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Live Like a Narnian: Christian Discipleship in Lewis's Chronicles

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In Live Like a Narnian Joe Rigney shows that Owen Barfield was right—What C.S. Lewis thought about everything was secretly present in what he said about anything. From apologetics to his thoughts on education, from his view of science to the role of government, from Natural Law to true manhood and womanhood—the breadth of Lewis's bright vision of life shines through in his In Live Like a Narnian Joe Rigney shows that Owen Barfield was right—What C.S. Lewis thought about everything was secretly present in what he said about anything. From apologetics to his thoughts on education, from his view of science to the role of government, from Natural Law to true manhood and womanhood—the breadth of Lewis's bright vision of life shines through in his beloved Chronicles. Come, learn to breathe Narnian air.


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In Live Like a Narnian Joe Rigney shows that Owen Barfield was right—What C.S. Lewis thought about everything was secretly present in what he said about anything. From apologetics to his thoughts on education, from his view of science to the role of government, from Natural Law to true manhood and womanhood—the breadth of Lewis's bright vision of life shines through in his In Live Like a Narnian Joe Rigney shows that Owen Barfield was right—What C.S. Lewis thought about everything was secretly present in what he said about anything. From apologetics to his thoughts on education, from his view of science to the role of government, from Natural Law to true manhood and womanhood—the breadth of Lewis's bright vision of life shines through in his beloved Chronicles. Come, learn to breathe Narnian air.

30 review for Live Like a Narnian: Christian Discipleship in Lewis's Chronicles

  1. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Ventura

    If you love Narnia, you will love this book. A joy to read from start to finish. Highly recommend.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ben Zornes

    As I’ve read the Narniad over the years, I have often thought that a book needed to be written highlighting the richest and most poignant lessons that Lewis intended to be learned in Narnia. Joe Rigney’s “Live Like a Narnian” is that book. This was an incredibly enjoyable read for any friend of Narnia (or Archenland). However, rumor has it that the Calormenes don’t particularly like this book. Rigney has masterfully chosen some of the most precious parts and themes in the Chronicles and then la As I’ve read the Narniad over the years, I have often thought that a book needed to be written highlighting the richest and most poignant lessons that Lewis intended to be learned in Narnia. Joe Rigney’s “Live Like a Narnian” is that book. This was an incredibly enjoyable read for any friend of Narnia (or Archenland). However, rumor has it that the Calormenes don’t particularly like this book. Rigney has masterfully chosen some of the most precious parts and themes in the Chronicles and then layers in other writings by Lewis to bring additional insight into what error, vice, or flawed logic Lewis was aiming to address. Obviously this is not an exhaustive book, and I hereby assert that Mr. Rigney ought to pen a second volume. Aslan hints in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader that the reason the children were brought to Narnia was that by knowing him there, they might know him better in our world (although of course he has a different name in our world). This is Lewis’ more explicit moments of tying Aslan to being a Christ-figure. I, along with many others, have been shaped by the lessons I learned upon the fresh and vibrant soil of Dancing Lawn, Beaversdam, the Stone Table and the Eastern Seas. Rigney has helpfully pointed out how Narnia is not an escape from reality, but rather it is brimful of lessons to be learned, and a manner of life that, as Christians, we ought to live. Chivalry, boldness, humility, enduring hardness, worship, obedience, masculine and feminine virtues all make an appearance in Narnia, and Live Like a Narnian aims to be a friendly reminder that to be a true King or Queen of Narnia, you must not forget Aslan’s signs. I especially enjoyed Rigney’s pointed discussion in Chapter 3 on Edmund, and how our present actions (and what we are worshipping) are shaping us into what we will be. We must not take the object of our worship lightly. I was moved to tears in several chapters, being reminded of the hardship that many of the Narnian heroes face, and yet despite the difficulties, persevere, resting all the while between the Lion’s paws. In Chapter 10 (about Shasta in The Horse and His Boy), I found a very timely reminder for me; in it Rigney quotes the Chronicle: “If you do one good deed your reward is usually to be set to do another and harder and better one.” What a great reminder. And really that is exactly what this book is…a helpful reminder to grip those lessons learned in Narnia. Don’t forget, don’t let the thick air of the shadowlands cloud your thinking and cause you to forget the lessons learned in Aslan’s country. I highly recommend Live Like a Narnia. Obviously, you should read the seven stories first…but then, this would be a helpful companion and guide. I give this book a Reepicheep salute, and commend Rigney for a job well done, and for making this a read that was really a pleasure to read (and not just because it was full of Lewis); Rigney’s commentary was truly as insightful, pastoral, and good-humored as one would expect a descendant of King Lune to be.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John

