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The Complete Peanuts, Vol 21: 1991-1992

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The Complete Peanuts: 1991-1992 is the 21st volume (of 25) of the perennial, best-selling series that collects every single one of the 18,000-plus Peanuts newspaper comic strips created by Charles M. Schulz, from its debut in 1950 to its end in 2000. In this volume, the series enters its homestretch as the strip enters its final decade: Schulz s cartooning has never looked The Complete Peanuts: 1991-1992 is the 21st volume (of 25) of the perennial, best-selling series that collects every single one of the 18,000-plus Peanuts newspaper comic strips created by Charles M. Schulz, from its debut in 1950 to its end in 2000. In this volume, the series enters its homestretch as the strip enters its final decade: Schulz s cartooning has never looked more confident, and his sense of humor is unrestrained. This material is perhaps the most overlooked of Charles M. Schulz s career, and The Complete Peanuts: 1991-1992 will cast it into a new light for scholars."


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The Complete Peanuts: 1991-1992 is the 21st volume (of 25) of the perennial, best-selling series that collects every single one of the 18,000-plus Peanuts newspaper comic strips created by Charles M. Schulz, from its debut in 1950 to its end in 2000. In this volume, the series enters its homestretch as the strip enters its final decade: Schulz s cartooning has never looked The Complete Peanuts: 1991-1992 is the 21st volume (of 25) of the perennial, best-selling series that collects every single one of the 18,000-plus Peanuts newspaper comic strips created by Charles M. Schulz, from its debut in 1950 to its end in 2000. In this volume, the series enters its homestretch as the strip enters its final decade: Schulz s cartooning has never looked more confident, and his sense of humor is unrestrained. This material is perhaps the most overlooked of Charles M. Schulz s career, and The Complete Peanuts: 1991-1992 will cast it into a new light for scholars."

