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When Trixie and Honey explore an abandoned gatehouse, they discover more than dust and spiderwebs. Stuck in the dirt floor is a huge diamond! Could a ring of jewel thieves be hiding out in Sleepyside?


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When Trixie and Honey explore an abandoned gatehouse, they discover more than dust and spiderwebs. Stuck in the dirt floor is a huge diamond! Could a ring of jewel thieves be hiding out in Sleepyside?

30 review for The Gatehouse Mystery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark Baker

    When Trixie and Honey find a diamond in the gatehouse on the Wheeler property, Trixie is certain that there is a thief around. Could it be one of the new Wheeler servants? We also get to meet Trixie's two older brothers and the five new friends form the Bob-Whites of the Glen. While the mystery isn't strong, the characters are great and this remains one of my favorites in the series. Read my full review at Carstairs Considers. When Trixie and Honey find a diamond in the gatehouse on the Wheeler property, Trixie is certain that there is a thief around. Could it be one of the new Wheeler servants? We also get to meet Trixie's two older brothers and the five new friends form the Bob-Whites of the Glen. While the mystery isn't strong, the characters are great and this remains one of my favorites in the series. Read my full review at Carstairs Considers.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jessaka

    I can understand why young adults would like this series, as it is sweet and there is a lot of interaction between brothers and sisters, and even friends. It didn't do much for me for this reason, and by this I mean that I would have preferred more action and mystery. Plus the interactions between the young adults weren’t that interesting to me. Maybe it was just the mood I was in at the time, but I am not sure that I would try to read another of this series. In this book, Trixie and her new frie I can understand why young adults would like this series, as it is sweet and there is a lot of interaction between brothers and sisters, and even friends. It didn't do much for me for this reason, and by this I mean that I would have preferred more action and mystery. Plus the interactions between the young adults weren’t that interesting to me. Maybe it was just the mood I was in at the time, but I am not sure that I would try to read another of this series. In this book, Trixie and her new friend Honey find a diamond in a old abandoned gatehouse. They spend a lot of time trying to find a hiding place for it and then moving it again and again. Then they spend much of their time speculating as to who lost it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Juli

    Trixie Belden is a teen amateur sleuth. She lives in Sleepyside, NY with her family. Her best friend, Honey Wheeler, and Honey's adopted brother, Jim Frayne, live at the large estate next door. Mysteries always seem to come their way. The series is similar to Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys. There are 39 books in the series, written between 1948 and 1986. The original six books were written by Julie Campbell. The rest of the series was written by various authors, using the pen name Kathryn Kenny. Th Trixie Belden is a teen amateur sleuth. She lives in Sleepyside, NY with her family. Her best friend, Honey Wheeler, and Honey's adopted brother, Jim Frayne, live at the large estate next door. Mysteries always seem to come their way. The series is similar to Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys. There are 39 books in the series, written between 1948 and 1986. The original six books were written by Julie Campbell. The rest of the series was written by various authors, using the pen name Kathryn Kenny. This was my absolute favorite book series when I was a kid. I had the entire series. Every holiday, birthday, or special event usually brought me new books and I remember being incredibly happy when several new books came out in the 80s. Before leaving for college, I sold the entire series to a mom who had two middle school age girls at home. I hope they loved the books as much as I did! The first four books were re-released a few years ago, but the rest are OOP. Luckily, I found scans of many of the books on OpenLibrary, so I'm going to re-read as much of the old series as I can find! Revisiting my old Sleepyside buddies as an adult has given me some mixed emotions, but all things considered I'm enjoying it. The Gatehouse Mystery is the third book in the series. Honey and Trixie are out walking and stop by the old Gatehouse on the Wheeler estate. The old building is overgrown with vines and neglected. They are shocked when they find a diamond in the old gatehouse wedged between two floorboards. Then they hear someone lurking in the bushes listening to their conversation. Who hid the diamond on the Wheeler estate? And are they in danger after finding it? Honey and Trixie know they need to discover the truth before the criminals attempt to recover the valuable stone. As a young girl, I loved reading about Trixie and her friends' adventuring. I spent many an afternoon laying across my bed reading about their exploits. I sympathized with Trixie's occasional annoyance at her little 6-year old brother. My young nephew was a pain in the butt sometimes too when I was 11 or so -- he's 38 years old now -- and I often had to babysit him much to my chagrin. I also remember laughing at the constant teasing between the siblings and friends in the books. :) I ran around with the neighbor kids back in the day myself and I think every one of us had a creative nickname, mostly insulting stuff. I fell in the creek once and got called wethead for a few weeks. So I liked reading about the teasing among the characters. It made the group seem a lot like my own gang of friends. At the time, I did notice that the wording and situations were a bit dated, but I didn't care. As an adult, I had a few problems re-reading this book. For example, the use of the word "squaw' as an insult. One of Trixie's brothers uses that name to tease the girls. It might have been acceptable back when the original six books were written, but it's pretty much seen as racist and derogatory now. I cringed a bit each time Mart teased his sister about being a " lazy squaw'' who should bring him food, and do her chores faster. It was meant as good natured teasing between siblings in the story, but it did bother the adult me. I have seen a few negative comments in reviews of the Trixie Belden series because the dad goes off to work and the mom takes care of the house, home chores, canning food, gardening, etc. I didn't see it as a negative when I originally read the books, or now. It's not sexist. For many families, that's how life was during that time period. I don't see it as belittling of the mom in the stories. The kids and the dad constantly talk about how awesome she is for being such a good cook, mom, gardener, and home maker. What's wrong with that? She gets way more praise and attention than the dad, who gets mentioned only rarely. A reader has to remember that these books are set in the 1950s. It was a much different world back then. I like the fact that the kids all have chores to do each day to help out, and for the most part they obey and respect their parents. The mysteries are a lot like those from Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys....unusual events, mysterious strangers, hidden treasures, etc instead of murders or anything too gruesome. So, despite the fact that I read the stories with a much older outlook than when I was a teenager, I'm still enjoying reading my way through this series again. I enjoy the dated language for the most part. When there is a word or phrase I find a bit offensive, I have to remind myself that the series is 60+ years old, and take things in the spirit in which it was originally meant. The Gatehouse Mystery is one of the Trixie Belden books that was re-released. I read an ebook copy using OverDrive through my local public library. I'm finding most of the OOP books in this series on OpenLibrary. They have many scans of OOP books available through Internet Archive. Register for an account here: https://openlibrary.org/ They provide links to books from Project Gutenberg, OpenLibrary scans, and publication information when print books are available. Everything is done with respect to copyright laws. All scanned materials and downloadable ebooks are in the public domain, or available to borrow and read online for a set time, just like a lending library. It's a great resource!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Clara Ellen