    This is a great, compact, little volume the way in which The Chronicles of Narnia disciples its readers into Christian maturity. Rigney shows how the books prepare the soil for receiving God's Word in the Bible, by preparing readers to think in biblical modes and categories. It is a sort of companion book to Doug Wilson's "What I Learned in Narnia," which Rigney endorses toward the end. Where Wilson's book is geared toward younger readers, Rigney's is aimed at older readers that will help their c This is a great, compact, little volume the way in which The Chronicles of Narnia disciples its readers into Christian maturity. Rigney shows how the books prepare the soil for receiving God's Word in the Bible, by preparing readers to think in biblical modes and categories. It is a sort of companion book to Doug Wilson's "What I Learned in Narnia," which Rigney endorses toward the end. Where Wilson's book is geared toward younger readers, Rigney's is aimed at older readers that will help their children or students understand the books in a much deeper way. This is really good, and I recommend it to everyone who has read the full series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    James Nance

    I didn’t think it would be possible for me appreciate Lewis’s Narnia Chronicles more than I already did. But Joe Rigney has succeeded in making me do just that. While this book is packed with helpful insights into living like a Narnian, it’s Rigney’s love for Narnia and C. S. Lewis that really come through to the reader. Thank you, Dr. Rigney!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Downs

    Rigney captures the lessons that Lewis teaches in The Chronicles of Narnia without taking away from the magic and mystery of the stories. He helps the reader understand why they love Narnia, and how to live as much like a Narnian in this world as is possible. His thoughts left me feeling discipled, refreshed, and desiring to know Aslan better in that world, so that I might know Jesus better in this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Great little book on things we can learn from Narnia. A great supplement to McGrath's section on Narnia in his biography of CS Lewis. Great little book on things we can learn from Narnia. A great supplement to McGrath's section on Narnia in his biography of CS Lewis.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Danette

    Wow! So good! If you haven't read The Chronicles of Narnia yet, do it! Then you can enjoy this book. Rigney pulls wonderful lessons out of the Chronicles and Lewis' other writings. I will be reading them again very soon to get a fresh breath of Narnian air. I especially loved the chapter, "Tirian's Trials and Tragedy - Enduring Deep Doubt and the Soul's Dark Night." "So then, The Last Battle shows us tragedy and despair. Does it also show us how to endure? Can it instruct Narnians how to live in th Wow! So good! If you haven't read The Chronicles of Narnia yet, do it! Then you can enjoy this book. Rigney pulls wonderful lessons out of the Chronicles and Lewis' other writings. I will be reading them again very soon to get a fresh breath of Narnian air. I especially loved the chapter, "Tirian's Trials and Tragedy - Enduring Deep Doubt and the Soul's Dark Night." "So then, The Last Battle shows us tragedy and despair. Does it also show us how to endure? Can it instruct Narnians how to live in the dark and 'take the adventure that Aslan sends to us'? I believe that it can." I believe lovers of Narnia will love this book. The appendix also has a good argument for the proper reading order of the Chronicles and I completely agree. 2020 A book about an interest of yours