30 review for The Complete Peanuts, Vol 21: 1991-1992

  1. 5 out of 5

    Greg Brozeit

    These collected works volumes occupy a special place in my library. I value them as much as any books I own and the physical quality of the volumes may be the best. This volume has the feel of Charles Schulz getting his second wind. The best strips, in my opinion, are from the mid-to-late 60s. Those of the 80s are still very good, they just don't have the punch of those a couple of decades earlier. In the latter half that decade the daily strips went from four frames to three. In the nineties, th These collected works volumes occupy a special place in my library. I value them as much as any books I own and the physical quality of the volumes may be the best. This volume has the feel of Charles Schulz getting his second wind. The best strips, in my opinion, are from the mid-to-late 60s. Those of the 80s are still very good, they just don't have the punch of those a couple of decades earlier. In the latter half that decade the daily strips went from four frames to three. In the nineties, the standardized format was thrown out completely. Now Schulz experimented with one frame, two frames, even up to five frames. Sometimes the Sunday strips were one frame, some with a density usually only seen in great political cartoons. Another great part of this collection is the introductory essay by avant-garde cartoonist Tom Tomorrow. He reminds us that as innocent and tame as Schulz may have seemed, many of the strips had a surreal quality to them, such as the Dr. Who Tardis-like interior of Snoopy's doghouse. And a dog that fantasizes about historical epochs, plays baseball, hangs out with birds, dreams about cookies, and still remains his owner's best friend has no counterpart in all of literature. Neither do the friendships and the occasional conflicts that never betray the love and respect each character has for each other. Make no mistake, this is literature.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    Schulz works deeper into the fifth and final decade of his extraordinary career, giving voice to familiar characters in familiar situations and introducing new characters (Cormac, a romantic rival to Linus for Sally) and ideas as well. In the familiar world of Peanuts, Snoopy laughs while reading the comics over Charlie Brown’s shoulder, getting the joke that Charlie Brown doesn’t. Peppermint Patty gives Marcie a series of signals for when she goes to the board to answer a teacher’s question (“If Schulz works deeper into the fifth and final decade of his extraordinary career, giving voice to familiar characters in familiar situations and introducing new characters (Cormac, a romantic rival to Linus for Sally) and ideas as well. In the familiar world of Peanuts, Snoopy laughs while reading the comics over Charlie Brown’s shoulder, getting the joke that Charlie Brown doesn’t. Peppermint Patty gives Marcie a series of signals for when she goes to the board to answer a teacher’s question (“If the answer is George Washington touch your head. If the answer is Lincoln touch your shoulder like this, okay?"). Marcie inadvertently gives the signal for a Hit and Run and baseball savvy Patty bolts the room. In the world of new ideas: Schulz begins to regularly use a single panel with an array of characters each getting a bit of dialogue. In one the children complain, one after the other, about Snoopy hanging around at the school bus stop. “But why,” the next to last wonders. “What does he want?” Snoopy is waiting because he knows one of them will likely leave his or her lunch bag behind. One of the reasons I like this format is it gives opportunity for Violet, a major character early in the strip who almost disappeared later. More familiar: Sally assaults Linus with her lunch box when he says that he’d toss a Valentine from her in the trash. Linus’s attorney shows up to eat the sandwiches that escaped from the lunch box but drops the case when Sally takes his supper dish hostage. Something new: in one three-panel Sunday strip, Schulz does what looks like a tip of the hat to Bill Watterson. The first two normal sized panels show Charlie Brown and Snoopy walking on a golf course. “You know what I think?” Charlie Brown asks. Snoopy tees up, “I’m afraid to ask.” Then the big third panel shows the two characters in the lower left corner as an enormous and realistically rendered tidal wave fills the panel except for their small corner. Charlie Brown says: “On a hole like this, I think you just have to relax and pretend the water isn’t there.” It is so impressive this deep into his career that Schulz is still experimenting and learning from others. That’s genius. Watterson, by the way, whose Calvin and Hobbes was absolutely brilliant from the start, began his strip in 1985, some thirty-five years after Schulz started his, and ended it in 1995, five years before Schulz’s retirement and death. No knock on Watterson but further reason to esteem Schulz for his long and brilliant career: it is hard doing something like this really well for even a decade, let alone five. But back to the strips—because I can’t help myself: Lucy to Linus angrily: “So you know just what I’m thinking, huh? I suppose you can read my mind…” Thumb-sucking, blanket-clutching Linus: “Not yet…I’d rather wait until it comes out in paperback.” Charlie Brown, who can’t decide between the Little Red-Headed Girl, who he won’t talk to, and Peggy Jean, who has moved away, is talking about love to Peppermint Patty, unable to make anything of the fact that both Patty and Marcie are rivals for his affection. “There once was a time when I thought I knew something about love, but now I don’t know anything.” “How come, Chuck?” “The older I got, the less I knew.” Not so much funny that as real. Patty does a report on the four seasons, “Baseball, Football, Basketball, and Hockey.” In Peanuts, Snoopy doesn’t eat Charlie Brown’s homework, he writes it. A Tale of Two Cities is about Minneapolis and St. Paul. Okay, it’s not, but that is Peppermint Patty’s guess after not reading the book. And in the world of Peanuts, Charlie Brown always falls for Lucy’s promise to hold the football so he can kick it. Sally wonders if it is because Charlie is in love with Lucy. “I should hope not,” he says. “I’ve discovered,” says Sally, “that love makes us do strange things.” A dizzy Charlie replies, “So does stupidity.” There is more, a lot more, but I’ll stop here.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brandt

    Instead of telling you how great Peanuts is (because you already know!) I always share my favorite strip from the collection I am reviewing, because frankly that's more interesting than me trying to actually review Charles Schulz's fifty year masterpiece. But before we get to that, I just want to mention that as I've begun to reach the home stretch of these collections (only four more to go I think) that the introductions to these volumes have been getting better as I've continued reading. Tom T Instead of telling you how great Peanuts is (because you already know!) I always share my favorite strip from the collection I am reviewing, because frankly that's more interesting than me trying to actually review Charles Schulz's fifty year masterpiece. But before we get to that, I just want to mention that as I've begun to reach the home stretch of these collections (only four more to go I think) that the introductions to these volumes have been getting better as I've continued reading. Tom Tomorrow provides an excellent introduction here where he pretty much reiterates what previous contributors from the comics pages (Lynn Johnston and Garry Trudeau among others) said about Schulz--he was always willing to make time for new creators on the comics pages to show them the ropes and give encouragement. I think this says volumes about the character of the man who brought the Peanuts gang into the world, as if the comic didn't speak to that. So now for the strip, which requires some setup. Usually every summer Schulz would seen Charlie Brown to summer camp. However in 1991, Charlie Brown decides not to go, and begins a correspondence with Marcie and Peppermint Patty, who have gone to summer camp. Something that not many people know/acknowledge in the later days of Peanuts is that Marcie has something of a crush on Charlie Brown and as such, Marcie suggests that they send Charlie Brown a letter from camp telling them he misses them. Charlie decides that he needs to send them some cookies in appreciation but while he goes to find a box to place them in, Snoopy licks the frosting out from the cookies (they are obviously Oreos or something akin to them.) Marcie and Patty then send a letter indicating that someone had licked the frosting out of the cookies (this is how we learn about Snoopy's transgression.) Charlie Brown decides he wants to make amends and sends a reply on July 6, 1991, which happened to be my sixteenth birthday: As a joke, I often refer to these volumes as "My Guide to Life, 19xx to 19xx edition." This strip belies the old adage that honesty is the best policy, because obviously, sometimes it isn't--especially when you are trying to impress someone and your efforts (as so often is the case with Charlie Brown) go to shit. But of course, even for his lack of candor, Charlie Brown will keep soldiering on, because that is what we do in the face of adversity, and after reading forty years of Peanuts if you can't see the Charlie Brown inside of you, there's likely no hope for you.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Pedro Fernández

