I’m glad to have this cookbook – it’ll work perfectly as a reference guide alongside my Joy of Cooking, and I intend to dip into it for holiday baking ideas as well. And if I scrape up the cash to get a stand mixer in the near future, I know I’ll be consulting these recipes again and again. Recommended for: the intermediate home baker, anyone who enjoys playing in the kitchen and is planning a trip to Napa in the future, and as a primer for favorite/standard American baked goods.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bundt

    In 1984, Karen Mitchell rented the St. Helena Bakery with its massive brick ovens dating back to the 1920s. Her goal was to recreate European breads using European artisan baking techniques and brick hearth ovens. Renovating the hundred-year-old building proved an enormous project; Karen wanted to create an open space with the feel of a 1930s café. The temperamental nature of the brick hearth ovens required experimentation to figure out the correct firing techniques and oven temperatures. In a d In 1984, Karen Mitchell rented the St. Helena Bakery with its massive brick ovens dating back to the 1920s. Her goal was to recreate European breads using European artisan baking techniques and brick hearth ovens. Renovating the hundred-year-old building proved an enormous project; Karen wanted to create an open space with the feel of a 1930s café. The temperamental nature of the brick hearth ovens required experimentation to figure out the correct firing techniques and oven temperatures. In a delightful turn of events, the bakery, known as the Model Bakery in the 1930s, once again took on that name, turning out a wide array of artisan breads, cakes, pastries and pies. Two decades in, Karen's daughter Sarah moved back to Napa Valley and joined the family business. I haven't had the pleasure of visiting the Model Bakery (I briefly visited California for the first time last year), but I learned about their eponymous cookbook on Rick Rodgers' Facebook page (Rick is one of the book's authors; his amazing Kaffeehaus: Exquisite Desserts from the Classic Cafés of Vienna, Budapest, and Prague is one of my favorite pastry books out of the dozens I own). I was instantly drawn in by the many classic recipes for breads, yeasted sweets (croissants, pain au chocolat, bear claws, cinnamon rolls), cakes, cookies, pies and tarts. These are simple, traditional, dependable recipes (no fancy flavorings, rare ingredients, or unusual baking equipment required!) that will be sure to delight. With a straightforward table of contents that conveniently fits on one page, it's easy to quickly locate recipes. Each chapter ends with a helpful "how-to" section that addresses certain aspects of food science (fermentation, enzymes, wet vs. dry doughs) and practical tips and tricks that will be especially helpful to new bakers (baking one sheet of cookies at a time for best results, parchment paper instead of silicone mats for crisper cookies). A compact look at ingredients (Karen and Sarah recommend Guittard French Vanilla as their chocolate of choice, whole-fat dairy instead of reduced fat, and European-style butter with a high butterfat content) and basic equipment will start bakers off on the right foot. For instance, they point out that "the thin and shiny cookie sheets that many home bakers have encourage burned cookie bottoms." Instead, they recommend using half- and quarter-sheet pans. As a serious home baker with an arsenal of professional pans, I strongly recommend the USA Pan 6-Piece Bakeware Set from USA Pans; the pans bake evenly and include a nonstick silicone coating that allows your baked goods to slide right off. Ingredients are given in volume and metric. I have worked with many yeast doughs for pastry over the years, but am fairly new to yeast breads. Even though I have a stand mixer, I prefer to work my doughs by hand, so I appreciate that every bread recipe also includes instructions on how to mix and knead by hand. I recently purchased an Emile Henry Flame Bread Baking Set - Black, and am looking forward to trying out some of the Model Bakery's artisan breads like the country olive pain au levain with rosemary. Their baking method involves heating an inverted ovenproof pot to 500; I think I'll take my chances with the cloche! I also loved the wild yeast grape starter; it is unlike any other starter I've seen in my many baking books. It's a bit harder to track down organic wine grapes in my neck of the woods, but it is worth the effort to do so. The sections on yeasted sweets, breakfast favorites, cakes and cookies were familiar territory for me; I own close to 40 baking books alone, so I am always excited to find new versions of classics. I LOVED the soda bread; moist and fruity (I added the optional currants and caraway seeds), this was addictive and so easy to make. Their take on bear claws was also a bit different than other versions I've made (this one has coconut and cake crumbs in the filling in addition to the almond paste). I was also thrilled to see schnecken dough featured. From the cake section, I tried the lemon pound cake (baked in my Nordic Ware Lemon Loaf pans for a pretty presentation) and the pumpkin gingerbread cake (baked in Nordic Ware Platinum Collection Pumpkin Patch Pan). I also had to try making the chocolate rads after hearing so much about them; the first batch I made as large as directed (and they are HUGE, easily a good six or seven inches across, see photo), then made the rest of the dough in "normal" sized cookies for easier storage and freezing. There's a pound of melted chocolate in the dough and 2 cups of chocolate chips for only 12 cookies, so any diehard chocoholics in your life may have finally met their match! I found that even after chilling the dough for longer than recommended, it was still messy to work with as far as slicing; I might try placing it in the freezer next time to firm it up a bit more. The lack of diagrams and step-by-step photos (particularly for laminated doughs) may make this a little challenging for novice home bakers, but the many tips and hints offer practical insights that I haven't seen in my many other baking books. I loved some of the old-fashioned touches like the berries and cream cake (you have the option of using white or buttermilk cake), coconut cake, and their unique take on lemon squares: instead of making a separate lemon curd, you make a filling that is poured directly into the prebaked crust and baked until set, making it much quicker than other recipes I've tried. I also discovered some new European favorites like the gateau Basque, a double-crust almond tart filled with cherries and pastry cream. Verdict: "The Model Bakery" is a wonderful reference for classic artisan breads, yeasted sweets and cookies, brownies and cakes (including a homemade two-tiered wedding cake for the truly ambitious) that is accessible by bakers of all skill levels. The many stories add a personal feel, and this is comfort baking at its finest. (Review copy courtesy of the Model Bakery - thank you Karen and Sarah!)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Beth Cato