  8. 5 out of 5

    Becky Pliego

    So many good things can be drawn from this book, but if I had to pick and choose only two, I would choose these sections as my favorite ones: "I can speak for every one, but breathing this type of Narnian air has a particular effect on me, one that I think Lewis intended... But more than just awaking my hunger, breathing Narnian air awakens a desire for a particular meal, one with tasty food, good conversation, lots of joy and laughter and revelry and strategizing about how to defeat the White Wi So many good things can be drawn from this book, but if I had to pick and choose only two, I would choose these sections as my favorite ones: "I can speak for every one, but breathing this type of Narnian air has a particular effect on me, one that I think Lewis intended... But more than just awaking my hunger, breathing Narnian air awakens a desire for a particular meal, one with tasty food, good conversation, lots of joy and laughter and revelry and strategizing about how to defeat the White Witch. It makes me want to eat my bread with joy and drink my wine with a merry heart, because God approves (Eccles. 9:7). It makes me want to guard my heart against gluttony and miserliness. It makes me want to live so that those with shriveled hearts and icy minds accuse me of self-indulgence and waste. It also makes me want to live so that the accusations are false. It makes me want to pay attention at mealtimes, both to the food on my plate and the friends on my table. It makes me want to enjoy high feasts on appropriate occasions, to eat simple meals as though they mattered (because they do), and to teach my children by example the meaning of jollification (hint: dancing is required). " (p.44-45) And this other line : "Indeed, the Witch provides two meals to Edmund: the enchanted candy and stale bread and water. The Witch and her evil are the origins of both gluttony and asceticism, of sinful indulgence and sinful austerity." (p.43)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patience Jones

    I really enjoyed this book. I don't know that there really was anything new to me in that most of the things noted wouldn't be a surprise to any thoughtful Narnia lover, but it was good to have them pulled out of the book to think about. I have a quibble which is perhaps more significant the more I consider it; the author is too ready to call Jesus Aslan. That may sound odd, but I think caution is needed. Aslan is a fictional character who represents Jesus. Jesus is real. Aslan is presented to u I really enjoyed this book. I don't know that there really was anything new to me in that most of the things noted wouldn't be a surprise to any thoughtful Narnia lover, but it was good to have them pulled out of the book to think about. I have a quibble which is perhaps more significant the more I consider it; the author is too ready to call Jesus Aslan. That may sound odd, but I think caution is needed. Aslan is a fictional character who represents Jesus. Jesus is real. Aslan is presented to us by a human fallible author and therefore we need to be very careful that we do not learn things from Aslan that are not true of Jesus. The Narnia Books are not Scripture. Of course once you start down this line of thought you begin to wonder whether there is any point to a book such as this at all. Why draw lessons from Narnia when you can draw them from the Bible? But I think that goes too far the other way. C.S. Lewis was skilled in showing Christian truths in his work, and why should we not have a book to help us think about those truths more deeply?

  10. 5 out of 5

    G.M. Burrow

    The best books on Narnia are the ones that make us want to return to the stories themselves, and Joe Rigney's slim, easy read does just that. He has a number of particularly fine insights, but the one that really sticks with me is this: "Though all of his plans come to naught, Tirian is never without one." - p. 145 The best books on Narnia are the ones that make us want to return to the stories themselves, and Joe Rigney's slim, easy read does just that. He has a number of particularly fine insights, but the one that really sticks with me is this: "Though all of his plans come to naught, Tirian is never without one." - p. 145

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ginger

    I heard Joe Rigney on a podcast about parenting and he was brilliant. I've read and reread the Narnia books, so while I expected to enjoy this, I didn't really expect to gain any new insight. I was quite wrong as this felt like a wonderful guide for citizenship into the Land of Narnia. I thoroughly enjoyed this, and now can't wait to read anything else he's written. I heard Joe Rigney on a podcast about parenting and he was brilliant. I've read and reread the Narnia books, so while I expected to enjoy this, I didn't really expect to gain any new insight. I was quite wrong as this felt like a wonderful guide for citizenship into the Land of Narnia. I thoroughly enjoyed this, and now can't wait to read anything else he's written.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Parkison