    Deep and powerful as always... Peanuts is a masterpiece!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Baal Of

    Another new character, and experimentation with large Sunday panels. I can essentially repeat what I've said before about previous volumes. Schulz continuous to do what he does, consistently. Another new character, and experimentation with large Sunday panels. I can essentially repeat what I've said before about previous volumes. Schulz continuous to do what he does, consistently.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    At this point of a long multi-volume series, there’s almost no point in doing individual reviews of the volumes as we rack them up. But pointlessness never held me back before, why should I let it now? For readers who have made it this far, or anyway have read at least some of the previous volumes, you’ll find more of the same here – Schulz is Schulz, and even at his worst was pretty good at what he did. (And he’s definitely in good form in this particular stretch of his run.) For anyone who som At this point of a long multi-volume series, there’s almost no point in doing individual reviews of the volumes as we rack them up. But pointlessness never held me back before, why should I let it now? For readers who have made it this far, or anyway have read at least some of the previous volumes, you’ll find more of the same here – Schulz is Schulz, and even at his worst was pretty good at what he did. (And he’s definitely in good form in this particular stretch of his run.) For anyone who somehow stumbled on this volume without having read any of the others, this might not be the best point to start – a lot of the material here will make more sense if you know the background to it. Pigpen makes a two day appearance in this stretch, and even has some lines. Violet continues to flesh out crowd scenes – one of them during Pigpen’s appearance! You can imagine their surprise at meeting each other in the studio, they probably each thought the other was dead. Or at least had left the neighborhood.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tj

    The genius of Charles Schultz is actually more for adults than children and cannot be appreciated until you are at least 30. Love Snoopy's philosophy about chocolate chip cookies and Sally's views on life. The genius of Charles Schultz is actually more for adults than children and cannot be appreciated until you are at least 30. Love Snoopy's philosophy about chocolate chip cookies and Sally's views on life.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stasia

    Most of the Peanuts collections that I have read, literally, so many times throughout the years that I can quote them and about name the year they're from, are largely the 50's-early 70's. While I have read the later years, I for some reason don't own as much from the period in my personal collection of Peanuts paraphernalia. So it almost feels like I'm reading these years for the first time again. And there is a definite change in these years, but I think it's a good change. For one thing, Char Most of the Peanuts collections that I have read, literally, so many times throughout the years that I can quote them and about name the year they're from, are largely the 50's-early 70's. While I have read the later years, I for some reason don't own as much from the period in my personal collection of Peanuts paraphernalia. So it almost feels like I'm reading these years for the first time again. And there is a definite change in these years, but I think it's a good change. For one thing, Charlie Brown and Snoopy's relationship seems deeper, with Charlie Brown wanting to just "make his dog happy". In the last collection, '89-'90, we see Marcie very upset and turning to Charlie Brown for help as her parents are putting so much pressure on her to do well in school and excel in everything she does- that is so relatable to many, though I daresay that most wish they had a Charlie Brown in their life to care the way he did for Marcie. These are just a couple examples. Overall, these years just seem sweeter in their context. There is still the 'laugh out loud' factor, but I have always thought it was the endearing sweetness of Peanuts that made people love it so much and continue for so many years.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Derelict Space Sheep

    42 WORD REVIEW: Despite Schulz’s at times self-indulgent format experimentations, Peanuts in the 90s starts to feel a little tired. (Snoopy’s cookie fixation, for instance, disappoints as a recurring punchline.) Nevertheless, there is much here to like. Only by his own benchmark is Schulz diminished.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    There is a great difference between this book and the others I've read (from the 50s-60s). The characters are less snarky and almost less enjoyable because of it. I was used to having so much more Lucy and missed her dearly. There is a great difference between this book and the others I've read (from the 50s-60s). The characters are less snarky and almost less enjoyable because of it. I was used to having so much more Lucy and missed her dearly.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Snoopy plays a lot of golf. Lots about Marcie and Peppermint Patty and their battle to see who Charlie Brown likes better. And Sally really shines in this edition.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lee Anne