    I was happy to borrow this book through Prime Reading. I love baking and consider myself fairly experienced. This cookbook surprised me in that it began with more challenging recipes, including many using a croissant dough base, then continuing to cakes, pies and tarts, and cookies and bars. There are recipes across a range of difficulties, all described in a personable, approachable tone, with lots of extra notes to help bakers along. I found several recipes I want to try.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ren Benton

    Feb 11, 2017: Successfully made croissants on the first try. A 6-7 hour overall time investment, but most of that is letting the dough rest rather than active labor. Not for the impatient, but not as intimidating as I thought it would be. I mixed the dough by hand (no kneading required) and used cheap American butter and table salt (because I'd have to drive 80 miles one way to acquire the recommended European butter and sea salt), and the croissants are flawlessly chewy-tender inside and crispy Feb 11, 2017: Successfully made croissants on the first try. A 6-7 hour overall time investment, but most of that is letting the dough rest rather than active labor. Not for the impatient, but not as intimidating as I thought it would be. I mixed the dough by hand (no kneading required) and used cheap American butter and table salt (because I'd have to drive 80 miles one way to acquire the recommended European butter and sea salt), and the croissants are flawlessly chewy-tender inside and crispy-flaky outside. There are also handy instructions for growing my own yeast, should I ever find myself running a bakery in an apocalypse situation. Will update when the hardcover arrives (because I've realize digital cookbooks aren't my jam) and I work my way through more recipes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I like checking out cookbooks from the library before buying so I know up front if they'll be useful. This one popped up on my radar when the ebook version was marked down on Amazon. After borrowing a copy and flipping through the recipes, I realized this isn't one I need to add to my collection. While there is a decent variety of commonly found recipes here and the included photos are crave-worthy, all I was interested in call for dairy and/or eggs so this one's a pass for me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Segen