    From the introductory word to the reader: “I... prefer people... read these chapters and say, ‘Ah, yes. That’s exactly what I’ve always thought about that scene, or that character, or that theme.’” Mission accomplished, Joe. I recently finished the Narnia books with my 5-year-old, and after having spent another serious jaunt through the wardrobe, having breathed Narnian air and spent time with Aslan, I feel refreshed and motivated to be a better, more noble, more honest, more humble, more gratef From the introductory word to the reader: “I... prefer people... read these chapters and say, ‘Ah, yes. That’s exactly what I’ve always thought about that scene, or that character, or that theme.’” Mission accomplished, Joe. I recently finished the Narnia books with my 5-year-old, and after having spent another serious jaunt through the wardrobe, having breathed Narnian air and spent time with Aslan, I feel refreshed and motivated to be a better, more noble, more honest, more humble, more grateful and jovial husband and dad and friend and pastor. Joe does a fantastic job at explaining the effects of breathing Narnian air. I’m particularly grateful for his tribute to King Lune (also my favorite minor character). I agree with Joe about reading the series in the right order (publication order), and then reading this book. It’s an excellent tribute to Lewis.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marc Sims

    An excellent devotional-type of book meditating on the wisdom in Lewis’ Narnia Chronicles. I read this directly after reading through all of them and found it to be immensely beneficial. Much of what Rigney writes on were things I already knew to be true, but wouldn’t have been able to put into words like he did. I would highly recommend this to parents who want to read the Narnia stories to their children and use them as a means of discipleship.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    An encouraging read to help Christians remember that they are held between the paws of the true Aslan. The chapter that analyzes Aslan’s rescue of the Dawn Treader party from the Dark Island made me weep. May I never forget that scene or Aslan’s precious admonition of, “Courage, dear heart.”

  15. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Definitely a book worth reading! Only i wish i had read it in one sitting instead of over weeks of interruptions. I think i would have gotten more out of it that way. So glad to have finally gotten my hands on it tho (even tho my mom was hiding it from me 😆)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Such a profoundly helpful book. If you have any love for Narnia, and for the Lion, this one is worth your time!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    As a general rule I don't often review non-fiction titles on here (strangely, I find them too subjective). However, anything that speaks about the sweet truths of Narnia pours right into my soul. This is a great read and a quick one. No Narnia lover could be disappointed, even if it’s just for the pleasure of reading something and saying l Yes! Yes! Exactly!” the whole time 😁 "It makes me want to pay attention at mealtimes, both to the food on my plate and the friends at the table. It makes me wa As a general rule I don't often review non-fiction titles on here (strangely, I find them too subjective). However, anything that speaks about the sweet truths of Narnia pours right into my soul. This is a great read and a quick one. No Narnia lover could be disappointed, even if it’s just for the pleasure of reading something and saying l Yes! Yes! Exactly!” the whole time 😁 "It makes me want to pay attention at mealtimes, both to the food on my plate and the friends at the table. It makes me want to enjoy high feasts on appropriate occasions, to eat simple meals as though they mattered (because they do) and to teach my children by example the meaning jollification." I loved his love for King Lune, and I enjoyed his breakdown of magic and how carefully and correctly it's written in the books. I loved his chapters on the The Last Battle, which is a book I can't think about without feel great sorrow at the great falseness that permeated so much of it. His pointing us towards the friendship between the King and Jewel as one of the keys for such trying times was notable. Some quotes I enjoyed: "Given the present trajectory of my life, what would happen if I should find myself stubmlings though the wardrobe into Narnia? Will Providence guide me to meet a faun who becomes a friend, or a Witch who seeks to steal, kill, and destroy? Given the kind of person that I am right now becoming, what would be my reaction if I heard Aslan's name for the first time?" "I think that Lewis intends for us to see ourselves in the Dufflepuds. And that ought to make us stop and think." "We must learn the biblical lesson that God often sends lions to chase us so that we, like Bree, can discover that we weren't going quite as fast as we could." "All of these examples may seem small and insignificant in the grand scheme of things. After all, isn't the important thing that he (Peter) fight bravely and win the battle? But their smallness is precisely the point. For manners, whether in the court or at the dinner table, are simply love in the little things, love in the trifles."