    My daughter and I are really enjoying the Trixie Belden mystery series as read-alouds. This one was a good story, and it was important because it marked the formation of the Bobwhites club that Trixie and her brothers and friends start. I love how everyone is supposed to contribute money for the club needs, and it must be money that the member actually earns. I also love how even though the kids may tease each other a little, they are very good-natured and supportive. When I was young, my favori My daughter and I are really enjoying the Trixie Belden mystery series as read-alouds. This one was a good story, and it was important because it marked the formation of the Bobwhites club that Trixie and her brothers and friends start. I love how everyone is supposed to contribute money for the club needs, and it must be money that the member actually earns. I also love how even though the kids may tease each other a little, they are very good-natured and supportive. When I was young, my favorite character was always Honey, because my hair and eyes were the same color as hers. But reading it as an adult to my daughter, I find that I like all the characters equally well. And the last few chapters were quite exciting! A good read...now on to book 4!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melissa McShane

    This third book in the Trixie Belden series has never been a favorite. I could make a case for it being the true beginning of the series, because it sets the tone for future books, all of which are more like this one than either of the first two. Though I remembered very well the plots of book one and book two, this one had me drawing a blank. It's also less compelling a mystery, mainly because Trixie pegs to the villain right up front and is, despite some unconvincing red herrings, never shown This third book in the Trixie Belden series has never been a favorite. I could make a case for it being the true beginning of the series, because it sets the tone for future books, all of which are more like this one than either of the first two. Though I remembered very well the plots of book one and book two, this one had me drawing a blank. It's also less compelling a mystery, mainly because Trixie pegs to the villain right up front and is, despite some unconvincing red herrings, never shown to be wrong. I also don't care much for Trixie's brothers Brian and Mart, who are dismissive of her in a way that I think is meant to be brotherly chaffing, but comes across as misogyny. I'm pretty sure they get better later on, and they do admit she was clever at the end, but it bugs me that a series that up until now has been good about not either harping on women being superior or girls being stupid took this turn. Anyway, the friendships are still central, though I wish there'd been more to Brian and Mart getting to know Jim that wasn't "Ho there, you look trustworthy, let us have adventures together." And as twee as the Bob-Whites club is, it's also got some appeal, particularly in how they all agree to bring to the club what they personally can do to support it and not Honey and Jim throwing Daddy's money into fixing the clubhouse. This is necessary because there's an awful lot of taking advantage of wealth going on--servants bringing them picnics, the big house and all its bedrooms that the Wheelers set up specifically to give the Beldens a home away from home, and (view spoiler)[Trixie's horse. Come on. It's not Miss Trask's horse. They made a huge deal about Trixie being able to earn money to buy a horse of her own, and in the end she just gets given one? Very disappointing (hide spoiler)] . Still, unnecessary wish-fulfillment aside, the story was fun enough to keep me going. Though I've checked my shelves and one of the set of the first 16 is missing. No idea when that happened, or if I ever had it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bev