    I became interested in baking a year or so ago and have been searching for the right baking cookbook. This is it. Recipes make the most complex easy. I love that once providing the basic recipe for lamination or for yeast rolls there are then multiple ways to use them. Whether croissants, pain au chocolat, cinnamon rolls, cakes or pies -- all are here. Recipes are logical and easy to follow. I've baked more pastries than cakes but this has put cakes back on my radar. My thanks to the author.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nellie

    Scrumptious recipes from the famous Sonoma Bakery. I have tried the caramel chocolate tart from there. Lots of yummy recipes to try. I do disagree with the baker. In my opinion, a true muffin is of the crumbly texture and DEFINITELY not the cake kind. This is the reason for only 4 stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Janet Clark

    No doubt if you have trafficked CA wine country you have stopped for a treat at this bakery. Best blueberry muffin recipe ever. So easy to bake. Exotic ingredients are fresh blueberries and a little buttermilk. You will love the results.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    this book would be perfect for someone who was a baker and was good at it that would not be me. i found a few things that i would like to try to make but there was nothing that would make me want to buy this book

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stormy

    Not a typical baking nook. This was a refreshing story of passion for using patience, quality ingredients, good technique, and the power of friendships in work you love. Staying true to local history and intertwining that into a risky venture produced this satisfying story of quality bread making and the comforts of enjoying fresh, warm loaves and cookies! Recommended to kitchen enthusiasts who like more than recipes to inspire them.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    This is a good cookbook for beginner or infrequent bakers. The beginning breaks down the basics in baking which is great. There are great recipes: Carrot Cake (with no raisins), tarts, and breads galore. This would be a good gift to a friend or family member starting out in their baking journey.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sheryl

    Really enjoyed this cookbook

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Chandler

    This was one of my go-to bakeries when I lived in the Napa Valley. Fine baking. Great recipes. Lots of interesting recipes. I want to make their Granola.

  15. 4 out of 5

    superawesomekt

    Beautifully written, photographed, formatted. Excellent array of recipes. While this is not for an inexperienced baker, it is packaged for an amateur. 4 stars as I wish there were more pictures :)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Love this cookbook! So many great classics, as well as a few new twists! All my favorites in one place and easy to search!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    I am not interested in this level of baking but it seems like a great book for those who want to perfect their skills. I did screen shot several dessert recipes for reference.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Year-round baking Fans of Peter Reinhardt baking books will enjoy this cookbook. An excellent variety of recipes covering breads, muffins, desserts, even holiday items. It's the variety and mix of accessible and complex recipes that make this a good buy

  19. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I've never been to this local bakery, but I think I should get there stat. Clearly they are making and selling some pretty delicious fare. I have marked lots of pages with the intention of making some of these delightful concoctions (Espresso Bundt Cake anyone?) but we'll see if the spirit ever truly moves me. Lots of simple favorites in here too--granola, buttermilk biscuits, red velvet cake, lemon squares, oatmeal raisin&peanut butter&chocolate chip cookies. I've never been to this local bakery, but I think I should get there stat. Clearly they are making and selling some pretty delicious fare. I have marked lots of pages with the intention of making some of these delightful concoctions (Espresso Bundt Cake anyone?) but we'll see if the spirit ever truly moves me. Lots of simple favorites in here too--granola, buttermilk biscuits, red velvet cake, lemon squares, oatmeal raisin&peanut butter&chocolate chip cookies.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    I remember going the Model Bakery several times years ago when I worked in CA, just for English Muffins. Now, I can make our own. Awesome! So nice to have this recipe and all the help on technique. Many other goodies too!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karalalala

    Maybe one of my favourite baking books. Love love.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tia Malkin-fontecchio

    Several new favorites from this book, including the cream scones. I have added all kinds of things to the basic recipe (most recently strawberries and rhubarb) and it's always great.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mara

    Nothing really stood out. I have most of those recipes from other trusted sources, and here I found nothing I wanted to try.

  24. 4 out of 5

    the_100

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lence Chiusinco

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Richard

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vanae Alyssa S.

  30. 5 out of 5

    1

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.