  18. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Kyriosity

    This book was like a nice, long chat with a friend on topic we both love a whole lot and for much the same reasons. Christian discipleship, training in obedience to Christ's commands, can come via many means. Lewis's storytelling has been among the most effective means in my life, and evidently in Joe Rigney's, as well, and we are both grateful. My side of the chat went something like, Yes, I agree! My thoughts exactly. Huh...never thought of that one. Aha...I'd missed that before! Not to mentio This book was like a nice, long chat with a friend on topic we both love a whole lot and for much the same reasons. Christian discipleship, training in obedience to Christ's commands, can come via many means. Lewis's storytelling has been among the most effective means in my life, and evidently in Joe Rigney's, as well, and we are both grateful. My side of the chat went something like, Yes, I agree! My thoughts exactly. Huh...never thought of that one. Aha...I'd missed that before! Not to mention.... And then there's.... Hold on a sec, I'm having a Jill-Pole-behind-the-gym-only-happier moment and need to get a Kleenex. For the author's side, you'll have to read the book. Aside from the spelling of wry, about which I wryly twitted Mr. Rigney, and a divergence of views on the proper placement of commas, I didn't find anything to disagree with in this book. I did have one weird technical issue, though: my Kindle didn't want to let me read the appendix. When I tried to navigate from the first page to the second, it told me, "You've finished." Fortunately, I found a way to trick it into letting me go on. I highlighted the last word of the first page and then right-arrowed my way to the second. After that, it let me move on in the usual manner. Good thing, too, 'cuz the appendix was loads of fun. Grateful for the encouragement to keep going further up and further in!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Conner

    Helpful and amusing. A must-read for Narnia and Lewis fans, Rigney pulls insights that help reveal the subtle themes present in many of the Narnian storylines and scenes, helping us take what we've seen in Narnia and applying it to our journey in the Christian life, or, by immersing us in Narnian air, helping us to see things in the real world more clearly. Particularly helpful are his explorations of various characters and their qualities. Helpful and amusing. A must-read for Narnia and Lewis fans, Rigney pulls insights that help reveal the subtle themes present in many of the Narnian storylines and scenes, helping us take what we've seen in Narnia and applying it to our journey in the Christian life, or, by immersing us in Narnian air, helping us to see things in the real world more clearly. Particularly helpful are his explorations of various characters and their qualities.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Homeschoolmama

    This book was better than I expected. The title didn't draw me in at all, I think another title would have been better. The insights Joe Rigney gives on the Chronicles are deep and make me want to re-read all the books! Excellent companion to the series. This book was better than I expected. The title didn't draw me in at all, I think another title would have been better. The insights Joe Rigney gives on the Chronicles are deep and make me want to re-read all the books! Excellent companion to the series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Megan Marie

    This book was not what I expected but I’m glad I pushed myself to read a style of writing I may not normally finish. My favorite parts of the book were the last two chapters the Epilogue and Appendix. The Appendix was a fun surprise. It makes me want to reread the series again. 😊

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lukas Mason

    Rigney has rekindled a desire in me to enter the wardrobe once more and breathe Narnian air. So many fresh insights begging to be ratified by another reading of the Chronicles. I’ll have to oblige soon.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Lister