    The Gatehouse Mystery is the third in the Trixie Belden series. She has made friends with Honey Wheeler and she and her new friend have helped Jim Frayne solve a few mysteries regarding his heritage and inheritance and Honey acquired a new brother when her parents adopt Jim. It is now the end of summer vacation and while waiting for Trixie's brothers, Brian and Mart, to come home from their summer of serving as counselors at camp she and Honey decide to investigate the run-down gatehouse hidden The Gatehouse Mystery is the third in the Trixie Belden series. She has made friends with Honey Wheeler and she and her new friend have helped Jim Frayne solve a few mysteries regarding his heritage and inheritance and Honey acquired a new brother when her parents adopt Jim. It is now the end of summer vacation and while waiting for Trixie's brothers, Brian and Mart, to come home from their summer of serving as counselors at camp she and Honey decide to investigate the run-down gatehouse hidden on a corner of the Wheelers' property. They've barely entered the building before Trixie's six-year-old brother Bobby trips and skins his knee on something in the hard dirt floor. Upon closer inspection, what she thinks is just a pebble turns out to be a diamond. How did a shiny diamond wind up in the cobwebby abandoned building? Trixie begins to imagine jewel thieves fighting over their loot--with a diamond being lost in the shuffle. Is it possible that jewel thieves have chosen the small New York town as the perfect hiding place from authorities? There are clues to be found in the gatehouse including two sets of footprints--rubber soles and leather toes--as well as the question of a certain man's letter of recommendation. When a prowler sneaks into Honey's bedroom while she and Trixie are having a sleepover, Trixie is sure it's the jewel thief looking for the diamond which is now hidden a secret compartment of Honey's jewel box. When the boys come home from camp, they, along with Jim, help Trixie and Honey solve the mystery of the diamond in the gatehouse. This was just as much fun to read as when I was young. It's really a pretty sophisticated mystery for young people--there's real danger for both Trixie and Jim and, although Trixie does jump to a few conclusions here and there, on the whole she makes deductions based on her observations and the clues at hand. A quite enjoyable walk down memory lane. First posted on my blog My Reader's Block. Please request permission before reposting. Thanks.

  7. 4 out of 5

    DivaDiane

    This book was amazing !!!!!!!👍🏻😊 - my 10 year old’s review and rating. But yeah, I pretty much agree with him. The Bob-Whites if the Glen have come together and they had an honest to God mystery to solve and dangerous situations to navigate. Not to mention losing the “Object” in question for a while. Naturally, Trixie figured everything out and had to convince the others. The boys’ constant robbing of Trixie and Honey and “girl stuff” gets a little old, but this book IS from the early 50’s and t This book was amazing !!!!!!!👍🏻😊 - my 10 year old’s review and rating. But yeah, I pretty much agree with him. The Bob-Whites if the Glen have come together and they had an honest to God mystery to solve and dangerous situations to navigate. Not to mention losing the “Object” in question for a while. Naturally, Trixie figured everything out and had to convince the others. The boys’ constant robbing of Trixie and Honey and “girl stuff” gets a little old, but this book IS from the early 50’s and thankfully hasn’t been updated like Nancy Drew. It’s Dulin to explain to my son how things worked back then. He didn’t know what carbon paper is or tracing paper. And I now remember how I learned to forge signatures! Haha!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    A few weeks ago I went on a girl’s weekend to Savannah with my sister, niece and a friend of hers. We ate, walked, ate, took a ghost tour, ate, shopped and ate some more. It was a fabulous weekend. One of my favorite stores to visit in Savannah is Books on Bay - a vintage book store on the River. I can usually find something to pique my interest in almost any book store. While I saw several books that I liked that day, nothing screamed ‘you must buy me’. I was standing at the register with my sis A few weeks ago I went on a girl’s weekend to Savannah with my sister, niece and a friend of hers. We ate, walked, ate, took a ghost tour, ate, shopped and ate some more. It was a fabulous weekend. One of my favorite stores to visit in Savannah is Books on Bay - a vintage book store on the River. I can usually find something to pique my interest in almost any book store. While I saw several books that I liked that day, nothing screamed ‘you must buy me’. I was standing at the register with my sister (who did find some gems!) and saw a book on the counter. “Trixie Belden - what’s this?” Let me explain: I’m a reader. It’s a big part of who I am. And one of my favorite things in life is bonding with someone over a book. Seeing a stranger in public reading a book that I loved can turn my day around. Someone will ask me what I’m reading and I’ll spend ten minutes describing the book before I realize that their glazed eyes indicate that they were just being polite and don’t really care about the mental health storylines in the Stormlight Archive. But sometimes you do meet someone who loves reading as much as you. That happened between me and Betsy, the owner of Books on Bay. “You haven’t read Trixie Belden?” Betsy was surprised and then she set out on a mission - not to sell me a book but to educate me on Trixie and her fandom. She showed me the different editions (Deluxe, Cellophane, Cameo, Paperback, and quite possibly the best name for any editions ever - the UGLIES.) Collectors may choose to purchase one specific edition, a mix or all editions of available books. I was able to look through all the options and learn which books were printed in each edition. “Will your friends kill you if you stay in here just a minute more?” With a laugh, I told her that they may do just that. She wanted to take my picture in front of her Trixie collection so that she could share it with the TB Facebook group. Of course, I let her. After all, I was beaming. Not because I had found a book but because I was able to spend time with a fellow book lover. Someone who shares my passion for reading. Ultimately I did choose to purchase a Deluxe hardback of book three - The Gatehouse Mystery by Julie Campbell. If, like me, you’ve never read a Trixie Belden, here are the details. Trixie is a 13-year-old girl living in the 1950s in New York state. She has three brothers and has become fast friends with her new neighbor, Honey Wheeler and Honey’s adopted brother, Jim. They form a club, Bob-Whites of the Glen, to solve mysteries. In this story Trixie and Honey find a diamond in an abandoned shed. The Bob-Whites are on the case to find the truth about the diamond…and the Wheeler’s new chauffeur. My strongest feeling while reading this book was nostalgia. I was reminded of the simplicity of youth. Doing chores, going to the movies with friends, arguing with your siblings and, in my case, reading a fun book. This series is older but not old-fashioned. Trixie is a relatable character who gets frustrated with her brothers and doesn’t always want to do her chores. Some people will say ‘it’s different now, kids aren’t interested in the same things’. And in a way they are right - most children don’t spend their day cleaning out a chicken coop or picking vegetables in the family garden like Trixie. But, what hasn’t changed? That’s what interests me. The value of hard work and pride in earning your own money. And, at it’s heart this story is about friendship - especially the joy of having a best friend in your teenage years. While I regret not reading this series when I was younger (and more in the target audience), I’m happy to have found it now. So much of our media today is based on being newer, bigger, better. I think we’ve lost something special along the way. We can find some magic in the books of the past. I encourage you to go back in time. Trixie Belden, an Agatha Christie mystery, Charles Dickens. A blast from the past may be just what you need in your life.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Constance