    There is a good deal of Spike in this one, if you like Spike. Also, there is a boy named Cormac who has a crush on Sally. I don't remember that at all from the 90s! There is a good deal of Spike in this one, if you like Spike. Also, there is a boy named Cormac who has a crush on Sally. I don't remember that at all from the 90s!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steven Hill

    10 out of 10

  14. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    Overall still enjoyable. There are a lot of repeat jokes but there's still an undeniable charm to these characters. Overall still enjoyable. There are a lot of repeat jokes but there's still an undeniable charm to these characters.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cora Crotteau

    I just found it a way to pass time so I didn't like it too much. Not trying to disrespect snoopy in any way. I just found it a way to pass time so I didn't like it too much. Not trying to disrespect snoopy in any way.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Benn Allen

    Some ten years ago, Fantagraphics Books began a project of publishing every "Peanuts" comic strip that was ever printed in the newspapers. At the time, I kinda wondered whether the company would make it, whether Fantagraphics would still be around to finish the project. 21 volumes later, and only four more left to go, it looks like they'll do it. Originally, I was only going to follow the series up to the mid-70s. To me, it seems that the post-1976 strips were vastly inferior to the ones that cam Some ten years ago, Fantagraphics Books began a project of publishing every "Peanuts" comic strip that was ever printed in the newspapers. At the time, I kinda wondered whether the company would make it, whether Fantagraphics would still be around to finish the project. 21 volumes later, and only four more left to go, it looks like they'll do it. Originally, I was only going to follow the series up to the mid-70s. To me, it seems that the post-1976 strips were vastly inferior to the ones that came before. But then when the 1977-1978 edition came out, I went ahead and bought it. I had decided to see the series to the end. I'm glad I did. Each volume of "The Complete Peanuts" has been a source of joy and fun for me to read. Maybe the adventures of Charlie Brown and Snoopy and company wasn't as fresh as they were in the '50s and '60s. And maybe the vicious humor had been toned down, but "Peanuts" still remains one of the greatest comic strips ever produced. The 1991-1992 volume saw creator, Charles M. Schulz experimenting with "Peanuts". Sparky began to use one or two panel layouts rather than the traditional four panel set up. Even the art showed some experimentation for the strip, using photorealism along with the normal cartoony style of the strip. (Notably in the April 24th, 1991 and the April 14th, 1992 strips. Among others.) Zip-a-tone also began to appear in the backgrounds of several strips, rather than the usual white, blank space. It should also be noted the 1991-1992 volume marks the return of original "Peanuts" character Violet and Patty (*not* Peppermint Patty, mind you), both of whom had been largely absent from the strip for 20, 30 years at this point. While both girls were generally used as background characters, they do get to deliver a line each in separate strips. Ultimately, "The Complete Peanuts: 1991-1992" is a fun, joyous book. It reminded me of why I fell in love with these characters. Few things I read will bring me as much pleasure as reading "Peanuts" does. I'm glad I decided to continue to collect and read this series of books.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Tom Tomorrow, one of the first cartoonists I enjoyed as an adult, wrote the intro to this volume—and closes his introduction by musing about the original piece Schulz personally gave him, which appears in this book. Schulz is clearly showing his age in this volume—the lines of his word balloons are starting to show a shaky hand. Topically, bungee jumping and velcro jumping come up in some cartoons. So too does Joe Garagiola's award in 1991, which they reference as him being in "the Baseball Hall Tom Tomorrow, one of the first cartoonists I enjoyed as an adult, wrote the intro to this volume—and closes his introduction by musing about the original piece Schulz personally gave him, which appears in this book. Schulz is clearly showing his age in this volume—the lines of his word balloons are starting to show a shaky hand. Topically, bungee jumping and velcro jumping come up in some cartoons. So too does Joe Garagiola's award in 1991, which they reference as him being in "the Baseball Hall of Fame" but was more related to his later career as an announcer than as his career as a player. Another thing I noticed is that Schulz starts drawing the characters' faces into objects on Sunday intro panels (for example, Peppermint Patty's face in a football to start off a football-themed cartoon). At a certain point I started noticing that odd habit but wondered when it started. It makes sense that it started in the 90s, because that was when I stopped reading the Sunday comics in the newspaper as regularly. At any rate, I can see the writing on the wall of Charles Schulz's career but that doesn't make these comics any less interesting to read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rugg Ruggedo