    This is a good book for anyone who wants an introduction or insight into how CS Lewis teaches truth through Narnia. I liked it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    As a child, I loved to read. I tore through many of the popular books in a fraction of the time it took many of my classmates. The library in my small town school had my name on many of the cards on the inside cover of the book. In fact, while I was in seminary I did substitute teaching and on two occasions I was at my former elementary school. During a break, I went to the library and actually found a few of the books I had read and one of them still had a card with my sloppy third or fourth-gr As a child, I loved to read. I tore through many of the popular books in a fraction of the time it took many of my classmates. The library in my small town school had my name on many of the cards on the inside cover of the book. In fact, while I was in seminary I did substitute teaching and on two occasions I was at my former elementary school. During a break, I went to the library and actually found a few of the books I had read and one of them still had a card with my sloppy third or fourth-grade handwriting on it. As a young reader, my favorite books were the books about Ramona Quimby by Beverly Cleary. If I had any inkling of difficulty in falling asleep I would pull one of those books off the shelf and would pound through it again until the power of gravity on my young eyelids became too much to bear. When I was roughly a decade old I remember receiving a box set of the Chronicles of Narnia. I do not remember all the details but I do remember that it was a gift. My certainty on this is a result of a vivid memory I have whenever I look at the box set that I still have more than 30 years later. The flashback takes me back to the obnoxious loud yellow couch in my grandparents living room where I tore the wrapping paper off of the gift. The memories I have of the Chronicles are not limited to the unwrapping of a gift but also to reading the books while lying on my grandmother's inflexible sofa. The series snared me as soon as young Lucy took off through the wardrobe, even though I had no real idea what a wardrobe was. I thought a wardrobe was the clothes that I owned. I was also perplexed by the lamppost in the wood because I didn't have a context for an ornate metal light stand and so I imagined the large wooden posts with lights hanging out over the streets that were the staple in the small town my grandparents lived in. The fascination only grew when my mother informed me that there were Christian overtones in the books. She wasn't sure what those themes were but she told me that she thought this Narnia place I was describing is like heaven. If you have read this long I am going to assume that you are familiar with the Narnian tales. You then understand my confusion of how Narnia was anything like heaven if the evil, white witch could have any control over it. Despite the confusion induced by my wonderful, well-meaning mother, the Christian imagery became clear for me at the Stone Table. If I wasn't hooked before the story of Aslan's death and resurrection that storyline definitely guaranteed the reading of the remaining six novels Over time I became less interested in literature and stories and developed an affinity for girls and metal music. I could barely remember the tales much less tell you how they could impact my Christian discipleship. Fast forward 20 plus years and my young daughter began to love stories herself. At this same time, I heard some exciting entertainment news. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe was being made into a feature film. This gave me a reignited fire for Lewis's tales of Narnia. I read them with my daughter in preparation for the movie. My desire to understand Narnia increased to a fanatical level. As a new Amazon customer, I discovered a plethora of books on the Chronicles. I bought a large assortment of them and devoured them in much the same way I did the Chronicles as a young child. I also discovered the Focus on the Family Radio Drama interpretations of the stories. On a long, solo road trip from Ohio to South Dakota to help my mother move I listened to all seven stories. All this biographical information to say that I love Narnia. Even as an adult have spent a significant amount of time enjoying the stories. Recently I developed a conviction that I need to be introducing my two youngest children to good literature. With that conviction, I am reading the Chronicles through again with them. One chapter at a time while tucking them into bed at night. With a renewed appreciation of the stories, it was exciting to see that Live Like a Narnian: Christian Discipleship in Lewis's Chronicles was on sale for Kindle for a mere $1.99. While I did not have the joy of unwrapping the book on my grandmother's loud couch, I did enjoy the brief moment of anticipation as the book hurtled through the internet to the Kindle app on my Inkbook 8 eReader. As I read the book the primary thing that came through to me was Joe Rigney's absolute love of all things Narnia. This book was not written at a time when the Chronicles were experiencing popularity due to an impending movie release. Instead, Rigney is writing out of his desire to be a true Narnia himself. I have read a lot of books on Narnia and none of them comes close to this one. Rigney captures the essence of Lewis and how he envisioned Christian formation. He does this by not only showing it throughout the seven Chronicles, but also by connecting the themes to Lewis's other writings. Even though I am a rather big fan of Lewis, in general, I have not read The Abolition of Man. After reading this book it is now towards the top of my "To Read" list. While some may think that the references outside of the Chronicles might be unnecessary, I found it to be a way of expanding Rigney's idea of breathing Narnian air. Another one of the things I appreciated about the book was that there was not an emphasis on The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. It is easy to see many of the Christian themes in that volume but there so much to explore in the other six Chronicles. Rigney brings us through the wardrobe, magically pulls us from the train station, and puts us into the water near a Narnian ship. We experience how we should have values shaped by the behavior of Kings and Queens of Narnia and even a talking badger. While there is a balanced treatment of all seven Chronicles I believe that his greatest focus is on The Horse and His Boy. If asked to pick a favorite tale this book would be my pick. The journey of Shasta, Bree, Hwin, and Aravis has always tugged at me more than any other story. Their journey shows us much about our journey in this life and the way God, in his providence, leads us and works all things together. This tale is the least likely to receive a movie treatment of all seven books, but I am looking forward to reading it again with my children. Live Like a Narnian has opened up a new appreciation for the story. I am not going to dress up as King Lune for Halloween anytime soon, but Rigney has helped me to see how Lewis's fiction can inspire me towards an abundant Christian life. I did find that some of the chapters can feel like they run on but I was so excited about the book that I read most of it in one sitting. Had I approached the book in a more reflective or devotional way I don't think I would have felt this way. To get the best benefit out of the book I encourage you not to be a glutton like me but instead feast with great joy at Aslan's table. In conclusion, if you are a fan of the Chronicles you need to pick up this book. It is a valuable resource to understand the Chronicles but also has great value for your Christian walk and discipleship. As a pastor the book makes me want to find a way to incorporate Narnian themes into a class for families as we all move further up and further in.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    So many good takeaways from this. King Lune was no doubt a man who knew how to fight, laugh, & feast. (view spoiler)[ From the Introduction Which brings us, finally, to the function of the Narnian stories in Lewis’s vision of education. The Narnian stories display through imaginative fiction and fairy tale the way that the world really is. Here is courage and bravery in its shining glory. Here is honesty and truth-telling in its simplicity and profundity. Here is treachery in all its ugliness. Here So many good takeaways from this. King Lune was no doubt a man who knew how to fight, laugh, & feast. (view spoiler)[ From the Introduction Which brings us, finally, to the function of the Narnian stories in Lewis’s vision of education. The Narnian stories display through imaginative fiction and fairy tale the way that the world really is. Here is courage and bravery in its shining glory. Here is honesty and truth-telling in its simplicity and profundity. Here is treachery in all its ugliness. Here is the face of Evil. Here also is the face of Good. A child (or adult) who lives in such stories will have developed the patterns of thought and affection that will be well-prepared to embrace the True, the Good, and the Beautiful (that is, to embrace Jesus Christ) when he finally encounters them (Him!). Like John the Baptist, Lewis and his cast of Narnians will have prepared the way. I thought I saw how stories of this kind could steal past a certain inhibition which paralyzed much of my own religion since childhood. Why did one find it so hard to feel as one was told one ought to feel about God or about the sufferings of Christ? I thought the chief reason was that one was told one ought to. An obligation can freeze feelings. And reverence itself did harm. The whole subject was associated with lowered voices; almost as if it were something medical. But suppose casting all these things into an imaginary world, stripping them of their stained-glass and Sunday school associations, one could make them for the first time appear in their real potency? Could one not thus steal past the watchful dragons? I thought one could. (C.S. Lewis, “Sometimes Fairy Stories,”) This paragraph can give us great insight in how we ought to read the Narnian stories. We ought not begin by trying to identify every Christian correspondence or layer of meaning. We must not short-circuit the shaping process. Instead (and this is especially important when introducing children to the stories) we ought to first immerse ourselves in the stories as stories. (hide spoiler)] The Q&A with the author was also insightful.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Richard Bicknase

