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Mountain Top Mystery

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Librarian's Note: For an alternate cover edition of the same ISBN, click here. Marooned on a mountain, the Aldens survive a landslide and find a Native American secret. Librarian's Note: For an alternate cover edition of the same ISBN, click here. Marooned on a mountain, the Aldens survive a landslide and find a Native American secret.


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Librarian's Note: For an alternate cover edition of the same ISBN, click here. Marooned on a mountain, the Aldens survive a landslide and find a Native American secret. Librarian's Note: For an alternate cover edition of the same ISBN, click here. Marooned on a mountain, the Aldens survive a landslide and find a Native American secret.

30 review for Mountain Top Mystery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Quinnd2006

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I love mysteries and these are my favorites. I love this series because: 1. you never know what might happen and 2.they are very easy to get into. The part that was very surprising was when Benny nearly fell off the mountain. My favorite part was when they found the Indian boy, David. The best part about mysteries is you never know what's going to happen. I love mysteries and these are my favorites. I love this series because: 1. you never know what might happen and 2.they are very easy to get into. The part that was very surprising was when Benny nearly fell off the mountain. My favorite part was when they found the Indian boy, David. The best part about mysteries is you never know what's going to happen.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bailey Marissa

    More adventures, more John Carter, and more proof that Grandfather is a billion years old because he knows everyone.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Delaney L

    Amazing!! ☺🎉👏👐!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    This takes place in autumn. There is a mountain, a forest, a light, a stranger, a cave, and baskets. The beginning of the story was the most interesting to me. I liked the mountain part of the story, but I didn't like the forest part. I thought the story and mystery would go a different way and was disappointed when it didn't. This takes place in autumn. There is a mountain, a forest, a light, a stranger, a cave, and baskets. The beginning of the story was the most interesting to me. I liked the mountain part of the story, but I didn't like the forest part. I thought the story and mystery would go a different way and was disappointed when it didn't.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Octavia Cade

    These books. I think I'm supposed to enjoy them for the (apparent) helpfulness and kindness and good nature of the protagonists, but half the time I end up with my jaw hanging open at their nosiness and presumption. They're all just so entitled, which is a change for the definite worse from the first in the series. Anyway, in this volume the bad behaviour continues. Little Benny demands to be taken mountain climbing, so of course Grandfather Alden indulges the brat. From the top of said mountain These books. I think I'm supposed to enjoy them for the (apparent) helpfulness and kindness and good nature of the protagonists, but half the time I end up with my jaw hanging open at their nosiness and presumption. They're all just so entitled, which is a change for the definite worse from the first in the series. Anyway, in this volume the bad behaviour continues. Little Benny demands to be taken mountain climbing, so of course Grandfather Alden indulges the brat. From the top of said mountain they see a light in the woods, which park rangers later inform them is an old American Indian, who wants nothing more than to be left alone. Of course the family descends upon her en masse, out of base curiosity. "Oh, we wanted to see if you were in trouble," they say, knowing full well from said rangers that she's fine. It turns out that old Lovan is worried about losing her land, and instead of, say, hiring her a lawyer so that it isn't stolen out from under her, Grandfather buys it (of course he does) continuing his habit of hoovering up every resource he can get his grubby mitts on. And of course there's a lost relative in there, because there always, always is. Warner has an obsession with lost relatives, apparently, and the story wanders on its condescending way from there.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    There is a definite change from the first few books to the rest in terms of the amount of supervision the kids are kept under. They're given some limited freedom, but always a carefully laid adult safety net. Except this story involves Indians who seem to be rather condescendingly treated, including a high-school aged Indian boy who is left virtually unsupervised with little adult concern. Value is placed on Indian culture, but as something to be collected and studied by the White men, not a wort There is a definite change from the first few books to the rest in terms of the amount of supervision the kids are kept under. They're given some limited freedom, but always a carefully laid adult safety net. Except this story involves Indians who seem to be rather condescendingly treated, including a high-school aged Indian boy who is left virtually unsupervised with little adult concern. Value is placed on Indian culture, but as something to be collected and studied by the White men, not a worthy thing in itself. I do believe Ms. Warner is struggling to at least some degree to be more modern and progressive... to value humans equally and not be insensitive, but she remains a product of her time.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elevetha

    The Boxcar Children = most read series between the ages of 6 and 9 for me. I think of these fondly. Every child should read this series.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Petrichor

    I reread this book as research for a writing project, and although it probably only deserves one star, I had to bump it up to two stars for nostalgia's sake. I reread this book as research for a writing project, and although it probably only deserves one star, I had to bump it up to two stars for nostalgia's sake.