    This is THE Trixie Belden book, the one that establishes the formula for almost every Trixie Belden book to follow. It is the first in which Trixie and Honey declare their intent to be private investigators, and, while previously they kept secrets to protect others, this is the first in which they withhold information for no reason other than because "they want to solve the crime before the police." Sadly, in this one, the Red Trailer Mystery idyll of girl power and independence is over, Trixie' This is THE Trixie Belden book, the one that establishes the formula for almost every Trixie Belden book to follow. It is the first in which Trixie and Honey declare their intent to be private investigators, and, while previously they kept secrets to protect others, this is the first in which they withhold information for no reason other than because "they want to solve the crime before the police." Sadly, in this one, the Red Trailer Mystery idyll of girl power and independence is over, Trixie's brothers return from camp, and rich girl Honey who had never done a lick of house work in her life suddenly makes the "best waffles," knows how to darn socks, and loves to - really loves - to sew. "Darning is my favorite," she rhasodizes. W.T.F.? How did this happen? Two books ago, Honey didn't even know socks *could* be darned; her governess just bought her new ones when the old ones wore out. And our girls cared more about horses than making curtains. Suddenly, gender roles are front and center. Don't get me wrong, I actually like Trixie's brothers. I think her arch-nemisis and strongest defender Mart is one of Campbell's best characters, but with the boys' return comes constant teasing about Trixie's lack of domestic skills and tomboy nature. I know. It's the 1950s, and this is the best we're going to get. Still, I kind of miss the Red Trailer days when the world was just Honey, Trixie, and Miss Trask, swimming, driving huge motor homes, and saving the world. In this one, we get some nice reminders that Miss Trask can drive a car better than most of the men around, and Mrs. Belden is nobody's fool and can do pretty much anything with one hand tied behind her back. But mending is now Honey's favorite leisure activity? Give me a break. That said, it's a decent mystery, with the usual stock bad guys that populate the series, and the "Bob-Whites of the Glen" - our 50s-era Scooby Gang is formed, with Brian the serious one, Jim the all-around great guy, Honey the diplomatic one, Mart the smart-aleck, and Trixie the mad-cap girl detective always putting her foot in her mouth or rushing off into danger without thinking it through. Well-paced, with an exciting denouement even if we are pretty sure of the bad guy early on.