    As someone who has re-read the books countless (probably 50+ easily) times and frequently relates happenings in life to Narnia references, this book was a joy to read. I would have probably given it 4.5 stars if the option was available to me, but only because I would have liked it to be longer and more thorough in diving deeper. Nothing is really missing as it is, I just wanted more to read in the same vein as a person wants a conversation with a dear friend on a topic of mutual love to continu As someone who has re-read the books countless (probably 50+ easily) times and frequently relates happenings in life to Narnia references, this book was a joy to read. I would have probably given it 4.5 stars if the option was available to me, but only because I would have liked it to be longer and more thorough in diving deeper. Nothing is really missing as it is, I just wanted more to read in the same vein as a person wants a conversation with a dear friend on a topic of mutual love to continue indefinitely. I've spent a lot of time breathing Narnian air in my life, and reading this book was like taking a walk alongside another that has been strengthened by this air—another whose love of the triune God has been deepened through their time in Narnia. I highly recommend the book to anyone who has read all of the Chronicles and enjoyed them. If you need more convincing, you know a book about Narnia that has an "appendix" depicting an NPR-style interview with the author conducted by the Faun Tumnus is going to be good. This appendix contained two points that I also greatly appreciated. First, the author, along with every Narnia-obsessed person I know (myself included), is a strong proponent of the original publishing order. We all have the same arguments why, and seeing yet another Narnia advocate spreading the word is encouraging. (I hope the original publishing is restored sooner rather than later, but I'm aware that might be asking too much). Second, he dislikes the movies for the same reason I dislike them: The movies take the character out of Narnia. Not just from the characters, but the land of Narnia itself. With the underlying order removed, the Narnia of the movies is like a Narnia with all of the air sucked out of it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brandon H.