  9. 4 out of 5

    JP

    It's kind of strange that after half a dozen books of being on their own, we now have several in a row that always have Grandfather and other adults watching over them, even as they get older and (hopefully) wiser. That being said, the (easy mode) mountain climbing is pretty neat, getting stranded is actually pretty good from a survival perspective, and finding and exploring caves is something I've always found cool--even if the Aldens don't actually do much of that part. On the other hand, when It's kind of strange that after half a dozen books of being on their own, we now have several in a row that always have Grandfather and other adults watching over them, even as they get older and (hopefully) wiser. That being said, the (easy mode) mountain climbing is pretty neat, getting stranded is actually pretty good from a survival perspective, and finding and exploring caves is something I've always found cool--even if the Aldens don't actually do much of that part. On the other hand, when you hear that there's an old Indian woman living alone because she wants to, you don't just go drop in unannounced and when you find out she's worried about losing your land... Grandfather just out and buys it? Sure it's ostensibly for a good cause, but that is really not a good way to teach people to solve problems... Overall, it's a fine enough book, but probably among the weaker of the series so far.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lianna Kendig

    (LL) So this is not only a white savior story, but it has a ton of racism and sexism throughout it. The natives in the story are not Indians, yet the characters (Lovan and David) refer to themselves and Indians; Lovan and David are also seen writing and speaking in “an Indian language.” Like are you kidding me? This is so widely xenophobic and historically inaccurate it’s dangerous for kids to read these books (in general but especially alone). The amount of freaking times they refer to Lovan as (LL) So this is not only a white savior story, but it has a ton of racism and sexism throughout it. The natives in the story are not Indians, yet the characters (Lovan and David) refer to themselves and Indians; Lovan and David are also seen writing and speaking in “an Indian language.” Like are you kidding me? This is so widely xenophobic and historically inaccurate it’s dangerous for kids to read these books (in general but especially alone). The amount of freaking times they refer to Lovan as “the old Indian woman” drives me up the wall, especially since they only ever refer to David by his name.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Misbah

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. While on a Mountain Top adventure the Aldens discover that an old native American woman lives in the woods at the base of the mountain. When they go visit her, she talks about treasure that belonged to her ancestors that is hidden in a cave of the mountain. The Aldens had been stranded on the mountain top when a rock had broken off and blocked the way down. The broken rock revealed a cave where the Aldens find the treasure and take it to the woman. Simultaneously, the woman also is introduced to While on a Mountain Top adventure the Aldens discover that an old native American woman lives in the woods at the base of the mountain. When they go visit her, she talks about treasure that belonged to her ancestors that is hidden in a cave of the mountain. The Aldens had been stranded on the mountain top when a rock had broken off and blocked the way down. The broken rock revealed a cave where the Aldens find the treasure and take it to the woman. Simultaneously, the woman also is introduced to her grand-nephew.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Nadzam

    As always, the bug and I enjoy reading these together, but none of them are as good as the first. There continues to be such genderized content that this time I wondered if I would continue to expose the little guy to them. I think the best plan for now is to just talk about it as, “WOW! That’s weird,” kind of conversation. I’m probably not ruining him, and if this is the thing I do that ruins him, I guess I’m happy that I ruined him with books and not something else?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Nessler

    This mystery involves American Indians. The children hike up a mountain get in to some trouble with rocks and a rock slide find new friends discover treasure and bring a family together. The Alden children are quite good at finding and solving a good mystery!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Wesley Rea