  10. 4 out of 5

    J.L. Day

    a HUGE and most dedicated fan of Trixie and her crew. This is odd, of course, because they were MEANT for teen and pre-teen girls, but I was a young boy that read everything he could get his hands on and when I first stumbled on my first TRIXIE BELDON book I was instantly hooked! I immediately sat about reading them all, as quickly as I could get my greedy little paws on them. Trixie is the star, or "lead" character, followed by Jim and Honey (who quickly became the love of my young life, I had a HUGE and most dedicated fan of Trixie and her crew. This is odd, of course, because they were MEANT for teen and pre-teen girls, but I was a young boy that read everything he could get his hands on and when I first stumbled on my first TRIXIE BELDON book I was instantly hooked! I immediately sat about reading them all, as quickly as I could get my greedy little paws on them. Trixie is the star, or "lead" character, followed by Jim and Honey (who quickly became the love of my young life, I had a total crush on a fictional character that only existed in ink) and this brave trio was constantly getting into trouble, solving mysteries and murders; that sort of thing. It falls along the line of the Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew and other similar series, but the Trixie series carries more of the teenage angst and a subtle love triangle of conflicted who likes whom mystery that battles back and forth throughout the series. All of the while though, the same cheerful, effervescent and energetic positive attitude and domineering never quit/never let them see you down philosophy is the major subtext all through the books. It is simply impossible to read these and NOT feel good about yourself and about LIFE, to have a sense of "all is well" in the world and a cheerful demeanor just naturally permeate your soul. I know, it SOUNDS crazy, but it is true. I lost all of my Trixie books years ago, lending them to friends and that sort of thing. Since then, I have been on a quest to rebuild my collection of hardbacks. I find most of them at "Friends of the Library Sales" and things like that, but I am ever watchful at garage sales and places, for I do not have even a third of them built back

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    Always makes my short list of favorites, usually the top 3, very often #1. For this is the book where the Bob-Whites of the Glen are formed and Trixie's older brothers are introduced. I always wanted to belong to a club and as I got older, I got a serious crush on dark, handsome, doctor-to-be Brian Belden. 8-17-12: The perfect summer book and still one of my favorites in the series. I did actually find myself annoyed this read-through by Jim and Honey constantly saying things that made it seem as Always makes my short list of favorites, usually the top 3, very often #1. For this is the book where the Bob-Whites of the Glen are formed and Trixie's older brothers are introduced. I always wanted to belong to a club and as I got older, I got a serious crush on dark, handsome, doctor-to-be Brian Belden. 8-17-12: The perfect summer book and still one of my favorites in the series. I did actually find myself annoyed this read-through by Jim and Honey constantly saying things that made it seem as though they had been living in Sleepyside for eons when it couldn't have been more than a month or a month and a half since they'd laid eyes on the town. It didn't detract from my enjoyment of the book, but maybe it put it down in "the top three" instead of squarely at #1. :) 6-23-13: See, this time those above things didn't bug me. :) Regan bugged me a little this time though. He's 22 and talks like an old man or like the Bob-Whites are little kids. Ah, well, "Reach for the ceiling, Laughing Boy!" still makes me smile. This is still one of my favorites in the whole series and a perfect summer read!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    For Christmas, my parents grabbed me the entire Trixie Belden set and I couldn't put them down. Even with a learning disability, I devoured the books. I look back now and I find that Trixie Belden was much more age related to young girls, particularly to me, reading the books than Nancy Drew. I found that they weren't so "over the top" either. I will be doing the same thing with my granddaughters if and when I have them, even if I have to stalk every used bookstore. For Christmas, my parents grabbed me the entire Trixie Belden set and I couldn't put them down. Even with a learning disability, I devoured the books. I look back now and I find that Trixie Belden was much more age related to young girls, particularly to me, reading the books than Nancy Drew. I found that they weren't so "over the top" either. I will be doing the same thing with my granddaughters if and when I have them, even if I have to stalk every used bookstore.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This one was my favorite, back in the day, and it’s still pretty good! I did get tired of hearing them say how hot they were though 😂.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    This may be the first novel I've ever read that was constructed entirely (and I do mean entirely) out of slang and baby-talk. This is not a see-crud, I guess, to those of you who are fans of this series. I can already hear you saying, "Natch. And isn't it just yummy-yum-yum?" To a certain degree, I guess it is. There's a secret-club feel to this series, a belonging and an inclusion that I imagine would appeal greatly to odd little kids. The mystery wasn't very mysterious, but it was fun to meet t This may be the first novel I've ever read that was constructed entirely (and I do mean entirely) out of slang and baby-talk. This is not a see-crud, I guess, to those of you who are fans of this series. I can already hear you saying, "Natch. And isn't it just yummy-yum-yum?" To a certain degree, I guess it is. There's a secret-club feel to this series, a belonging and an inclusion that I imagine would appeal greatly to odd little kids. The mystery wasn't very mysterious, but it was fun to meet the brothers of Trixie. And I admit to snorting with adolescent-style laughter every time the boys called the girls "Moll Dicks, Inc." because yes, I am twelve years old. The plotting is solid, if transparent. The characters are very likable, though I can't really tell the boys apart yet. I don't like the illustrations, I think they make Trixie and Honey look eight years old.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Leta