    Sometimes books on Christian discipleship can be a real chore to get through. Not this one! It is a DELIGHTFUL look at the magical work of C.S. Lewis' Narnian Chronicles and how the sundry messages within it can be applied to living out the Christian faith. The author showed that not only is he is well immersed in Narnia but also that he understands the mind of Lewis and what he was trying to communicate. I would recommend adding this to your *must-read* list if you're a fan of Narnia and C.S. L Sometimes books on Christian discipleship can be a real chore to get through. Not this one! It is a DELIGHTFUL look at the magical work of C.S. Lewis' Narnian Chronicles and how the sundry messages within it can be applied to living out the Christian faith. The author showed that not only is he is well immersed in Narnia but also that he understands the mind of Lewis and what he was trying to communicate. I would recommend adding this to your *must-read* list if you're a fan of Narnia and C.S. Lewis. Best read AFTER you have finished the chronicles. On a side note, it was fun to read a book about Narnia by someone whose favorite Narnian story was the same as mine. My only disappointment was that it felt way too short. The magical air of Narnia was coming through these pages and I didn't want it to end so soon.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Great introduction to how to think about what Lewis is doing, or maybe a sneak behind the scenes for people who don't know Lewis from other writings. Highly recommend for people who have only read Narnia. But, as Rigney himself would surely say, there's no substitutes for moving on to other Lewis writings. I would recommend things like God in the Dock and The Screwtape Letters, for starters, followed by the Space Trilogy and The Abolition of Man. Great introduction to how to think about what Lewis is doing, or maybe a sneak behind the scenes for people who don't know Lewis from other writings. Highly recommend for people who have only read Narnia. But, as Rigney himself would surely say, there's no substitutes for moving on to other Lewis writings. I would recommend things like God in the Dock and The Screwtape Letters, for starters, followed by the Space Trilogy and The Abolition of Man.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ethan West

    This is a good short little book about Narnia and some of the christian ideas and themes found in the series. I do agree with Joe Rigney in saying that there could have been so much more if he had had time. The Chronicles of Narnia are deep and with each successive reading I see and understand more of those depths. I will definitely be reading "Planet Narnia" by Michael Ward as the author has suggested. This is a good short little book about Narnia and some of the christian ideas and themes found in the series. I do agree with Joe Rigney in saying that there could have been so much more if he had had time. The Chronicles of Narnia are deep and with each successive reading I see and understand more of those depths. I will definitely be reading "Planet Narnia" by Michael Ward as the author has suggested.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Vincent Stewart

    Lovers of Narnia I invite you to take a journey with author Joe Rigney as he walks through the beloved stories. A great read for all fans of Narnia. Live Like A Narnian pulled some of the more memorable moments out of the stories and explored there depth and application to aid the Christian disciple in walking out these great truths in his life.

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