    The cover of this book always stuck in my mind as something amazing. The actual story, however? It's okay. Not the best of the Boxcar Children books, in my opinion. My son struggled to keep his attention on this one. The cover of this book always stuck in my mind as something amazing. The actual story, however? It's okay. Not the best of the Boxcar Children books, in my opinion. My son struggled to keep his attention on this one.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alissa

    This book seemed to be alluding to something that the grandfather knew but it never told us what. These books are simple for kids to read and have respectful characters, but are not super engaging for me as an adult to read, even as a read aloud.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ashle Oaks

    This was not really a mystery as much as it was a treasure hunt. It was very stereotypical in the way the girls and Native Americans were written.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Crissy

    This one didn't seem like much of a mystery to me. They had a mishap and had to figure out a way to get out of it. This one didn't seem like much of a mystery to me. They had a mishap and had to figure out a way to get out of it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Wow, white saviorism...? Why do we have to make a whole book about native Americans? I thought the books were past that

  19. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    liked what happens in the story, easy little book to read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Britt

    I love the adventures these kids have, and how they look after everyone and each other.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    I love the Boxcar Children and how they solve mysteries. One of the older ones. Lots of interesting surprises in this one and happy ending.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lana Kamennof-sine

    yes it's a juvenile read but was pleased to find it one that incorporated in straightforward ways positive family relations, pro indigenous rights, etc. yes it's a juvenile read but was pleased to find it one that incorporated in straightforward ways positive family relations, pro indigenous rights, etc.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    A classic and well acclaimed series, recommended as a great series for young readers. The Boxcar Children invoke the enjoyment for mystery-solving and having a close relationship with family.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Reagan Houpt

    Why are all these kids so nosy? Can't they just mind their own business and not get into other peoples' life problems? Why are all these kids so nosy? Can't they just mind their own business and not get into other peoples' life problems?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Read with Peter for his book report

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bianca Richards

    this was a book for my book club. It was an okay read kind of boring. Very old-fashioned too.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Glenn

    kept me on my toes.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Grace Lynch

    I didn’t finish this one in a day because it was a little slow for me. But as a children’s book, I would say it’s another fun book for kids to read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    I am re-reading the original 19 in numerical order. A fine romp that continues in the tradition of the previous books. The "mystery" this time is two-fold, first the ever-present identity of the mystery person, this time an Indian boy, and second, the hunt for a hidden treasure. This is the next summer after the previous book and the kids have decided to go where Grandfather was supposed to be taking them when they inadvertently ended up at the Lighthouse last time. The children are obviously ol I am re-reading the original 19 in numerical order. A fine romp that continues in the tradition of the previous books. The "mystery" this time is two-fold, first the ever-present identity of the mystery person, this time an Indian boy, and second, the hunt for a hidden treasure. This is the next summer after the previous book and the kids have decided to go where Grandfather was supposed to be taking them when they inadvertently ended up at the Lighthouse last time. The children are obviously older now, though no ages are given. Illustrations of Benny, sometimes called Ben now, show him as an older boy, not the little boy shown on this cover. John Carter is the only recurring character who returns this time but he has now assumed the role of Grandfather's right-hand man. The book has a cultural message about not forgetting the ways of the past, specifically here the "Indians", and presents them in a positive light showing how the Great-Grandmother Indian woman is passing along her skills of sweetgrass basket weaving and wampum bead making to the present generation. This is then the first time in the series in which the book ends with words presuming to tell us that there will be another adventure next summer and that will be time for another story. The series has gone through some minor changes since the early novels but one knows what to expect by this point.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This is one of my new favorites among this series. I'm always left wanting the story to continue, but this one in particular left me smiling as I finished the book. Now, I enjoy all the TBC books, but I'm rarely physically smiling when I finish any book. When I realized I was actually smiling at the way this story wrapped up with the love of family being a predominant theme of this book, I knew I'd found a new favorite to add to my favorites collection. This is one of my new favorites among this series. I'm always left wanting the story to continue, but this one in particular left me smiling as I finished the book. Now, I enjoy all the TBC books, but I'm rarely physically smiling when I finish any book. When I realized I was actually smiling at the way this story wrapped up with the love of family being a predominant theme of this book, I knew I'd found a new favorite to add to my favorites collection.

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