    I loved these books when I was young. If store carried books for any reason, I'd look for a Trixie Belden book. And re-reading them now I'm only a little surprised by how much of the story, dialogue, and description I remember intact. One reason why I loved them so much is that Trixie seemed like a real person with good points and flaws. And she seemed ... 13 years old. So often children and teenagers seem more like adults in disguise. ("Beverly Hills, 90210" seemed a lot more like people in thei I loved these books when I was young. If store carried books for any reason, I'd look for a Trixie Belden book. And re-reading them now I'm only a little surprised by how much of the story, dialogue, and description I remember intact. One reason why I loved them so much is that Trixie seemed like a real person with good points and flaws. And she seemed ... 13 years old. So often children and teenagers seem more like adults in disguise. ("Beverly Hills, 90210" seemed a lot more like people in their late 20s who were mysteriously forced to drop by a high school every day.) I *still* want to be a member of the Bob-Whites, even now. :-/

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Michelle

    I first read this in the 70's when I was really into this series [my love for them never really died, hence the re-reads]. SO glad I get a chance to re-read them!!! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Re-read~August 30, 2013 I really enjoyed reading this one again. You get introduced [FINALLY] to Trixie's brother's and to some of the peripheral players that pop up time and again in the books. You also learn about diamonds and forgery and such! :-) Easy read th I first read this in the 70's when I was really into this series [my love for them never really died, hence the re-reads]. SO glad I get a chance to re-read them!!! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Re-read~August 30, 2013 I really enjoyed reading this one again. You get introduced [FINALLY] to Trixie's brother's and to some of the peripheral players that pop up time and again in the books. You also learn about diamonds and forgery and such! :-) Easy read that was a fun reminder of my days devouring these books when I was younger!!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mell

    Found this book laying around somewhere during my elementary school years, and it started my Trixie Belden collection. I went on to collect all of them, and they're boxed up in my basement today. Preferred Trixie, who was fiesty and middle class, to Nancy Drew, who I perceived as unbelievable perfect and rich. The books have not all been simultaneously in print for some time, and the last few are hard to find. I'm sure I would find them predictable and trite by my current standards. But I did mo Found this book laying around somewhere during my elementary school years, and it started my Trixie Belden collection. I went on to collect all of them, and they're boxed up in my basement today. Preferred Trixie, who was fiesty and middle class, to Nancy Drew, who I perceived as unbelievable perfect and rich. The books have not all been simultaneously in print for some time, and the last few are hard to find. I'm sure I would find them predictable and trite by my current standards. But I did move on to better reading . . .

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    This is probably the first "big" book I read as a kid. I can say I liked it because my memories of it are good, but I don't remember as much about the story. I do remember thinking Trixie and I were basically the same age and I can't believe what kind of trouble she gets herself into. Anyway, I remember liking it :) This is probably the first "big" book I read as a kid. I can say I liked it because my memories of it are good, but I don't remember as much about the story. I do remember thinking Trixie and I were basically the same age and I can't believe what kind of trouble she gets herself into. Anyway, I remember liking it :)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dina

    Listening to the audio book for my summer re-read. Re-reading via audio book/overdrive 8/18/14-8/19/14 I love this book so much! Brian and Mart are home from camp, and the BWG's are formed. 2015 audio reread in September Listening to the audio book for my summer re-read. Re-reading via audio book/overdrive 8/18/14-8/19/14 I love this book so much! Brian and Mart are home from camp, and the BWG's are formed. 2015 audio reread in September

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katt Hansen

    When are the boys going to learn to trust Trixie's instincts? The story starts with a found diamond, and while you're positive you know exactly who did it from the start, the difficulty is in the proof. Something that is in short supply! When are the boys going to learn to trust Trixie's instincts? The story starts with a found diamond, and while you're positive you know exactly who did it from the start, the difficulty is in the proof. Something that is in short supply!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Darling

    This is the first one that felt like a complete mystery, and where the series finds its footing, I think. :)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Teri Pre

    5 cents for a phone call?? These books ARE old! :)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Deanna Anderson

    This is one of my favorite Trixie books because this is when Trixie's older brothers come home from camp and the club Bob-Whites of the Glen are formed. Trixie's brothers are mentioned in both books, but they are absent since the two books take place in the summer and the boys are at a camp as junior counselors. But, after the adventures and meeting two new friends in the first two books, the boys are back and the five characters become best friends. To me, this is the real start of the adventur This is one of my favorite Trixie books because this is when Trixie's older brothers come home from camp and the club Bob-Whites of the Glen are formed. Trixie's brothers are mentioned in both books, but they are absent since the two books take place in the summer and the boys are at a camp as junior counselors. But, after the adventures and meeting two new friends in the first two books, the boys are back and the five characters become best friends. To me, this is the real start of the adventures. The clubhouse is obtained, the club name is decided on, and from here on in it is one mysterious adventure after another. I love this series and have re-read it periodically over the past 30 years. I am on probably on the 10th or 12th re-read? I never kept count, but I know I re-read it a lot. The stories are timeless and good wholehearted, innocent fun for ages 11-16 (or older, as in my example) and the characters engage in true friendships, morals, real adventures and mysteries, and there is always something new to learn.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Julie Graves