    The ten years of Peanuts begins with this volume. This volume begins with an intro by Tom Tomorrow(Dan Perkins), as he remembers meeting Charles Schultz and conversations about comics and art. So few long running stories thru these years. There is the go back to stories about Marcie and The Flying Ace. Lucy decides to run a bible school. Charlie Brown sends Snoopy licked Oreos to summer camp for Marcie and Peppermint Patty, no icing. Snoopy and Linus start a cookies for blankets campaign. Then (a The ten years of Peanuts begins with this volume. This volume begins with an intro by Tom Tomorrow(Dan Perkins), as he remembers meeting Charles Schultz and conversations about comics and art. So few long running stories thru these years. There is the go back to stories about Marcie and The Flying Ace. Lucy decides to run a bible school. Charlie Brown sends Snoopy licked Oreos to summer camp for Marcie and Peppermint Patty, no icing. Snoopy and Linus start a cookies for blankets campaign. Then (a new character?) Cormac stars in the summer camp story. Like I said very few long story lines, but the experimentation with the panel form continued, and there were great short stuff,one or two day day ideas. Just a great series for the fans of Charles Schultz. History for those who love comic strips. Lots of giggles for any one looking to spend a moment away from their daily life. Just four more volumes yet to come,and the collection will be complete.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mister Mank

    While the '90s - the last decade of Schulz's incredible career - are not a good entry point for beginners, they're still full of wonderful strips. Yes, he's mellowed, and the strips are occasionally overrun with nostalgia and a hopeless fondness for the characters, but then we also see Schulz experimenting with more single-panel strips, slim panels, new characters, and Ben-Day dots. Definitely worth revisiting if you've written-off this era (as I wrongly have in the past). I'm pleasantly surpris While the '90s - the last decade of Schulz's incredible career - are not a good entry point for beginners, they're still full of wonderful strips. Yes, he's mellowed, and the strips are occasionally overrun with nostalgia and a hopeless fondness for the characters, but then we also see Schulz experimenting with more single-panel strips, slim panels, new characters, and Ben-Day dots. Definitely worth revisiting if you've written-off this era (as I wrongly have in the past). I'm pleasantly surprised to be looking forward to the next volume.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tim Jarrett

    With this volume the series enters its final decade. The age doesn't show too much though. I remember thinking at the time that the quality was falling off, but that was really only in comparison to Schulz's 1960s peak. He was definitely still tinkering with the art, finding different panel rhythms and ways to tell the story. A couple of puzzling non sequitur strips here, like the single panel Sunday about Victoria Falls, but otherwise good material all the way around. With this volume the series enters its final decade. The age doesn't show too much though. I remember thinking at the time that the quality was falling off, but that was really only in comparison to Schulz's 1960s peak. He was definitely still tinkering with the art, finding different panel rhythms and ways to tell the story. A couple of puzzling non sequitur strips here, like the single panel Sunday about Victoria Falls, but otherwise good material all the way around.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    The Complete Peanuts 1991-1992 by Charles M. Schulz is another volume in the ongoing series that is reproducing all of the peanuts strips. The quality on Peanuts is amazingly consistent. Some favorite strips from this volume include several featuring the "Cheshire Beagle". The Complete Peanuts 1991-1992 by Charles M. Schulz is another volume in the ongoing series that is reproducing all of the peanuts strips. The quality on Peanuts is amazingly consistent. Some favorite strips from this volume include several featuring the "Cheshire Beagle".

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rob Hermanowski

    See my review of the entire Complete Peanuts in Volume 26.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mark Schlatter

    Some interesting Sunday strips where Schulz does basically a one panel comic illustrating Charlie Brown and Snoopy golfing.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dwayne Keller

    Another Peanuts classic. You can't go wrong. Another Peanuts classic. You can't go wrong.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Leaflet

    It's always a joy to bring home a new volume of Peanuts strips. Schulz does some experimenting with size and number of panels - and why not? His humor is still sharp. It's always a joy to bring home a new volume of Peanuts strips. Schulz does some experimenting with size and number of panels - and why not? His humor is still sharp.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Superb as ever, only 4 volumes left to go, sigh :-(

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marcy

    The Snoopy cookie-obsession thread had my son and I in stitches.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    A lovely trip down memory lane.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Panda

    This comic book is very good. I am currently doing a play, and I am casted as Linus. this book gave me an insight to his behavior and personality.

  30. 4 out of 5

    PottWab Regional Library

    O

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