    I loved Trixie Belden when I was a teenager. I am re-reading them and am enjoying just as much as way back when. My only gripe is that I bought the new re-released ones(as far as they go, I have the entire 39 from when I was younger but thought it would be fun to collect the new ones), anyway, I am finding that some of the word changes in the new ones are driving me crazy! For instance in the first book Trixie interchanged using Moms and Mother. Everyone that has ever read Trixie Belden knows th I loved Trixie Belden when I was a teenager. I am re-reading them and am enjoying just as much as way back when. My only gripe is that I bought the new re-released ones(as far as they go, I have the entire 39 from when I was younger but thought it would be fun to collect the new ones), anyway, I am finding that some of the word changes in the new ones are driving me crazy! For instance in the first book Trixie interchanged using Moms and Mother. Everyone that has ever read Trixie Belden knows that the Belden clan always called their mother "MOMS" not mother. Also in this 3rd book in the "old" version the boys called the girls "Schoolgirl Shamuses" and in the new version they call them "Moll Dicks" WHAT THE HECK?!?! I had to go look up what the heck a "Moll" is. According to one of the definitions I looked up a Moll is a female companion to a gangster. That would NOT describe Honey and Trixie. Of course we all know that "dick" is a slang word for Private Eye, but "Moll dick" Again...WHAT THE HECK! And what happened to "Gleeps" and "Jeepers" now it is all "golly" all over the place. Give me a stinkin break! Supposedly the changes in the wording was supposed to bring things more up-to-date but I would argue leaving the old would have been way more understanding than this new stuff. UGH!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katja

    5 stars & 5/10 hearts. I am *officially* hooked to the Trixie Belden series. Man, this story was good. I was convinced of who was the bad guy pretty early on but then Jim threw in a loop and I was puzzled all over again. Jim was simply awesome, okay?? And I really like Brian and Mart!! And Honey is awesome. Trixie is still both irritating and amazing, haha! It bugs me that she keeps running herself into bad situations but at the same time I must admit it's realistic. XP I really love the humour 5 stars & 5/10 hearts. I am *officially* hooked to the Trixie Belden series. Man, this story was good. I was convinced of who was the bad guy pretty early on but then Jim threw in a loop and I was puzzled all over again. Jim was simply awesome, okay?? And I really like Brian and Mart!! And Honey is awesome. Trixie is still both irritating and amazing, haha! It bugs me that she keeps running herself into bad situations but at the same time I must admit it's realistic. XP I really love the humour of this book, and I really like how it takes everyone to solve the mystery. (Can we just repeat that Regan is amazing and Dick is emphatically not?) Again, euphemisms, but that was all. Also, despite my suspicions, the mystery remained confusing and intense right to the end. AND KUDOS TO THE AUTHOR FOR GETTING THE VILLAIN TO ADMIT TO STUFF WITHOUT USING THE VILLAIN MONOLOGUE CARD!! :D :D Trixie took a leaf out of Sherlock Holmes' book. ;) A Favourite Humorous Quote: “'I hope it is lost,' said Honey suddenly. 'I never want to see the horrid thing again. It's practically ruined my whole summer.' "Jim hooted. 'This is Friday afternoon, and you found it Wednesday morning. What brief summers you have, Miss Wheeler!'"

  26. 4 out of 5

    April Brown

    A childhood favorite re-visited. Is the story as good as I remember? – Yes What ages would I recommend it too? – Ten and up. Length? – Most of a day’s read. Characters? – Memorable, several characters. Setting? – Real world, pre - computer pre - air conditioning, pre - cell phone. Written approximately? – 1951. Does the story leave questions in the readers mind? – Ready to read more. Any issues the author (or a more recent publisher) should cover? Yes. A slight mention of the time frame of the story - A childhood favorite re-visited. Is the story as good as I remember? – Yes What ages would I recommend it too? – Ten and up. Length? – Most of a day’s read. Characters? – Memorable, several characters. Setting? – Real world, pre - computer pre - air conditioning, pre - cell phone. Written approximately? – 1951. Does the story leave questions in the readers mind? – Ready to read more. Any issues the author (or a more recent publisher) should cover? Yes. A slight mention of the time frame of the story - as the teens are given far more freedom to come and go as they please than would be safe today. Also, the absence of computers, cell phones, and air conditioning in homes, especially the mansion. Short storyline: Trixie Belden, Honey, Jim, and her brothers work to catch the thieves who dropped a diamond in their future clubhouse. This one spends a lot of time focusing on thought processing, and less action. Notes for the reader: A great mystery! No violence (only referred to from the past), no murder.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    As Trixie and Honey explore an abandoned gatehouse on Honey's estate, they find more than they bargained for: a big, shiny diamond! They set about trying to solve the mystery themselves and soon find they are surrounded by possible suspects: a passing tramp, the new gardener, the old gardener, the new chauffer, the new maid, etc. This book also brings the return of Trixie's brothers home from their jobs at summer camp and the development of something that has Honey claiming all of her dreams hav As Trixie and Honey explore an abandoned gatehouse on Honey's estate, they find more than they bargained for: a big, shiny diamond! They set about trying to solve the mystery themselves and soon find they are surrounded by possible suspects: a passing tramp, the new gardener, the old gardener, the new chauffer, the new maid, etc. This book also brings the return of Trixie's brothers home from their jobs at summer camp and the development of something that has Honey claiming all of her dreams have finally come true. There are plenty of cute moments with the youngest Belden boy and with horses. When I started re-reading this book this time, I remembered not liking it all that much. As an adult, though, I can now realize that good writing just caused me to really dislike one of the suspects, which spilled over onto my overall view of the book when I was younger. I love the camaraderie amongst the main characters. This book also cemented my respect for Miss Trask. And, I've never looked at a strawberry the same way since!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Priscilla Montes

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is about two best friends named Trixie and Honey and how they found a diamond stuck in the dirt floor of an abandoned gatehouse in Sleepyside. They both assumed there were 2 thieves or robbers because they found two different footsteps on the ground near where the diamond was found. The girls later on got a new chauffeur named Dick who Trixie believed that he became their chauffeur because he was one of the robbers or thieves that were in the gatehouse, and maybe saw the girls take th This book is about two best friends named Trixie and Honey and how they found a diamond stuck in the dirt floor of an abandoned gatehouse in Sleepyside. They both assumed there were 2 thieves or robbers because they found two different footsteps on the ground near where the diamond was found. The girls later on got a new chauffeur named Dick who Trixie believed that he became their chauffeur because he was one of the robbers or thieves that were in the gatehouse, and maybe saw the girls take the diamond. Therefore, they hid the diamond in a safe place where no one could find it but them. I think this novel was very good since there was a lot of action going on with the girl and how they were trying to figure out how the diamond got there and what they were going to do with the diamond. However, in some pages of the book, it talked about different topics that were not related to what was going on. Therefore, I rated this book only 3 stars. Overall, I still liked it and was very interested to what was going to happen next.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Just reread in an old first edition I picked up. This has got to be one of the best, if not THE best. So many series tropes are introduced here--I've thought before that in some ways Mansion and Red Trailer are almost prequels; this is the real introduction to the series proper. We get Brian and Mart, and Trixie and Honey announce they're going to be detectives, and the Bob-Whites are formed, and they find the clubhouse. Am always amused, though, that they make it sound like the Wheelers have be Just reread in an old first edition I picked up. This has got to be one of the best, if not THE best. So many series tropes are introduced here--I've thought before that in some ways Mansion and Red Trailer are almost prequels; this is the real introduction to the series proper. We get Brian and Mart, and Trixie and Honey announce they're going to be detectives, and the Bob-Whites are formed, and they find the clubhouse. Am always amused, though, that they make it sound like the Wheelers have been living there for ages--just how many times has Honey been over to Crabapple Farm and eaten leftovers for dinner, really?--and Jim has been with them that long, too, rather than being all "Yeah, I think I've met you maybe twice, but I'm going to call you Mother and Dad anyway; see you next time the helicopter drops you off for an afternoon".

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Okay, I'll admit, I adore this series. I read them addictively when I was a kid, and that affection still stands. But when I read them now, adult perspective still intrudes, and even the early books in this series are formulaic, hackneyed, and all deus-ex-machina, all the time. Compared to the Boy Wonder, Space Boy!-type series of just a few years earlier, Trixie and her cohorts are geniuses and their adventures are original as all hell, so I'll give them some credit for being actually, genuinel Okay, I'll admit, I adore this series. I read them addictively when I was a kid, and that affection still stands. But when I read them now, adult perspective still intrudes, and even the early books in this series are formulaic, hackneyed, and all deus-ex-machina, all the time. Compared to the Boy Wonder, Space Boy!-type series of just a few years earlier, Trixie and her cohorts are geniuses and their adventures are original as all hell, so I'll give them some credit for being actually, genuinely better than their contemporaries (except the Drew-Hardy collection...I never read the Bobbseys, so I'll leave their judgment to others), but I'm undecided whether achieving genuine mediocrity is better or worse than charming awfulness. And the covers of those Girl Wonder, Girlfriend of Space Boy! series-es were so much more fun.

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